Remembering the Challenger

The NASA lost seven of its own on the morning of

Jan. 28, 1986, when a booster engine failed, causing the Shuttle

Challenger to break apart just 73 seconds after launch. (Reuters)

NASA's Space Shuttle Challenger (STS-51L) crewmembers are seen in this undated handout photo taken at Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. Left to right: Mission Specialist Ellison S. Onizuka, Pilot Mike Smith, Teacher in Space Christa McAuliffe, Commander Dick Scobee, Payload Specialist Greg Jarvis, Mission Specialist Ron McNair and Mission Specialist Judy Resnik.
Roger Boisjoly
NASA's Space Shuttle Challenger (STS-51L) crewmembers are seen in this undated handout photo taken at Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. Left to right: Mission Specialist Ellison S. Onizuka, Pilot Mike Smith, Teacher in Space Christa McAuliffe, Commander Dick Scobee, Payload Specialist Greg Jarvis, Mission Specialist Ron McNair and Mission Specialist Judy Resnik.
High school teacher Christa McAuliffe greets family and friends at Manchester Airport, July 20, 1985. McAuliffe was announced on Friday as the school teacher that would be the first citizen to go up in space aboard the Space Shuttle. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)
Roger Boisjoly
High school teacher Christa McAuliffe greets family and friends at Manchester Airport, July 20, 1985. McAuliffe was announced on Friday as the school teacher that would be the first citizen to go up in space aboard the Space Shuttle. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)
The crew for the Space Shuttle Challenger flight 51-L leaves their quarters for the launch pad, Jan. 27, 1986, at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Front to back are Commander Francis Scobee, Mission Spl. Judith Resnik, Mission Spl. Ronald McNair, Payload Spl. Gregory Jarvis, Mission Spl. Ellison Onizuka, teacher Christa McAuliffe, and pilot Michael Smith. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
Roger Boisjoly
The crew for the Space Shuttle Challenger flight 51-L leaves their quarters for the launch pad, Jan. 27, 1986, at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Front to back are Commander Francis Scobee, Mission Spl. Judith Resnik, Mission Spl. Ronald McNair, Payload Spl. Gregory Jarvis, Mission Spl. Ellison Onizuka, teacher Christa McAuliffe, and pilot Michael Smith. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
The Space Shuttle orbiter Challenger lifts off from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, Jan. 28, 1986, in a cloud of smoke with a crew of seven aboard. The shuttle exploded after this photo, taken from atop the Vehicular Assembly Building, was made. (AP Photo/Thom Baur)
Roger Boisjoly
The Space Shuttle orbiter Challenger lifts off from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, Jan. 28, 1986, in a cloud of smoke with a crew of seven aboard. The shuttle exploded after this photo, taken from atop the Vehicular Assembly Building, was made. (AP Photo/Thom Baur)
FILE--File picture from January 28, 1986, shows the explosion of space shuttle Challenger over Cap Canaveral/Florida. The space shuttle with seven astronauts onboard explodet 74 seconds after launch in 16 km height. All occupants were killed. (AP Photo/handout)
Roger Boisjoly
FILE--File picture from January 28, 1986, shows the explosion of space shuttle Challenger over Cap Canaveral/Florida. The space shuttle with seven astronauts onboard explodet 74 seconds after launch in 16 km height. All occupants were killed. (AP Photo/handout)
Morton Thiokol engineer Roger Boisjoly, appearing before the House Committee on Science and Technology, details his objections to the launch of space shuttle Challenger when he learned of freezing temperatures at Kennedy Space Center in Washington, June 17, 1986. (AP Photo/John Duricka)
Roger Boisjoly
Morton Thiokol engineer Roger Boisjoly, appearing before the House Committee on Science and Technology, details his objections to the launch of space shuttle Challenger when he learned of freezing temperatures at Kennedy Space Center in Washington, June 17, 1986. (AP Photo/John Duricka)
NASA administrator Sean O'Keefe lays a wreath at the Space Shuttle Challenger Memorial January 28, 2003 at Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia. The Challenger exploded shortly after take-off January 28, 1986, killing the entire crew. They are: Michael Smith, Ronald McNair, Ellison Onizuka, Judith Resnick, Dick Scobee, Greg Jarvis and Christa McAuliffe. O'Keefe also used the occasion to remember the crew of Apollo 1, Roger Chaffee, Ed White and Gus Grissom, who died in a fire on the launch pad on January 27, 1967. (Photo by Bill Ingalls/NASA/Getty Images)
Roger Boisjoly
NASA administrator Sean O'Keefe lays a wreath at the Space Shuttle Challenger Memorial January 28, 2003 at Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia. The Challenger exploded shortly after take-off January 28, 1986, killing the entire crew. They are: Michael Smith, Ronald McNair, Ellison Onizuka, Judith Resnick, Dick Scobee, Greg Jarvis and Christa McAuliffe. O'Keefe also used the occasion to remember the crew of Apollo 1, Roger Chaffee, Ed White and Gus Grissom, who died in a fire on the launch pad on January 27, 1967. (Photo by Bill Ingalls/NASA/Getty Images)
Stephen Feldman, at podium, president and CEO of the Astronauts Memorial Foundation speaks in front of the memorial during a rememberance ceremony to mark the 25th Anniversary of space shuttle Challenger explosion at the Kennedy Space Center visitor complex in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Friday, Jan. 28, 2011. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
Challenger
Stephen Feldman, at podium, president and CEO of the Astronauts Memorial Foundation speaks in front of the memorial during a rememberance ceremony to mark the 25th Anniversary of space shuttle Challenger explosion at the Kennedy Space Center visitor complex in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Friday, Jan. 28, 2011. (AP Photo/John Raoux)

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