Rio de Janeiro severely behind schedule for 2016 Olympics

International Olympic Committee (IOC) vice president John Coates has called Brazil's preparations for the 2016 Rio de Janeiro Games "the worst" he has ever seen and critically behind schedule.

Attending an Olympic forum in Sydney, Coates told delegates that construction had not commenced on some venues, infrastructure was significantly delayed and water quality was also a major concern two years out from the Games.

He warned, however, that there was no "plan B" to find another host.

"I think this is a worse situation than Athens," said the Australian, referring to preparations for the 2004 Games, which were plagued by construction delays.
Reuters

Garbage is seen near a fishing boat on Fundao beach in the Guanabara Bay in Rio de Janeiro

Garbage is seen near a fishing boat on Fundao beach in the Guanabara Bay in Rio de Janeiro March 13, 2014. According to the local media, the city of Rio de Janeiro continues to face criticism locally and abroad that the bodies of water it plans to use for competition in the 2016 Olympic Games are too polluted to host events. Untreated sewage and trash frequently find their way into the Atlantic waters of Copacabana Beach and Guanabara Bay - both future sites to events such as marathon swimming, sailing and triathlon events. REUTERS/Sergio Moraes (BRAZIL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SPORT OLYMPICS)

Workers Building Rio's Olympic Park Continue Strike

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL - APRIL 16: A security guard keeps watch at the entrance to Olympic Park, the primary set of venues being built for the Rio 2016 Olympic Games, on April 16, 2014 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. More than 2,000 workers have been on strike at the site for the past two weeks in spite of an apparent new settlement. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

A Brazilian Army soldier walks past bullet holes in a wall during an operation in the Mare slums complex in Rio de Janeiro

A Brazilian Army soldier walks past bullet holes in a wall during an operation in the Mare slums complex in Rio de Janeiro March 26, 2014. Brazil will deploy federal troops to Rio de Janeiro to help quell a surge in violent crime following attacks by drug traffickers on police posts in three slums on the north side of the city, government officials said on Friday. Less than three months before Rio welcomes tens of thousands of foreign soccer fans for the World Cup, the attacks cast new doubts on government efforts to expel gangs from slums using a strong police presence. The city will host the Olympics in 2016. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes (BRAZIL - Tags: CRIME LAW)

People gather to observe the Perimetral overpass, after its partial demolition as part of Rio's Porto Maravilha urbanisation project, in Rio de Janeiro

People gather to observe the Perimetral overpass, after its partial demolition as part of Rio's Porto Maravilha (Marvelous Port) urbanisation project, in Rio de Janeiro April 20, 2014. The project is for the city's redevelopment ahead of the 2016 Olympic Games. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes (BRAZIL - Tags: POLITICS SPORT SOCIETY OLYMPICS BUSINESS TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

In this Jan. 9, 2014 photo, trash fills an area in the Favela do Metro slum outside Maracana stadium where some homes have been demolished and residents evicted in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Some residents in this slum were evicted from their homes two years ago for the area to be renovated for this year's World Cup and 2016 Olympics, but people reoccupied the homes and are fighting to stay. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)

Workers Building Rio's Olympic Park Continue Strike

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL - APRIL 16: A security guard keeps watch at an entrance to Olympic Park, the primary set of venues being built for the Rio 2016 Olympic Games, on April 16, 2014 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. More than 2,000 workers have been on strike at the site for the past two weeks in spite of an apparent new settlement. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Workers Building Rio's Olympic Park Continue Strike

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL - APRIL 16: A man walks near the entrance to Olympic Park, the primary set of venues being built for the Rio 2016 Olympic Games, on April 16, 2014 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. More than 2,000 workers have been on strike at the site for the past two weeks in spite of an apparent new settlement. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Federal Forces Occupy Mare Favela Complex

