San Francisco Giants

San Francisco Giants

FILE - In this Sept. 16, 2017, file photo, Hall of Famer Orlando Cepeda waves to fans prior to the San Francisco Giants' baseball game against the Arizona Diamondbacks, in San Francisco. Orlando Cepeda has been hospitalized in the Bay Area. Giants spokeswoman Staci Slaughter on Tuesday , Feb. 20, 2018, confirmed Cepeda had been transported to a hospital late Monday, but didnt immediately have further details. The 80-year-old Cepeda was a first baseman during his 17 big league seasons, beginning his career with the Giants and moving on to St. Louis, Atlanta, Oakland, Boston and Kansas City. (AP Photo/Ben Margot, File)
Hall of Famer Orlando Cepeda hospitalized in Bay Area
FILE - In this Sept. 16, 2017, file photo, Hall of Famer Orlando Cepeda waves to fans prior to the San Francisco Giants' baseball game against the Arizona Diamondbacks, in San Francisco. Orlando Cepeda has been hospitalized in the Bay Area. Giants spokeswoman Staci Slaughter on Tuesday , Feb. 20, 2018, confirmed Cepeda had been transported to a hospital late Monday, but didnt immediately have further details. The 80-year-old Cepeda was a first baseman during his 17 big league seasons, beginning his career with the Giants and moving on to St. Louis, Atlanta, Oakland, Boston and Kansas City. (AP Photo/Ben Margot, File)
And it's not the San Francisco Giants
Report: Tim Lincecum has guaranteed contract offer
And it's not the San Francisco Giants
And it's not the San Francisco Giants
Report: Tim Lincecum has guaranteed contract offer
And it's not the San Francisco Giants
In this Feb. 19, 2018 photo San Francisco Giants' Tony Watson stretches during a spring training baseball practice in Scottsdale, Ariz. Watson and the Giants have finalized a two-year contract that includes a player option for 2020, a deal that guarantees the former All-Star reliever $9 million. (AP Photo/Ben Margot, file)
Watson, Giants finalize deal that guarantees $9 million
In this Feb. 19, 2018 photo San Francisco Giants' Tony Watson stretches during a spring training baseball practice in Scottsdale, Ariz. Watson and the Giants have finalized a two-year contract that includes a player option for 2020, a deal that guarantees the former All-Star reliever $9 million. (AP Photo/Ben Margot, file)
San Francisco Giants manager Bruce Bochy, right, watches catcher Buster Posey during a spring training baseball practice on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018 in Scottsdale, Ariz. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)
Later spring training starts means some players are fresher
San Francisco Giants manager Bruce Bochy, right, watches catcher Buster Posey during a spring training baseball practice on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018 in Scottsdale, Ariz. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)
San Francisco Giants' Buster Posey, right, speaks with pitcher Tyler Herb during a spring training baseball practice on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018 in Scottsdale, Ariz. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)
Later spring training starts means some players are fresher
San Francisco Giants' Buster Posey, right, speaks with pitcher Tyler Herb during a spring training baseball practice on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018 in Scottsdale, Ariz. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)
San Francisco Giants' Buster Posey swings during a spring training baseball batting practice on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018 in Scottsdale, Ariz. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)
Buster Posey, new SF teammate Andrew McCutchen go way back
San Francisco Giants' Buster Posey swings during a spring training baseball batting practice on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018 in Scottsdale, Ariz. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)
FILE - In this June 1, 2015, file photo, Pittsburgh Pirates' Andrew McCutchen singles off San Francisco Giants starting pitcher Ryan Vogelsong during a baseball game in San Francisco. At right is Giants catcher Buster Posey. McCutchen and Posey are now teammates with the Giants. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, File)
Buster Posey, new SF teammate Andrew McCutchen go way back
FILE - In this June 1, 2015, file photo, Pittsburgh Pirates' Andrew McCutchen singles off San Francisco Giants starting pitcher Ryan Vogelsong during a baseball game in San Francisco. At right is Giants catcher Buster Posey. McCutchen and Posey are now teammates with the Giants. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, File)
In this Feb. 9, 2018 photo, San Francisco Giants pitcher Madison Bumgarner is interviewed during the team's media day in San Francisco. Bumgarner is in the best shape of his life ready for a bounce-back season after a most forgettable one for San Francisco's big lefty ace. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)
Giants ace Bumgarner eager for a new slate after bike injury
In this Feb. 9, 2018 photo, San Francisco Giants pitcher Madison Bumgarner is interviewed during the team's media day in San Francisco. Bumgarner is in the best shape of his life ready for a bounce-back season after a most forgettable one for San Francisco's big lefty ace. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)
FILE - In this Sept. 3, 2017 file photo, San Francisco Giants pitcher Madison Bumgarner works against the St. Louis Cardinals in the first inning of a baseball game in San Francisco. Bumgarner is in the best shape of his life ready for a bounce-back season after a most forgettable one for San Francisco's big lefty ace. (AP Photo/Ben Margot, file)
Giants ace Bumgarner eager for a new slate after bike injury
FILE - In this Sept. 3, 2017 file photo, San Francisco Giants pitcher Madison Bumgarner works against the St. Louis Cardinals in the first inning of a baseball game in San Francisco. Bumgarner is in the best shape of his life ready for a bounce-back season after a most forgettable one for San Francisco's big lefty ace. (AP Photo/Ben Margot, file)
FILE - In this Aug. 2, 2017, file photo, Oakland Athletics' Matt Chapman watches his RBI double off San Francisco Giants starting pitcher Matt Moore duirng the second inning of a baseball game, in San Francisco. Khris Davis will be the offensive centerpiece with power-hitting outfielders Matt Chapman and Matt Olson surrounding him. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, File)
With Khris Davis' power, A's look to build off strong finish
FILE - In this Aug. 2, 2017, file photo, Oakland Athletics' Matt Chapman watches his RBI double off San Francisco Giants starting pitcher Matt Moore duirng the second inning of a baseball game, in San Francisco. Khris Davis will be the offensive centerpiece with power-hitting outfielders Matt Chapman and Matt Olson surrounding him. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, File)
FILE - In this Aug. 29, 2017, file photo, San Francisco Giants' Denard Span watches his RBI double during the second inning of a baseball game against the San Diego Padres in San Diego. Span, obtained in the trade that sent Evan Longoria to San Francisco, is the biggest name added to the roster Tampa Bay Rays this winter. (AP Photo/Orlando Ramirez, File)
Revamped Rays have new look in 2018 after 4 losing seasons
FILE - In this Aug. 29, 2017, file photo, San Francisco Giants' Denard Span watches his RBI double during the second inning of a baseball game against the San Diego Padres in San Diego. Span, obtained in the trade that sent Evan Longoria to San Francisco, is the biggest name added to the roster Tampa Bay Rays this winter. (AP Photo/Orlando Ramirez, File)
FILE - In this June 18, 2017, file photo, Colorado Rockies' Nolan Arenado, front, is doused by teammates Trevor Story, back left, and Ian Desmond after Arenado hit a walkoff, three-run home run off San Francisco Giants relief pitcher Mark Melancon in the ninth inning of a baseball game in Denver. The Rockies are counting on big seasons from Arenado and center fielder Charlie Blackmon along with bounce-back campaigns from other position players to make a run at back-to-back playoff appearances for the first time in team history. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski, File)
Rockies boost bullpen in effort to make it back to playoffs
