U.S. women's beach volleyball teams

The U.S. has two women's beach volleyball teams left in the competition. Will legendary duo Kerri Walsh Jennings and Misty May-Treanor face compatriots April Ross and Jennifer Kessy in the gold medal match?

Olympian Misty May-Treanor Welcomes Twins: See the Sweet Pic!

The beach volleyball gold medalist has her own little volleyball team -- and they met the whole squad!

Young athletes meet pro beach volleyball player April Ross after raising money for breast cancer

Professional beach volleyball player April Ross met with some young Chicago student athletes who had helped raise money to find a cure for breast cancer.

Young athletes meet pro beach volleyball player April Ross after raising money for breast cancer

Professional beach volleyball player April Ross met with some young Chicago student athletes who had helped raise money to find a cure for breast cancer.

Young athletes meet pro beach volleyball player April Ross after raising money for breast cancer

Professional beach volleyball player April Ross met with some young Chicago student athletes who had helped raise money to find a cure for breast cancer.

Young athletes meet pro beach volleyball player April Ross after raising money for breast cancer

Professional beach volleyball player April Ross met with some young Chicago student athletes who had helped raise money to find a cure for breast cancer.

United States' Lauren Fendrick, left, and April Ross, react during the gold medal match against Germany's team with Laura Ludwig and Kira Walkenhorst at the Beach Volleyball World Championships in Vienna, Austria, Saturday, Aug. 5, 2017. (AP Photo/Ronald Zak)

United States' Lauren Fendrick, left, and April Ross, react during the gold medal match against Germany's team with Laura Ludwig and Kira Walkenhorst at the Beach Volleyball World Championships in Vienna, Austria, Saturday, Aug. 5, 2017. (AP Photo/Ronald Zak)

United States' April Ross signals during the women's gold medal match against Germany's Laura Ludwig and Kira Walkenhorst, at the Beach Volleyball World Championships in Vienna, Austria, Saturday, Aug. 5, 2017. (AP Photo/Ronald Zak)

United States' April Ross signals during the women's gold medal match against Germany's Laura Ludwig and Kira Walkenhorst, at the Beach Volleyball World Championships in Vienna, Austria, Saturday, Aug. 5, 2017. (AP Photo/Ronald Zak)

Germany's Kira Walkenhorst, right, and Laura Ludwig, celebrate with the trophy after winning the women's final against the US team with April Ross and Lauren Fendrick at the Beach Volleyball World Championships in Vienna, Austria, Saturday, Aug. 5, 2017. (AP Photo/Ronald Zak)

Germany's Kira Walkenhorst, right, and Laura Ludwig, celebrate with the trophy after winning the women's final against the US team with April Ross and Lauren Fendrick at the Beach Volleyball World Championships in Vienna, Austria, Saturday, Aug. 5, 2017. (AP Photo/Ronald Zak)

Germany's Kira Walkenhorst, right and Laura Ludwig, kiss the trophy after winning the women's gold medal match against the US team with April Ross and Lauren Fendrick at the Beach Volleyball World Championships in Vienna, Austria, Saturday, Aug. 5, 2017. (AP Photo/Ronald Zak)

Germany's Kira Walkenhorst, right and Laura Ludwig, kiss the trophy after winning the women's gold medal match against the US team with April Ross and Lauren Fendrick at the Beach Volleyball World Championships in Vienna, Austria, Saturday, Aug. 5, 2017. (AP Photo/Ronald Zak)

Germany's Kira Walkenhorst, left, and Laura Ludwig, celebrate after winning the women's gold medal match against the US team with April Ross and Lauren Fendrick at the Beach Volleyball World Championships in Vienna, Austria, Saturday, Aug. 5, 2017. (AP Photo/Ronald Zak)

Germany's Kira Walkenhorst, left, and Laura Ludwig, celebrate after winning the women's gold medal match against the US team with April Ross and Lauren Fendrick at the Beach Volleyball World Championships in Vienna, Austria, Saturday, Aug. 5, 2017. (AP Photo/Ronald Zak)

Germany's Kira Walkenhorst, left, and Laura Ludwig, celebrate after winning the women's gold medal match against the US team with April Ross and Lauren Fendrick at the Beach Volleyball World Championships in Vienna, Austria, Saturday, Aug. 5, 2017. (AP Photo/Ronald Zak)