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL - MARCH 30: Brazilian Navy soldiers enter the unpacified Complexo da Mare, one of the largest 'favela' complexes in Rio, on March 30, 2014 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The Brazilian government has deployed federal forces to occupy the group of violence-plagued slums ahead of the June 12 start of the 2014 FIFA World Cup. The group of 16 communities house around 130,000 residents and have been dominated by drug gangs and militias. Mare is located close to Rio's international airport and has been mentioned as a likely pacification target for the police amid the city's efforts to improve security ahead of the 2014 FIFA World Cup and Rio 2016 Olympic Games. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Workers Building Rio's Olympic Park Continue Strike

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL - APRIL 16: A man walks past an entrance to Olympic Park, the primary set of venues being built for the Rio 2016 Olympic Games, on April 16, 2014 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. More than 2,000 workers have been on strike at the site for the past two weeks in spite of an apparent new settlement. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Policemen take position during an operation in the Mare slums complex in Rio de Janeiro

Policemen take position during an operation in the Mare slums complex in Rio de Janeiro March 26, 2014. Brazil will deploy federal troops to Rio de Janeiro to help quell a surge in violent crime following attacks by drug traffickers on police posts in three slums on the north side of the city, government officials said on Friday. Less than three months before Rio welcomes tens of thousands of foreign soccer fans for the World Cup, the attacks cast new doubts on government efforts to expel gangs from slums using a strong police presence. The city will host the Olympics in 2016. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes (BRAZIL - Tags: CRIME LAW)

Construction workers on strike stand outside the Rio 2016 Olympic Park construction site in Rio de Janeiro

Construction workers on strike stand outside the Rio 2016 Olympic Park construction site in Rio de Janeiro April 8, 2014. Workers building Rio's 2016 Olympic Park fought with security guards on Monday but although shots were fired no one was injured in the melee, eyewitnesses said. Scuffles broke out between guards and construction workers on strike for more pay and better union representation. The workers closed several busy avenues around the site on Monday and trouble ensued. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes (BRAZIL - Tags: SPORT OLYMPICS POLITICS CIVIL UNREST)

Rio's Complexo da Mare Favelas Remain Unpacified

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL - MARCH 29: Joao Batista da Silva (R) exits his home in the unpacified Complexo da Mare slum complex, one of the largest 'favela' complexes in Rio, on March 29, 2014 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The Brazilian government is deploying federal forces tomorrow to occupy the group of violence-plagued 'favelas' ahead of the June 12 start of the 2014 FIFA World Cup. The group of 16 communities house around 130,000 residents and have been dominated by drug gangs and militias. Mare is located close to Rio's international airport and has been mentioned as a likely pacification target for the police amid the city's efforts to improve security ahead of the 2014 FIFA World Cup and Rio 2016 Olympic Games. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

FILE - In this March 20, 2014, file photo, shot through a pane of glass shows a view of the Olympic Park under construction in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. More than 2,000 construction workers were off the job Friday April 4, 2014, in the second day of a strike that has slowed work at the Olympic Park, the main cluster of venues for the 2016 Rio de Janeiro Games. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo, File)

Boys play soccer as a policeman patrols one day after the occupation of the Mare slums complex in Rio de Janeiro

Boys play soccer as a policeman patrols one day after the occupation of the Mare slums complex in Rio de Janeiro, March 31, 2014. The federal troops and police occupied the Mare slums complex on Sunday to help quell a surge in violent crime following attacks by drug traffickers on police posts in three slums on the north side of the city, government officials said. Less than three months before Rio welcomes tens of thousands of foreign soccer fans for the World Cup, the attacks cast new doubts on government efforts to expel gangs from slums using a strong police presence. The city will host the Olympics in 2016. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes (BRAZIL - Tags: CRIME LAW SPORT SOCCER WORLD CUP SOCIETY)

A man takes a shower as policemen patrol during an operation at the Mare slums complex in Rio de Janeiro