FILE - In this June 18, 2017, file photo, Colorado Rockies' Nolan Arenado, front, is doused by teammates Trevor Story, back left, and Ian Desmond after Arenado hit a walkoff, three-run home run off San Francisco Giants relief pitcher Mark Melancon in the ninth inning of a baseball game in Denver. The Rockies are counting on big seasons from Arenado and center fielder Charlie Blackmon along with bounce-back campaigns from other position players to make a run at back-to-back playoff appearances for the first time in team history. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski, File)
FILE - In this March 22, 2015, file photo, San Francisco Giants manager Bruce Bochy gestures during batting practice in Scottsdale, Ariz. Bochy's first glimpse at his new roster gives him hope the Giants will feature a lineup much like the ones of several years ago, when his club was capturing World Series championships every other year. (AP Photo/Ben Margot, File)
Giants add Longoria, McCutchen as they try to bounce back
FILE - In this March 22, 2015, file photo, San Francisco Giants manager Bruce Bochy gestures during batting practice in Scottsdale, Ariz. Bochy's first glimpse at his new roster gives him hope the Giants will feature a lineup much like the ones of several years ago, when his club was capturing World Series championships every other year. (AP Photo/Ben Margot, File)
FIE - In this Oct. 1, 2017, file photo, Tampa Bay Rays' Evan Longoria hits an RBI-double during a baseball game against the Baltimore Orioles in St. Petersburg, Fla. San Francisco Giants manager Bruce Bochy's first glimpse at his new roster gives him hope the Giants will feature a lineup much like the ones of several years ago, when his club was capturing World Series championships every other year. He has new right fielder Andrew McCutchen and third baseman Evan Longoria, and all the reliable returners such as Gold Glove shortstop Brandon Crawford, aces Madison Bumgarner and Johnny Cueto, and closer Mark Melancon eager to have a bounce-back year. (AP Photo/Steve Nesius, File)
Giants add Longoria, McCutchen as they try to bounce back
FIE - In this Oct. 1, 2017, file photo, Tampa Bay Rays' Evan Longoria hits an RBI-double during a baseball game against the Baltimore Orioles in St. Petersburg, Fla. San Francisco Giants manager Bruce Bochy's first glimpse at his new roster gives him hope the Giants will feature a lineup much like the ones of several years ago, when his club was capturing World Series championships every other year. He has new right fielder Andrew McCutchen and third baseman Evan Longoria, and all the reliable returners such as Gold Glove shortstop Brandon Crawford, aces Madison Bumgarner and Johnny Cueto, and closer Mark Melancon eager to have a bounce-back year. (AP Photo/Steve Nesius, File)
FILE - In this Sept. 24, 2017, file photo, Pittsburgh Pirates' Andrew McCutchen celebrates after a 4-1 win over the St. Louis Cardinals after a baseball game in Pittsburgh. San Francisco Giants' manager Bruce Bochy's first glimpse at his new roster gives him hope the Giants will feature a lineup much like the ones of several years ago, when his club was capturing World Series championships every other year. He has new right fielder Andrew McCutchen and third baseman Evan Longoria, and all the reliable returners such as Gold Glove shortstop Brandon Crawford, aces Madison Bumgarner and Johnny Cueto, and closer Mark Melancon eager to have a bounce-back year. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar, File)
Giants add Longoria, McCutchen as they try to bounce back
FILE - In this Sept. 24, 2017, file photo, Pittsburgh Pirates' Andrew McCutchen celebrates after a 4-1 win over the St. Louis Cardinals after a baseball game in Pittsburgh. San Francisco Giants' manager Bruce Bochy's first glimpse at his new roster gives him hope the Giants will feature a lineup much like the ones of several years ago, when his club was capturing World Series championships every other year. He has new right fielder Andrew McCutchen and third baseman Evan Longoria, and all the reliable returners such as Gold Glove shortstop Brandon Crawford, aces Madison Bumgarner and Johnny Cueto, and closer Mark Melancon eager to have a bounce-back year. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar, File)
FILE - In this Sept. 16, 2017, file photo, Pittsburgh Pirates center fielder Andrew McCutchen catches hit for an out by Cincinnati Reds' Jesse Winker during a baseball game in Cincinnati. San Francisco Giants' manager Bruce Bochy's first glimpse at his new roster gives him hope the Giants will feature a lineup much like the ones of several years ago, when his club was capturing World Series championships every other year. He has new right fielder Andrew McCutchen and third baseman Evan Longoria, and all the reliable returners such as Gold Glove shortstop Brandon Crawford, aces Madison Bumgarner and Johnny Cueto, and closer Mark Melancon eager to have a bounce-back year. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
Giants add Longoria, McCutchen as they try to bounce back
FILE - In this Sept. 16, 2017, file photo, Pittsburgh Pirates center fielder Andrew McCutchen catches hit for an out by Cincinnati Reds' Jesse Winker during a baseball game in Cincinnati. San Francisco Giants' manager Bruce Bochy's first glimpse at his new roster gives him hope the Giants will feature a lineup much like the ones of several years ago, when his club was capturing World Series championships every other year. He has new right fielder Andrew McCutchen and third baseman Evan Longoria, and all the reliable returners such as Gold Glove shortstop Brandon Crawford, aces Madison Bumgarner and Johnny Cueto, and closer Mark Melancon eager to have a bounce-back year. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
FILE - In this Aug. 20, 2017, file photo, San Francisco Giants pitcher Madison Bumgarner works against the Philadelphia Phillies during a baseball game in San Francisco. Giants manager Bruce Bochy's first glimpse at his new roster gives him hope the Giants will feature a lineup much like the ones of several years ago, when his club was capturing World Series championships every other year. (AP Photo/Ben Margot, File)
Giants add Longoria, McCutchen as they try to bounce back
FILE - In this Aug. 20, 2017, file photo, San Francisco Giants pitcher Madison Bumgarner works against the Philadelphia Phillies during a baseball game in San Francisco. Giants manager Bruce Bochy's first glimpse at his new roster gives him hope the Giants will feature a lineup much like the ones of several years ago, when his club was capturing World Series championships every other year. (AP Photo/Ben Margot, File)
On the Fantasy Baseball Today podcast, Adam Aizer, Heath Cummings and Scott White offer a 2018 season outlook for the San Francisco Giants.
Fantasy Baseball Today: 2018 San Francisco Giants Outlook
On the Fantasy Baseball Today podcast, Adam Aizer, Heath Cummings and Scott White offer a 2018 season outlook for the San Francisco Giants.
On the Fantasy Baseball Today podcast, Adam Aizer, Heath Cummings and Scott White offer a 2018 season outlook for the San Francisco Giants.
Fantasy Baseball Today: 2018 San Francisco Giants Outlook
On the Fantasy Baseball Today podcast, Adam Aizer, Heath Cummings and Scott White offer a 2018 season outlook for the San Francisco Giants.
On the Fantasy Baseball Today podcast, Adam Aizer, Heath Cummings and Scott White offer a 2018 season outlook for the San Francisco Giants.
Fantasy Baseball Today: 2018 San Francisco Giants Outlook
On the Fantasy Baseball Today podcast, Adam Aizer, Heath Cummings and Scott White offer a 2018 season outlook for the San Francisco Giants.
On the Fantasy Baseball Today podcast, Adam Aizer, Heath Cummings and Scott White offer a 2018 season outlook for the San Francisco Giants.
Fantasy Baseball Today: 2018 San Francisco Giants Outlook
On the Fantasy Baseball Today podcast, Adam Aizer, Heath Cummings and Scott White offer a 2018 season outlook for the San Francisco Giants.
FILE - In this Aug. 7, 2007, file photo, San Francisco Giants' Barry Bonds drops his bat after hitting his 756th career home run during the fifth inning of a baseball game off Washington Nationals' Mike Bacsik in San Francisco. Bonds will have his No. 25 jersey retired this August by the Giants when his former Pittsburgh Pirates are in town, the team announced Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018. (AP Photo/Ben Margot, File)
Giants to retire Barry Bonds' No. 25 jersey in August