Germany's Kira Walkenhorst, left, and Laura Ludwig, celebrate after winning the women's gold medal match against the US team with April Ross and Lauren Fendrick at the Beach Volleyball World Championships in Vienna, Austria, Saturday, Aug. 5, 2017. (AP Photo/Ronald Zak)

Germany's Kira Walkenhorst, left, and Laura Ludwig, celebrate after winning the women's gold medal match against the US team with April Ross and Lauren Fendrick at the Beach Volleyball World Championships in Vienna, Austria, Saturday, Aug. 5, 2017. (AP Photo/Ronald Zak)

Germany's Kira Walkenhorst, left, and Laura Ludwig, celebrate after winning the women's gold medal match against the US team with April Ross and Lauren Fendrick at the Beach Volleyball World Championships in Vienna, Austria, Saturday, Aug. 5, 2017. (AP Photo/Ronald Zak)

Germany's Kira Walkenhorst, left, and Laura Ludwig, celebrate after winning the women's gold medal match against the US team with April Ross and Lauren Fendrick at the Beach Volleyball World Championships in Vienna, Austria, Saturday, Aug. 5, 2017. (AP Photo/Ronald Zak)

Germany's Kira Walkenhorst, left, and Laura Ludwig, celebrate after winning the women's gold medal match against the US team with April Ross and Lauren Fendrick at the Beach Volleyball World Championships in Vienna, Austria, Saturday, Aug. 5, 2017. (AP Photo/Ronald Zak)

FIVB Beach Volleyball World Championships - Day 9

VIENNA, AUSTRIA - AUGUST 05: Laura Ludwig (C) of Germany is sprayed by champagne from April Ross (L) of USA and Larissa Maestrini (R) of Brazil after the medal ceremony for the Women's Final on August 05, 2017 in Vienna, Austria. (Photo by Srdjan Stevanovic/Getty Images for FIVB)

FIVB Beach Volleyball World Championships - Day 9

VIENNA, AUSTRIA - AUGUST 05: Silver medalist Lauren Fendrick (L) and April Ross pose during the medal ceremony for the Women's Final on August 05, 2017 in Vienna, Austria. (Photo by Srdjan Stevanovic/Getty Images for FIVB)

FIVB Beach Volleyball World Championships - Day 9

VIENNA, AUSTRIA - AUGUST 05: (L-R) Silver medalist Lauren Fendrick and April Ross of USA Gold medalist Kira Walkenhorst and Laura Ludwig of Germany Bronze medalist Larissa Maestrini and Talita Antunes of Brazil pose for the photo during the medal ceremony for the Women's Final on August 05, 2017 in Vienna, Austria. (Photo by Srdjan Stevanovic/Getty Images for FIVB)

FIVB Beach Volleyball World Championships - Day 9

VIENNA, AUSTRIA - AUGUST 05: (L-R) Silver medalist Lauren Fendrick and April Ross of USA Gold medalist Kira Walkenhorst and Laura Ludwig of Germany Bronze medalist Larissa Maestrini and Talita Antunes of Brazil pose for the photo during the medal ceremony for the Women's Final on August 05, 2017 in Vienna, Austria. (Photo by Srdjan Stevanovic/Getty Images for FIVB)

United States's April Ross signals during the match against United States's team at the women's semi final the Beach Volleyball World Championships in Vienna, Austria, Friday, Aug. 4, 2017. (AP Photo/Ronald Zak)

FIVB Beach Volleyball World Championships - Day 8

VIENNA, AUSTRIA - AUGUST 04: Lauren Fendrick (L) and April Ross (R) of USA celebrate after the Women's Semi Final match between USA and Canada on August 4, 2017 in Vienna, Austria. (Photo by Srdjan Stevanovic/Getty Images for FIVB)

FIVB Beach Volleyball World Championships - Day 8

VIENNA, AUSTRIA - AUGUST 04: April Ross of USA serves the ball during the Women's Semi Final match between USA and Canada on August 4, 2017 in Vienna, Austria. (Photo by Srdjan Stevanovic/Getty Images for FIVB)

The Sports Dish: What Steph Curry, Francisco Lindor, More Athletes Love to Eat

This piece originally appears in the August 2017 issue of SI Kids. Subscribe here.

What's it like cooking for a two-time NBA MVP? Luckily for Steph Curry, his wife, Ayesha, is a gourmet chef who loves preparing food so much that she started a meal kit company, Homemade Kids.

