San Francisco Giants

San Francisco Giants

FILE - In this Sept. 27, 2017, file photo, Arizona Diamondbacks' J.D. Martinez watches the flight of his home run against the San Francisco Giants during the ninth inning of a baseball game in Phoenix. The Boston Red Sox have still yet to finalize their contract with prized free agent Martinez. Red Sox manager Alex Cora said Friday, Feb. 23, 2018, that he is not concerned by the delay and is simply focused on preparing the players he already has in camp. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, File)
Cora 'not concerned' Red Sox deal with Martinez not yet done
FILE - In this Sept. 27, 2017, file photo, Arizona Diamondbacks' J.D. Martinez watches the flight of his home run against the San Francisco Giants during the ninth inning of a baseball game in Phoenix. The Boston Red Sox have still yet to finalize their contract with prized free agent Martinez. Red Sox manager Alex Cora said Friday, Feb. 23, 2018, that he is not concerned by the delay and is simply focused on preparing the players he already has in camp. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, File)
San Francisco Giants great Orlando Cepeda is in the hospital after having a "cardiac incident," the team announced Wednesday. Matt Yurus reports.
SF Giants Great Orlando Cepeda Hospitalized, In Critical Condition
San Francisco Giants great Orlando Cepeda is in the hospital after having a "cardiac incident," the team announced Wednesday. Matt Yurus reports.
San Francisco Giants great Orlando Cepeda is in the hospital after having a "cardiac incident," the team announced Wednesday. Matt Yurus reports.
SF Giants Great Orlando Cepeda Hospitalized, In Critical Condition
San Francisco Giants great Orlando Cepeda is in the hospital after having a "cardiac incident," the team announced Wednesday. Matt Yurus reports.
San Francisco Giants great Orlando Cepeda is in the hospital after having a "cardiac incident," the team announced Wednesday. Matt Yurus reports.
SF Giants Great Orlando Cepeda Hospitalized, In Critical Condition
San Francisco Giants great Orlando Cepeda is in the hospital after having a "cardiac incident," the team announced Wednesday. Matt Yurus reports.
San Francisco Giants great Orlando Cepeda is in the hospital after having a "cardiac incident," the team announced Wednesday. Matt Yurus reports.
SF Giants Great Orlando Cepeda Hospitalized, In Critical Condition
San Francisco Giants great Orlando Cepeda is in the hospital after having a "cardiac incident," the team announced Wednesday. Matt Yurus reports.
San Francisco Giants great Orlando Cepeda is in the hospital after having a "cardiac incident," the team announced Wednesday. Matt Yurus reports.
SF Giants Great Orlando Cepeda Hospitalized, In Critical Condition
San Francisco Giants great Orlando Cepeda is in the hospital after having a "cardiac incident," the team announced Wednesday. Matt Yurus reports.
San Francisco Giants great Orlando Cepeda is in the hospital after having a "cardiac incident," the team announced Wednesday. Matt Yurus reports.
SF Giants Great Orlando Cepeda Hospitalized, In Critical Condition
San Francisco Giants great Orlando Cepeda is in the hospital after having a "cardiac incident," the team announced Wednesday. Matt Yurus reports.
San Francisco Giants great Orlando Cepeda is in the hospital after having a "cardiac incident," the team announced Wednesday. Matt Yurus reports.
SF Giants Great Orlando Cepeda Hospitalized, In Critical Condition
San Francisco Giants great Orlando Cepeda is in the hospital after having a "cardiac incident," the team announced Wednesday. Matt Yurus reports.
San Francisco Giants great Orlando Cepeda is in the hospital after having a "cardiac incident," the team announced Wednesday. Matt Yurus reports.
SF Giants Great Orlando Cepeda Hospitalized, In Critical Condition
San Francisco Giants great Orlando Cepeda is in the hospital after having a "cardiac incident," the team announced Wednesday. Matt Yurus reports.
FILE - In this Sept. 16, 2017, file photo, Hall of Famer Orlando Cepeda waves to fans prior to the San Francisco Giants' baseball game against the Arizona Diamondbacks, in San Francisco. The San Francisco Giants said Wednesday, Feb. 21, 2018, that Hall of Famer Cepeda remains hospitalized in critical condition after a cardiac incident. He was taken to a Bay Area hospital late Monday. (AP Photo/Ben Margot, File)
Hall of Famer Orlando Cepeda critical after cardiac incident
FILE - In this Sept. 16, 2017, file photo, Hall of Famer Orlando Cepeda waves to fans prior to the San Francisco Giants' baseball game against the Arizona Diamondbacks, in San Francisco. The San Francisco Giants said Wednesday, Feb. 21, 2018, that Hall of Famer Cepeda remains hospitalized in critical condition after a cardiac incident. He was taken to a Bay Area hospital late Monday. (AP Photo/Ben Margot, File)
FILE - In this Sept. 16, 2017, file photo, Hall of Famer Orlando Cepeda waves to fans prior to the San Francisco Giants' baseball game against the Arizona Diamondbacks, in San Francisco. Orlando Cepeda has been hospitalized in the Bay Area. Giants spokeswoman Staci Slaughter on Tuesday , Feb. 20, 2018, confirmed Cepeda had been transported to a hospital late Monday, but didnt immediately have further details. The 80-year-old Cepeda was a first baseman during his 17 big league seasons, beginning his career with the Giants and moving on to St. Louis, Atlanta, Oakland, Boston and Kansas City. (AP Photo/Ben Margot, File)
Hall of Famer Orlando Cepeda critical after cardiac incident
FILE - In this Sept. 16, 2017, file photo, Hall of Famer Orlando Cepeda waves to fans prior to the San Francisco Giants' baseball game against the Arizona Diamondbacks, in San Francisco. Orlando Cepeda has been hospitalized in the Bay Area. Giants spokeswoman Staci Slaughter on Tuesday , Feb. 20, 2018, confirmed Cepeda had been transported to a hospital late Monday, but didnt immediately have further details. The 80-year-old Cepeda was a first baseman during his 17 big league seasons, beginning his career with the Giants and moving on to St. Louis, Atlanta, Oakland, Boston and Kansas City. (AP Photo/Ben Margot, File)
<p>SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Hall of Famer Orlando Cepeda has been hospitalized in the Bay Area.</p><p>The San Francisco Giants said Tuesday the 80-year-old Cepeda had been taken to a hospital late Monday. The team tweeted a statement Wednesday.</p><p>Cepeda has been a regular at Giants home games and attended an 80th birthday event for Hall of Famer Willie McCovey last month.</p><p>Cepeda was a first baseman during his 17 big league seasons, beginning with the Giants. He also played for St. Louis, Atlanta, Oakland, Boston and Kansas City.</p><p>A seven-time All-Star who played in three World Series, Cepeda was the 1958 NL Rookie of the Year with San Francisco and NL MVP in 1967 with St. Louis. In 1961, he led the NL with 46 homers and 142 RBIs. Cepeda was a .297 career hitter with 379 home runs.</p>
Hall of Famer Orlando Cepeda Hospitalized in Bay Area

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Hall of Famer Orlando Cepeda has been hospitalized in the Bay Area.