FILE - In this Aug. 7, 2007, file photo, San Francisco Giants' Barry Bonds drops his bat after hitting his 756th career home run during the fifth inning of a baseball game off Washington Nationals' Mike Bacsik in San Francisco. Bonds will have his No. 25 jersey retired this August by the Giants when his former Pittsburgh Pirates are in town, the team announced Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018. (AP Photo/Ben Margot, File)
FILE - In this Aug. 7, 2007, file photo, San Francisco Giants Barry Bonds celebrates after his 756th career home run in the fifth inning of a baseball game against the Washington Nationals in San Francisco. Bonds will have his No. 25 jersey retired this August by the Giants when his former Pittsburgh Pirates are in town, the team announced Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, File)
Giants to retire Barry Bonds' No. 25 jersey in August
FILE - In this Aug. 7, 2007, file photo, San Francisco Giants Barry Bonds celebrates after his 756th career home run in the fifth inning of a baseball game against the Washington Nationals in San Francisco. Bonds will have his No. 25 jersey retired this August by the Giants when his former Pittsburgh Pirates are in town, the team announced Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, File)
FILE - In this Sept. 26, 2007, file photo, San Francisco Giants' Barry Bonds waves goodbye to the fans at AT&T Park after his final at bat against the San Diego Padres in the sixth inning of their baseball game in San Francisco, Wednesday, Sept. 26, 2007. Bonds will have his No. 25 jersey retired this August by the Giants when his former Pittsburgh Pirates are in town, the team announced Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, File)
Giants to retire Barry Bonds' No. 25 jersey in August
FILE - In this Sept. 26, 2007, file photo, San Francisco Giants' Barry Bonds waves goodbye to the fans at AT&T Park after his final at bat against the San Diego Padres in the sixth inning of their baseball game in San Francisco, Wednesday, Sept. 26, 2007. Bonds will have his No. 25 jersey retired this August by the Giants when his former Pittsburgh Pirates are in town, the team announced Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, File)
FILE - In this April 13, 2002, file photo, San Francisco Giants' Barry Bonds waves and poses for fans during the annual on-field photo day before the Giants' baseball game against the Milwaukee Brewers in San Francisco. Bonds will have his No. 25 jersey retired this August by the Giants when his former Pittsburgh Pirates are in town, the team announced Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, File)
Giants to retire Barry Bonds' No. 25 jersey in August
FILE - In this April 13, 2002, file photo, San Francisco Giants' Barry Bonds waves and poses for fans during the annual on-field photo day before the Giants' baseball game against the Milwaukee Brewers in San Francisco. Bonds will have his No. 25 jersey retired this August by the Giants when his former Pittsburgh Pirates are in town, the team announced Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, File)
<p>In what might be the most controversial pregame ceremony in baseball history, the Giants announced they will retire Barry Bonds’ No. 25 before their Aug. 11 game against the Pirates, the only other team Bonds suited up for. And minutes <a href="https://www.si.com/mlb/2018/02/06/barry-bonds-jersey-retired-san-francisco-giants" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:after the news went public on Tuesday afternoon" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">after the news went public on Tuesday afternoon</a>, the baseball world once again embroiled itself in the ongoing debate of how to acknowledge steroid users.</p><p>For anyone who hasn’t followed the Giants organization closely, the team’s decision to openly endorse Bonds and all the baggage he brings in tow is a surprising (some would say appalling) one. Why would the team celebrate a player who spent the last half of his career dogged by cheating accusations and in and out of court rooms?</p><p>But for anyone that’s kept close tabs on San Francisco, this decision really isn’t <em>that</em> surprising. The team has left a very public trail of breadcrumbs that led to this announcement, starting with a formal reestablishment of ties (Bonds was named a special advisor to the CEO last March) and ending with a plaque on the Giants’ Wall of Fame in July.</p><p>The Giants’ delicate and deliberate dealing with Bonds finally reached its next phase, and the timing is right—if not overdue—to hang Bonds’ No. 25 alongside franchise greats like Willie Mays’ No. 24 and Willie McCovey’s No. 44.</p><p>Yes, it’s surprising for the Giants, an otherwise squeaky-clean organization that’s done everything to distance itself from controversy since Bonds “retired” 11 years ago, to openly champion for the player many perceive to be the poster boy of the Steroid Era. It’s surprising to see the team break its own unwritten rule that it won’t retire a player’s number until they’re enshrined in the Hall of Fame. Even after Gaylord Perry was inducted in 1991, the Giants didn’t retire Perry’s No. 36 until 2005.</p><p>It’s surprising to see the Giants venture into these murky waters knowing they’ll alienate 29 other fanbases like Bonds did for years. But that shouldn’t be (and evidently isn’t) their concern. What is likely of concern, and what may have stood as the biggest driving factor to this decision but won’t ever be publicly admitted, is that the Giants were running out of time.</p><p>In a <a href="https://theathletic.com/219944/2018/01/23/the-hall-of-fame-really-does-matter-to-barry-bonds-and-his-sense-of-urgency-is-greater-than-you-might-think/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:terrific piece" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">terrific piece</a> by Andrew Baggarly of <em>The Athletic</em>, Baggarly depicts an emotional Bonds speaking at a birthday gathering for McCovey at AT&#38;T Park last month.</p><p>“(Bonds) ended his remarks by speaking of ‘getting there’ one day,” Baggarly wrote. “He just hoped if that day ever arrived, it wouldn’t come too late for Mays and McCovey to be there to witness it.”</p><p>Within the context of that quote, “getting there” refers to the Hall of Fame. But the meat of the point still holds true.</p><p>Bonds has always spoken passionately about his lifelong relationships with McCovey and his godfather, Mays. Both have been prominent fixtures around AT&#38;T Park for years, but it won’t be that way forever. McCovey turned 80 last month and is confined to a wheel chair. Mays will turn 87 in May.</p><p>In the eyes of Bonds and the Giants, the proper way to publicly celebrate Bonds’ career is with Mays and McCovey in attendance, right alongside Bonds.</p><p>Hall of Fame voters have made it clear that if Bonds is making it to Cooperstown, it’s not going to be in the next two or three years. He only garnered 56.4% of the vote this year, with the 18.6% gap a lot larger than it may appear. His best shot will probably come in his last go-around on the ballot in 2022.</p><p>Evidently the Giants weren’t willing to chance it and wait that long, which invites the obvious question for San Francisco fans: Why did we have to wait this long at all?</p><p>Without Bonds, the Giants may <a href="https://calltothepen.com/2016/11/10/san-francisco-giants-history-move-florida-denied-mlb/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:be playing in Tampa Bay right now" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">be playing in Tampa Bay right now</a>. Without Bonds, the Giants’ effort to build their gorgeous waterfront ballpark may have been delayed years longer or not come to fruition at all. Without Bonds’ home run chases and the pennant races he fueled, the Giants wouldn’t be the organizational juggernaut they are today.</p><p>For all the storm clouds and negativity that followed most of his career in San Francisco, he’s given the Giants much more than he’s taken. That alone should have merited his number retirement, an honor Bonds earned years before he became entangled in PED controversies.</p><p>But it’s never been that simple with Bonds, and it never will be.</p><p>The Giants could have continued their game of not issuing a No. 25 jersey because it was “retired” without actually being retired. Fortunately that game has reached its conclusion.</p><p>Finally, San Francisco will permanently put No. 25 to rest.</p>
The Giants Are Right To Retire Barry Bonds's Number Even if Controversy Awaits