"Parmesan chicken tenders are so easy and delicious," Ayesha says. "Chicken Parmesan is one of Stephen's favorite meals for me to make. This version is a play on our family favorite, and our kids can join in on making it and have fun! It is served alongside the Game Day Pasta Sauce, where I sneak in delicious veggies to create a flavorful sauce. It's the perfect complement."

Ayesha Curry's Parmesan Chicken Tenders

½ cup all-purpose flour
2 eggs
1 cup Italian bread crumbs
½ cup grated Parmesan cheese
1 pound chicken tenders
¼ teaspoon salt
¼ teaspoon freshly-ground black pepper
1 teaspoon dried basil
1 teaspoon smoked paprika

?

Game Day Pasta Sauce

2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
½ cup finely diced yellow onion
Kosher salt
Freshly-ground black pepper
4 garlic cloves, minced
1 globe eggplant, cut into cubes (about 6 cups)
1½ cup dry red wine
2 bay leaves
2 teaspoons tomato paste
1 (13.5-ounce) can whole San Marzano tomatoes, crushed with a spoon or your hands, including liquid
Pinch of dried thyme
2 teaspoons dark sugar

• Preheat oven to 450 degrees.
• Line baking sheet with parchment paper.
• Set out three bowls. Mix Parmesan, bread crumbs, paprika, and basil in the first bowl. (To amp up the nutrition, you can substitute flax seeds for the bread crumbs.)
• Mix flour, salt, and pepper in the second bowl. Stir to combine.
• Crack eggs into a bowl and lightly beat them.
• Dip chicken first into flour, then egg mix, and then dredge in bread crumb mixture. Repeat with all the chicken.
• Place coated chicken on prepared baking sheet. Cook for 15 to 20 minutes (turning halfway through) until golden brown and the juices run clear.
• Heat the oil in a large skillet or Dutch oven, over medium heat. Add the onion, season with salt and pepper, and cook until softened, about three minutes. Add the garlic and cook for one more minute.
• Add the eggplant and season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring often, until the eggplant begins to soften, about three minutes.
• Add the wine and bay leaves, increase the heat to medium-high, and cook until the wine has reduced by half, about five minutes.
• Stir in tomato paste and cook for 30 seconds. Pour in the tomatoes and season with thyme, brown sugar, and one teaspoon kosher salt.
• Cook, simmering gently over medium-low heat, until the tomatoes have thickened enough to lightly coat the back of a spoon, about five minutes. Be sure to crush the tomatoes with a wooden spoon if any large chunks remain. Fish out the bay leaves and discard.

?

More athletes dish on their preferred foods:

Francisco Lindor, Cleveland Indians: Lindor is a major league shortstop and a 23-year-old man. That doesn't mean he's too big for his mom's cooking. During the season, his mother, Maria, often visits his home in Cleveland. When Lindor returns from a road trip, she greets him with his favorite dish: homemade lasagna. Maria, who is from Puerto Rico, puts a Latin twist on the Italian meal. Among the seasonings she uses to flavor the meat are sofrito and adobo. And the dish includes three cheeses: white cheddar, mozzarella, and—here's the secret—cream cheese instead of the usual ricotta. "I love the way she makes it," Lindor says. "It's always huge whenever you spend time on the road and you come back and your mom is cooking for you."

?

Breanna Stewart, Seattle Storm: "My mom makes these chicken riggies that are off the chart. She usually makes it when I have a team over or my family gets together because it's a bigger dish. It's rigatoni noodles with chicken and a tomato sauce. She can add red pepper flakes to make it spicier. She puts diced tomatoes in it, and she can add peppers and all types of things. I made it for my team when I was at UConn because they'd had it before—my mom would bring me leftovers that she'd frozen, and the team came to my house one time and she made it. I don't want to say it was good as my mom's, but they all approved."

Madison Keys, tennis player: "I really enjoy kale and have it often. I like to make kale chips for a healthy, crunchy snack. It makes kale seem less like a vegetable. Add a little salt and bake it for 10 to 15 minutes."

Eric Kendricks, Vikings LB: "I used to hate drinking water, but now I can't live without it. I used to not drink water because it didn't taste like anything. I learned that other drinks are full of sugar and caused me to cramp during physical activity. Literally, your body can't survive without water, and it is healthy to stay hydrated. Drink up!"

April Ross, Pro beach volleyball player and two-time Olympic medalist: "The weirdest food I ever ate was cow tongue, my sophomore year of high school for extra credit in Spanish class. I thought it was very meaty, but I wouldn't eat it again unless there was something in it for me."

