Secretary of State John Kerry

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry embarked on talks March 25 with Afghan

President Hamid Karzai.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, right, meets with Iraq's Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki in Baghdad, Iraq, Sunday, March 24, 2013. Kerry made an unannounced visit to Iraq on Sunday and will urge al-Maliki to make sure Iranian flights over Iraq do not carry arms and fighters to Syria, a U.S. official said. (AP Photo/Jason Reed, Pool)
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, right, meets with Iraq's Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki in Baghdad, Iraq, Sunday, March 24, 2013. Kerry made an unannounced visit to Iraq on Sunday and will urge al-Maliki to make sure Iranian flights over Iraq do not carry arms and fighters to Syria, a U.S. official said. (AP Photo/Jason Reed, Pool)
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, right, meets with Iraq's Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki in Baghdad, Iraq, Sunday, March 24, 2013. Kerry made an unannounced visit to Iraq on Sunday and will urge al-Maliki to make sure Iranian flights over Iraq do not carry arms and fighters to Syria, a U.S. official said. (AP Photo/Jason Reed, Pool)
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, center, shakes hands with a member of the U.S. Air Force 816 Expeditionary Airlift Squadron aboard a C-17 aircraft en route to Baghdad from Amman, Sunday, March 24, 2013. (AP Photo/Jason Reed, Pool)
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, center, shakes hands with a member of the U.S. Air Force 816 Expeditionary Airlift Squadron aboard a C-17 aircraft en route to Baghdad from Amman, Sunday, March 24, 2013. (AP Photo/Jason Reed, Pool)
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, center, shakes hands with a member of the U.S. Air Force 816 Expeditionary Airlift Squadron aboard a C-17 aircraft en route to Baghdad from Amman, Sunday, March 24, 2013. (AP Photo/Jason Reed, Pool)
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, second right, walks across the tarmac of Baghdad International Airport as he prepares to board an aircraft out of the Iraqi capital Sunday, March 24, 2013. Kerry was in Iraq today, meeting with officials in an unannounced visit. He says he made it clear in talks with the Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki that the U.S. is unhappy with Iraq for letting Iran use its airspace to ship weapons and fighters to Syria. (AP Photo/Jason Reed, Pool)
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, second right, walks across the tarmac of Baghdad International Airport as he prepares to board an aircraft out of the Iraqi capital Sunday, March 24, 2013. Kerry was in Iraq today, meeting with officials in an unannounced visit. He says he made it clear in talks with the Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki that the U.S. is unhappy with Iraq for letting Iran use its airspace to ship weapons and fighters to Syria. (AP Photo/Jason Reed, Pool)
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, second right, walks across the tarmac of Baghdad International Airport as he prepares to board an aircraft out of the Iraqi capital Sunday, March 24, 2013. Kerry was in Iraq today, meeting with officials in an unannounced visit. He says he made it clear in talks with the Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki that the U.S. is unhappy with Iraq for letting Iran use its airspace to ship weapons and fighters to Syria. (AP Photo/Jason Reed, Pool)
Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass., emerges after a unanimous vote by the Senate Foreign Relations Committee approving him to become America's next top diplomat, replacing Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2013. Kerry, who has served on the Foreign Relations panel for 28 years and led the committee for the past four, is expected to be swiftly confirmed by the whole Senate later Tuesday. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass., emerges after a unanimous vote by the Senate Foreign Relations Committee approving him to become America's next top diplomat, replacing Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2013. Kerry, who has served on the Foreign Relations panel for 28 years and led the committee for the past four, is expected to be swiftly confirmed by the whole Senate later Tuesday. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass., emerges after a unanimous vote by the Senate Foreign Relations Committee approving him to become America's next top diplomat, replacing Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2013. Kerry, who has served on the Foreign Relations panel for 28 years and led the committee for the past four, is expected to be swiftly confirmed by the whole Senate later Tuesday. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
FILE - This Nov. 13, 2012 file photo shows Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman, Sen. .John Kerry, D-Mass. pursued by reporters as he arrives for a closed-door meetin on Capitol Hill in Washington. Kerry is angling for the nation’s top diplomatic job by being diplomatic. He's asking supporters not to overtly lobby on his behalf, a strategy reflecting both his disdain for Washington’s personnel politics and a recognition that if Obama taps Rice instead, Kerry will have to shepherd her difficult nomination through the Senate committee he runs. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
FILE - This Nov. 13, 2012 file photo shows Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman, Sen. .John Kerry, D-Mass. pursued by reporters as he arrives for a closed-door meetin on Capitol Hill in Washington. Kerry is angling for the nation’s top diplomatic job by being diplomatic. He's asking supporters not to overtly lobby on his behalf, a strategy reflecting both his disdain for Washington’s personnel politics and a recognition that if Obama taps Rice instead, Kerry will have to shepherd her difficult nomination through the Senate committee he runs. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