The San Francisco Giants said Tuesday the 80-year-old Cepeda had been taken to a hospital late Monday. The team tweeted a statement Wednesday.

Cepeda has been a regular at Giants home games and attended an 80th birthday event for Hall of Famer Willie McCovey last month.

Cepeda was a first baseman during his 17 big league seasons, beginning with the Giants. He also played for St. Louis, Atlanta, Oakland, Boston and Kansas City.

A seven-time All-Star who played in three World Series, Cepeda was the 1958 NL Rookie of the Year with San Francisco and NL MVP in 1967 with St. Louis. In 1961, he led the NL with 46 homers and 142 RBIs. Cepeda was a .297 career hitter with 379 home runs.

<p>The latest MLB tank job takes us to Florida, but not the team you expected. The Marlins made national waves this winter for their teardown, in which their best players were shipped out of town to help new owners Derek Jeter and Bruce Sherman pay off the franchise’s massive debts. But not to be outdone in terms of a Sunshine State sell-off, the Rays have spent the last week trying to catch up to Miami in terms of surrendering the season before it even begins.</p><p>Over the last four days, the Rays have jettisoned three key pieces of their 2017 roster: designated hitter Corey Dickerson (<a href="https://twitter.com/RaysBaseball/status/965040507486461952" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:designated for assignment" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">designated for assignment</a>), starter Jake Odorizzi (<a href="https://twitter.com/TBTimes_Rays/status/965054546216177664" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:traded to Minnesota" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">traded to Minnesota</a>) and outfielder Steven Souza (<a href="https://www.mlbtraderumors.com/2018/02/yankees-rays-dbacks-trade-brandon-drury-steven-souza.html" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:sent to Arizona in a three-team swap" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">sent to Arizona in a three-team swap</a>). That comes on the heels of the December deal in which they <a href="https://www.si.com/mlb/2017/12/20/san-francisco-giants-evan-longoria-trade-tampa-bay-rays" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:dumped face of the franchise Evan Longoria on San Francisco" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">dumped face of the franchise Evan Longoria on San Francisco</a> in exchange for three prospects and Denard Span, and a late November trade of former closer Brad Boxberger to the Diamondbacks. The team has also waved goodbye, via free agency, to starter Alex Cobb, first basemen Logan Morrison and Lucas Duda, and relievers Steve Cishek and Tommy Hunter.</p><p>To replace all of those outgoing names, the Rays have done … well, nothing. Tampa’s transaction log is a stream of departures with little in the way of additions. The team has signed a single major league free agent, bringing back veteran reliever Sergio Romo (<strong>UPDATE</strong>: This afternoon, the Rays added a second, <a href="https://twitter.com/JesseSanchezMLB/status/966379846942253056" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:reportedly coming to terms with outfielder Carlos Gomez" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">reportedly coming to terms with outfielder Carlos Gomez</a> on a one-year pact). Otherwise, the Rays have settled for inking no-name players to minor league contracts. That holds for the trades, too: Span and ex-Angels first baseman C.J. Cron are the only established major leaguers acquired so far, and both are far from what you’d call difference makers.</p><p>The result is a Rays team that, a few bright spots aside, will be bad (at best) in 2018. Where Morrison and Longoria and Dickerson and Souza were, Tampa will now turn to the forgettable likes of Cron, Brad Miller, Daniel Robertson, Matt Duffy, and Mallex Smith. With Odorizzi and Cobb gone, Chris Archer is the team’s only trustworthy starter. The bullpen is equally bereft of recognizable or reliable names beyond closer Alex Colome. In the rough-and-tumble AL East, Tampa stands virtually no chance with that sorry assemblage, despite <a href="http://www.tampabay.com/blogs/rays/2018/02/20/rays-trade-souza-in-three-team-deal-that-nets-prospects/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:its front office’s risible claims that the Rays will be competitive" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">its front office’s risible claims that the Rays will be competitive</a>.</p><p>It’s a sad end for a franchise that was, at one point, the model of how to build a winner on a shoestring budget. The Rays could never compete with division rivals New York or Boston (or really anyone else) for top free agents, but Tampa kept motoring along, somehow stringing together winning seasons despite a payroll that would’ve been a rounding error for the Yankees. That all began to come crashing down in 2014, when the Rays slumped from 92 wins and a wild-card berth to 77 wins and fourth place in the AL East; they’ve missed the playoffs the last four years running.</p><p>It’s going to be a long time, most likely, until the Rays see the postseason again. But while contention was going to be a tough task in 2018 no matter what, it’s still startling to see how thoroughly they’ve given up on the season. There are tank jobs, and then there’s what Tampa’s front office has done, stripping the team of most of its best parts and leaving nothing but Archer, Colome, Kevin Kiermaier and some fringe major leaguers. What’s galling is how little the Rays have gotten in return for their firesale. Longoria returned two pitchers with big arms but likely bullpen futures and infielder Christian Arroyo, who has potential but was overwhelmed in the majors last year. Odorizzi returned a single player, a low-minors shortstop. Souza was worth two minor leaguers, both fine but neither a star. And Dickerson, an All-Star in 2017, may get the Rays nothing if they’re unable to work out a trade.</p><p>All of those players have their flaws—Longoria is aging and expensive, Odorizzi is coming off a mediocre year, Dickerson collapsed in the second half—but it’s still a sorry state of affairs to dump all those players for what amounts to a few lottery tickets. And while the Rays’ front office has made all the requisite noises about competing now and re-tooling for later, it’s hard not to look at this winter’s moves as a franchise punting on a season simply to save money. By selling off Longoria, Dickerson, Souza, and Odorizzi, the team cut roughly $30 million off its already anemic payroll; as it currently stands, Tampa’s financial commitments for 2018 are just around $73 million, a steep drop from last year’s $91 million figure. Amazingly enough, that $73 million mark—nearly $80 million below last year’s league average payroll—isn’t even the lowest in baseball currently. The White Sox ($70 million), Phillies ($67 million), and A’s ($59 million) are all below the Rays; the Pirates and Marlins aren’t far off.</p><p>Not every team can be the Dodgers, but it’s disheartening to see how many teams have refused to open their wallets this winter—and how shameless they’ve been about it. In an era of exploding revenues and where each owner was gifted a $50 million payment from MLB as part of its sale of BAMTech, there’s no excuse for the kind of penny-pinching we’re seeing. That’s especially the case for Tampa, which despite a weak offense went 80–82 last year and had the pieces in place, both in the majors and in a strong farm system, to contend for at least a wild-card spot, if ownership had agreed to spend this winter.</p><p>Instead, Rays fans will be gifted at-bats from Cron and Span, starts from Nate Eovaldi and Matt Andriese, and relief appearances from Triple A Durham’s most unexciting arms. They’ll watch as Longoria, who should have retired a Ray, instead tries to lift the Giants out of the doldrums. They’ll wait to see where Colome and Archer end up, either sometime this spring or at the trade deadline. They’ll wonder how long they’ll get to hold on to Blake Snell and Brent Honeywell and the rest of the team’s exciting young players, their clocks already ticking. And they’ll get the sales pitch from ownership for <a href="https://www.si.com/mlb/2018/02/09/tampa-bay-rays-new-stadium-ybor-city-tropicana-field" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:a gleaming new stadium in Tampa’s Ybor City" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">a gleaming new stadium in Tampa’s Ybor City</a>—one that will likely cost taxpayers in Hillsborough County <a href="http://www.tampabay.com/sports/baseball/rays/Sternberg-Tampa-Bay-Rays-share-of-new-ballpark-could-be-150-million_162689251" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:hundreds of millions of dollars" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">hundreds of millions of dollars</a> to house the next group of players sold off when they get too expensive.</p><p>Rays fans deserved better. So do the fans of the Marlins, Pirates, A’s, and what feels like a dozen other teams who have openly stopped trying to field a competitive squad, choosing instead to slash payroll or simply not spend. Rob Manfred <a href="https://twitter.com/McCulloughTimes/status/966058423782588416" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:may not like the word" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">may not like the word</a> “tanking,” but that’s what this is, plain and simple: a losing product designed to save money, not compete. The players know it <a href="https://www.draysbay.com/2018/2/19/17027100/tampa-bay-rays-news-and-links-chris-archer-jake-odorizzi-corey-dickerson-trade-rumor-minnesota-twins" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:and don’t" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">and don’t</a> <a href="http://mlb.nbcsports.com/2018/02/19/kevin-kiermaier-on-rays-recent-moves-i-am-100-percent-frustrated-and-very-upset/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:like it" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">like it</a>; the empty seats at Tropicana Field will be proof enough of how the fans feel. If only the people signing the checks in Tampa felt the same way.</p>
The Rays Are the Latest Team to Give Up on the 2018 Season