Dexter Fowler, Cardinals CF: "I'm obsessed with the yellowtail sashimi at Nobu. It's fresh; it's the right flavor. It's perfect. We probably get nine orders of it every time we go. It's usually just my wife and me, but my three-year-old daughter, Naya, goes too. Naya loves sushi."

The Sports Dish: What Steph Curry, Francisco Lindor, More Athletes Love to Eat

This piece originally appears in the August 2017 issue of SI Kids. Subscribe here.

What's it like cooking for a two-time NBA MVP? Luckily for Steph Curry, his wife, Ayesha, is a gourmet chef who loves preparing food so much that she started a meal kit company, Homemade Kids.

"Parmesan chicken tenders are so easy and delicious," Ayesha says. "Chicken Parmesan is one of Stephen's favorite meals for me to make. This version is a play on our family favorite, and our kids can join in on making it and have fun! It is served alongside the Game Day Pasta Sauce, where I sneak in delicious veggies to create a flavorful sauce. It's the perfect complement."

Ayesha Curry's Parmesan Chicken Tenders

½ cup all-purpose flour
2 eggs
1 cup Italian bread crumbs
½ cup grated Parmesan cheese
1 pound chicken tenders
¼ teaspoon salt
¼ teaspoon freshly-ground black pepper
1 teaspoon dried basil
1 teaspoon smoked paprika

?

Game Day Pasta Sauce

2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
½ cup finely diced yellow onion
Kosher salt
Freshly-ground black pepper
4 garlic cloves, minced
1 globe eggplant, cut into cubes (about 6 cups)
1½ cup dry red wine
2 bay leaves
2 teaspoons tomato paste
1 (13.5-ounce) can whole San Marzano tomatoes, crushed with a spoon or your hands, including liquid
Pinch of dried thyme
2 teaspoons dark sugar

• Preheat oven to 450 degrees.
• Line baking sheet with parchment paper.
• Set out three bowls. Mix Parmesan, bread crumbs, paprika, and basil in the first bowl. (To amp up the nutrition, you can substitute flax seeds for the bread crumbs.)
• Mix flour, salt, and pepper in the second bowl. Stir to combine.
• Crack eggs into a bowl and lightly beat them.
• Dip chicken first into flour, then egg mix, and then dredge in bread crumb mixture. Repeat with all the chicken.
• Place coated chicken on prepared baking sheet. Cook for 15 to 20 minutes (turning halfway through) until golden brown and the juices run clear.
• Heat the oil in a large skillet or Dutch oven, over medium heat. Add the onion, season with salt and pepper, and cook until softened, about three minutes. Add the garlic and cook for one more minute.
• Add the eggplant and season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring often, until the eggplant begins to soften, about three minutes.
• Add the wine and bay leaves, increase the heat to medium-high, and cook until the wine has reduced by half, about five minutes.
• Stir in tomato paste and cook for 30 seconds. Pour in the tomatoes and season with thyme, brown sugar, and one teaspoon kosher salt.
• Cook, simmering gently over medium-low heat, until the tomatoes have thickened enough to lightly coat the back of a spoon, about five minutes. Be sure to crush the tomatoes with a wooden spoon if any large chunks remain. Fish out the bay leaves and discard.

?

More athletes dish on their preferred foods:

Francisco Lindor, Cleveland Indians: Lindor is a major league shortstop and a 23-year-old man. That doesn't mean he's too big for his mom's cooking. During the season, his mother, Maria, often visits his home in Cleveland. When Lindor returns from a road trip, she greets him with his favorite dish: homemade lasagna. Maria, who is from Puerto Rico, puts a Latin twist on the Italian meal. Among the seasonings she uses to flavor the meat are sofrito and adobo. And the dish includes three cheeses: white cheddar, mozzarella, and—here's the secret—cream cheese instead of the usual ricotta. "I love the way she makes it," Lindor says. "It's always huge whenever you spend time on the road and you come back and your mom is cooking for you."

?

Breanna Stewart, Seattle Storm: "My mom makes these chicken riggies that are off the chart. She usually makes it when I have a team over or my family gets together because it's a bigger dish. It's rigatoni noodles with chicken and a tomato sauce. She can add red pepper flakes to make it spicier. She puts diced tomatoes in it, and she can add peppers and all types of things. I made it for my team when I was at UConn because they'd had it before—my mom would bring me leftovers that she'd frozen, and the team came to my house one time and she made it. I don't want to say it was good as my mom's, but they all approved."

