Team USA goes for Olympic gold

Kobe Bryant, LeBron James and the rest of the U.S. men's basketball team are eyeing Olympic gold.

A group of young men play basketball on an outdoor court on a day of unseasonably warm weather in New York, U.S., February 21, 2018. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
A group of young men play basketball on an outdoor court on a day of unseasonably warm weather in New York
A group of young men play basketball on an outdoor court on a day of unseasonably warm weather in New York, U.S., February 21, 2018. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
A group of young men play basketball on an outdoor court on a day of unseasonably warm weather in New York, U.S., February 21, 2018. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
A group of young men play basketball on an outdoor court on a day of unseasonably warm weather in New York
A group of young men play basketball on an outdoor court on a day of unseasonably warm weather in New York, U.S., February 21, 2018. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
FILE - In this Sept. 21, 2016, file photo, Phoenix Mercury's Kelsey Bone, right, and Mistie Bass, fourth from right, kneel during the playing of the national anthem before the start of a first round WNBA playoff basketball game a in Indianapolis. Despite their efforts on the field and off, women athletes have to struggle to get the same attention as men despite having as much to say, said Harry Edwards, a scholar of race and sports who has worked as a consultant for several U.S. pro teams. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings, File)
FILE - In this Sept. 21, 2016, file photo, Phoenix Mercury's Kelsey Bone, right, and Mistie Bass, fourth from right, kneel during the playing of the national anthem before the start of a first round WNBA playoff basketball game a in Indianapolis. Despite their efforts on the field and off, women athletes have to struggle to get the same attention as men despite having as much to say, said Harry Edwards, a scholar of race and sports who has worked as a consultant for several U.S. pro teams. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings, File)
FILE - In this Sept. 21, 2016, file photo, Phoenix Mercury's Kelsey Bone, right, and Mistie Bass, fourth from right, kneel during the playing of the national anthem before the start of a first round WNBA playoff basketball game a in Indianapolis. Despite their efforts on the field and off, women athletes have to struggle to get the same attention as men despite having as much to say, said Harry Edwards, a scholar of race and sports who has worked as a consultant for several U.S. pro teams. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings, File)
<p>LOS ANGELES — The NBA wrapped up another successful iteration of its Basketball Without Borders Global Camp over the weekend, bringing together many of the world’s top teenage prospects and mixing them together into a development-oriented setting. A whole host of scouts and executives from all 30 NBA teams attended the three-day event, which moves each year with All-Star weekend and has become a must-scout opportunity, also including elite international girls prospects for the WNBA to evaluate.</p><p>Staffed by an experienced group of NBA coaches and basketball personnel, there is an emphasis not only on skills and scrimmaging, but life skills as campers move toward pro careers in the U.S. and elsewhere. The level of competition was strong, peaking on Day Two as players gained comfort in their environment and adjusted to their busy schedules.</p><p>The Crossover’s Front Office was present for all three days of camp, laying eyes on many of the prospects for the first time. Out of 42 boys from 29 countries, here are the players who set themselves apart, headlined by a pair of potential first-rounders for the 2019 draft.</p><p><strong>Sekou Doumboya, F, France</strong><br><strong>Height</strong>: 6’9” | <strong>Weight</strong>: 210 | <strong>Draft-eligible</strong>: 2019<br>Born in Guinea, Doumboya moved to France as a child and helped lead the team to gold as one of the younger prospects at the U18 Euros in 2016. Perhaps the best all-around athlete among this year’s BWB campers, Doumboya is tracking as an early first-round selection for next year’s draft. Possessing a rare combination of power and skill, he plays above the rim with ease, throwing down explosive two-handed slams and gathering quickly in space off one or two feet. When attacking downhill, there were few players who could stay in front of him. Despite lacking great change of direction due in part to his handle, Doumboya’s burst got it done in this setting. His lean, strong frame should be able to fill out, and he was arguably the top prospect at the camp.</p><p>Doumboya displayed nice shooting touch and a soft, easy release on the perimeter that looked consistent all weekend. He has considerable upside in that area, and while right now it’s more of a set shot, he has the requisite body control to develop into a capable shooter on the move. His developing handle and passing skills suggest he could play either forward position down the road. He’s instinctive reading the ball off the glass and may be best suited as a mismatch-type small-ball four in the NBA, and defended quite well on the perimeter when locked in. Doumboya was noticeably among the more vocal campers, as well. He told the Front Office he patterns his game after Paul George. The hype appears to be warranted.</p><p><strong>Luka Samanic, F, Croatia</strong><br><strong>Height: </strong>6’10” | <strong>Weight: </strong>210 | <strong>Draft-eligible: </strong>2019<br>Currently plying his trade for FC Barcelona’s junior team, Samanic showed up in El Segundo with a lofty reputation after winning MVP at last summer’s FIBA U18 European Championships. His father played professionally at a high level overseas. He’s quite a talent, blessed with great vision and able to handle, spot up and score at all three levels. Though not elite laterally, he’s smooth and has quality fundamental footwork that enables him to get where he needs to go and easily attack the basket off one or two dribbles. His performance was up and down throughout the weekend, but when engaged, Samanic’s potential was evident.</p><p>With a nice blend of size, skill level and overall floor comprehension, Samanic should be able to handle either forward spot down the line. In an interview with the Front Office, he expressed his comfort level playing all five positions. He can handle on the perimeter or slide down to the interior, and while his jumper is still developing, he looks comfortable with his release and simply needs to work on consistency. Samanic should end up in the first-round conversation in what presently looks like a thinner 2019 draft.</p><p><strong>Charles Bassey, C, Nigeria</strong><br><strong>Height:</strong> 6’10” | <strong>Weight: </strong>225 | <strong>Draft-eligible: </strong>2020<br>Bassey won the camp MVP award with productive play over the course of the weekend, and headlined an extremely strong group of big men. He’s bounced around American high schools, currently playing at Aspire Academy in Kentucky, but is considered one of the best prospects in the high school class of 2019 and reinforced that ranking over the weekend. He possesses immense physical ability, with a thick, sturdy build that’s still maturing. He profiles as a dynamic rim-runner if everything breaks correctly, with the length to defend the basket and elevate in the paint. </p><p>Bassey’s skill level has improved since we saw him last year at the HoopHall Classic, and he showed some level of jump shooting ability and was able to lead fast breaks on a couple of occasions. That said, not facing great competition in high school and it’s a little unclear exactly what of his improvements will translate into real, structured game situations at this stage. His shot selection was occasionally questionable and it does beg the question as to how he perceives himself a a player—but Bassey is young enough to think he’ll figure that out. Western Kentucky, Kansas and UCLA are among the schools recruiting him at this stage. </p><p><strong>Killian Hayes, G, France</strong><br><strong>Height: </strong>6’5” | <strong>Weight: </strong>190 | <strong>Draft-eligible: </strong>2020<br>Clearly the top guard in attendance, Hayes is a natural playmaker and stood out on both ends of the floor all weekend. Born to an American father and French mother, Hayes was the second-youngest player at the entire event but displayed a highly advanced feel for a 16-year-old, firing timely passes and picking his spots well offensively. His teammates seemed to enjoy playing with him, and his ability to create off the bounce meant easy baskets for his team. Equally impressive was Hayes’ aggressive on-ball defense, as he generated turnovers and denied dribble penetration while using his length to apply high pressure. Accounting how much he appears to enjoy competing on that end, he could be up to defending three positions on the perimeter in due time.</p><p>One of just a few left-handers at the camp, Hayes looks comfortable shooting jumpers and should be able to gain added consistency as he develops, although his shot comes out of his hand a bit sideways which could eventually pose issues. He came in as a known entity and certainly helped himself with his overall showing, turning in a particularly strong second day of camp before sitting out much of the third with an apparent minor leg injury. He told the Front Office he patterns his game after Manu Ginobili, and that he’s used to functioning mostly at shooting guard with his club team, Cholet. The game already comes easily to him, and he’s on track for eventual first-round consideration.</p><p><strong>N’Faly Dante, C, Mali</strong><br><strong>Height: </strong>7’0”<strong> | Weight: </strong>220<strong> | Draft-eligible: </strong>2021<br>The youngest player in attendance, Dante boasts enviable tools for a rim-protecting, interior dive man and continues to flash big-time talent. Currently prepping at Sunrise Christian, Dante has a well-developed, wide frame and managed a number of explosive dunks gathering off two feet. Skill-wise he’s a work in progress, particularly when it comes to post footwork. Right now he can hang his hat on his athletic frame and activity level in the paint. He has the size and length to be a terrific anchor on defense. There’s a long way to go, but Dante has the full attention of NBA scouts. Kansas and LSU are among the colleges involved.</p><p><strong>Josh Green, SG, Australia</strong><br><strong>Height: </strong>6’6” | <strong>Weight</strong>: 190 | <strong>Draft-eligible</strong>: 2020<br>Green had several of the weekend’s best highlight dunks and has elite-level verticality to his game, able to take off and finish from outside the paint and make a strong impact in transition. He’s spent the high school season with IMG Academy, and has a host of top-tier college offers. He certainly took advantage of his opportunity with NBA scouts watching, showcasing his explosion and flashing an improved handle. While Green has a ways to go in terms of creating his own shot, he has potential to be a two-way wing player if all breaks correctly.</p><p><strong>AJ Lawson, G/F, Canada</strong><br><strong>Height: </strong>6’7” | <strong>Weight: </strong>160 | <strong>Draft-eligible: </strong>2020<br>Lawson was one of the better athletes on the floor this weekend, displaying some twitchy bounce and offensive feel as a ball-handler. He’s extremely skinny, with a similar build to Patrick McCaw that gives him some promise defensively. His versatility is intriguing if he can pack on muscle over the next few years. He showed a solid handle and was able to attack the paint and deliver some nice passes with either hand. Lawson hit some shots from outside and spent a lot of time on the ball, and though he’s not a natural point guard, he could evolve into a secondary playmaker. He doesn’t elevate much on his jumper and needs to become far more consistent in that area. He has offers including Oregon and SMU, visited Kentucky in December, and is scratching the surface in terms of what he might become.</p><p><strong>Paul Eboua, F, Cameroon</strong><br><strong>Height: </strong>6’7” | <strong>Weight: </strong>200 | <strong>Draft-eligible: </strong>2019<br>One of the most unique players at the camp from a physical perspective, Eboua has broad shoulders, thick legs and extreme length (he’s been measured with a 7’2” wingspan) that could make him an exceptional defender. He’s physically reminiscent of a young Ron Artest, and makes instinctive plays above the rim on either end of the floor. He may be stuck between positions at the moment, lacking the ball-handling skills and confidence to operate on the wing against better competition and also the interior feel to play as a four. Eboua did flash a bit of shooting touch, but is far from a consistent threat. He’s mostly limited to straight-line drives and energy points around the basket. Currently at Stella Azzura Academy in Italy, he’s still very early in his development and will be a name to follow over the next couple years.</p><p><strong>Biram Faye, F/C, Senegal</strong><br><strong>Height: </strong>6’8” | <strong>Weight: </strong>215 | <strong>Draft-eligible</strong>: 2020<br>Faye was one of the more physically intriguing players at the camp, with a strong build and quick bounce off the floor that led to a number of eye-popping dunks. He’s developing in Spain with Gran Canaria, and had a breakout weekend in front of NBA scouts with his ability to run the floor, finish and block shots. Faye consistently played with fire and showed good overall instincts playing mostly in traffic. He doesn’t have much of an offensive skill set yet, but put himself on the radar simply by playing the right way and making plays for his team. There’s a place in the NBA for bigs with his traits.</p><p><strong>Tyrese Samuel, F, Canada</strong><br><strong>Height: </strong>6’8” | <strong>Weight: </strong>210 | <strong>Draft-eligible</strong>: 2021<br>One of the clear standouts on day one of the camp, Samuel performed well when his motor was running and has the makings of a versatile forward, able to compete athletically as a big and also step out and knock down the occasional shot. It looks like he may be stuck between positions at the moment, but his ball skills aren’t bad and his powerful leaping ability stood out. His handle is functional attacking the rim, but he lacks necessary level of shake to play the three in college at this stage. His effort level and body language waxed and waned, and the consistency of his play with them. Set to graduate from Wasatch Academy in Utah in 2019, Samuel is set to take the high-major college route.</p><p><strong>Filip Petrusev, PF, Serbia</strong><br><strong>Height</strong>: 6’10” | <strong>Weight: </strong>215 | <strong>Draft-eligible</strong>: 2019<br>Already committed to Gonzaga for next year, Petrusev is a fluid, smooth-shooting stretch big who should be a perfect fit in Spokane. He’s teammates with potential 2019 No.1 pick R.J. Barrett at Montverde Academy, and was able to shine with some nice moments in the camp environment. He’s not a surefire NBA guy, but has the size and shooting tools going for him and will be in a great situation for his development. After helping lead Serbia to a title in last summer’s U18 Euros, Petrusev is a player to track long-term with some projectable utility at the NBA level.</p><p><strong>Leandro Bolmaro, G/F, Argentina</strong><br><strong>Height</strong>: 6’6” | <strong>Weight: </strong>170 | <strong>Draft-eligible</strong>: 2019<br>Perhaps the top pure shooter at the camp, Bolmaro was a constant threat from outside and played with a nice level of confidence and feel with the ball in his hands. He was consistently impactful and has the requisite size for his position, if not top-tier athleticism. Bolmaro is a player to monitor as a potential shooting specialist as he matures.</p>
Evaluating the Top International Prospects at Basketball Without Borders