In what might be the most controversial pregame ceremony in baseball history, the Giants announced they will retire Barry Bonds’ No. 25 before their Aug. 11 game against the Pirates, the only other team Bonds suited up for. And minutes after the news went public on Tuesday afternoon, the baseball world once again embroiled itself in the ongoing debate of how to acknowledge steroid users.

For anyone who hasn’t followed the Giants organization closely, the team’s decision to openly endorse Bonds and all the baggage he brings in tow is a surprising (some would say appalling) one. Why would the team celebrate a player who spent the last half of his career dogged by cheating accusations and in and out of court rooms?

But for anyone that’s kept close tabs on San Francisco, this decision really isn’t that surprising. The team has left a very public trail of breadcrumbs that led to this announcement, starting with a formal reestablishment of ties (Bonds was named a special advisor to the CEO last March) and ending with a plaque on the Giants’ Wall of Fame in July.

The Giants’ delicate and deliberate dealing with Bonds finally reached its next phase, and the timing is right—if not overdue—to hang Bonds’ No. 25 alongside franchise greats like Willie Mays’ No. 24 and Willie McCovey’s No. 44.

Yes, it’s surprising for the Giants, an otherwise squeaky-clean organization that’s done everything to distance itself from controversy since Bonds “retired” 11 years ago, to openly champion for the player many perceive to be the poster boy of the Steroid Era. It’s surprising to see the team break its own unwritten rule that it won’t retire a player’s number until they’re enshrined in the Hall of Fame. Even after Gaylord Perry was inducted in 1991, the Giants didn’t retire Perry’s No. 36 until 2005.

It’s surprising to see the Giants venture into these murky waters knowing they’ll alienate 29 other fanbases like Bonds did for years. But that shouldn’t be (and evidently isn’t) their concern. What is likely of concern, and what may have stood as the biggest driving factor to this decision but won’t ever be publicly admitted, is that the Giants were running out of time.

In a terrific piece by Andrew Baggarly of The Athletic, Baggarly depicts an emotional Bonds speaking at a birthday gathering for McCovey at AT&T Park last month.

“(Bonds) ended his remarks by speaking of ‘getting there’ one day,” Baggarly wrote. “He just hoped if that day ever arrived, it wouldn’t come too late for Mays and McCovey to be there to witness it.”

Within the context of that quote, “getting there” refers to the Hall of Fame. But the meat of the point still holds true.