Madison Keys, tennis player: "I really enjoy kale and have it often. I like to make kale chips for a healthy, crunchy snack. It makes kale seem less like a vegetable. Add a little salt and bake it for 10 to 15 minutes."

Eric Kendricks, Vikings LB: "I used to hate drinking water, but now I can't live without it. I used to not drink water because it didn't taste like anything. I learned that other drinks are full of sugar and caused me to cramp during physical activity. Literally, your body can't survive without water, and it is healthy to stay hydrated. Drink up!"

April Ross, Pro beach volleyball player and two-time Olympic medalist: "The weirdest food I ever ate was cow tongue, my sophomore year of high school for extra credit in Spanish class. I thought it was very meaty, but I wouldn't eat it again unless there was something in it for me."

Dexter Fowler, Cardinals CF: "I'm obsessed with the yellowtail sashimi at Nobu. It's fresh; it's the right flavor. It's perfect. We probably get nine orders of it every time we go. It's usually just my wife and me, but my three-year-old daughter, Naya, goes too. Naya loves sushi."

United States's April Ross signals during the match against Czech Republic's team during the women's round of 16 at the Beach Volleyball World Championships in Vienna, Austria, Thursday, Aug. 3, 2017. (AP Photo/Ronald Zak)

United States's April Ross signals during the match against Czech Republic's team during the women's round of 16 at the Beach Volleyball World Championships in Vienna, Austria, Thursday, Aug. 3, 2017. (AP Photo/Ronald Zak)

United States's April Ross and Lauren Fendrick, from left, compete during their match against Czech Republic's team during the women's round of 16 at the Beach Volleyball World Championships in Vienna, Austria, Thursday, Aug. 3, 2017. (AP Photo/Ronald Zak)

United States's April Ross and Lauren Fendrick, from left, compete during their match against Czech Republic's team during the women's round of 16 at the Beach Volleyball World Championships in Vienna, Austria, Thursday, Aug. 3, 2017. (AP Photo/Ronald Zak)

United States's April Ross dives for a ball while playing against Czech Republic's team during the women's round of 16 at the Beach Volleyball World Championships in Vienna, Austria, Thursday, Aug. 3, 2017. (AP Photo/Ronald Zak)

FIVB Beach Volleyball World Championships - Day 4

VIENNA, AUSTRIA - JULY 31: Louise Bawden (R) of Australia reacts near April Ross (L) of USA during the Women's Pool K Main draw match between Australia and USA on July 31, 2017 in Vienna, Austria. (Photo by Srdjan Stevanovic/Getty Images for FIVB)

United States's April Ross and Lauren Fendrick from left, react during the match against Australia's team at the women's pool play at the Beach Volleyball World Championships in Vienna, Austria, Sunday, July 30, 2017. (AP Photo/Ronald Zak)

United States's April Ross and Lauren Fendrick, from left, react during the match against China's tean at the women's pool play at the Beach Volleyball Worlds Championships in Vienna, Austria, Friday, July 28, 2017. (AP Photo/Ronald Zak)

FIVB Beach Volleyball World Championships - Day 1

VIENNA, AUSTRIA - JULY 28: Fan Wang (R) of China spike the ball over April Ross (L) of USA during the Women's Pool K Main draw match between USA and China on July 28, 2017 in Vienna, Austria. (Photo by Srdjan Stevanovic/Getty Images for FIVB)

Beach volleyball player Kerri Walsh Jennings arrives at the ESPYS at the Microsoft Theater on Wednesday, July 12, 2017, in Los Angeles. (Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP)

Professional beach volleyball player April Ross speaks at the 15th annual High School Athlete of the Year Awards at the Ritz-Carlton hotel on Tuesday, July 11, 2017, in Marina del Rey, Calif. (AP Photo/Chris Pizzello)