LOS ANGELES — The NBA wrapped up another successful iteration of its Basketball Without Borders Global Camp over the weekend, bringing together many of the world’s top teenage prospects and mixing them together into a development-oriented setting. A whole host of scouts and executives from all 30 NBA teams attended the three-day event, which moves each year with All-Star weekend and has become a must-scout opportunity, also including elite international girls prospects for the WNBA to evaluate.

Staffed by an experienced group of NBA coaches and basketball personnel, there is an emphasis not only on skills and scrimmaging, but life skills as campers move toward pro careers in the U.S. and elsewhere. The level of competition was strong, peaking on Day Two as players gained comfort in their environment and adjusted to their busy schedules.

The Crossover’s Front Office was present for all three days of camp, laying eyes on many of the prospects for the first time. Out of 42 boys from 29 countries, here are the players who set themselves apart, headlined by a pair of potential first-rounders for the 2019 draft.

Sekou Doumboya, F, France
Height: 6’9” | Weight: 210 | Draft-eligible: 2019
Born in Guinea, Doumboya moved to France as a child and helped lead the team to gold as one of the younger prospects at the U18 Euros in 2016. Perhaps the best all-around athlete among this year’s BWB campers, Doumboya is tracking as an early first-round selection for next year’s draft. Possessing a rare combination of power and skill, he plays above the rim with ease, throwing down explosive two-handed slams and gathering quickly in space off one or two feet. When attacking downhill, there were few players who could stay in front of him. Despite lacking great change of direction due in part to his handle, Doumboya’s burst got it done in this setting. His lean, strong frame should be able to fill out, and he was arguably the top prospect at the camp.

Doumboya displayed nice shooting touch and a soft, easy release on the perimeter that looked consistent all weekend. He has considerable upside in that area, and while right now it’s more of a set shot, he has the requisite body control to develop into a capable shooter on the move. His developing handle and passing skills suggest he could play either forward position down the road. He’s instinctive reading the ball off the glass and may be best suited as a mismatch-type small-ball four in the NBA, and defended quite well on the perimeter when locked in. Doumboya was noticeably among the more vocal campers, as well. He told the Front Office he patterns his game after Paul George. The hype appears to be warranted.

Luka Samanic, F, Croatia
Height: 6’10” | Weight: 210 | Draft-eligible: 2019
Currently plying his trade for FC Barcelona’s junior team, Samanic showed up in El Segundo with a lofty reputation after winning MVP at last summer’s FIBA U18 European Championships. His father played professionally at a high level overseas. He’s quite a talent, blessed with great vision and able to handle, spot up and score at all three levels. Though not elite laterally, he’s smooth and has quality fundamental footwork that enables him to get where he needs to go and easily attack the basket off one or two dribbles. His performance was up and down throughout the weekend, but when engaged, Samanic’s potential was evident.

With a nice blend of size, skill level and overall floor comprehension, Samanic should be able to handle either forward spot down the line. In an interview with the Front Office, he expressed his comfort level playing all five positions. He can handle on the perimeter or slide down to the interior, and while his jumper is still developing, he looks comfortable with his release and simply needs to work on consistency. Samanic should end up in the first-round conversation in what presently looks like a thinner 2019 draft.

Charles Bassey, C, Nigeria
Height: 6’10” | Weight: 225 | Draft-eligible: 2020
Bassey won the camp MVP award with productive play over the course of the weekend, and headlined an extremely strong group of big men. He’s bounced around American high schools, currently playing at Aspire Academy in Kentucky, but is considered one of the best prospects in the high school class of 2019 and reinforced that ranking over the weekend. He possesses immense physical ability, with a thick, sturdy build that’s still maturing. He profiles as a dynamic rim-runner if everything breaks correctly, with the length to defend the basket and elevate in the paint.

Bassey’s skill level has improved since we saw him last year at the HoopHall Classic, and he showed some level of jump shooting ability and was able to lead fast breaks on a couple of occasions. That said, not facing great competition in high school and it’s a little unclear exactly what of his improvements will translate into real, structured game situations at this stage. His shot selection was occasionally questionable and it does beg the question as to how he perceives himself a a player—but Bassey is young enough to think he’ll figure that out. Western Kentucky, Kansas and UCLA are among the schools recruiting him at this stage.

Killian Hayes, G, France
Height: 6’5” | Weight: 190 | Draft-eligible: 2020
Clearly the top guard in attendance, Hayes is a natural playmaker and stood out on both ends of the floor all weekend. Born to an American father and French mother, Hayes was the second-youngest player at the entire event but displayed a highly advanced feel for a 16-year-old, firing timely passes and picking his spots well offensively. His teammates seemed to enjoy playing with him, and his ability to create off the bounce meant easy baskets for his team. Equally impressive was Hayes’ aggressive on-ball defense, as he generated turnovers and denied dribble penetration while using his length to apply high pressure. Accounting how much he appears to enjoy competing on that end, he could be up to defending three positions on the perimeter in due time.

