This week in history: July 1–July 6

By Claudine Zap

This week in history…the first Tour de France race begins. The bikini is introduced. And LBJ signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Plus more.

This week in history: July 1–July 6

Contestants in the 1948 Tour de France parade up the Champs Elysees in Paris, en route to Porte de St. Cloud for the start of France's most important sports event, on July 8, 1948.  (AP Photo)

This week in history: July 1–July 6

An aide-de-camp salutes Gov. Chris Patten as he holds the folded British flag during a ceremony for his departure from the Government House, his official residence in Hong Kong, June 30, 1997. Patten is the 28th and final British governor of Hong Kong as 154 years of British rule comes to an end at midnight with the handover of Hong Kong to China. (AP Photo/Eric Draper)

This week in history: July 1–July 6

President Lyndon Johnson signs the civil rights bill July 2, 1964, in the East Room of the White House. Standing from left, are: Sen. Everett Dirksen, R-IL; Rep. Clarence Brown, R-OH; Sen. Hubert Humphrey, D-MN; Rep. Charles Halleck, R-IN; Rep. William McCullough, R-OH; and Rep. Emanuel Celler, D-NY. (AP Photo)

This week in history: July 1–July 6

This is an artist's rendition of the Confederate attack on the Union lines known as Pickett's Charge at Gettysburg, Pa. George E. Pickett's charge took place on July 3, 1863, the last day of the Battle of Gettysburg that began on July 1. The Confederate Army of Northern Virginia did not succeed in forcing the Union Army of the Potomac to retreat. (AP Photo/U.S. Army Signal Corps)

This week in history: July 1–July 6

Declaration of Independence - document formally entitled 'The unanimous Declaration of the thirteen united States of America', dated 4 July 1776. Signed, amongst others, by: John Hancock, Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, and Benjamin Franklin. (Photo by Culture Club/Getty Images)

This week in history: July 1–July 6

The new 'Bikini' swimming costume (in a newsprint-patterned fabric), which caused a sensation at a beauty contest at the Molitor swimming pool in Paris. Designer Louis Reard was unable to find a 'respectable' model for his costume and the job of displaying it went to 19-year-old Micheline Bernardini, a nude dancer from the Casino de Paris. She is holding a small box into which the entire costume can be packed. Celebrated as the first bikini, Luard's design came a few months after a similar two-piece design was produced by French designer Jacques Heim. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)

This week in history: July 1–July 6

Althea Gibson of the United States plays during Wimbledon in 1956.  Gibson, the first black person to win Wimbledon  and the U.S. national title, died September 28, 2003 at the age of 76. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

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