Beach Volleyball Player April Ross Talks About Rio, NYC, and Her Olympic Plans

What drew you to the sport of beach volleyball? To be honest, my soccer team kind of folded. The girls didn’t come back, so I didn’t have a soccer team to play on. And I needed a new sport, a new team, and my dad suggested volleyball. I didn’t think I would like it, but I went, and a lot of my friends were playing, and I just fell in love with the sport. I had a lot of fun doing it, so that’s why I stuck with it. You led USC to the national championship twice. How did that help shape your career? It was a big confidence boost. We were the best team in college. And we worked very hard. So I saw how much hard work went into winning. We worked really long and hard every day to win those national championships, so I think that work ethic is now ingrained in me. You’ve been to the Olympics twice, in 2012 and 2016. What is the Olympic experience like? For me, it’s the ultimate in sport. And it’s the ultimate in beach volleyball to get to go. It’s the highest level you can achieve as a beach volleyball player, so it’s a huge honor to qualify, and then to go for the United States. It’s the closest I’m going to get to serving my country, in a way. And so you feel that obligation to go out there and leave your heart on the court. It’s a very emotional experience. You lost to Kerri Walsh-Jennings and Misty May-Treanor in the finals in 2012. Did that add to the pressure of trying to replace May-Treanor when you partnered with Walsh-Jennings? I never felt any pressure to replace Misty. When I got together with Kerri we were just a completely new team. Just like I would have been a completely new team with anybody else I would have partnered with. What was your favorite part of the Olympics that wasn’t in the public eye? You know, I really didn’t do much in Rio. It was just like kind of like sleep, eat, compete. I trained a little bit. There were all the different houses, like the sponsors have different houses where all the athletes can go and hang out. So I got to hang out with my family at the Team USA house or the Oakley house, and that was cool. Tell me about your new partnership with Lauren Fendrick. What do you think are some of your strengths and weaknesses as a team? Lauren and I have been really good friends for a long time. She came to my wedding; I was in her wedding. And I really respect her as a blocker. So for me, it was a no-brainer to pair with her. And I think our strength is definitely our defense. She’s a great blocker, and I can run around behind her and dig balls. I think our serving is really good. Our weakness might only be that we’re a new team, and we need to get in a rhythm Going back a little bit, what was it like to play with your longtime friend Whitney Pavlik and win the Austin Open with her? It was amazing. I think Whitney might be taking the rest of the summer off, so I knew that might be her last tournament. I was really happy that we got to go play together and especially win. So, you’re in Manhattan. It’s not exactly known for its beach volleyball—it’s more urban. What’s it like to play here? I love it. You know we play on the natural beaches in California, and that’s amazing. But for me, other than that, New York is the best place to play. We’re surrounded by water, and New York is one of my favorite places to be anyway. So many great places to eat, and walk around and see, and all that stuff. How many more Olympics would you like to play? Definitely one. And if Los Angeles gets the Olympics in 2024, then possibly two. And just a few questions about the match. You did have the incident when you dislocated your toe, unfortunately. How much do you think that affected the championship match? And how’s it feeling now? It still feels pretty bad. So because I hurt my toe, Lauren and I switched sides of the court. So I think people didn't know what to expect from us. And I think we had to play a little bit differently. So I think that was hard for the other team to adjust and figure out what we were going to do. But Lauren had to do a lot more than she usually does. You were really vocal throughout the match. You could be heard by the fans, firing your team up. What kind of effect do you think that had on the match, especially coming back in the first set? Well, I think Lauren was looking to me, like: How do I feel? Was my toe hurting too much? So for me to be vocal and energetic, I think that encouraged her that I was feeling O.K. and kind of kept our team spirits up. What are your thoughts on the new rule that you have to be serving to win? At first I didn’t like it too much. But I think the more that I play with it, I think it makes me better, and I think it makes the teams better. We have to fight for that last point. You have to dig in deep and play really well to get that last point. So it’s growing on me, for sure.

Photograph by Henry Mode

Olympic Medalist Kerri Walsh Jennings Aims For Tokyo 2020 At 38: ‘I Don’t Believe in Barriers’

Olympian Kerri Walsh Jennings is aiming to win a gold medal in beach volleyball at the Tokyo Olympics in 2020 when she’ll be 41 because, she said on Thursday, “I don’t believe in barriers.” Speaking at TheWrap’s Power Women breakfast in San Francisco, the three-time gold medalist said: “You have to earn your way there. I don’t believe in barriers. I believe my heart will tell me [when to stop]. I pray that my body doesn’t give out — my body feels amazing. I’ve had five shoulder surgeries, I’ve been through a lot, my training is smarter and my diet is smarter in my recovery processes, and I have amazing trainers. I honestly pray for clarity that it’s clear when I’m done, my heart will tell me that, ‘Kerri, you’re done.'” “I’ve lived this part of my life and I’m ready to transition into something else and grow into something else,” she continued. “My mission in the next four years is just grow in my sport — it’s such a beautiful, empowering sport for women, and the drive in this country, the opportunities this country survive on are huge and I want to take it to the next level … I want to beat the world.”