One of just a few left-handers at the camp, Hayes looks comfortable shooting jumpers and should be able to gain added consistency as he develops, although his shot comes out of his hand a bit sideways which could eventually pose issues. He came in as a known entity and certainly helped himself with his overall showing, turning in a particularly strong second day of camp before sitting out much of the third with an apparent minor leg injury. He told the Front Office he patterns his game after Manu Ginobili, and that he’s used to functioning mostly at shooting guard with his club team, Cholet. The game already comes easily to him, and he’s on track for eventual first-round consideration.

N’Faly Dante, C, Mali
Height: 7’0” | Weight: 220 | Draft-eligible: 2021
The youngest player in attendance, Dante boasts enviable tools for a rim-protecting, interior dive man and continues to flash big-time talent. Currently prepping at Sunrise Christian, Dante has a well-developed, wide frame and managed a number of explosive dunks gathering off two feet. Skill-wise he’s a work in progress, particularly when it comes to post footwork. Right now he can hang his hat on his athletic frame and activity level in the paint. He has the size and length to be a terrific anchor on defense. There’s a long way to go, but Dante has the full attention of NBA scouts. Kansas and LSU are among the colleges involved.

Josh Green, SG, Australia
Height: 6’6” | Weight: 190 | Draft-eligible: 2020
Green had several of the weekend’s best highlight dunks and has elite-level verticality to his game, able to take off and finish from outside the paint and make a strong impact in transition. He’s spent the high school season with IMG Academy, and has a host of top-tier college offers. He certainly took advantage of his opportunity with NBA scouts watching, showcasing his explosion and flashing an improved handle. While Green has a ways to go in terms of creating his own shot, he has potential to be a two-way wing player if all breaks correctly.

AJ Lawson, G/F, Canada
Height: 6’7” | Weight: 160 | Draft-eligible: 2020
Lawson was one of the better athletes on the floor this weekend, displaying some twitchy bounce and offensive feel as a ball-handler. He’s extremely skinny, with a similar build to Patrick McCaw that gives him some promise defensively. His versatility is intriguing if he can pack on muscle over the next few years. He showed a solid handle and was able to attack the paint and deliver some nice passes with either hand. Lawson hit some shots from outside and spent a lot of time on the ball, and though he’s not a natural point guard, he could evolve into a secondary playmaker. He doesn’t elevate much on his jumper and needs to become far more consistent in that area. He has offers including Oregon and SMU, visited Kentucky in December, and is scratching the surface in terms of what he might become.

Paul Eboua, F, Cameroon
Height: 6’7” | Weight: 200 | Draft-eligible: 2019
One of the most unique players at the camp from a physical perspective, Eboua has broad shoulders, thick legs and extreme length (he’s been measured with a 7’2” wingspan) that could make him an exceptional defender. He’s physically reminiscent of a young Ron Artest, and makes instinctive plays above the rim on either end of the floor. He may be stuck between positions at the moment, lacking the ball-handling skills and confidence to operate on the wing against better competition and also the interior feel to play as a four. Eboua did flash a bit of shooting touch, but is far from a consistent threat. He’s mostly limited to straight-line drives and energy points around the basket. Currently at Stella Azzura Academy in Italy, he’s still very early in his development and will be a name to follow over the next couple years.

Biram Faye, F/C, Senegal
Height: 6’8” | Weight: 215 | Draft-eligible: 2020
Faye was one of the more physically intriguing players at the camp, with a strong build and quick bounce off the floor that led to a number of eye-popping dunks. He’s developing in Spain with Gran Canaria, and had a breakout weekend in front of NBA scouts with his ability to run the floor, finish and block shots. Faye consistently played with fire and showed good overall instincts playing mostly in traffic. He doesn’t have much of an offensive skill set yet, but put himself on the radar simply by playing the right way and making plays for his team. There’s a place in the NBA for bigs with his traits.

Tyrese Samuel, F, Canada
Height: 6’8” | Weight: 210 | Draft-eligible: 2021
One of the clear standouts on day one of the camp, Samuel performed well when his motor was running and has the makings of a versatile forward, able to compete athletically as a big and also step out and knock down the occasional shot. It looks like he may be stuck between positions at the moment, but his ball skills aren’t bad and his powerful leaping ability stood out. His handle is functional attacking the rim, but he lacks necessary level of shake to play the three in college at this stage. His effort level and body language waxed and waned, and the consistency of his play with them. Set to graduate from Wasatch Academy in Utah in 2019, Samuel is set to take the high-major college route.

Filip Petrusev, PF, Serbia
Height: 6’10” | Weight: 215 | Draft-eligible: 2019
Already committed to Gonzaga for next year, Petrusev is a fluid, smooth-shooting stretch big who should be a perfect fit in Spokane. He’s teammates with potential 2019 No.1 pick R.J. Barrett at Montverde Academy, and was able to shine with some nice moments in the camp environment. He’s not a surefire NBA guy, but has the size and shooting tools going for him and will be in a great situation for his development. After helping lead Serbia to a title in last summer’s U18 Euros, Petrusev is a player to track long-term with some projectable utility at the NBA level.

Leandro Bolmaro, G/F, Argentina
Height: 6’6” | Weight: 170 | Draft-eligible: 2019
Perhaps the top pure shooter at the camp, Bolmaro was a constant threat from outside and played with a nice level of confidence and feel with the ball in his hands. He was consistently impactful and has the requisite size for his position, if not top-tier athleticism. Bolmaro is a player to monitor as a potential shooting specialist as he matures.