The latest MLB tank job takes us to Florida, but not the team you expected. The Marlins made national waves this winter for their teardown, in which their best players were shipped out of town to help new owners Derek Jeter and Bruce Sherman pay off the franchise’s massive debts. But not to be outdone in terms of a Sunshine State sell-off, the Rays have spent the last week trying to catch up to Miami in terms of surrendering the season before it even begins.

Over the last four days, the Rays have jettisoned three key pieces of their 2017 roster: designated hitter Corey Dickerson (designated for assignment), starter Jake Odorizzi (traded to Minnesota) and outfielder Steven Souza (sent to Arizona in a three-team swap). That comes on the heels of the December deal in which they dumped face of the franchise Evan Longoria on San Francisco in exchange for three prospects and Denard Span, and a late November trade of former closer Brad Boxberger to the Diamondbacks. The team has also waved goodbye, via free agency, to starter Alex Cobb, first basemen Logan Morrison and Lucas Duda, and relievers Steve Cishek and Tommy Hunter.

To replace all of those outgoing names, the Rays have done … well, nothing. Tampa’s transaction log is a stream of departures with little in the way of additions. The team has signed a single major league free agent, bringing back veteran reliever Sergio Romo (UPDATE: This afternoon, the Rays added a second, reportedly coming to terms with outfielder Carlos Gomez on a one-year pact). Otherwise, the Rays have settled for inking no-name players to minor league contracts. That holds for the trades, too: Span and ex-Angels first baseman C.J. Cron are the only established major leaguers acquired so far, and both are far from what you’d call difference makers.

The result is a Rays team that, a few bright spots aside, will be bad (at best) in 2018. Where Morrison and Longoria and Dickerson and Souza were, Tampa will now turn to the forgettable likes of Cron, Brad Miller, Daniel Robertson, Matt Duffy, and Mallex Smith. With Odorizzi and Cobb gone, Chris Archer is the team’s only trustworthy starter. The bullpen is equally bereft of recognizable or reliable names beyond closer Alex Colome. In the rough-and-tumble AL East, Tampa stands virtually no chance with that sorry assemblage, despite its front office’s risible claims that the Rays will be competitive.

It’s a sad end for a franchise that was, at one point, the model of how to build a winner on a shoestring budget. The Rays could never compete with division rivals New York or Boston (or really anyone else) for top free agents, but Tampa kept motoring along, somehow stringing together winning seasons despite a payroll that would’ve been a rounding error for the Yankees. That all began to come crashing down in 2014, when the Rays slumped from 92 wins and a wild-card berth to 77 wins and fourth place in the AL East; they’ve missed the playoffs the last four years running.

It’s going to be a long time, most likely, until the Rays see the postseason again. But while contention was going to be a tough task in 2018 no matter what, it’s still startling to see how thoroughly they’ve given up on the season. There are tank jobs, and then there’s what Tampa’s front office has done, stripping the team of most of its best parts and leaving nothing but Archer, Colome, Kevin Kiermaier and some fringe major leaguers. What’s galling is how little the Rays have gotten in return for their firesale. Longoria returned two pitchers with big arms but likely bullpen futures and infielder Christian Arroyo, who has potential but was overwhelmed in the majors last year. Odorizzi returned a single player, a low-minors shortstop. Souza was worth two minor leaguers, both fine but neither a star. And Dickerson, an All-Star in 2017, may get the Rays nothing if they’re unable to work out a trade.

All of those players have their flaws—Longoria is aging and expensive, Odorizzi is coming off a mediocre year, Dickerson collapsed in the second half—but it’s still a sorry state of affairs to dump all those players for what amounts to a few lottery tickets. And while the Rays’ front office has made all the requisite noises about competing now and re-tooling for later, it’s hard not to look at this winter’s moves as a franchise punting on a season simply to save money. By selling off Longoria, Dickerson, Souza, and Odorizzi, the team cut roughly $30 million off its already anemic payroll; as it currently stands, Tampa’s financial commitments for 2018 are just around $73 million, a steep drop from last year’s $91 million figure. Amazingly enough, that $73 million mark—nearly $80 million below last year’s league average payroll—isn’t even the lowest in baseball currently. The White Sox ($70 million), Phillies ($67 million), and A’s ($59 million) are all below the Rays; the Pirates and Marlins aren’t far off.