Bonds has always spoken passionately about his lifelong relationships with McCovey and his godfather, Mays. Both have been prominent fixtures around AT&T Park for years, but it won’t be that way forever. McCovey turned 80 last month and is confined to a wheel chair. Mays will turn 87 in May.

In the eyes of Bonds and the Giants, the proper way to publicly celebrate Bonds’ career is with Mays and McCovey in attendance, right alongside Bonds.

Hall of Fame voters have made it clear that if Bonds is making it to Cooperstown, it’s not going to be in the next two or three years. He only garnered 56.4% of the vote this year, with the 18.6% gap a lot larger than it may appear. His best shot will probably come in his last go-around on the ballot in 2022.

Evidently the Giants weren’t willing to chance it and wait that long, which invites the obvious question for San Francisco fans: Why did we have to wait this long at all?

Without Bonds, the Giants may be playing in Tampa Bay right now. Without Bonds, the Giants’ effort to build their gorgeous waterfront ballpark may have been delayed years longer or not come to fruition at all. Without Bonds’ home run chases and the pennant races he fueled, the Giants wouldn’t be the organizational juggernaut they are today.

For all the storm clouds and negativity that followed most of his career in San Francisco, he’s given the Giants much more than he’s taken. That alone should have merited his number retirement, an honor Bonds earned years before he became entangled in PED controversies.

But it’s never been that simple with Bonds, and it never will be.

The Giants could have continued their game of not issuing a No. 25 jersey because it was “retired” without actually being retired. Fortunately that game has reached its conclusion.

Finally, San Francisco will permanently put No. 25 to rest.

<p>In what might be the most controversial pregame ceremony in baseball history, the Giants announced they will retire Barry Bonds’ No. 25 before their Aug. 11 game against the Pirates, the only other team Bonds suited up for. And minutes <a href="https://www.si.com/mlb/2018/02/06/barry-bonds-jersey-retired-san-francisco-giants" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:after the news went public on Tuesday afternoon" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">after the news went public on Tuesday afternoon</a>, the baseball world once again embroiled itself in the ongoing debate of how to acknowledge steroid users.</p><p>For anyone who hasn’t followed the Giants organization closely, the team’s decision to openly endorse Bonds and all the baggage he brings in tow is a surprising (some would say appalling) one. Why would the team celebrate a player who spent the last half of his career dogged by cheating accusations and in and out of court rooms?</p><p>But for anyone that’s kept close tabs on San Francisco, this decision really isn’t <em>that</em> surprising. The team has left a very public trail of breadcrumbs that led to this announcement, starting with a formal reestablishment of ties (Bonds was named a special advisor to the CEO last March) and ending with a plaque on the Giants’ Wall of Fame in July.</p><p>The Giants’ delicate and deliberate dealing with Bonds finally reached its next phase, and the timing is right—if not overdue—to hang Bonds’ No. 25 alongside franchise greats like Willie Mays’ No. 24 and Willie McCovey’s No. 44.</p><p>Yes, it’s surprising for the Giants, an otherwise squeaky-clean organization that’s done everything to distance itself from controversy since Bonds “retired” 11 years ago, to openly champion for the player many perceive to be the poster boy of the Steroid Era. It’s surprising to see the team break its own unwritten rule that it won’t retire a player’s number until they’re enshrined in the Hall of Fame. Even after Gaylord Perry was inducted in 1991, the Giants didn’t retire Perry’s No. 36 until 2005.</p><p>It’s surprising to see the Giants venture into these murky waters knowing they’ll alienate 29 other fanbases like Bonds did for years. But that shouldn’t be (and evidently isn’t) their concern. What is likely of concern, and what may have stood as the biggest driving factor to this decision but won’t ever be publicly admitted, is that the Giants were running out of time.</p><p>In a <a href="https://theathletic.com/219944/2018/01/23/the-hall-of-fame-really-does-matter-to-barry-bonds-and-his-sense-of-urgency-is-greater-than-you-might-think/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:terrific piece" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">terrific piece</a> by Andrew Baggarly of <em>The Athletic</em>, Baggarly depicts an emotional Bonds speaking at a birthday gathering for McCovey at AT&#38;T Park last month.</p><p>“(Bonds) ended his remarks by speaking of ‘getting there’ one day,” Baggarly wrote. “He just hoped if that day ever arrived, it wouldn’t come too late for Mays and McCovey to be there to witness it.”</p><p>Within the context of that quote, “getting there” refers to the Hall of Fame. But the meat of the point still holds true.</p><p>Bonds has always spoken passionately about his lifelong relationships with McCovey and his godfather, Mays. Both have been prominent fixtures around AT&#38;T Park for years, but it won’t be that way forever. McCovey turned 80 last month and is confined to a wheel chair. Mays will turn 87 in May.</p><p>In the eyes of Bonds and the Giants, the proper way to publicly celebrate Bonds’ career is with Mays and McCovey in attendance, right alongside Bonds.</p><p>Hall of Fame voters have made it clear that if Bonds is making it to Cooperstown, it’s not going to be in the next two or three years. He only garnered 56.4% of the vote this year, with the 18.6% gap a lot larger than it may appear. His best shot will probably come in his last go-around on the ballot in 2022.</p><p>Evidently the Giants weren’t willing to chance it and wait that long, which invites the obvious question for San Francisco fans: Why did we have to wait this long at all?</p><p>Without Bonds, the Giants may <a href="https://calltothepen.com/2016/11/10/san-francisco-giants-history-move-florida-denied-mlb/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:be playing in Tampa Bay right now" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">be playing in Tampa Bay right now</a>. Without Bonds, the Giants’ effort to build their gorgeous waterfront ballpark may have been delayed years longer or not come to fruition at all. Without Bonds’ home run chases and the pennant races he fueled, the Giants wouldn’t be the organizational juggernaut they are today.</p><p>For all the storm clouds and negativity that followed most of his career in San Francisco, he’s given the Giants much more than he’s taken. That alone should have merited his number retirement, an honor Bonds earned years before he became entangled in PED controversies.</p><p>But it’s never been that simple with Bonds, and it never will be.</p><p>The Giants could have continued their game of not issuing a No. 25 jersey because it was “retired” without actually being retired. Fortunately that game has reached its conclusion.</p><p>Finally, San Francisco will permanently put No. 25 to rest.</p>
The Giants Are Right To Retire Barry Bonds's Number Even if Controversy Awaits

In what might be the most controversial pregame ceremony in baseball history, the Giants announced they will retire Barry Bonds’ No. 25 before their Aug. 11 game against the Pirates, the only other team Bonds suited up for. And minutes after the news went public on Tuesday afternoon, the baseball world once again embroiled itself in the ongoing debate of how to acknowledge steroid users.