<p>LOS ANGELES — The NBA wrapped up another successful iteration of its Basketball Without Borders Global Camp over the weekend, bringing together many of the world’s top teenage prospects and mixing them together into a development-oriented setting. A whole host of scouts and executives from all 30 NBA teams attended the three-day event, which moves each year with All-Star weekend and has become a must-scout opportunity, also including elite international girls prospects for the WNBA to evaluate.</p><p>Staffed by an experienced group of NBA coaches and basketball personnel, there is an emphasis not only on skills and scrimmaging, but life skills as campers move toward pro careers in the U.S. and elsewhere. The level of competition was strong, peaking on Day Two as players gained comfort in their environment and adjusted to their busy schedules.</p><p>The Crossover’s Front Office was present for all three days of camp, laying eyes on many of the prospects for the first time. Out of 42 boys from 29 countries, here are the players who set themselves apart, headlined by a pair of potential first-rounders for the 2019 draft.</p><p><strong>Sekou Doumboya, F, France</strong><br><strong>Height</strong>: 6’9” | <strong>Weight</strong>: 210 | <strong>Draft-eligible</strong>: 2019<br>Born in Guinea, Doumboya moved to France as a child and helped lead the team to gold as one of the younger prospects at the U18 Euros in 2016. Perhaps the best all-around athlete among this year’s BWB campers, Doumboya is tracking as an early first-round selection for next year’s draft. Possessing a rare combination of power and skill, he plays above the rim with ease, throwing down explosive two-handed slams and gathering quickly in space off one or two feet. When attacking downhill, there were few players who could stay in front of him. Despite lacking great change of direction due in part to his handle, Doumboya’s burst got it done in this setting. His lean, strong frame should be able to fill out, and he was arguably the top prospect at the camp.</p><p>Doumboya displayed nice shooting touch and a soft, easy release on the perimeter that looked consistent all weekend. He has considerable upside in that area, and while right now it’s more of a set shot, he has the requisite body control to develop into a capable shooter on the move. His developing handle and passing skills suggest he could play either forward position down the road. He’s instinctive reading the ball off the glass and may be best suited as a mismatch-type small-ball four in the NBA, and defended quite well on the perimeter when locked in. Doumboya was noticeably among the more vocal campers, as well. He told the Front Office he patterns his game after Paul George. The hype appears to be warranted.</p><p><strong>Luka Samanic, F, Croatia</strong><br><strong>Height: </strong>6’10” | <strong>Weight: </strong>210 | <strong>Draft-eligible: </strong>2019<br>Currently plying his trade for FC Barcelona’s junior team, Samanic showed up in El Segundo with a lofty reputation after winning MVP at last summer’s FIBA U18 European Championships. His father played professionally at a high level overseas. He’s quite a talent, blessed with great vision and able to handle, spot up and score at all three levels. Though not elite laterally, he’s smooth and has quality fundamental footwork that enables him to get where he needs to go and easily attack the basket off one or two dribbles. His performance was up and down throughout the weekend, but when engaged, Samanic’s potential was evident.</p><p>With a nice blend of size, skill level and overall floor comprehension, Samanic should be able to handle either forward spot down the line. In an interview with the Front Office, he expressed his comfort level playing all five positions. He can handle on the perimeter or slide down to the interior, and while his jumper is still developing, he looks comfortable with his release and simply needs to work on consistency. Samanic should end up in the first-round conversation in what presently looks like a thinner 2019 draft.</p><p><strong>Charles Bassey, C, Nigeria</strong><br><strong>Height:</strong> 6’10” | <strong>Weight: </strong>225 | <strong>Draft-eligible: </strong>2020<br>Bassey won the camp MVP award with productive play over the course of the weekend, and headlined an extremely strong group of big men. He’s bounced around American high schools, currently playing at Aspire Academy in Kentucky, but is considered one of the best prospects in the high school class of 2019 and reinforced that ranking over the weekend. He possesses immense physical ability, with a thick, sturdy build that’s still maturing. He profiles as a dynamic rim-runner if everything breaks correctly, with the length to defend the basket and elevate in the paint. </p><p>Bassey’s skill level has improved since we saw him last year at the HoopHall Classic, and he showed some level of jump shooting ability and was able to lead fast breaks on a couple of occasions. That said, not facing great competition in high school and it’s a little unclear exactly what of his improvements will translate into real, structured game situations at this stage. His shot selection was occasionally questionable and it does beg the question as to how he perceives himself a a player—but Bassey is young enough to think he’ll figure that out. Western Kentucky, Kansas and UCLA are among the schools recruiting him at this stage. </p><p><strong>Killian Hayes, G, France</strong><br><strong>Height: </strong>6’5” | <strong>Weight: </strong>190 | <strong>Draft-eligible: </strong>2020<br>Clearly the top guard in attendance, Hayes is a natural playmaker and stood out on both ends of the floor all weekend. Born to an American father and French mother, Hayes was the second-youngest player at the entire event but displayed a highly advanced feel for a 16-year-old, firing timely passes and picking his spots well offensively. His teammates seemed to enjoy playing with him, and his ability to create off the bounce meant easy baskets for his team. Equally impressive was Hayes’ aggressive on-ball defense, as he generated turnovers and denied dribble penetration while using his length to apply high pressure. Accounting how much he appears to enjoy competing on that end, he could be up to defending three positions on the perimeter in due time.</p><p>One of just a few left-handers at the camp, Hayes looks comfortable shooting jumpers and should be able to gain added consistency as he develops, although his shot comes out of his hand a bit sideways which could eventually pose issues. He came in as a known entity and certainly helped himself with his overall showing, turning in a particularly strong second day of camp before sitting out much of the third with an apparent minor leg injury. He told the Front Office he patterns his game after Manu Ginobili, and that he’s used to functioning mostly at shooting guard with his club team, Cholet. The game already comes easily to him, and he’s on track for eventual first-round consideration.</p><p><strong>N’Faly Dante, C, Mali</strong><br><strong>Height: </strong>7’0”<strong> | Weight: </strong>220<strong> | Draft-eligible: </strong>2021<br>The youngest player in attendance, Dante boasts enviable tools for a rim-protecting, interior dive man and continues to flash big-time talent. Currently prepping at Sunrise Christian, Dante has a well-developed, wide frame and managed a number of explosive dunks gathering off two feet. Skill-wise he’s a work in progress, particularly when it comes to post footwork. Right now he can hang his hat on his athletic frame and activity level in the paint. He has the size and length to be a terrific anchor on defense. There’s a long way to go, but Dante has the full attention of NBA scouts. Kansas and LSU are among the colleges involved.</p><p><strong>Josh Green, SG, Australia</strong><br><strong>Height: </strong>6’6” | <strong>Weight</strong>: 190 | <strong>Draft-eligible</strong>: 2020<br>Green had several of the weekend’s best highlight dunks and has elite-level verticality to his game, able to take off and finish from outside the paint and make a strong impact in transition. He’s spent the high school season with IMG Academy, and has a host of top-tier college offers. He certainly took advantage of his opportunity with NBA scouts watching, showcasing his explosion and flashing an improved handle. While Green has a ways to go in terms of creating his own shot, he has potential to be a two-way wing player if all breaks correctly.</p><p><strong>AJ Lawson, G/F, Canada</strong><br><strong>Height: </strong>6’7” | <strong>Weight: </strong>160 | <strong>Draft-eligible: </strong>2020<br>Lawson was one of the better athletes on the floor this weekend, displaying some twitchy bounce and offensive feel as a ball-handler. He’s extremely skinny, with a similar build to Patrick McCaw that gives him some promise defensively. His versatility is intriguing if he can pack on muscle over the next few years. He showed a solid handle and was able to attack the paint and deliver some nice passes with either hand. Lawson hit some shots from outside and spent a lot of time on the ball, and though he’s not a natural point guard, he could evolve into a secondary playmaker. He doesn’t elevate much on his jumper and needs to become far more consistent in that area. He has offers including Oregon and SMU, visited Kentucky in December, and is scratching the surface in terms of what he might become.</p><p><strong>Paul Eboua, F, Cameroon</strong><br><strong>Height: </strong>6’7” | <strong>Weight: </strong>200 | <strong>Draft-eligible: </strong>2019<br>One of the most unique players at the camp from a physical perspective, Eboua has broad shoulders, thick legs and extreme length (he’s been measured with a 7’2” wingspan) that could make him an exceptional defender. He’s physically reminiscent of a young Ron Artest, and makes instinctive plays above the rim on either end of the floor. He may be stuck between positions at the moment, lacking the ball-handling skills and confidence to operate on the wing against better competition and also the interior feel to play as a four. Eboua did flash a bit of shooting touch, but is far from a consistent threat. He’s mostly limited to straight-line drives and energy points around the basket. Currently at Stella Azzura Academy in Italy, he’s still very early in his development and will be a name to follow over the next couple years.</p><p><strong>Biram Faye, F/C, Senegal</strong><br><strong>Height: </strong>6’8” | <strong>Weight: </strong>215 | <strong>Draft-eligible</strong>: 2020<br>Faye was one of the more physically intriguing players at the camp, with a strong build and quick bounce off the floor that led to a number of eye-popping dunks. He’s developing in Spain with Gran Canaria, and had a breakout weekend in front of NBA scouts with his ability to run the floor, finish and block shots. Faye consistently played with fire and showed good overall instincts playing mostly in traffic. He doesn’t have much of an offensive skill set yet, but put himself on the radar simply by playing the right way and making plays for his team. There’s a place in the NBA for bigs with his traits.</p><p><strong>Tyrese Samuel, F, Canada</strong><br><strong>Height: </strong>6’8” | <strong>Weight: </strong>210 | <strong>Draft-eligible</strong>: 2021<br>One of the clear standouts on day one of the camp, Samuel performed well when his motor was running and has the makings of a versatile forward, able to compete athletically as a big and also step out and knock down the occasional shot. It looks like he may be stuck between positions at the moment, but his ball skills aren’t bad and his powerful leaping ability stood out. His handle is functional attacking the rim, but he lacks necessary level of shake to play the three in college at this stage. His effort level and body language waxed and waned, and the consistency of his play with them. Set to graduate from Wasatch Academy in Utah in 2019, Samuel is set to take the high-major college route.</p><p><strong>Filip Petrusev, PF, Serbia</strong><br><strong>Height</strong>: 6’10” | <strong>Weight: </strong>215 | <strong>Draft-eligible</strong>: 2019<br>Already committed to Gonzaga for next year, Petrusev is a fluid, smooth-shooting stretch big who should be a perfect fit in Spokane. He’s teammates with potential 2019 No.1 pick R.J. Barrett at Montverde Academy, and was able to shine with some nice moments in the camp environment. He’s not a surefire NBA guy, but has the size and shooting tools going for him and will be in a great situation for his development. After helping lead Serbia to a title in last summer’s U18 Euros, Petrusev is a player to track long-term with some projectable utility at the NBA level.</p><p><strong>Leandro Bolmaro, G/F, Argentina</strong><br><strong>Height</strong>: 6’6” | <strong>Weight: </strong>170 | <strong>Draft-eligible</strong>: 2019<br>Perhaps the top pure shooter at the camp, Bolmaro was a constant threat from outside and played with a nice level of confidence and feel with the ball in his hands. He was consistently impactful and has the requisite size for his position, if not top-tier athleticism. Bolmaro is a player to monitor as a potential shooting specialist as he matures.</p>
Evaluating the Top International Prospects at Basketball Without Borders

LOS ANGELES — The NBA wrapped up another successful iteration of its Basketball Without Borders Global Camp over the weekend, bringing together many of the world’s top teenage prospects and mixing them together into a development-oriented setting. A whole host of scouts and executives from all 30 NBA teams attended the three-day event, which moves each year with All-Star weekend and has become a must-scout opportunity, also including elite international girls prospects for the WNBA to evaluate.

Staffed by an experienced group of NBA coaches and basketball personnel, there is an emphasis not only on skills and scrimmaging, but life skills as campers move toward pro careers in the U.S. and elsewhere. The level of competition was strong, peaking on Day Two as players gained comfort in their environment and adjusted to their busy schedules.

The Crossover’s Front Office was present for all three days of camp, laying eyes on many of the prospects for the first time. Out of 42 boys from 29 countries, here are the players who set themselves apart, headlined by a pair of potential first-rounders for the 2019 draft.

Sekou Doumboya, F, France
Height: 6’9” | Weight: 210 | Draft-eligible: 2019
Born in Guinea, Doumboya moved to France as a child and helped lead the team to gold as one of the younger prospects at the U18 Euros in 2016. Perhaps the best all-around athlete among this year’s BWB campers, Doumboya is tracking as an early first-round selection for next year’s draft. Possessing a rare combination of power and skill, he plays above the rim with ease, throwing down explosive two-handed slams and gathering quickly in space off one or two feet. When attacking downhill, there were few players who could stay in front of him. Despite lacking great change of direction due in part to his handle, Doumboya’s burst got it done in this setting. His lean, strong frame should be able to fill out, and he was arguably the top prospect at the camp.