Not every team can be the Dodgers, but it’s disheartening to see how many teams have refused to open their wallets this winter—and how shameless they’ve been about it. In an era of exploding revenues and where each owner was gifted a $50 million payment from MLB as part of its sale of BAMTech, there’s no excuse for the kind of penny-pinching we’re seeing. That’s especially the case for Tampa, which despite a weak offense went 80–82 last year and had the pieces in place, both in the majors and in a strong farm system, to contend for at least a wild-card spot, if ownership had agreed to spend this winter.

Instead, Rays fans will be gifted at-bats from Cron and Span, starts from Nate Eovaldi and Matt Andriese, and relief appearances from Triple A Durham’s most unexciting arms. They’ll watch as Longoria, who should have retired a Ray, instead tries to lift the Giants out of the doldrums. They’ll wait to see where Colome and Archer end up, either sometime this spring or at the trade deadline. They’ll wonder how long they’ll get to hold on to Blake Snell and Brent Honeywell and the rest of the team’s exciting young players, their clocks already ticking. And they’ll get the sales pitch from ownership for a gleaming new stadium in Tampa’s Ybor City—one that will likely cost taxpayers in Hillsborough County hundreds of millions of dollars to house the next group of players sold off when they get too expensive.

Rays fans deserved better. So do the fans of the Marlins, Pirates, A’s, and what feels like a dozen other teams who have openly stopped trying to field a competitive squad, choosing instead to slash payroll or simply not spend. Rob Manfred may not like the word “tanking,” but that’s what this is, plain and simple: a losing product designed to save money, not compete. The players know it and don’t like it; the empty seats at Tropicana Field will be proof enough of how the fans feel. If only the people signing the checks in Tampa felt the same way.

<p>The latest MLB tank job takes us to Florida, but not the team you expected. The Marlins made national waves this winter for their teardown, in which their best players were shipped out of town to help new owners Derek Jeter and Bruce Sherman pay off the franchise’s massive debts. But not to be outdone in terms of a Sunshine State sell-off, the Rays have spent the last week trying to catch up to Miami in terms of surrendering the season before it even begins.</p><p>Over the last four days, the Rays have jettisoned three key pieces of their 2017 roster: designated hitter Corey Dickerson (<a href="https://twitter.com/RaysBaseball/status/965040507486461952" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:designated for assignment" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">designated for assignment</a>), starter Jake Odorizzi (<a href="https://twitter.com/TBTimes_Rays/status/965054546216177664" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:traded to Minnesota" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">traded to Minnesota</a>) and outfielder Steven Souza (<a href="https://www.mlbtraderumors.com/2018/02/yankees-rays-dbacks-trade-brandon-drury-steven-souza.html" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:sent to Arizona in a three-team swap" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">sent to Arizona in a three-team swap</a>). That comes on the heels of the December deal in which they <a href="https://www.si.com/mlb/2017/12/20/san-francisco-giants-evan-longoria-trade-tampa-bay-rays" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:dumped face of the franchise Evan Longoria on San Francisco" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">dumped face of the franchise Evan Longoria on San Francisco</a> in exchange for three prospects and Denard Span, and a late November trade of former closer Brad Boxberger to the Diamondbacks. The team has also waved goodbye, via free agency, to starter Alex Cobb, first basemen Logan Morrison and Lucas Duda, and relievers Steve Cishek and Tommy Hunter.</p><p>To replace all of those outgoing names, the Rays have done … well, nothing. Tampa’s transaction log is a stream of departures with little in the way of additions. The team has signed a single major league free agent, bringing back veteran reliever Sergio Romo (<strong>UPDATE</strong>: This afternoon, the Rays added a second, <a href="https://twitter.com/JesseSanchezMLB/status/966379846942253056" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:reportedly coming to terms with outfielder Carlos Gomez" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">reportedly coming to terms with outfielder Carlos Gomez</a> on a one-year pact). Otherwise, the Rays have settled for inking no-name players to minor league contracts. That holds for the trades, too: Span and ex-Angels first baseman C.J. Cron are the only established major leaguers acquired so far, and both are far from what you’d call difference makers.</p><p>The result is a Rays team that, a few bright spots aside, will be bad (at best) in 2018. Where Morrison and Longoria and Dickerson and Souza were, Tampa will now turn to the forgettable likes of Cron, Brad Miller, Daniel Robertson, Matt Duffy, and Mallex Smith. With Odorizzi and Cobb gone, Chris Archer is the team’s only trustworthy starter. The bullpen is equally bereft of recognizable or reliable names beyond closer Alex Colome. In the rough-and-tumble AL East, Tampa stands virtually no chance with that sorry assemblage, despite <a href="http://www.tampabay.com/blogs/rays/2018/02/20/rays-trade-souza-in-three-team-deal-that-nets-prospects/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:its front office’s risible claims that the Rays will be competitive" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">its front office’s risible claims that the Rays will be competitive</a>.</p><p>It’s a sad end for a franchise that was, at one point, the model of how to build a winner on a shoestring budget. The Rays could never compete with division rivals New York or Boston (or really anyone else) for top free agents, but Tampa kept motoring along, somehow stringing together winning seasons despite a payroll that would’ve been a rounding error for the Yankees. That all began to come crashing down in 2014, when the Rays slumped from 92 wins and a wild-card berth to 77 wins and fourth place in the AL East; they’ve missed the playoffs the last four years running.</p><p>It’s going to be a long time, most likely, until the Rays see the postseason again. But while contention was going to be a tough task in 2018 no matter what, it’s still startling to see how thoroughly they’ve given up on the season. There are tank jobs, and then there’s what Tampa’s front office has done, stripping the team of most of its best parts and leaving nothing but Archer, Colome, Kevin Kiermaier and some fringe major leaguers. What’s galling is how little the Rays have gotten in return for their firesale. Longoria returned two pitchers with big arms but likely bullpen futures and infielder Christian Arroyo, who has potential but was overwhelmed in the majors last year. Odorizzi returned a single player, a low-minors shortstop. Souza was worth two minor leaguers, both fine but neither a star. And Dickerson, an All-Star in 2017, may get the Rays nothing if they’re unable to work out a trade.</p><p>All of those players have their flaws—Longoria is aging and expensive, Odorizzi is coming off a mediocre year, Dickerson collapsed in the second half—but it’s still a sorry state of affairs to dump all those players for what amounts to a few lottery tickets. And while the Rays’ front office has made all the requisite noises about competing now and re-tooling for later, it’s hard not to look at this winter’s moves as a franchise punting on a season simply to save money. By selling off Longoria, Dickerson, Souza, and Odorizzi, the team cut roughly $30 million off its already anemic payroll; as it currently stands, Tampa’s financial commitments for 2018 are just around $73 million, a steep drop from last year’s $91 million figure. Amazingly enough, that $73 million mark—nearly $80 million below last year’s league average payroll—isn’t even the lowest in baseball currently. The White Sox ($70 million), Phillies ($67 million), and A’s ($59 million) are all below the Rays; the Pirates and Marlins aren’t far off.</p><p>Not every team can be the Dodgers, but it’s disheartening to see how many teams have refused to open their wallets this winter—and how shameless they’ve been about it. In an era of exploding revenues and where each owner was gifted a $50 million payment from MLB as part of its sale of BAMTech, there’s no excuse for the kind of penny-pinching we’re seeing. That’s especially the case for Tampa, which despite a weak offense went 80–82 last year and had the pieces in place, both in the majors and in a strong farm system, to contend for at least a wild-card spot, if ownership had agreed to spend this winter.</p><p>Instead, Rays fans will be gifted at-bats from Cron and Span, starts from Nate Eovaldi and Matt Andriese, and relief appearances from Triple A Durham’s most unexciting arms. They’ll watch as Longoria, who should have retired a Ray, instead tries to lift the Giants out of the doldrums. They’ll wait to see where Colome and Archer end up, either sometime this spring or at the trade deadline. They’ll wonder how long they’ll get to hold on to Blake Snell and Brent Honeywell and the rest of the team’s exciting young players, their clocks already ticking. And they’ll get the sales pitch from ownership for <a href="https://www.si.com/mlb/2018/02/09/tampa-bay-rays-new-stadium-ybor-city-tropicana-field" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:a gleaming new stadium in Tampa’s Ybor City" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">a gleaming new stadium in Tampa’s Ybor City</a>—one that will likely cost taxpayers in Hillsborough County <a href="http://www.tampabay.com/sports/baseball/rays/Sternberg-Tampa-Bay-Rays-share-of-new-ballpark-could-be-150-million_162689251" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:hundreds of millions of dollars" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">hundreds of millions of dollars</a> to house the next group of players sold off when they get too expensive.</p><p>Rays fans deserved better. So do the fans of the Marlins, Pirates, A’s, and what feels like a dozen other teams who have openly stopped trying to field a competitive squad, choosing instead to slash payroll or simply not spend. Rob Manfred <a href="https://twitter.com/McCulloughTimes/status/966058423782588416" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:may not like the word" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">may not like the word</a> “tanking,” but that’s what this is, plain and simple: a losing product designed to save money, not compete. The players know it <a href="https://www.draysbay.com/2018/2/19/17027100/tampa-bay-rays-news-and-links-chris-archer-jake-odorizzi-corey-dickerson-trade-rumor-minnesota-twins" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:and don’t" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">and don’t</a> <a href="http://mlb.nbcsports.com/2018/02/19/kevin-kiermaier-on-rays-recent-moves-i-am-100-percent-frustrated-and-very-upset/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:like it" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">like it</a>; the empty seats at Tropicana Field will be proof enough of how the fans feel. If only the people signing the checks in Tampa felt the same way.</p>
The Rays Are the Latest Team to Give Up on the 2018 Season