For anyone who hasn’t followed the Giants organization closely, the team’s decision to openly endorse Bonds and all the baggage he brings in tow is a surprising (some would say appalling) one. Why would the team celebrate a player who spent the last half of his career dogged by cheating accusations and in and out of court rooms?

But for anyone that’s kept close tabs on San Francisco, this decision really isn’t that surprising. The team has left a very public trail of breadcrumbs that led to this announcement, starting with a formal reestablishment of ties (Bonds was named a special advisor to the CEO last March) and ending with a plaque on the Giants’ Wall of Fame in July.

The Giants’ delicate and deliberate dealing with Bonds finally reached its next phase, and the timing is right—if not overdue—to hang Bonds’ No. 25 alongside franchise greats like Willie Mays’ No. 24 and Willie McCovey’s No. 44.

Yes, it’s surprising for the Giants, an otherwise squeaky-clean organization that’s done everything to distance itself from controversy since Bonds “retired” 11 years ago, to openly champion for the player many perceive to be the poster boy of the Steroid Era. It’s surprising to see the team break its own unwritten rule that it won’t retire a player’s number until they’re enshrined in the Hall of Fame. Even after Gaylord Perry was inducted in 1991, the Giants didn’t retire Perry’s No. 36 until 2005.

It’s surprising to see the Giants venture into these murky waters knowing they’ll alienate 29 other fanbases like Bonds did for years. But that shouldn’t be (and evidently isn’t) their concern. What is likely of concern, and what may have stood as the biggest driving factor to this decision but won’t ever be publicly admitted, is that the Giants were running out of time.

In a terrific piece by Andrew Baggarly of The Athletic, Baggarly depicts an emotional Bonds speaking at a birthday gathering for McCovey at AT&T Park last month.

“(Bonds) ended his remarks by speaking of ‘getting there’ one day,” Baggarly wrote. “He just hoped if that day ever arrived, it wouldn’t come too late for Mays and McCovey to be there to witness it.”

Within the context of that quote, “getting there” refers to the Hall of Fame. But the meat of the point still holds true.

Bonds has always spoken passionately about his lifelong relationships with McCovey and his godfather, Mays. Both have been prominent fixtures around AT&T Park for years, but it won’t be that way forever. McCovey turned 80 last month and is confined to a wheel chair. Mays will turn 87 in May.

In the eyes of Bonds and the Giants, the proper way to publicly celebrate Bonds’ career is with Mays and McCovey in attendance, right alongside Bonds.

Hall of Fame voters have made it clear that if Bonds is making it to Cooperstown, it’s not going to be in the next two or three years. He only garnered 56.4% of the vote this year, with the 18.6% gap a lot larger than it may appear. His best shot will probably come in his last go-around on the ballot in 2022.

Evidently the Giants weren’t willing to chance it and wait that long, which invites the obvious question for San Francisco fans: Why did we have to wait this long at all?

Without Bonds, the Giants may be playing in Tampa Bay right now. Without Bonds, the Giants’ effort to build their gorgeous waterfront ballpark may have been delayed years longer or not come to fruition at all. Without Bonds’ home run chases and the pennant races he fueled, the Giants wouldn’t be the organizational juggernaut they are today.

For all the storm clouds and negativity that followed most of his career in San Francisco, he’s given the Giants much more than he’s taken. That alone should have merited his number retirement, an honor Bonds earned years before he became entangled in PED controversies.

But it’s never been that simple with Bonds, and it never will be.

The Giants could have continued their game of not issuing a No. 25 jersey because it was “retired” without actually being retired. Fortunately that game has reached its conclusion.

Finally, San Francisco will permanently put No. 25 to rest.

<p>In what might be the most controversial pregame ceremony in baseball history, the Giants announced they will retire Barry Bonds’ No. 25 before their Aug. 11 game against the Pirates, the only other team Bonds suited up for. And minutes <a href="https://www.si.com/mlb/2018/02/06/barry-bonds-jersey-retired-san-francisco-giants" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:after the news went public on Tuesday afternoon" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">after the news went public on Tuesday afternoon</a>, the baseball world once again embroiled itself in the ongoing debate of how to acknowledge steroid users.</p><p>For anyone who hasn’t followed the Giants organization closely, the team’s decision to openly endorse Bonds and all the baggage he brings in tow is a surprising (some would say appalling) one. Why would the team celebrate a player who spent the last half of his career dogged by cheating accusations and in and out of court rooms?</p><p>But for anyone that’s kept close tabs on San Francisco, this decision really isn’t <em>that</em> surprising. The team has left a very public trail of breadcrumbs that led to this announcement, starting with a formal reestablishment of ties (Bonds was named a special advisor to the CEO last March) and ending with a plaque on the Giants’ Wall of Fame in July.</p><p>The Giants’ delicate and deliberate dealing with Bonds finally reached its next phase, and the timing is right—if not overdue—to hang Bonds’ No. 25 alongside franchise greats like Willie Mays’ No. 24 and Willie McCovey’s No. 44.</p><p>Yes, it’s surprising for the Giants, an otherwise squeaky-clean organization that’s done everything to distance itself from controversy since Bonds “retired” 11 years ago, to openly champion for the player many perceive to be the poster boy of the Steroid Era. It’s surprising to see the team break its own unwritten rule that it won’t retire a player’s number until they’re enshrined in the Hall of Fame. Even after Gaylord Perrty was inducted in 1991, the Giants didn’t retire Perry’s No. 36 until 2005.</p><p>It’s surprising to see the Giants venture into these murky waters knowing they’ll alienate 29 other fanbases like Bonds did for years. But that shouldn’t be (and evidently isn’t) their concern. What is likely of concern, and what may have stood as the biggest driving factor to this decision but won’t ever be publicly admitted, is that the Giants were running out of time.</p><p>In a <a href="https://theathletic.com/219944/2018/01/23/the-hall-of-fame-really-does-matter-to-barry-bonds-and-his-sense-of-urgency-is-greater-than-you-might-think/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:terrific piece" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">terrific piece</a> by Andrew Baggarly of <em>The Athletic</em>, Baggarly depicts an emotional Bonds speaking at a birthday gathering for McCovey at AT&#38;T Park last month.</p><p>“(Bonds) ended his remarks by speaking of ‘getting there’ one day,” Baggarly wrote. “He just hoped if that day ever arrived, it wouldn’t come too late for Mays and McCovey to be there to witness it.”</p><p>Within the context of that quote, “getting there” refers to the Hall of Fame. But the meat of the point still holds true.</p><p>Bonds has always spoken passionately about his lifelong relationships with McCovey and his godfather, Mays. Both have been prominent fixtures around AT&#38;T Park for years, but it won’t be that way forever. McCovey turned 80 last month and is confined to a wheel chair. Mays will turn 87 in May.</p><p>In the eyes of Bonds and the Giants, the proper way to publicly celebrate Bonds’ career is with Mays and McCovey in attendance, right alongside Bonds.</p><p>Hall of Fame voters have made it clear that if Bonds is making it to Cooperstown, it’s not going to be in the next two or three years. He only garnered 56.4% of the vote this year, with the 18.6% gap a lot larger than it may appear. His best shot will probably come in his last go-around on the ballot in 2022.</p><p>Evidently the Giants weren’t willing to chance it and wait that long, which invites the obvious question for San Francisco fans: Why did we have to wait this long at all?</p><p>Without Bonds, the Giants may <a href="https://calltothepen.com/2016/11/10/san-francisco-giants-history-move-florida-denied-mlb/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:be playing in Tampa Bay right now" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">be playing in Tampa Bay right now</a>. Without Bonds, the Giants’ effort to build their gorgeous waterfront ballpark may have been delayed years longer or not come to fruition at all. Without Bonds’ home run chases and the pennant races he fueled, the Giants wouldn’t be the organizational juggernaut they are today.</p><p>For all the storm clouds and negativity that followed most of his career in San Francisco, he’s given the Giants much more than he’s taken. That alone should have merited his number retirement, an honor Bonds earned years before he became entangled in PED controversies.</p><p>But it’s never been that simple with Bonds, and it never will be.</p><p>The Giants could have continued their game of not issuing a No. 25 jersey because it was “retired” without actually being retired. Fortunately that game has reached its conclusion.</p><p>Finally, San Francisco will permanently put No. 25 to rest.</p>
The Giants Are Right To Retire Barry Bonds's Number Even if Controversy Awaits