Doumboya displayed nice shooting touch and a soft, easy release on the perimeter that looked consistent all weekend. He has considerable upside in that area, and while right now it’s more of a set shot, he has the requisite body control to develop into a capable shooter on the move. His developing handle and passing skills suggest he could play either forward position down the road. He’s instinctive reading the ball off the glass and may be best suited as a mismatch-type small-ball four in the NBA, and defended quite well on the perimeter when locked in. Doumboya was noticeably among the more vocal campers, as well. He told the Front Office he patterns his game after Paul George. The hype appears to be warranted.

Luka Samanic, F, Croatia
Height: 6’10” | Weight: 210 | Draft-eligible: 2019
Currently plying his trade for FC Barcelona’s junior team, Samanic showed up in El Segundo with a lofty reputation after winning MVP at last summer’s FIBA U18 European Championships. His father played professionally at a high level overseas. He’s quite a talent, blessed with great vision and able to handle, spot up and score at all three levels. Though not elite laterally, he’s smooth and has quality fundamental footwork that enables him to get where he needs to go and easily attack the basket off one or two dribbles. His performance was up and down throughout the weekend, but when engaged, Samanic’s potential was evident.

With a nice blend of size, skill level and overall floor comprehension, Samanic should be able to handle either forward spot down the line. In an interview with the Front Office, he expressed his comfort level playing all five positions. He can handle on the perimeter or slide down to the interior, and while his jumper is still developing, he looks comfortable with his release and simply needs to work on consistency. Samanic should end up in the first-round conversation in what presently looks like a thinner 2019 draft.

Charles Bassey, C, Nigeria
Height: 6’10” | Weight: 225 | Draft-eligible: 2020
Bassey won the camp MVP award with productive play over the course of the weekend, and headlined an extremely strong group of big men. He’s bounced around American high schools, currently playing at Aspire Academy in Kentucky, but is considered one of the best prospects in the high school class of 2019 and reinforced that ranking over the weekend. He possesses immense physical ability, with a thick, sturdy build that’s still maturing. He profiles as a dynamic rim-runner if everything breaks correctly, with the length to defend the basket and elevate in the paint.

Bassey’s skill level has improved since we saw him last year at the HoopHall Classic, and he showed some level of jump shooting ability and was able to lead fast breaks on a couple of occasions. That said, not facing great competition in high school and it’s a little unclear exactly what of his improvements will translate into real, structured game situations at this stage. His shot selection was occasionally questionable and it does beg the question as to how he perceives himself a a player—but Bassey is young enough to think he’ll figure that out. Western Kentucky, Kansas and UCLA are among the schools recruiting him at this stage.

Killian Hayes, G, France
Height: 6’5” | Weight: 190 | Draft-eligible: 2020
Clearly the top guard in attendance, Hayes is a natural playmaker and stood out on both ends of the floor all weekend. Born to an American father and French mother, Hayes was the second-youngest player at the entire event but displayed a highly advanced feel for a 16-year-old, firing timely passes and picking his spots well offensively. His teammates seemed to enjoy playing with him, and his ability to create off the bounce meant easy baskets for his team. Equally impressive was Hayes’ aggressive on-ball defense, as he generated turnovers and denied dribble penetration while using his length to apply high pressure. Accounting how much he appears to enjoy competing on that end, he could be up to defending three positions on the perimeter in due time.

One of just a few left-handers at the camp, Hayes looks comfortable shooting jumpers and should be able to gain added consistency as he develops, although his shot comes out of his hand a bit sideways which could eventually pose issues. He came in as a known entity and certainly helped himself with his overall showing, turning in a particularly strong second day of camp before sitting out much of the third with an apparent minor leg injury. He told the Front Office he patterns his game after Manu Ginobili, and that he’s used to functioning mostly at shooting guard with his club team, Cholet. The game already comes easily to him, and he’s on track for eventual first-round consideration.

N’Faly Dante, C, Mali
Height: 7’0” | Weight: 220 | Draft-eligible: 2021
The youngest player in attendance, Dante boasts enviable tools for a rim-protecting, interior dive man and continues to flash big-time talent. Currently prepping at Sunrise Christian, Dante has a well-developed, wide frame and managed a number of explosive dunks gathering off two feet. Skill-wise he’s a work in progress, particularly when it comes to post footwork. Right now he can hang his hat on his athletic frame and activity level in the paint. He has the size and length to be a terrific anchor on defense. There’s a long way to go, but Dante has the full attention of NBA scouts. Kansas and LSU are among the colleges involved.

Josh Green, SG, Australia
Height: 6’6” | Weight: 190 | Draft-eligible: 2020
Green had several of the weekend’s best highlight dunks and has elite-level verticality to his game, able to take off and finish from outside the paint and make a strong impact in transition. He’s spent the high school season with IMG Academy, and has a host of top-tier college offers. He certainly took advantage of his opportunity with NBA scouts watching, showcasing his explosion and flashing an improved handle. While Green has a ways to go in terms of creating his own shot, he has potential to be a two-way wing player if all breaks correctly.

AJ Lawson, G/F, Canada
Height: 6’7” | Weight: 160 | Draft-eligible: 2020
Lawson was one of the better athletes on the floor this weekend, displaying some twitchy bounce and offensive feel as a ball-handler. He’s extremely skinny, with a similar build to Patrick McCaw that gives him some promise defensively. His versatility is intriguing if he can pack on muscle over the next few years. He showed a solid handle and was able to attack the paint and deliver some nice passes with either hand. Lawson hit some shots from outside and spent a lot of time on the ball, and though he’s not a natural point guard, he could evolve into a secondary playmaker. He doesn’t elevate much on his jumper and needs to become far more consistent in that area. He has offers including Oregon and SMU, visited Kentucky in December, and is scratching the surface in terms of what he might become.

Paul Eboua, F, Cameroon
Height: 6’7” | Weight: 200 | Draft-eligible: 2019
One of the most unique players at the camp from a physical perspective, Eboua has broad shoulders, thick legs and extreme length (he’s been measured with a 7’2” wingspan) that could make him an exceptional defender. He’s physically reminiscent of a young Ron Artest, and makes instinctive plays above the rim on either end of the floor. He may be stuck between positions at the moment, lacking the ball-handling skills and confidence to operate on the wing against better competition and also the interior feel to play as a four. Eboua did flash a bit of shooting touch, but is far from a consistent threat. He’s mostly limited to straight-line drives and energy points around the basket. Currently at Stella Azzura Academy in Italy, he’s still very early in his development and will be a name to follow over the next couple years.

Biram Faye, F/C, Senegal
Height: 6’8” | Weight: 215 | Draft-eligible: 2020
Faye was one of the more physically intriguing players at the camp, with a strong build and quick bounce off the floor that led to a number of eye-popping dunks. He’s developing in Spain with Gran Canaria, and had a breakout weekend in front of NBA scouts with his ability to run the floor, finish and block shots. Faye consistently played with fire and showed good overall instincts playing mostly in traffic. He doesn’t have much of an offensive skill set yet, but put himself on the radar simply by playing the right way and making plays for his team. There’s a place in the NBA for bigs with his traits.

Tyrese Samuel, F, Canada
Height: 6’8” | Weight: 210 | Draft-eligible: 2021
One of the clear standouts on day one of the camp, Samuel performed well when his motor was running and has the makings of a versatile forward, able to compete athletically as a big and also step out and knock down the occasional shot. It looks like he may be stuck between positions at the moment, but his ball skills aren’t bad and his powerful leaping ability stood out. His handle is functional attacking the rim, but he lacks necessary level of shake to play the three in college at this stage. His effort level and body language waxed and waned, and the consistency of his play with them. Set to graduate from Wasatch Academy in Utah in 2019, Samuel is set to take the high-major college route.

Filip Petrusev, PF, Serbia
Height: 6’10” | Weight: 215 | Draft-eligible: 2019
Already committed to Gonzaga for next year, Petrusev is a fluid, smooth-shooting stretch big who should be a perfect fit in Spokane. He’s teammates with potential 2019 No.1 pick R.J. Barrett at Montverde Academy, and was able to shine with some nice moments in the camp environment. He’s not a surefire NBA guy, but has the size and shooting tools going for him and will be in a great situation for his development. After helping lead Serbia to a title in last summer’s U18 Euros, Petrusev is a player to track long-term with some projectable utility at the NBA level.

Leandro Bolmaro, G/F, Argentina
Height: 6’6” | Weight: 170 | Draft-eligible: 2019
Perhaps the top pure shooter at the camp, Bolmaro was a constant threat from outside and played with a nice level of confidence and feel with the ball in his hands. He was consistently impactful and has the requisite size for his position, if not top-tier athleticism. Bolmaro is a player to monitor as a potential shooting specialist as he matures.