A man takes a shower as policemen patrol during an operation at the Mare slums complex in Rio de Janeiro, March 30, 2014. Federal troops and police occupied the Mare slums complex on Sunday to help quell a surge in violent crime following attacks by drug traffickers on police posts in three slums on the north side of the city, government officials said. Less than three months before Rio welcomes tens of thousands of foreign soccer fans for the World Cup, the attacks cast new doubts on government efforts to expel gangs from slums using a strong police presence. The city will host the Olympics in 2016. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes (BRAZIL - Tags: CRIME LAW SOCIETY SPORT SOCCER)

Members of federal police patrol the Mare slums complex in Rio de Janeiro

Members of federal police patrol the Mare slums complex in Rio de Janeiro March 30, 2014.The federal troops and police occupied the Mare slums complex on Sunday to help quell a surge in violent crime following attacks by drug traffickers on police posts in three slums on the north side of the city, government officials said. Less than three months before Rio welcomes tens of thousands of foreign soccer fans for the World Cup, the attacks cast new doubts on government efforts to expel gangs from slums using a strong police presence. The city will host the Olympics in 2016. REUTERS/Sergio Moraes (BRAZIL - Tags: CRIME LAW SPORT SOCCER)

Federal Forces Occupy Mare Favela Complex

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL - MARCH 30: A Brazilian military police patrol after entering the unpacified Complexo da Mare, one of the largest 'favela' complexes in Rio, on March 30, 2014 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The Brazilian government has deployed federal forces to occupy the group of violence-plagued slums ahead of the June 12 start of the 2014 FIFA World Cup. The group of 16 communities house around 130,000 residents and have been dominated by drug gangs and militias. Mare is located close to Rio's international airport and has been mentioned as a likely pacification target for the police amid the city's efforts to improve security ahead of the 2014 FIFA World Cup and Rio 2016 Olympic Games. (Photo by Buda Mendes/Getty Images)

People hold candles as they attend a memorial held in memory of police officers from the Police Peacekeeping Unit who were killed while carrying out their duty, in downtown Rio de Janeiro

People hold candles as they attend a memorial by non-governmental organization (NGO) Rio de Paz (Rio of Peace), held in memory of police officers from the Police Peacekeeping Unit (UPP) who were killed while carrying out their duty, in downtown Rio de Janeiro March 17, 2014. The introduction of the peacekeeping program in the Rio de Janeiro slums is part of efforts to crack down on crime and increase security as the city prepares to host the 2014 World Cup soccer tournament and the 2016 Olympic Games. REUTERS/Sergio Moraes (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY CIVIL UNREST CRIME LAW SPORT SOCCER WORLD CUP)

Residents walk past Brazilian Navy armored vehicles during an operation at the Mare slums complex in Rio de Janeiro

Residents walk past Brazilian Navy armored vehicles during an operation at the Mare slums complex in Rio de Janeiro March 30, 2014. The federal troops and police occupied the Mare slums complex on Sunday to help quell a surge in violent crime following attacks by drug traffickers on police posts in three slums on the north side of the city, government officials said. Less than three months before Rio welcomes tens of thousands of foreign soccer fans for the World Cup, the attacks cast new doubts on government efforts to expel gangs from slums using a strong police presence. The city will host the Olympics in 2016. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes (BRAZIL - Tags: CRIME LAW SOCIETY)

Federal Forces Occupy Mare Favela Complex

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL - MARCH 30: Police helicopters patrol the unpacified Complexo da Mare, one of the largest 'favela' complexes in Rio, on March 30, 2014 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The Brazilian government has deployed federal forces to occupy the group of violence-plagued 'favelas' ahead of the June 12 start of the 2014 FIFA World Cup. The group of 16 communities house around 130,000 residents and have been dominated by drug gangs and militias. Mare is located close to Rio's international airport and has been mentioned as a likely pacification target for the police amid the city's efforts to improve security ahead of the 2014 FIFA World Cup and Rio 2016 Olympic Games. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