Olympic Medalist Kerri Walsh Jennings Aims For Tokyo 2020 At 38: ‘I Don’t Believe in Barriers’

Olympian Kerri Walsh Jennings is aiming to win a gold medal in beach volleyball at the Tokyo Olympics in 2020 when she’ll be 41 because, she said on Thursday, “I don’t believe in barriers.” Speaking at TheWrap’s Power Women breakfast in San Francisco, the three-time gold medalist said: “You have to earn your way there. I don’t believe in barriers. I believe my heart will tell me [when to stop]. I pray that my body doesn’t give out — my body feels amazing. I’ve had five shoulder surgeries, I’ve been through a lot, my training is smarter and my diet is smarter in my recovery processes, and I have amazing trainers. I honestly pray for clarity that it’s clear when I’m done, my heart will tell me that, ‘Kerri, you’re done.'” “I’ve lived this part of my life and I’m ready to transition into something else and grow into something else,” she continued. “My mission in the next four years is just grow in my sport — it’s such a beautiful, empowering sport for women, and the drive in this country, the opportunities this country survive on are huge and I want to take it to the next level … I want to beat the world.”

Olympic Medalist Kerri Walsh Jennings Aims For Tokyo 2020 At 38: ‘I Don’t Believe in Barriers’

Olympian Kerri Walsh Jennings is aiming to win a gold medal in beach volleyball at the Tokyo Olympics in 2020 when she’ll be 41 because, she said on Thursday, “I don’t believe in barriers.” Speaking at TheWrap’s Power Women breakfast in San Francisco, the three-time gold medalist said: “You have to earn your way there. I don’t believe in barriers. I believe my heart will tell me [when to stop]. I pray that my body doesn’t give out — my body feels amazing. I’ve had five shoulder surgeries, I’ve been through a lot, my training is smarter and my diet is smarter in my recovery processes, and I have amazing trainers. I honestly pray for clarity that it’s clear when I’m done, my heart will tell me that, ‘Kerri, you’re done.'” “I’ve lived this part of my life and I’m ready to transition into something else and grow into something else,” she continued. “My mission in the next four years is just grow in my sport — it’s such a beautiful, empowering sport for women, and the drive in this country, the opportunities this country survive on are huge and I want to take it to the next level … I want to beat the world.”

Olympic Medalist Kerri Walsh Jennings Aims For Tokyo 2020 At 38: ‘I Don’t Believe in Barriers’

Olympian Kerri Walsh Jennings is aiming to win a gold medal in beach volleyball at the Tokyo Olympics in 2020 when she’ll be 41 because, she said on Thursday, “I don’t believe in barriers.” Speaking at TheWrap’s Power Women breakfast in San Francisco, the three-time gold medalist said: “You have to earn your way there. I don’t believe in barriers. I believe my heart will tell me [when to stop]. I pray that my body doesn’t give out — my body feels amazing. I’ve had five shoulder surgeries, I’ve been through a lot, my training is smarter and my diet is smarter in my recovery processes, and I have amazing trainers. I honestly pray for clarity that it’s clear when I’m done, my heart will tell me that, ‘Kerri, you’re done.'” “I’ve lived this part of my life and I’m ready to transition into something else and grow into something else,” she continued. “My mission in the next four years is just grow in my sport — it’s such a beautiful, empowering sport for women, and the drive in this country, the opportunities this country survive on are huge and I want to take it to the next level … I want to beat the world.”

Olympic Medalist Kerri Walsh Jennings Aims For Tokyo 2020 At 38: ‘I Don’t Believe in Barriers’

Olympian Kerri Walsh Jennings is aiming to win a gold medal in beach volleyball at the Tokyo Olympics in 2020 when she’ll be 41 because, she said on Thursday, “I don’t believe in barriers.” Speaking at TheWrap’s Power Women breakfast in San Francisco, the three-time gold medalist said: “You have to earn your way there. I don’t believe in barriers. I believe my heart will tell me [when to stop]. I pray that my body doesn’t give out — my body feels amazing. I’ve had five shoulder surgeries, I’ve been through a lot, my training is smarter and my diet is smarter in my recovery processes, and I have amazing trainers. I honestly pray for clarity that it’s clear when I’m done, my heart will tell me that, ‘Kerri, you’re done.'” “I’ve lived this part of my life and I’m ready to transition into something else and grow into something else,” she continued. “My mission in the next four years is just grow in my sport — it’s such a beautiful, empowering sport for women, and the drive in this country, the opportunities this country survive on are huge and I want to take it to the next level … I want to beat the world.”