The Cadet Field House has signs that read that the Air Force Academy had canceled all athletic events on Saturday Jan. 20, 2018 at the U.S. Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, Colo. Hours after the partial shutdown took effect, the academy said both home and away events have been postponed. The academy&#39;s online sports calendar lists seven competitions that had been set for Saturday: men&#39;s and women&#39;s basketball games at Fresno State, men&#39;s and women&#39;s swimming at UNLV, men&#39;s hockey against Sacred Heart at the academy and men&#39;s gymnastics against Oklahoma at the academy. (Dougal Brownlie/The Gazette via AP)
The Cadet Field House has signs that read that the Air Force Academy had canceled all athletic events on Saturday Jan. 20, 2018 at the U.S. Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, Colo. Hours after the partial shutdown took effect, the academy said both home and away events have been postponed. The academy's online sports calendar lists seven competitions that had been set for Saturday: men's and women's basketball games at Fresno State, men's and women's swimming at UNLV, men's hockey against Sacred Heart at the academy and men's gymnastics against Oklahoma at the academy. (Dougal Brownlie/The Gazette via AP)
The Cadet Field House has signs that read that the Air Force Academy had canceled all athletic events on Saturday Jan. 20, 2018 at the U.S. Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, Colo. Hours after the partial shutdown took effect, the academy said both home and away events have been postponed. The academy's online sports calendar lists seven competitions that had been set for Saturday: men's and women's basketball games at Fresno State, men's and women's swimming at UNLV, men's hockey against Sacred Heart at the academy and men's gymnastics against Oklahoma at the academy. (Dougal Brownlie/The Gazette via AP)
People walk towards the Cadet Field House as a sign reads that the Air Force Academy has canceled all athletic events on Saturday Jan. 20, 2018 at the U.S. Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, Colo. Hours after the partial shutdown took effect, the academy said both home and away events have been postponed. The academy&#39;s online sports calendar lists seven competitions that had been set for Saturday: men&#39;s and women&#39;s basketball games at Fresno State, men&#39;s and women&#39;s swimming at UNLV, men&#39;s hockey against Sacred Heart at the academy and men&#39;s gymnastics against Oklahoma at the academy. (Dougal Brownlie/The Gazette via AP)
People walk towards the Cadet Field House as a sign reads that the Air Force Academy has canceled all athletic events on Saturday Jan. 20, 2018 at the U.S. Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, Colo. Hours after the partial shutdown took effect, the academy said both home and away events have been postponed. The academy's online sports calendar lists seven competitions that had been set for Saturday: men's and women's basketball games at Fresno State, men's and women's swimming at UNLV, men's hockey against Sacred Heart at the academy and men's gymnastics against Oklahoma at the academy. (Dougal Brownlie/The Gazette via AP)
People walk towards the Cadet Field House as a sign reads that the Air Force Academy has canceled all athletic events on Saturday Jan. 20, 2018 at the U.S. Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, Colo. Hours after the partial shutdown took effect, the academy said both home and away events have been postponed. The academy's online sports calendar lists seven competitions that had been set for Saturday: men's and women's basketball games at Fresno State, men's and women's swimming at UNLV, men's hockey against Sacred Heart at the academy and men's gymnastics against Oklahoma at the academy. (Dougal Brownlie/The Gazette via AP)
A sign overs up the &#39;Today&#39;s Event&#39; at Cadet Field House that reads that the Air Force Academy had canceled all athletic events on Saturday Jan. 20, 2018 at the U.S. Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, Colo. Hours after the partial shutdown took effect, the academy said both home and away events have been postponed. The academy&#39;s online sports calendar lists seven competitions that had been set for Saturday: men&#39;s and women&#39;s basketball games at Fresno State, men&#39;s and women&#39;s swimming at UNLV, men&#39;s hockey against Sacred Heart at the academy and men&#39;s gymnastics against Oklahoma at the academy. (Dougal Brownlie/The Gazette via AP)
A sign overs up the 'Today's Event' at Cadet Field House that reads that the Air Force Academy had canceled all athletic events on Saturday Jan. 20, 2018 at the U.S. Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, Colo. Hours after the partial shutdown took effect, the academy said both home and away events have been postponed. The academy's online sports calendar lists seven competitions that had been set for Saturday: men's and women's basketball games at Fresno State, men's and women's swimming at UNLV, men's hockey against Sacred Heart at the academy and men's gymnastics against Oklahoma at the academy. (Dougal Brownlie/The Gazette via AP)
A sign overs up the 'Today's Event' at Cadet Field House that reads that the Air Force Academy had canceled all athletic events on Saturday Jan. 20, 2018 at the U.S. Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, Colo. Hours after the partial shutdown took effect, the academy said both home and away events have been postponed. The academy's online sports calendar lists seven competitions that had been set for Saturday: men's and women's basketball games at Fresno State, men's and women's swimming at UNLV, men's hockey against Sacred Heart at the academy and men's gymnastics against Oklahoma at the academy. (Dougal Brownlie/The Gazette via AP)
A sign overs up the &#39;Today&#39;s Event&#39; at Cadet Field House that reads that the Air Force Academy has canceled all athletic events on Saturday Jan. 20, 2018 at the U.S. Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, Colo. Hours after the partial shutdown took effect, the academy said both home and away events have been postponed. The academy&#39;s online sports calendar lists seven competitions that had been set for Saturday: men&#39;s and women&#39;s basketball games at Fresno State, men&#39;s and women&#39;s swimming at UNLV, men&#39;s hockey against Sacred Heart at the academy and men&#39;s gymnastics against Oklahoma at the academy. (Dougal Brownlie/The Gazette via AP)
A sign overs up the 'Today's Event' at Cadet Field House that reads that the Air Force Academy has canceled all athletic events on Saturday Jan. 20, 2018 at the U.S. Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, Colo. Hours after the partial shutdown took effect, the academy said both home and away events have been postponed. The academy's online sports calendar lists seven competitions that had been set for Saturday: men's and women's basketball games at Fresno State, men's and women's swimming at UNLV, men's hockey against Sacred Heart at the academy and men's gymnastics against Oklahoma at the academy. (Dougal Brownlie/The Gazette via AP)
A sign overs up the 'Today's Event' at Cadet Field House that reads that the Air Force Academy has canceled all athletic events on Saturday Jan. 20, 2018 at the U.S. Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, Colo. Hours after the partial shutdown took effect, the academy said both home and away events have been postponed. The academy's online sports calendar lists seven competitions that had been set for Saturday: men's and women's basketball games at Fresno State, men's and women's swimming at UNLV, men's hockey against Sacred Heart at the academy and men's gymnastics against Oklahoma at the academy. (Dougal Brownlie/The Gazette via AP)
Signs for the Air Force Hockey game for the evening game against Sacred Heart were discarded at Cadet Field House after the Air Force Academy has canceled all athletic events on Saturday, Jan. 20, 2018 at the U.S. Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, Colo. Hours after the partial shutdown took effect, the academy said both home and away events have been postponed. The academy&#39;s online sports calendar lists seven competitions that had been set for Saturday: men&#39;s and women&#39;s basketball games at Fresno State, men&#39;s and women&#39;s swimming at UNLV, men&#39;s hockey against Sacred Heart at the academy and men&#39;s gymnastics against Oklahoma at the academy. (Dougal Brownlie/The Gazette via AP)
Signs for the Air Force Hockey game for the evening game against Sacred Heart were discarded at Cadet Field House after the Air Force Academy has canceled all athletic events on Saturday, Jan. 20, 2018 at the U.S. Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, Colo. Hours after the partial shutdown took effect, the academy said both home and away events have been postponed. The academy's online sports calendar lists seven competitions that had been set for Saturday: men's and women's basketball games at Fresno State, men's and women's swimming at UNLV, men's hockey against Sacred Heart at the academy and men's gymnastics against Oklahoma at the academy. (Dougal Brownlie/The Gazette via AP)
Signs for the Air Force Hockey game for the evening game against Sacred Heart were discarded at Cadet Field House after the Air Force Academy has canceled all athletic events on Saturday, Jan. 20, 2018 at the U.S. Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, Colo. Hours after the partial shutdown took effect, the academy said both home and away events have been postponed. The academy's online sports calendar lists seven competitions that had been set for Saturday: men's and women's basketball games at Fresno State, men's and women's swimming at UNLV, men's hockey against Sacred Heart at the academy and men's gymnastics against Oklahoma at the academy. (Dougal Brownlie/The Gazette via AP)
UCLA men&#39;s basketball head coach Steve Alford speaks at a press conference at UCLA in Los Angeles, California, U.S., November 15, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
UCLA men's basketball head coach Steve Alford speaks at a press conference at UCLA in Los Angeles
UCLA men's basketball head coach Steve Alford speaks at a press conference at UCLA in Los Angeles, California, U.S., November 15, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
UCLA men&#39;s basketball head coach Steve Alford speaks at a press conference at UCLA in Los Angeles, California, U.S., November 15, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
UCLA men's basketball head coach Steve Alford speaks at a press conference at UCLA in Los Angeles
UCLA men's basketball head coach Steve Alford speaks at a press conference at UCLA in Los Angeles, California, U.S., November 15, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
UCLA men&#39;s basketball head coach Steve Alford speaks at a press conference at UCLA in Los Angeles, California, U.S., November 15, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
UCLA men's basketball head coach Steve Alford speaks at a press conference at UCLA in Los Angeles
UCLA men's basketball head coach Steve Alford speaks at a press conference at UCLA in Los Angeles, California, U.S., November 15, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
UCLA men&#39;s basketball head coach Steve Alford listens at a press conference at UCLA in Los Angeles, California, U.S., November 15, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
UCLA men's basketball head coach Steve Alford listens at a press conference at UCLA in Los Angeles
UCLA men's basketball head coach Steve Alford listens at a press conference at UCLA in Los Angeles, California, U.S., November 15, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
The U.S. men&apos;s basketball team has selected Greensboro, North Carolina, to host its first home World Cup qualifying game.
USA men’s basketball picks Greensboro, NC, for 1st home game
The U.S. men's basketball team has selected Greensboro, North Carolina, to host its first home World Cup qualifying game.
The KFC Yum! Center where the University of Louisville men&#39;s basketball team plays, is pictured in Louisville, Kentucky, U.S., September 28, 2017. REUTERS/Chris Kenning
The KFC Yum! Center where the University of Louisville men's basketball team plays, is pictured in Louisville
The KFC Yum! Center where the University of Louisville men's basketball team plays, is pictured in Louisville, Kentucky, U.S., September 28, 2017. REUTERS/Chris Kenning
The KFC Yum! Center where the University of Louisville men&#39;s basketball team plays, is pictured in Louisville, Kentucky, U.S., September 28, 2017. REUTERS/Chris Kenning
The KFC Yum! Center where the University of Louisville men's basketball team plays, is pictured in Louisville
The KFC Yum! Center where the University of Louisville men's basketball team plays, is pictured in Louisville, Kentucky, U.S., September 28, 2017. REUTERS/Chris Kenning