A sofa is seen in the Guanabara Bay in Rio de Janeiro

A sofa is seen in the Guanabara Bay in Rio de Janeiro March 12, 2014. According to the local media, the city of Rio de Janeiro continues to face criticism locally and abroad that the bodies of water it plans to use for competition in the 2016 Olympic Games are too polluted to host events. Untreated sewage and trash frequently find their way into the Atlantic waters of Copacabana Beach and Guanabara Bay - both future sites to events such as marathon swimming, sailing and triathlon events. Picture taken on March 12, 2014. REUTERS/Sergio Moraes (BRAZIL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SPORT OLYMPICS)

Brazilian biologist Mario Moscatelli takes pictures next to garbage at Pombeba island in the Guanabara Bay in Rio de Janeiro

Brazilian biologist Mario Moscatelli takes pictures next to garbage at Pombeba island in the Guanabara Bay in Rio de Janeiro March 12, 2014. According to the local media, the city of Rio de Janeiro continues to face criticism locally and abroad that the bodies of water it plans to use for competition in the 2016 Olympic Games are too polluted to host events. Untreated sewage and trash frequently find their way into the Atlantic waters of Copacabana Beach and Guanabara Bay - both future sites to events such as marathon swimming, sailing and triathlon events. Picture taken on March 12, 2014. REUTERS/Sergio Moraes (BRAZIL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SPORT OLYMPICS)

Federal Forces Occupy Mare Favela Complex

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL - MARCH 30: Brazilian Navy soldiers keep watch in the unpacified Complexo da Mare, one of the largest 'favela' complexes in Rio, on March 30, 2014 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The Brazilian government has deployed federal forces to occupy the group of violence-plagued slums ahead of the June 12 start of the 2014 FIFA World Cup. The group of 16 communities house around 130,000 residents and have been dominated by drug gangs and militias. Mare is located close to Rio's international airport and has been mentioned as a likely pacification target for the police amid the city's efforts to improve security ahead of the 2014 FIFA World Cup and Rio 2016 Olympic Games. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

An aerial shot shows the construction ongoing at the Olympic Park in Rio de Janeiro

An aerial shot shows the construction ongoing at the Olympic Park in Rio de Janeiro March 28, 2014. Rio de Janeiro will host the 2016 Olympic Games. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes (BRAZIL - Tags: SPORT OLYMPICS BUSINESS CONSTRUCTION)

Masked demonstrators protest against the World Cup 2014, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Thursday, March 27, 2014. The demonstrators call for better schools, health care, questioning the billions spent to host this year's World Cup and the 2016 Olympics. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)

Policemen display a package of seized cocaine after an operation in the Mare slums complex in Rio de Janeiro

Policemen display a package of seized cocaine after an operation in the Mare slums complex in Rio de Janeiro March 27, 2014. Brazil will deploy federal troops to Rio deJaneiro to help quell a surge in violent crime following attacks by drug traffickers on police posts in three slums on the north side of the city, government officials said on March 21. Less than three months before Rio welcomes tens of thousands of foreign soccer fans for the World Cup, the attacks cast new doubts on government efforts to expel gangs from slums using a strong police presence. The city will host the Olympics in 2016. REUTERS/Sergio Moraes (BRAZIL - Tags: CRIME LAW SPORT SOCCER DRUGS SOCIETY)

Special Police Operations Battalion (BOPE) officers stand guard, as army soldiers look for weapons with the aid of a metal detector during an operation in the Mare slum complex, ahead of its "pacification," in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Wednesday, March 26, 2014. Elite federal police and army troops will be sent to the city to help quell a wave of violence in so-called "pacified" slums. Recent attacks on police bases in the favelas is raising concerns about an ambitious security program that began in 2008, in part to secure the city ahead of this year's World Cup and the 2016 Olympics. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)