The latest MLB tank job takes us to Florida, but not the team you expected. The Marlins made national waves this winter for their teardown, in which their best players were shipped out of town to help new owners Derek Jeter and Bruce Sherman pay off the franchise’s massive debts. But not to be outdone in terms of a Sunshine State sell-off, the Rays have spent the last week trying to catch up to Miami in terms of surrendering the season before it even begins.

Over the last four days, the Rays have jettisoned three key pieces of their 2017 roster: designated hitter Corey Dickerson (designated for assignment), starter Jake Odorizzi (traded to Minnesota) and outfielder Steven Souza (sent to Arizona in a three-team swap). That comes on the heels of the December deal in which they dumped face of the franchise Evan Longoria on San Francisco in exchange for three prospects and Denard Span, and a late November trade of former closer Brad Boxberger to the Diamondbacks. The team has also waved goodbye, via free agency, to starter Alex Cobb, first basemen Logan Morrison and Lucas Duda, and relievers Steve Cishek and Tommy Hunter.

To replace all of those outgoing names, the Rays have done … well, nothing. Tampa’s transaction log is a stream of departures with little in the way of additions. The team has signed a single major league free agent, bringing back veteran reliever Sergio Romo (UPDATE: This afternoon, the Rays added a second, reportedly coming to terms with outfielder Carlos Gomez on a one-year pact). Otherwise, the Rays have settled for inking no-name players to minor league contracts. That holds for the trades, too: Span and ex-Angels first baseman C.J. Cron are the only established major leaguers acquired so far, and both are far from what you’d call difference makers.

The result is a Rays team that, a few bright spots aside, will be bad (at best) in 2018. Where Morrison and Longoria and Dickerson and Souza were, Tampa will now turn to the forgettable likes of Cron, Brad Miller, Daniel Robertson, Matt Duffy, and Mallex Smith. With Odorizzi and Cobb gone, Chris Archer is the team’s only trustworthy starter. The bullpen is equally bereft of recognizable or reliable names beyond closer Alex Colome. In the rough-and-tumble AL East, Tampa stands virtually no chance with that sorry assemblage, despite its front office’s risible claims that the Rays will be competitive.

It’s a sad end for a franchise that was, at one point, the model of how to build a winner on a shoestring budget. The Rays could never compete with division rivals New York or Boston (or really anyone else) for top free agents, but Tampa kept motoring along, somehow stringing together winning seasons despite a payroll that would’ve been a rounding error for the Yankees. That all began to come crashing down in 2014, when the Rays slumped from 92 wins and a wild-card berth to 77 wins and fourth place in the AL East; they’ve missed the playoffs the last four years running.

It’s going to be a long time, most likely, until the Rays see the postseason again. But while contention was going to be a tough task in 2018 no matter what, it’s still startling to see how thoroughly they’ve given up on the season. There are tank jobs, and then there’s what Tampa’s front office has done, stripping the team of most of its best parts and leaving nothing but Archer, Colome, Kevin Kiermaier and some fringe major leaguers. What’s galling is how little the Rays have gotten in return for their firesale. Longoria returned two pitchers with big arms but likely bullpen futures and infielder Christian Arroyo, who has potential but was overwhelmed in the majors last year. Odorizzi returned a single player, a low-minors shortstop. Souza was worth two minor leaguers, both fine but neither a star. And Dickerson, an All-Star in 2017, may get the Rays nothing if they’re unable to work out a trade.