<p>On Dec. 28, 2015, Omri Casspi had arguably the best game of his career: The veteran forward scored a career–high 36 points, including nine three-pointers, on the road against the defending champion Warriors. That’s the player the Warriors hope they added this summer, when Casspi joined Golden State on a one-year contract.</p><p>Casspi is at a crucial juncture in his career. After eight years in the league, most recently a down season that saw him play for three different teams, the Israeli forward might have to fight for minutes this season with the loaded Warriors. Still, his ability to shoot threes—he’s a 36.7% career shooter from beyond the arc—could make him an invaluable role player.</p><p>Before stepping on the court for his new team, Casspi traveled to his home country with NBA commissioner Adam Silver, Basketball Hall of Famer David Robinson and several NBA players for a Basketball Without Borders camp, which brought together kids from 22 different countries and a variety of religious backgrounds. <a href="http://SI.com" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:SI.com" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">SI.com</a> recently spoke to Casspi about the Warriors, Basketball without Borders, representing Israel and more. </p><p><em>This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.</em></p><p><strong>Stanley Kay: What has the reaction been like in your home country to the news that you</strong><strong>’re joining the NBA champions?</strong></p><p><strong>Omri Casspi: </strong>It was crazy. The Warriors—one thing about them, besides the fact that they’re champions—people really love them. They really love the way they play, they love their players, they love their personnel, they love the way the organization is being handled from the ownership down to the GM, coaches and everybody else. And I remember the next day—I went to sleep, and since 6 a.m. my phone was blowing up. I had 400 missed calls, texts from all over, the prime minister, the minister of sport, and a crazy amount of love really. People were really excited about it. And I felt like it’s a dream come true. You have the opportunity to join this caliber of an organization with this caliber of people, of personalities, of people that are working in this organization. It’s just a dream come true, and I’m looking forward to that challenge.</p><p><strong>SK: What did Bibi [Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu] text you?</strong></p><p><strong>OC: </strong>Yeah, he was really excited. I talked to him, and I talked to the minister of sport on the phone. They said they’re really proud and they’re looking forward to the opportunity of me playing there and coming to watch. It was overwhelming, in a sense. When I got drafted, people were going crazy back home and this was even crazier.</p><p><strong>SK: You</strong><strong>’ve yet to actually participate in a playoff game in your career. How big of a factor was it to join a contender?</strong></p><p><strong>OC: </strong>It was very big. So many times there are good players on bad teams and they don’t get the credit that they sometimes deserve to. I felt that we had years in Sacramento that we played as individuals maybe we played better than as a team. We never really got the credit that we deserved to, and I felt that I’ve been in the league for eight years now, I’m 29, there’s nothing I want more than to win. And there’s nothing that I want more than to help my team win basketball games, whether it’s on the court or off the court.</p><p>Obviously there will be games that I might play, and that I might not play. So I want to be the best teammate I can be to my teammates, the most supportive and the guy that does all the things that need to be done to help the team win. And obviously great that a team like the Warriors reached out and gave me that opportunity. I’ve been around long enough now to understand what I’m getting into, and I’m looking forward to that challenge.</p><p><strong>SK: You dropped 36 points on the Warriors a couple years ago. I imagine that ranks highly on your career highlights.</strong></p><p><strong>OC: </strong>No question. It was definitely a night to remember. Sometimes you have big nights, but it doesn’t really happen like that when you go back and forth with one of the greatest shooters of all-time, if not the greatest. It was obviously a night to remember.</p><p><strong>SK: Say it</strong><strong>’s in the end of the game, a couple seconds left on the clock, Warriors down by three. You</strong><strong>’ve got the ball, and somehow Kevin Durant, Klay Thompson and Steph Curry are all open behind the three-point arc. Who are you passing to?</strong></p><p><strong>OC: </strong>[Laughs] That’s a good question. I’d take a timeout, I’d think about it. Honestly, I don’t know—they’re all great. Really, honestly, it depends who has the best game. With that caliber of shooters, and as good as teammates as they are, I feel like if one guy got it going, that’s the smart play to do.</p><p><strong>SK: Or maybe you could just pull up.</strong></p><p><strong>OC: </strong>Oh, yeah. I don’t think Steve Kerr would be too happy with that. [Laughs]</p><p><strong>SK: You</strong><strong>’ve been in the United States for eight years now. Have you managed to </strong><a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/19/sports/basketball/19casspi.html?mcubz=3" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:find good hummus yet" class="link rapid-noclick-resp"><strong>find good hummus yet</strong></a><strong>?</strong></p><p><strong>OC: </strong>[Laughs] Actually there is. There’s one in L.A. that really resembles home. It’s called Dr. Sandwich. It’s actually an Israeli guy that does really good hummus and really good shawarma.</p><p><strong>SK: At least in my experience at grocery stores, I</strong><strong>’ve never found anything like the hummus I ate in Israel when I visited.</strong></p><p><strong>OC: </strong>Oh, no question.</p><p><strong>SK: Obviously you</strong><strong>’ve brought a lot of NBA players to Israel over the years. What NBA player would you most want to bring to Israel that you haven</strong><strong>’t been able to bring yet?</strong></p><p><strong>OC: </strong>I don’t know, that’s a very good question. I always felt that bringing NBA guys to Israel is obviously great for them to see Israel and to kind of interact with fans all over the world that they have and see the history, etc. But it’s also great for the country. It’s creating a great P.R. for a beautiful country that gets so much bad P.R. at times. My thought was always just helping basketball develop and helping our country have a very good atmosphere and buzz around it. Because it deserves it.</p><p><strong>SK: You mentioned</strong><strong> good P.R. for Israel. What was your reaction when the NFL player Michael Bennett decided to withdraw from a sponsored trip to Israel over concerns that he was being used for public relations?</strong></p><p><strong>OC: </strong>When things are coming out this way, it creates a negativity in a sense. Creating good P.R. is obviously a thought, but it’s not the purpose of the trip. The purpose of the trip is us having fun. And I never ask any of my guys to upload pictures or to talk about Israel or what not. It happens naturally. Because guys are coming and they have a good time and they see the love. We went to the Western Wall on a Friday night one day, and we had thousands of people following us around and taking pictures and showing so much love. I don’t think they ever get love like that anywhere. Sometimes we do work for the communities and bring kids from different communities and do the work, and that alone creates great atmosphere. So when football players decide not to be used, I can understand. He doesn’t need to be used. He’s a grown man, and we’re all grown men. Whether they come in and they like the country or not, it’s up to them.</p><p><strong>SK: Have you ever encountered a similar situation where maybe a player you invite has concerns about the trip, and if so how do you handle that?</strong></p><p><strong>OC: </strong>No, never, because it was never about it. This is not what it was about. It was always about us going and having a good time, and having a summer together. And sometimes with my teammates, it’s getting to know each other. I had Caron Butler and Rudy Gay and DeMarcus Cousins all coming together and working out, and going to drink wine at night and talking about the season and what it’s going to be like, and what we can do to help the team win. So it’s never really about creating a P.R. It happens naturally because people are having a good time.</p><p><strong>SK: Was going to the Dead Sea with Boogie Cousins as fun as it looked in that picture?</strong></p><p><strong>OC: </strong>That was a day to remember. We had a great time.</p><p><strong>SK: On a more serious note, we</strong><strong>’ve seen resurgent anti-Semitism in the U.S. The Anti-Defamation League </strong><a href="https://www.adl.org/news/press-releases/us-anti-semitic-incidents-spike-86-percent-so-far-in-2017" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:said" class="link rapid-noclick-resp"><strong>said</strong></a><strong> anti-Semitic incidents were up 86% in the first three months of this year.</strong><strong> How close of attention have you paid to this resurgence of anti-Semitism in your adopted home?</strong></p><p><strong>OC:</strong> I always do. I’m always concerned for the wellbeing of my family and the people I know around me and the Jewish communities around the country. I don’t think that what happened in Virginia resembled the U.S. I never felt, in my personal life, anti-Semitism from people, especially in the U.S.—on the basketball court or in my private life. We live in a crazy time. But there’s plenty of wonderful people here in the U.S. that are so much against it. We see the media going against it, and people around the country going against it. Hopefully this will go away as it came around, and that us as people will just come together and banish those who are trying to do those horrible things.</p><p><strong>SK: One of the people in the NBA who</strong><strong>’s been the most outspoken about this stuff is your new coach, Steve Kerr. Is that something that players around the league take notice of, when a coach is willing to speak out?</strong></p><p>Of course. No question. It’s part of our life. I never really got into politics and stuff like that, but when things of that nature are coming around, you can’t just not appreciate people standing up to that. We definitely appreciate that.</p><p><strong>SK: You say you</strong><strong>’ve never gotten into politics, but you</strong><strong>’re the sole representative of Israel in the NBA and there aren</strong><strong>’t many Jewish players in the league. Do you feel like when there</strong><strong>’s an important issue</strong><strong>, whether it</strong><strong>’s resurgent anti-Semitism or something to do with Israel, do you feel more of an obligation to speak up, now that your fellow players are speaking up about issues that are important to them as well?</strong></p><p>It really depends what it is. I won’t get to who the president is, or whatever it is, but anti-Semitism is something that’s above politics. Anti-Semitism is something that I’m always going to stand up against, and be against it obviously and support my people. But I won’t get into conflicts—whether it’s conflicts in politics, the Middle East, whatever it is. It’s not my job. I’m an athlete and I don’t want to get into that. But anti-Semitism—and not only that, just racism in general, people going up against them because of the color of their skin, their race or their religion—I’m always going to stand up against that. But that would be about it.</p><p><em>(Note: SI spoke to Casspi earlier this month, before President Trump tweeted that he had </em><em>“withdrawn</em><em>” the Warriors</em><em>’ White House invitation. On Sunday, Casspi addressed the incident. </em><em>“The number one job of a president is bringing people together,</em><em>” he </em><a href="http://www.haaretz.com/world-news/americas/1.813866" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:said" class="link rapid-noclick-resp"><em>said</em></a><em>. </em><em>“He</em><em>’s the one who chose to be at the top, but he needs to bring people together. What he</em><em>’s creating is a divide between the people.</em><em>”)</em></p><p><strong>SK: In August, you helped lead a Basketball Without Borders program in Tel Aviv, the first time Israel has hosted the event. Why do you think it</strong><strong>’s important to bring together children of different faiths and backgrounds, and why do you think basketball is a good way to do that?</strong></p><p>Sports in general is a great way to connect people from different communities. I’ve been in the league for eight years, and I’ve been working on bringing Basketball Without Borders to Israel for the past five years. I felt like this year one of the things I was really proud of, besides the fact that it’s so great for basketball in Israel and it’s creating such good attention for basketball and sports in Israel, but we had an opportunity to connect people from different communities outside of basketball. We did so much off the court work, bringing kids from the Muslim community and kids from the Jewish community, and by playing basketball and by talking in different group chats, creating a bridge of connecting people from different backgrounds. So many times, those kids, they don’t have that opportunity before. I felt like kids made friendships for a lifetime.</p>
Omri Casspi Q&A: The Warriors, Israel and Basketball Without Borders