A Special Police Operations Battalion (BOPE) officer is chased by a barking dog during an operation in the Mare slum complex, ahead of its "pacification," in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Wednesday, March 26, 2014. Elite federal police and army troops will be sent to the city to help quell a wave of violence in so-called "pacified" slums. Recent attacks on police bases in the favelas is raising concerns about an ambitious security program that began in 2008, in part to secure the city ahead of this year's World Cup and the 2016 Olympics. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)

A young resident looks out from his window as military police officers patrol during an operation in the Mare slum complex, ahead of its "pacification," in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Tuesday, March 25, 2014. Elite federal police and army troops will be sent to the city to help quell a wave of violence in so-called "pacified" slums. Recent attacks on police bases in the favelas is raising concerns about an ambitious security program that began in 2008, in part to secure the city ahead of this year's World Cup and the 2016 Olympics. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)

A woman wearing a Barcelona jersey with Lionel Messi's name holds a child as police officers take up positions during an operation at the Mare slums complex in Rio de Janeiro

A woman wearing a Barcelona jersey with Lionel Messi's name holds a child as police officers take up positions during an operation at the Mare slums complex in Rio de Janeiro March 25, 2014. Brazil will deploy federal troops to Rio de Janeiro to help quell a surge in violent crime following attacks by drug traffickers on police posts in three slums on the north side of the city, government officials said on Friday. Less than three months before Rio welcomes tens of thousands of foreign soccer fans for the World Cup, the attacks cast new doubts on government efforts to expel gangs from slums using a strong police presence. The city will host the Olympics in 2016. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes (BRAZIL - Tags: CRIME LAW)

Residents observe a police officer take up position during an operation at the Mare slums complex in Rio de Janeiro

Residents observe a police officer take up position during an operation at the Mare slums complex in Rio de Janeiro March 25, 2014. Brazil will deploy federal troops to Rio de Janeiro to help quell a surge in violent crime following attacks by drug traffickers on police posts in three slums on the north side of the city, government officials said on Friday. Less than three months before Rio welcomes tens of thousands of foreign soccer fans for the World Cup, the attacks cast new doubts on government efforts to expel gangs from slums using a strong police presence. The city will host the Olympics in 2016. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes (BRAZIL - Tags: CRIME LAW)

After hearing gun shots, a military police officer runs for cover, past residents, during an operation in the Mare slum complex, ahead of its "pacification," in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Tuesday, March 25, 2014. Elite federal police and army troops will be sent to the city to help quell a wave of violence in so-called "pacified" slums. Recent attacks on police bases in the favelas is raising concerns about an ambitious security program that began in 2008, in part to secure the city ahead of this year's World Cup and the 2016 Olympics. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)

The Metro Mangueira slum, which will be demolished for the 2014 World Cup infrastructure, is seen next to the Mangueira slum and near the Maracana stadium in Rio de Janeiro

The Metro Mangueira slum (R), which will be demolished for the 2014 World Cup infrastructure, is seen next to the Mangueira slum (L) and near the Maracana stadium in Rio de Janeiro March 25, 2014. According to a document released by the popular movement "Comite Popular da Copa e Olimpiadas do Rio de Janeiro" (People's Committee of the World Cup and Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro), the preparations for the 2014 World Cup and the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro will displace more than 7,185 families from their homes to make way for new sports facilities, bus routes for traffic and improvements in tourism infrastructure. REUTERS/Sergio Moraes (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY SPORT SOCCER)

Rio's Pacified Favelas Face Challenges Ahead Of World Cup

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL - MARCH 23: People play soccer on a muddy field in the Complexo do Alemao pacified 'favela' community on March 23, 2014 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The 'favela' was previously controlled by drug traffickers and is now occupied by the city's Police Pacification Unit (UPP). A number of UPP's were attacked by drug gang members on March 20 and some pacified favelas will soon receive federal forces as reinforcements. The UPP are patrolling some of Rio's favelas amid the city's efforts to improve security ahead of the 2014 FIFA World Cup and 2016 Olympic Games. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Rio's Pacified Favelas Face Challenges Ahead Of World Cup