FILE - This Nov. 13, 2012 file photo shows Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman, Sen. .John Kerry, D-Mass. pursued by reporters as he arrives for a closed-door meetin on Capitol Hill in Washington. Kerry is angling for the nation’s top diplomatic job by being diplomatic. He's asking supporters not to overtly lobby on his behalf, a strategy reflecting both his disdain for Washington’s personnel politics and a recognition that if Obama taps Rice instead, Kerry will have to shepherd her difficult nomination through the Senate committee he runs. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass., emerges after a unanimous vote by the Senate Foreign Relations Committee approving him to become America's next top diplomat, replacing Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2013. Kerry, who has served on the Foreign Relations panel for 28 years and led the committee for the past four, is expected to be swiftly confirmed by the whole Senate later Tuesday. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass., emerges after a unanimous vote by the Senate Foreign Relations Committee approving him to become America's next top diplomat, replacing Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2013. Kerry, who has served on the Foreign Relations panel for 28 years and led the committee for the past four, is expected to be swiftly confirmed by the whole Senate later Tuesday. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass., emerges after a unanimous vote by the Senate Foreign Relations Committee approving him to become America's next top diplomat, replacing Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2013. Kerry, who has served on the Foreign Relations panel for 28 years and led the committee for the past four, is expected to be swiftly confirmed by the whole Senate later Tuesday. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
FILE - This Nov. 13, 2012 file photo shows Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman, Sen. .John Kerry, D-Mass. pursued by reporters as he arrives for a closed-door meetin on Capitol Hill in Washington. Kerry is angling for the nation’s top diplomatic job by being diplomatic. He's asking supporters not to overtly lobby on his behalf, a strategy reflecting both his disdain for Washington’s personnel politics and a recognition that if Obama taps Rice instead, Kerry will have to shepherd her difficult nomination through the Senate committee he runs. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
FILE - This Nov. 13, 2012 file photo shows Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman, Sen. .John Kerry, D-Mass. pursued by reporters as he arrives for a closed-door meetin on Capitol Hill in Washington. Kerry is angling for the nation’s top diplomatic job by being diplomatic. He's asking supporters not to overtly lobby on his behalf, a strategy reflecting both his disdain for Washington’s personnel politics and a recognition that if Obama taps Rice instead, Kerry will have to shepherd her difficult nomination through the Senate committee he runs. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
FILE - This Nov. 13, 2012 file photo shows Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman, Sen. .John Kerry, D-Mass. pursued by reporters as he arrives for a closed-door meetin on Capitol Hill in Washington. Kerry is angling for the nation’s top diplomatic job by being diplomatic. He's asking supporters not to overtly lobby on his behalf, a strategy reflecting both his disdain for Washington’s personnel politics and a recognition that if Obama taps Rice instead, Kerry will have to shepherd her difficult nomination through the Senate committee he runs. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass., emerges after a unanimous vote by the Senate Foreign Relations Committee approving him to become America's next top diplomat, replacing Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2013. Kerry, who has served on the Foreign Relations panel for 28 years and led the committee for the past four, is expected to be swiftly confirmed by the whole Senate later Tuesday. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass., emerges after a unanimous vote by the Senate Foreign Relations Committee approving him to become America's next top diplomat, replacing Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2013. Kerry, who has served on the Foreign Relations panel for 28 years and led the committee for the past four, is expected to be swiftly confirmed by the whole Senate later Tuesday. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass., emerges after a unanimous vote by the Senate Foreign Relations Committee approving him to become America's next top diplomat, replacing Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2013. Kerry, who has served on the Foreign Relations panel for 28 years and led the committee for the past four, is expected to be swiftly confirmed by the whole Senate later Tuesday. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
FILE - This Nov. 13, 2012 file photo shows Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman, Sen. .John Kerry, D-Mass. pursued by reporters as he arrives for a closed-door meetin on Capitol Hill in Washington. Kerry is angling for the nation’s top diplomatic job by being diplomatic. He's asking supporters not to overtly lobby on his behalf, a strategy reflecting both his disdain for Washington’s personnel politics and a recognition that if Obama taps Rice instead, Kerry will have to shepherd her difficult nomination through the Senate committee he runs. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
FILE - This Nov. 13, 2012 file photo shows Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman, Sen. .John Kerry, D-Mass. pursued by reporters as he arrives for a closed-door meetin on Capitol Hill in Washington. Kerry is angling for the nation’s top diplomatic job by being diplomatic. He's asking supporters not to overtly lobby on his behalf, a strategy reflecting both his disdain for Washington’s personnel politics and a recognition that if Obama taps Rice instead, Kerry will have to shepherd her difficult nomination through the Senate committee he runs. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
FILE - This Nov. 13, 2012 file photo shows Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman, Sen. .John Kerry, D-Mass. pursued by reporters as he arrives for a closed-door meetin on Capitol Hill in Washington. Kerry is angling for the nation’s top diplomatic job by being diplomatic. He's asking supporters not to overtly lobby on his behalf, a strategy reflecting both his disdain for Washington’s personnel politics and a recognition that if Obama taps Rice instead, Kerry will have to shepherd her difficult nomination through the Senate committee he runs. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

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