All of those players have their flaws—Longoria is aging and expensive, Odorizzi is coming off a mediocre year, Dickerson collapsed in the second half—but it’s still a sorry state of affairs to dump all those players for what amounts to a few lottery tickets. And while the Rays’ front office has made all the requisite noises about competing now and re-tooling for later, it’s hard not to look at this winter’s moves as a franchise punting on a season simply to save money. By selling off Longoria, Dickerson, Souza, and Odorizzi, the team cut roughly $30 million off its already anemic payroll; as it currently stands, Tampa’s financial commitments for 2018 are just around $73 million, a steep drop from last year’s $91 million figure. Amazingly enough, that $73 million mark—nearly $80 million below last year’s league average payroll—isn’t even the lowest in baseball currently. The White Sox ($70 million), Phillies ($67 million), and A’s ($59 million) are all below the Rays; the Pirates and Marlins aren’t far off.

Not every team can be the Dodgers, but it’s disheartening to see how many teams have refused to open their wallets this winter—and how shameless they’ve been about it. In an era of exploding revenues and where each owner was gifted a $50 million payment from MLB as part of its sale of BAMTech, there’s no excuse for the kind of penny-pinching we’re seeing. That’s especially the case for Tampa, which despite a weak offense went 80–82 last year and had the pieces in place, both in the majors and in a strong farm system, to contend for at least a wild-card spot, if ownership had agreed to spend this winter.

Instead, Rays fans will be gifted at-bats from Cron and Span, starts from Nate Eovaldi and Matt Andriese, and relief appearances from Triple A Durham’s most unexciting arms. They’ll watch as Longoria, who should have retired a Ray, instead tries to lift the Giants out of the doldrums. They’ll wait to see where Colome and Archer end up, either sometime this spring or at the trade deadline. They’ll wonder how long they’ll get to hold on to Blake Snell and Brent Honeywell and the rest of the team’s exciting young players, their clocks already ticking. And they’ll get the sales pitch from ownership for a gleaming new stadium in Tampa’s Ybor City—one that will likely cost taxpayers in Hillsborough County hundreds of millions of dollars to house the next group of players sold off when they get too expensive.

Rays fans deserved better. So do the fans of the Marlins, Pirates, A’s, and what feels like a dozen other teams who have openly stopped trying to field a competitive squad, choosing instead to slash payroll or simply not spend. Rob Manfred may not like the word “tanking,” but that’s what this is, plain and simple: a losing product designed to save money, not compete. The players know it and don’t like it; the empty seats at Tropicana Field will be proof enough of how the fans feel. If only the people signing the checks in Tampa felt the same way.