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL - MARCH 23: A Military Police officer holds his weapon while watching suspects in the Complexo do Alemao pacified 'favela' community on March 23, 2014 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The 'favela' was previously controlled by drug traffickers and is now occupied by the city's Police Pacification Unit (UPP). A number of UPP's were attacked by drug gang members on March 20 and some pacified favelas will soon receive federal forces as reinforcements. The UPP are patrolling some of Rio's favelas amid the city's efforts to improve security ahead of the 2014 FIFA World Cup and 2016 Olympic Games. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Rio's Pacified Favelas Face Challenges Ahead Of World Cup

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL - MARCH 22: UPP police officers gather in the Prazeres pacified 'favela' community on March 22, 2014 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The 'favela' was previously controlled by drug traffickers and is now occupied by the city's Police Pacification Unit (UPP). A number of UPP's were attacked by drug gang members on March 20 and some pacified favelas will soon receive federal forces as reinforcements. The UPP are patrolling some of Rio's favelas amid the city's efforts to improve security ahead of the 2014 FIFA World Cup and 2016 Olympic Games. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Rio's Complexo da Mare Favelas Remain Unpacified

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL - MARCH 18: Resident Simone poses in her room in the unpacified Complexo da Mare slum complex, one of the largest favela complexes in Rio, on March 18, 2014 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The settlement of the area began in the 1940's with wooden structures built over the edge of Guanabara Bay. The group of 16 communities house around 130,000 residents while plagued by violence and poverty and dominated by drug gangs. Mare is located close to Rio's international airport and has been mentioned as a likely pacification target for the police. Rio's Police Pacification Unit (UPP) now controls 38 of the city favelas amid the city's efforts to improve security ahead of the 2014 FIFA World Cup and 2016 Olympic Games. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Rio's Complexo da Mare Favelas Remain Unpacified

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL - MARCH 18: Resident Janubie washes her face with fresh water from an open pipe near her house in an impoverished area in the unpacified Complexo da Mare slum complex, one of the largest 'favela' complexes in Rio, on March 18, 2014 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The group of 16 communities house around 130,000 residents while plagued by violence and poverty and dominated by drug gangs. Mare is located close to Rio's international airport and has been mentioned as a likely pacification target for the police. Rio's Police Pacification Unit (UPP) now controls 38 of the city favelas amid the city's efforts to improve security ahead of the 2014 FIFA World Cup and 2016 Olympic Games. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Rio's Complexo da Mare Favelas Remain Unpacified

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL - MARCH 18: Residents (R-L) Luiza, Janubie, Leiticia, Anacleide and Lucas sit beneath an overpass near their houses in an impoverished area in the unpacified Complexo da Mare slum complex, one of the largest 'favela' complexes in Rio, on March 18, 2014 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The group of 16 communities house around 130,000 residents while plagued by violence and poverty and dominated by drug gangs. Mare is located close to Rio's international airport and has been mentioned as a likely pacification target for the police. Rio's Police Pacification Unit (UPP) now controls 38 of the city favelas amid the city's efforts to improve security ahead of the 2014 FIFA World Cup and 2016 Olympic Games. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Rio's Complexo da Mare Favelas Remain Unpacified

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL - MARCH 18: Houses stand in the unpacified Complexo da Mare slum complex, one of the largest 'favela' complexes in Rio, on March 18, 2014 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The group of 16 communities house around 130,000 residents while plagued by violence and poverty and dominated by drug gangs. Mare is located close to Rio's international airport and has been mentioned as a likely pacification target for the police. Rio's Police Pacification Unit (UPP) now controls 38 of the city favelas amid the city's efforts to improve security ahead of the 2014 FIFA World Cup and 2016 Olympic Games. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)