In what might be the most controversial pregame ceremony in baseball history, the Giants announced they will retire Barry Bonds’ No. 25 before their Aug. 11 game against the Pirates, the only other team Bonds suited up for. And minutes after the news went public on Tuesday afternoon, the baseball world once again embroiled itself in the ongoing debate of how to acknowledge steroid users.

For anyone who hasn’t followed the Giants organization closely, the team’s decision to openly endorse Bonds and all the baggage he brings in tow is a surprising (some would say appalling) one. Why would the team celebrate a player who spent the last half of his career dogged by cheating accusations and in and out of court rooms?

But for anyone that’s kept close tabs on San Francisco, this decision really isn’t that surprising. The team has left a very public trail of breadcrumbs that led to this announcement, starting with a formal reestablishment of ties (Bonds was named a special advisor to the CEO last March) and ending with a plaque on the Giants’ Wall of Fame in July.

The Giants’ delicate and deliberate dealing with Bonds finally reached its next phase, and the timing is right—if not overdue—to hang Bonds’ No. 25 alongside franchise greats like Willie Mays’ No. 24 and Willie McCovey’s No. 44.

Yes, it’s surprising for the Giants, an otherwise squeaky-clean organization that’s done everything to distance itself from controversy since Bonds “retired” 11 years ago, to openly champion for the player many perceive to be the poster boy of the Steroid Era. It’s surprising to see the team break its own unwritten rule that it won’t retire a player’s number until they’re enshrined in the Hall of Fame. Even after Gaylord Perrty was inducted in 1991, the Giants didn’t retire Perry’s No. 36 until 2005.

It’s surprising to see the Giants venture into these murky waters knowing they’ll alienate 29 other fanbases like Bonds did for years. But that shouldn’t be (and evidently isn’t) their concern. What is likely of concern, and what may have stood as the biggest driving factor to this decision but won’t ever be publicly admitted, is that the Giants were running out of time.

In a terrific piece by Andrew Baggarly of The Athletic, Baggarly depicts an emotional Bonds speaking at a birthday gathering for McCovey at AT&T Park last month.

“(Bonds) ended his remarks by speaking of ‘getting there’ one day,” Baggarly wrote. “He just hoped if that day ever arrived, it wouldn’t come too late for Mays and McCovey to be there to witness it.”

Within the context of that quote, “getting there” refers to the Hall of Fame. But the meat of the point still holds true.

Bonds has always spoken passionately about his lifelong relationships with McCovey and his godfather, Mays. Both have been prominent fixtures around AT&T Park for years, but it won’t be that way forever. McCovey turned 80 last month and is confined to a wheel chair. Mays will turn 87 in May.

In the eyes of Bonds and the Giants, the proper way to publicly celebrate Bonds’ career is with Mays and McCovey in attendance, right alongside Bonds.

Hall of Fame voters have made it clear that if Bonds is making it to Cooperstown, it’s not going to be in the next two or three years. He only garnered 56.4% of the vote this year, with the 18.6% gap a lot larger than it may appear. His best shot will probably come in his last go-around on the ballot in 2022.

Evidently the Giants weren’t willing to chance it and wait that long, which invites the obvious question for San Francisco fans: Why did we have to wait this long at all?

Without Bonds, the Giants may be playing in Tampa Bay right now. Without Bonds, the Giants’ effort to build their gorgeous waterfront ballpark may have been delayed years longer or not come to fruition at all. Without Bonds’ home run chases and the pennant races he fueled, the Giants wouldn’t be the organizational juggernaut they are today.

For all the storm clouds and negativity that followed most of his career in San Francisco, he’s given the Giants much more than he’s taken. That alone should have merited his number retirement, an honor Bonds earned years before he became entangled in PED controversies.

But it’s never been that simple with Bonds, and it never will be.

The Giants could have continued their game of not issuing a No. 25 jersey because it was “retired” without actually being retired. Fortunately that game has reached its conclusion.

Finally, San Francisco will permanently put No. 25 to rest.