Faster, higher, rustier: Medals from Rio Olympics damaged

FILE - In this Aug. 18, 2016, file photo, United States' Kerri Walsh Jennings stands on the podium after winning the bronze medal in the women's beach volleyball competition of the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. More than 100 athletes from around the world say the medals they won at the Rio Olympics are damaged. The IOC and Rio organizers plan to replace them with new medals. Among those with defective medals are beach volleyball star Kerri Walsh Jennings who says her bronze medal from last summer is flaking and rusting. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)

FILE - In this Aug. 18, 2016, file photo, United States' Kerri Walsh Jennings stands on the podium after winning the bronze medal in the women's beach volleyball competition of the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. More than 100 athletes from around the world say the medals they won at the Rio Olympics are damaged. The IOC and Rio organizers plan to replace them with new medals. Among those with defective medals are beach volleyball star Kerri Walsh Jennings who says her bronze medal from last summer is flaking and rusting. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)

FILE - In this Aug. 18, 2016, file photo, United States' Kerri Walsh Jennings stands on the podium after winning the bronze medal in the women's beach volleyball competition of the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. More than 100 athletes from around the world say the medals they won at the Rio Olympics are damaged. The IOC and Rio organizers plan to replace them with new medals. Among those with defective medals are beach volleyball star Kerri Walsh Jennings who says her bronze medal from last summer is flaking and rusting. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)

Faster, higher, rustier: Medals from Rio Olympics damaged

Kyle Snyder made history at the Rio Olympics by becoming the youngest American wrestler to win a gold medal.

The medal will soon be history as well, to be replaced by the IOC and Rio organizers because of damage.

Snyder and Helen Maroulis, another U.S. gold medalist wrestler, are among a group of more than 100 athletes from around the world with defective Olympic medals.

Beach volleyball star Kerri Walsh Jennings says her bronze medal from last summer is flaking and rusting, and USA Swimming spokesman Scott Leightman said some swimmers have damaged medals as well.

USA Basketball spokesman Craig Miller said the organization reached out to its players and seven — three men and four women — reported they believe there is an issue with their medals. The names of players aren’t known yet, and the plan will likely be to pass the medals on to USOC for evaluation.

Rio Games spokesman Mario Andrada said Friday that officials have noted problems with the covering on 6 to 7 percent of the medals.

“The most common issue is that they were dropped or mishandled, and the varnish has come off and they’ve rusted or gone black in the spot where they were damaged,” Andrada said.

Snyder, who wrestles for Ohio State, was 20 when he won his medal. He noticed an issue with his medal the day after he won it.

He went to a party at the Team USA house in Rio, where he said multiple people handled the medal as they celebrated. Snyder said he later discovered a scratch on the back of it, though he added there has been no further damage.

Snyder said he has until the end of the week to return his gold medal and has no idea when he’ll receive his replacement.

“It wasn’t too big of a deal,” Snyder said. “But since they’re giving me a new one, it’s kind of cool.”

Rio de Janeiro spent about $12 billion to organize the games, which were plagued by cost-cutting, poor attendance and reports of bribes and corruption linked to the building of some Olympic-related facilities.

Nine months later, many of the venues are empty and have no tenants or income — with the maintenance costs dumped on the federal government. In addition to the issues with the medals, which featured the Rio and Olympic logos, the local organizing committee still owes creditors about $30 million

Greg Massialas, a national coach for the U.S. fencing team in Rio, said in a message to The Associated Press that the silver medal son Alex won is damage free. He added that he hasn’t heard about any issues with other American fencers.

U.S. shooter Ginny Thrasher and boxer Claressa Shields, along with men’s tennis bronze medalist Kei Nishikori of Japan, also reported that their gold medals are intact.

Walsh Jennings, who won three golds in previous Olympics, says her medals tend to get beaten up because she doesn’t hesitate to let people touch them or try them on. But she won’t consider locking them up because people are inspired by them.

“They’ve offered to replace them. I’m not sure if I want to swap it out,” Walsh-Jennings told the AP, adding the reason was “100 percent sentimental.”

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