In this photo from Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018, San Francisco Giants pitcher Johnny Cueto stands atop Camelback Mountain in Scottsdale, Ariz. In each of his three springs with San Francisco, Cueto has picked a rental home nearby Camelback, on a different side of the idyllic landmark every year to be close by his favorite hiking terrain. (AP Photo/Janie McCauley)
Giants Johnny Cueto takes his fitness to Camelback Mountain
In this photo from Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018, San Francisco Giants pitcher Johnny Cueto stands atop Camelback Mountain in Scottsdale, Ariz. In each of his three springs with San Francisco, Cueto has picked a rental home nearby Camelback, on a different side of the idyllic landmark every year to be close by his favorite hiking terrain. (AP Photo/Janie McCauley)
In this photo from Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018, San Francisco Giants pitcher Johnny Cueto stands atop Camelback Mountain in Scottsdale, Ariz. In each of his three springs with San Francisco, Cueto has picked a rental home nearby Camelback, on a different side of the idyllic landmark every year to be close by his favorite hiking terrain. (AP Photo/Janie McCauley)
Giants Johnny Cueto takes his fitness to Camelback Mountain
In this photo from Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018, San Francisco Giants pitcher Johnny Cueto stands atop Camelback Mountain in Scottsdale, Ariz. In each of his three springs with San Francisco, Cueto has picked a rental home nearby Camelback, on a different side of the idyllic landmark every year to be close by his favorite hiking terrain. (AP Photo/Janie McCauley)
In this photo from Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018, San Francisco Giants pitcher Johnny Cueto stands atop Camelback Mountain in Scottsdale, Ariz. In each of his three springs with San Francisco, Cueto has picked a rental home nearby Camelback, on a different side of the idyllic landmark every year to be close by his favorite hiking terrain. (AP Photo/Janie McCauley)
Giants Johnny Cueto takes his fitness to Camelback Mountain
In this photo from Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018, San Francisco Giants pitcher Johnny Cueto stands atop Camelback Mountain in Scottsdale, Ariz. In each of his three springs with San Francisco, Cueto has picked a rental home nearby Camelback, on a different side of the idyllic landmark every year to be close by his favorite hiking terrain. (AP Photo/Janie McCauley)
And it&#39;s not the San Francisco Giants
Report: Tim Lincecum has guaranteed contract offer
And it's not the San Francisco Giants
And it&#39;s not the San Francisco Giants
Report: Tim Lincecum has guaranteed contract offer
And it's not the San Francisco Giants
In this Feb. 19, 2018 photo San Francisco Giants&#39; Tony Watson stretches during a spring training baseball practice in Scottsdale, Ariz. Watson and the Giants have finalized a two-year contract that includes a player option for 2020, a deal that guarantees the former All-Star reliever $9 million. (AP Photo/Ben Margot, file)
Watson, Giants finalize deal that guarantees $9 million
In this Feb. 19, 2018 photo San Francisco Giants' Tony Watson stretches during a spring training baseball practice in Scottsdale, Ariz. Watson and the Giants have finalized a two-year contract that includes a player option for 2020, a deal that guarantees the former All-Star reliever $9 million. (AP Photo/Ben Margot, file)
San Francisco Giants manager Bruce Bochy, right, watches catcher Buster Posey during a spring training baseball practice on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018 in Scottsdale, Ariz. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)
Later spring training starts means some players are fresher
San Francisco Giants manager Bruce Bochy, right, watches catcher Buster Posey during a spring training baseball practice on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018 in Scottsdale, Ariz. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)
San Francisco Giants&#39; Buster Posey, right, speaks with pitcher Tyler Herb during a spring training baseball practice on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018 in Scottsdale, Ariz. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)
Later spring training starts means some players are fresher
San Francisco Giants' Buster Posey, right, speaks with pitcher Tyler Herb during a spring training baseball practice on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018 in Scottsdale, Ariz. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)
San Francisco Giants&#39; Buster Posey swings during a spring training baseball batting practice on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018 in Scottsdale, Ariz. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)
Buster Posey, new SF teammate Andrew McCutchen go way back
San Francisco Giants' Buster Posey swings during a spring training baseball batting practice on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018 in Scottsdale, Ariz. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)
FILE - In this June 1, 2015, file photo, Pittsburgh Pirates&#39; Andrew McCutchen singles off San Francisco Giants starting pitcher Ryan Vogelsong during a baseball game in San Francisco. At right is Giants catcher Buster Posey. McCutchen and Posey are now teammates with the Giants. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, File)
Buster Posey, new SF teammate Andrew McCutchen go way back
FILE - In this June 1, 2015, file photo, Pittsburgh Pirates' Andrew McCutchen singles off San Francisco Giants starting pitcher Ryan Vogelsong during a baseball game in San Francisco. At right is Giants catcher Buster Posey. McCutchen and Posey are now teammates with the Giants. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, File)
In this Feb. 9, 2018 photo, San Francisco Giants pitcher Madison Bumgarner is interviewed during the team&#39;s media day in San Francisco. Bumgarner is in the best shape of his life ready for a bounce-back season after a most forgettable one for San Francisco&#39;s big lefty ace. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)
Giants ace Bumgarner eager for a new slate after bike injury
In this Feb. 9, 2018 photo, San Francisco Giants pitcher Madison Bumgarner is interviewed during the team's media day in San Francisco. Bumgarner is in the best shape of his life ready for a bounce-back season after a most forgettable one for San Francisco's big lefty ace. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)
FILE - In this Sept. 3, 2017 file photo, San Francisco Giants pitcher Madison Bumgarner works against the St. Louis Cardinals in the first inning of a baseball game in San Francisco. Bumgarner is in the best shape of his life ready for a bounce-back season after a most forgettable one for San Francisco&#39;s big lefty ace. (AP Photo/Ben Margot, file)
Giants ace Bumgarner eager for a new slate after bike injury
FILE - In this Sept. 3, 2017 file photo, San Francisco Giants pitcher Madison Bumgarner works against the St. Louis Cardinals in the first inning of a baseball game in San Francisco. Bumgarner is in the best shape of his life ready for a bounce-back season after a most forgettable one for San Francisco's big lefty ace. (AP Photo/Ben Margot, file)
FILE - In this Aug. 2, 2017, file photo, Oakland Athletics&#39; Matt Chapman watches his RBI double off San Francisco Giants starting pitcher Matt Moore duirng the second inning of a baseball game, in San Francisco. Khris Davis will be the offensive centerpiece with power-hitting outfielders Matt Chapman and Matt Olson surrounding him. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, File)
With Khris Davis' power, A's look to build off strong finish
FILE - In this Aug. 2, 2017, file photo, Oakland Athletics' Matt Chapman watches his RBI double off San Francisco Giants starting pitcher Matt Moore duirng the second inning of a baseball game, in San Francisco. Khris Davis will be the offensive centerpiece with power-hitting outfielders Matt Chapman and Matt Olson surrounding him. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, File)
FILE - In this Aug. 29, 2017, file photo, San Francisco Giants&#39; Denard Span watches his RBI double during the second inning of a baseball game against the San Diego Padres in San Diego. Span, obtained in the trade that sent Evan Longoria to San Francisco, is the biggest name added to the roster Tampa Bay Rays this winter. (AP Photo/Orlando Ramirez, File)
Revamped Rays have new look in 2018 after 4 losing seasons
FILE - In this Aug. 29, 2017, file photo, San Francisco Giants' Denard Span watches his RBI double during the second inning of a baseball game against the San Diego Padres in San Diego. Span, obtained in the trade that sent Evan Longoria to San Francisco, is the biggest name added to the roster Tampa Bay Rays this winter. (AP Photo/Orlando Ramirez, File)
FILE - In this June 18, 2017, file photo, Colorado Rockies&#39; Nolan Arenado, front, is doused by teammates Trevor Story, back left, and Ian Desmond after Arenado hit a walkoff, three-run home run off San Francisco Giants relief pitcher Mark Melancon in the ninth inning of a baseball game in Denver. The Rockies are counting on big seasons from Arenado and center fielder Charlie Blackmon along with bounce-back campaigns from other position players to make a run at back-to-back playoff appearances for the first time in team history. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski, File)
Rockies boost bullpen in effort to make it back to playoffs