The San Francisco Giants have decided to honour the all-time leader in home runs by retiring his jersey.
Giants to retire Barry Bonds' number 25
The San Francisco Giants have decided to honour the all-time leader in home runs by retiring his jersey.
The Hall of Fame wont honor Bonds, but the San Francisco Giants will
Giants will retire Barry Bonds’ number in August
The Hall of Fame wont honor Bonds, but the San Francisco Giants will
The Hall of Fame wont honor Bonds, but the San Francisco Giants will
Giants will retire Barry Bonds’ number in August
The Hall of Fame wont honor Bonds, but the San Francisco Giants will
Yahoo Sports Minute recaps the San Francisco Giants announcing their plans to retire No. 25 in honor of Barry Bonds.
Giants to retire Barry Bonds' No. 25
Yahoo Sports Minute recaps the San Francisco Giants announcing their plans to retire No. 25 in honor of Barry Bonds.
Yahoo Sports Minute recaps the San Francisco Giants announcing their plans to retire No. 25 in honor of Barry Bonds.
Giants to retire Barry Bonds' No. 25
Yahoo Sports Minute recaps the San Francisco Giants announcing their plans to retire No. 25 in honor of Barry Bonds.
Yahoo Sports Minute recaps the San Francisco Giants announcing their plans to retire No. 25 in honor of Barry Bonds.
Giants to retire Barry Bonds' No. 25
Yahoo Sports Minute recaps the San Francisco Giants announcing their plans to retire No. 25 in honor of Barry Bonds.
Yahoo Sports Minute recaps the San Francisco Giants announcing their plans to retire No. 25 in honor of Barry Bonds.
Giants to retire Barry Bonds' No. 25
Yahoo Sports Minute recaps the San Francisco Giants announcing their plans to retire No. 25 in honor of Barry Bonds.
The San Francisco Giants broke from tradition Tuesday and announced their plans to retire No. 25 in honor of Barry Bonds.
Giants break from tradition and decide to retire Barry Bonds' No. 25
The San Francisco Giants broke from tradition Tuesday and announced their plans to retire No. 25 in honor of Barry Bonds.
The San Francisco Giants broke from tradition Tuesday and announced their plans to retire No. 25 in honor of Barry Bonds.
Giants break from tradition and decide to retire Barry Bonds' No. 25
The San Francisco Giants broke from tradition Tuesday and announced their plans to retire No. 25 in honor of Barry Bonds.
<p>The San Francisco Giants announced plans to retire Barry Bonds&#39; No. 25 jersey on Aug. 11 before a game against the Pittsburgh Pirates at AT&#38;T Park.</p><p>Bonds is the 12th Giants player to get his number retired by the team. He played 15 seasons for the Giants from 1993 to 2007. He hit .312 with 381 doubles, 41 triples and 1,440 RBI in his 1,976 games with San Francisco. He hit 586 of his MLB record 762 home runs were hit in a Giants uniform.</p><p>&quot;I&#39;m both honored and humbled that the Giants are going to retire my number this season,&quot; Bonds said in a statement. &quot;As I&#39;ve always said, the Giants and Giants fans, are a part of my family. Growing up, Candlestick Park was my home away from home, and it is where my dad and godfather Willie played. For me to have played on the same field as them, wear the same uniform and now have my number retired, joining Willie and the other Giants legends is extremely special. Number 25 has meant a lot to me throughout my career and it is even more special that I got to share that with my dad.&quot;</p><p>Bonds was the Marlins hitting coach in 2016 but currently serves as a special advisor with the Giants&#39; front office. Bonds received 238 votes (56.4%) in his bid to get elected into the Hall of Fame, which requires at least 75% of the vote for induction. It was just a slight increase from his previous total of 53.8% from 2017. Bonds&#39; candidacy has been blemished by his ties to the BALCO doping scandal. His eligibility on the ballot will expire in 2022.</p><p>The first 20,000 fans in attendance will also receive a No. 25 baseball cap.</p>
Giants to Retire Barry Bonds' No. 25 Jersey At August 11 Ceremony

The San Francisco Giants announced plans to retire Barry Bonds' No. 25 jersey on Aug. 11 before a game against the Pittsburgh Pirates at AT&T Park.

Bonds is the 12th Giants player to get his number retired by the team. He played 15 seasons for the Giants from 1993 to 2007. He hit .312 with 381 doubles, 41 triples and 1,440 RBI in his 1,976 games with San Francisco. He hit 586 of his MLB record 762 home runs were hit in a Giants uniform.

"I'm both honored and humbled that the Giants are going to retire my number this season," Bonds said in a statement. "As I've always said, the Giants and Giants fans, are a part of my family. Growing up, Candlestick Park was my home away from home, and it is where my dad and godfather Willie played. For me to have played on the same field as them, wear the same uniform and now have my number retired, joining Willie and the other Giants legends is extremely special. Number 25 has meant a lot to me throughout my career and it is even more special that I got to share that with my dad."

Bonds was the Marlins hitting coach in 2016 but currently serves as a special advisor with the Giants' front office. Bonds received 238 votes (56.4%) in his bid to get elected into the Hall of Fame, which requires at least 75% of the vote for induction. It was just a slight increase from his previous total of 53.8% from 2017. Bonds' candidacy has been blemished by his ties to the BALCO doping scandal. His eligibility on the ballot will expire in 2022.

The first 20,000 fans in attendance will also receive a No. 25 baseball cap.

FILE - In this April 12, 2017, file photo, Arizona Diamondbacks pitcher Shelby Miller (26) throws against the San Francisco Giants during the first inning of a baseball game in San Francisco. Miller has won his salary arbitration case against Arizona after missing most of last season due to a torn elbow ligament, a decision that gave players a 2-0 record in decisions this year. Miller was awarded a $200,000 raise to $4.9 million on Thursday, Feb. 1, 2018, by arbitrators. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu, File)
Injured Arizona RHP Miller wins in arbitration; players 2-0
FILE - In this April 12, 2017, file photo, Arizona Diamondbacks pitcher Shelby Miller (26) throws against the San Francisco Giants during the first inning of a baseball game in San Francisco. Miller has won his salary arbitration case against Arizona after missing most of last season due to a torn elbow ligament, a decision that gave players a 2-0 record in decisions this year. Miller was awarded a $200,000 raise to $4.9 million on Thursday, Feb. 1, 2018, by arbitrators. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu, File)

What to Read Next