FILE - In this June 18, 2017, file photo, Colorado Rockies' Nolan Arenado, front, is doused by teammates Trevor Story, back left, and Ian Desmond after Arenado hit a walkoff, three-run home run off San Francisco Giants relief pitcher Mark Melancon in the ninth inning of a baseball game in Denver. The Rockies are counting on big seasons from Arenado and center fielder Charlie Blackmon along with bounce-back campaigns from other position players to make a run at back-to-back playoff appearances for the first time in team history. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski, File)
FILE - In this March 22, 2015, file photo, San Francisco Giants manager Bruce Bochy gestures during batting practice in Scottsdale, Ariz. Bochy&#39;s first glimpse at his new roster gives him hope the Giants will feature a lineup much like the ones of several years ago, when his club was capturing World Series championships every other year. (AP Photo/Ben Margot, File)
Giants add Longoria, McCutchen as they try to bounce back
FILE - In this March 22, 2015, file photo, San Francisco Giants manager Bruce Bochy gestures during batting practice in Scottsdale, Ariz. Bochy's first glimpse at his new roster gives him hope the Giants will feature a lineup much like the ones of several years ago, when his club was capturing World Series championships every other year. (AP Photo/Ben Margot, File)
FIE - In this Oct. 1, 2017, file photo, Tampa Bay Rays&#39; Evan Longoria hits an RBI-double during a baseball game against the Baltimore Orioles in St. Petersburg, Fla. San Francisco Giants manager Bruce Bochy&#39;s first glimpse at his new roster gives him hope the Giants will feature a lineup much like the ones of several years ago, when his club was capturing World Series championships every other year. He has new right fielder Andrew McCutchen and third baseman Evan Longoria, and all the reliable returners such as Gold Glove shortstop Brandon Crawford, aces Madison Bumgarner and Johnny Cueto, and closer Mark Melancon eager to have a bounce-back year. (AP Photo/Steve Nesius, File)
Giants add Longoria, McCutchen as they try to bounce back
FIE - In this Oct. 1, 2017, file photo, Tampa Bay Rays' Evan Longoria hits an RBI-double during a baseball game against the Baltimore Orioles in St. Petersburg, Fla. San Francisco Giants manager Bruce Bochy's first glimpse at his new roster gives him hope the Giants will feature a lineup much like the ones of several years ago, when his club was capturing World Series championships every other year. He has new right fielder Andrew McCutchen and third baseman Evan Longoria, and all the reliable returners such as Gold Glove shortstop Brandon Crawford, aces Madison Bumgarner and Johnny Cueto, and closer Mark Melancon eager to have a bounce-back year. (AP Photo/Steve Nesius, File)
FILE - In this Sept. 24, 2017, file photo, Pittsburgh Pirates&#39; Andrew McCutchen celebrates after a 4-1 win over the St. Louis Cardinals after a baseball game in Pittsburgh. San Francisco Giants&#39; manager Bruce Bochy&#39;s first glimpse at his new roster gives him hope the Giants will feature a lineup much like the ones of several years ago, when his club was capturing World Series championships every other year. He has new right fielder Andrew McCutchen and third baseman Evan Longoria, and all the reliable returners such as Gold Glove shortstop Brandon Crawford, aces Madison Bumgarner and Johnny Cueto, and closer Mark Melancon eager to have a bounce-back year. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar, File)
Giants add Longoria, McCutchen as they try to bounce back
FILE - In this Sept. 24, 2017, file photo, Pittsburgh Pirates' Andrew McCutchen celebrates after a 4-1 win over the St. Louis Cardinals after a baseball game in Pittsburgh. San Francisco Giants' manager Bruce Bochy's first glimpse at his new roster gives him hope the Giants will feature a lineup much like the ones of several years ago, when his club was capturing World Series championships every other year. He has new right fielder Andrew McCutchen and third baseman Evan Longoria, and all the reliable returners such as Gold Glove shortstop Brandon Crawford, aces Madison Bumgarner and Johnny Cueto, and closer Mark Melancon eager to have a bounce-back year. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar, File)
FILE - In this Sept. 16, 2017, file photo, Pittsburgh Pirates center fielder Andrew McCutchen catches hit for an out by Cincinnati Reds&#39; Jesse Winker during a baseball game in Cincinnati. San Francisco Giants&#39; manager Bruce Bochy&#39;s first glimpse at his new roster gives him hope the Giants will feature a lineup much like the ones of several years ago, when his club was capturing World Series championships every other year. He has new right fielder Andrew McCutchen and third baseman Evan Longoria, and all the reliable returners such as Gold Glove shortstop Brandon Crawford, aces Madison Bumgarner and Johnny Cueto, and closer Mark Melancon eager to have a bounce-back year. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
Giants add Longoria, McCutchen as they try to bounce back
FILE - In this Sept. 16, 2017, file photo, Pittsburgh Pirates center fielder Andrew McCutchen catches hit for an out by Cincinnati Reds' Jesse Winker during a baseball game in Cincinnati. San Francisco Giants' manager Bruce Bochy's first glimpse at his new roster gives him hope the Giants will feature a lineup much like the ones of several years ago, when his club was capturing World Series championships every other year. He has new right fielder Andrew McCutchen and third baseman Evan Longoria, and all the reliable returners such as Gold Glove shortstop Brandon Crawford, aces Madison Bumgarner and Johnny Cueto, and closer Mark Melancon eager to have a bounce-back year. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
FILE - In this Aug. 20, 2017, file photo, San Francisco Giants pitcher Madison Bumgarner works against the Philadelphia Phillies during a baseball game in San Francisco. Giants manager Bruce Bochy&#39;s first glimpse at his new roster gives him hope the Giants will feature a lineup much like the ones of several years ago, when his club was capturing World Series championships every other year. (AP Photo/Ben Margot, File)
Giants add Longoria, McCutchen as they try to bounce back
FILE - In this Aug. 20, 2017, file photo, San Francisco Giants pitcher Madison Bumgarner works against the Philadelphia Phillies during a baseball game in San Francisco. Giants manager Bruce Bochy's first glimpse at his new roster gives him hope the Giants will feature a lineup much like the ones of several years ago, when his club was capturing World Series championships every other year. (AP Photo/Ben Margot, File)
On the Fantasy Baseball Today podcast, Adam Aizer, Heath Cummings and Scott White offer a 2018 season outlook for the San Francisco Giants.
Fantasy Baseball Today: 2018 San Francisco Giants Outlook
On the Fantasy Baseball Today podcast, Adam Aizer, Heath Cummings and Scott White offer a 2018 season outlook for the San Francisco Giants.
On the Fantasy Baseball Today podcast, Adam Aizer, Heath Cummings and Scott White offer a 2018 season outlook for the San Francisco Giants.
Fantasy Baseball Today: 2018 San Francisco Giants Outlook
On the Fantasy Baseball Today podcast, Adam Aizer, Heath Cummings and Scott White offer a 2018 season outlook for the San Francisco Giants.
On the Fantasy Baseball Today podcast, Adam Aizer, Heath Cummings and Scott White offer a 2018 season outlook for the San Francisco Giants.
Fantasy Baseball Today: 2018 San Francisco Giants Outlook
On the Fantasy Baseball Today podcast, Adam Aizer, Heath Cummings and Scott White offer a 2018 season outlook for the San Francisco Giants.
On the Fantasy Baseball Today podcast, Adam Aizer, Heath Cummings and Scott White offer a 2018 season outlook for the San Francisco Giants.
Fantasy Baseball Today: 2018 San Francisco Giants Outlook
On the Fantasy Baseball Today podcast, Adam Aizer, Heath Cummings and Scott White offer a 2018 season outlook for the San Francisco Giants.
FILE - In this Aug. 7, 2007, file photo, San Francisco Giants&#39; Barry Bonds drops his bat after hitting his 756th career home run during the fifth inning of a baseball game off Washington Nationals&#39; Mike Bacsik in San Francisco. Bonds will have his No. 25 jersey retired this August by the Giants when his former Pittsburgh Pirates are in town, the team announced Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018. (AP Photo/Ben Margot, File)
Giants to retire Barry Bonds' No. 25 jersey in August
FILE - In this Aug. 7, 2007, file photo, San Francisco Giants' Barry Bonds drops his bat after hitting his 756th career home run during the fifth inning of a baseball game off Washington Nationals' Mike Bacsik in San Francisco. Bonds will have his No. 25 jersey retired this August by the Giants when his former Pittsburgh Pirates are in town, the team announced Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018. (AP Photo/Ben Margot, File)
FILE - In this Aug. 7, 2007, file photo, San Francisco Giants Barry Bonds celebrates after his 756th career home run in the fifth inning of a baseball game against the Washington Nationals in San Francisco. Bonds will have his No. 25 jersey retired this August by the Giants when his former Pittsburgh Pirates are in town, the team announced Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, File)
Giants to retire Barry Bonds' No. 25 jersey in August
FILE - In this Aug. 7, 2007, file photo, San Francisco Giants Barry Bonds celebrates after his 756th career home run in the fifth inning of a baseball game against the Washington Nationals in San Francisco. Bonds will have his No. 25 jersey retired this August by the Giants when his former Pittsburgh Pirates are in town, the team announced Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, File)

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