On Dec. 28, 2015, Omri Casspi had arguably the best game of his career: The veteran forward scored a career–high 36 points, including nine three-pointers, on the road against the defending champion Warriors. That’s the player the Warriors hope they added this summer, when Casspi joined Golden State on a one-year contract.

Casspi is at a crucial juncture in his career. After eight years in the league, most recently a down season that saw him play for three different teams, the Israeli forward might have to fight for minutes this season with the loaded Warriors. Still, his ability to shoot threes—he’s a 36.7% career shooter from beyond the arc—could make him an invaluable role player.

Before stepping on the court for his new team, Casspi traveled to his home country with NBA commissioner Adam Silver, Basketball Hall of Famer David Robinson and several NBA players for a Basketball Without Borders camp, which brought together kids from 22 different countries and a variety of religious backgrounds. SI.com recently spoke to Casspi about the Warriors, Basketball without Borders, representing Israel and more.

This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.

Stanley Kay: What has the reaction been like in your home country to the news that you’re joining the NBA champions?

Omri Casspi: It was crazy. The Warriors—one thing about them, besides the fact that they’re champions—people really love them. They really love the way they play, they love their players, they love their personnel, they love the way the organization is being handled from the ownership down to the GM, coaches and everybody else. And I remember the next day—I went to sleep, and since 6 a.m. my phone was blowing up. I had 400 missed calls, texts from all over, the prime minister, the minister of sport, and a crazy amount of love really. People were really excited about it. And I felt like it’s a dream come true. You have the opportunity to join this caliber of an organization with this caliber of people, of personalities, of people that are working in this organization. It’s just a dream come true, and I’m looking forward to that challenge.

SK: What did Bibi [Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu] text you?

OC: Yeah, he was really excited. I talked to him, and I talked to the minister of sport on the phone. They said they’re really proud and they’re looking forward to the opportunity of me playing there and coming to watch. It was overwhelming, in a sense. When I got drafted, people were going crazy back home and this was even crazier.

SK: You’ve yet to actually participate in a playoff game in your career. How big of a factor was it to join a contender?

OC: It was very big. So many times there are good players on bad teams and they don’t get the credit that they sometimes deserve to. I felt that we had years in Sacramento that we played as individuals maybe we played better than as a team. We never really got the credit that we deserved to, and I felt that I’ve been in the league for eight years now, I’m 29, there’s nothing I want more than to win. And there’s nothing that I want more than to help my team win basketball games, whether it’s on the court or off the court.

Obviously there will be games that I might play, and that I might not play. So I want to be the best teammate I can be to my teammates, the most supportive and the guy that does all the things that need to be done to help the team win. And obviously great that a team like the Warriors reached out and gave me that opportunity. I’ve been around long enough now to understand what I’m getting into, and I’m looking forward to that challenge.

SK: You dropped 36 points on the Warriors a couple years ago. I imagine that ranks highly on your career highlights.

OC: No question. It was definitely a night to remember. Sometimes you have big nights, but it doesn’t really happen like that when you go back and forth with one of the greatest shooters of all-time, if not the greatest. It was obviously a night to remember.

SK: Say it’s in the end of the game, a couple seconds left on the clock, Warriors down by three. You’ve got the ball, and somehow Kevin Durant, Klay Thompson and Steph Curry are all open behind the three-point arc. Who are you passing to?

OC: [Laughs] That’s a good question. I’d take a timeout, I’d think about it. Honestly, I don’t know—they’re all great. Really, honestly, it depends who has the best game. With that caliber of shooters, and as good as teammates as they are, I feel like if one guy got it going, that’s the smart play to do.

SK: Or maybe you could just pull up.

OC: Oh, yeah. I don’t think Steve Kerr would be too happy with that. [Laughs]

SK: You’ve been in the United States for eight years now. Have you managed to find good hummus yet?

OC: [Laughs] Actually there is. There’s one in L.A. that really resembles home. It’s called Dr. Sandwich. It’s actually an Israeli guy that does really good hummus and really good shawarma.

SK: At least in my experience at grocery stores, I’ve never found anything like the hummus I ate in Israel when I visited.

OC: Oh, no question.

SK: Obviously you’ve brought a lot of NBA players to Israel over the years. What NBA player would you most want to bring to Israel that you haven’t been able to bring yet?

OC: I don’t know, that’s a very good question. I always felt that bringing NBA guys to Israel is obviously great for them to see Israel and to kind of interact with fans all over the world that they have and see the history, etc. But it’s also great for the country. It’s creating a great P.R. for a beautiful country that gets so much bad P.R. at times. My thought was always just helping basketball develop and helping our country have a very good atmosphere and buzz around it. Because it deserves it.

SK: You mentioned good P.R. for Israel. What was your reaction when the NFL player Michael Bennett decided to withdraw from a sponsored trip to Israel over concerns that he was being used for public relations?

OC: When things are coming out this way, it creates a negativity in a sense. Creating good P.R. is obviously a thought, but it’s not the purpose of the trip. The purpose of the trip is us having fun. And I never ask any of my guys to upload pictures or to talk about Israel or what not. It happens naturally. Because guys are coming and they have a good time and they see the love. We went to the Western Wall on a Friday night one day, and we had thousands of people following us around and taking pictures and showing so much love. I don’t think they ever get love like that anywhere. Sometimes we do work for the communities and bring kids from different communities and do the work, and that alone creates great atmosphere. So when football players decide not to be used, I can understand. He doesn’t need to be used. He’s a grown man, and we’re all grown men. Whether they come in and they like the country or not, it’s up to them.

SK: Have you ever encountered a similar situation where maybe a player you invite has concerns about the trip, and if so how do you handle that?

OC: No, never, because it was never about it. This is not what it was about. It was always about us going and having a good time, and having a summer together. And sometimes with my teammates, it’s getting to know each other. I had Caron Butler and Rudy Gay and DeMarcus Cousins all coming together and working out, and going to drink wine at night and talking about the season and what it’s going to be like, and what we can do to help the team win. So it’s never really about creating a P.R. It happens naturally because people are having a good time.

SK: Was going to the Dead Sea with Boogie Cousins as fun as it looked in that picture?

OC: That was a day to remember. We had a great time.

SK: On a more serious note, we’ve seen resurgent anti-Semitism in the U.S. The Anti-Defamation League said anti-Semitic incidents were up 86% in the first three months of this year. How close of attention have you paid to this resurgence of anti-Semitism in your adopted home?

OC: I always do. I’m always concerned for the wellbeing of my family and the people I know around me and the Jewish communities around the country. I don’t think that what happened in Virginia resembled the U.S. I never felt, in my personal life, anti-Semitism from people, especially in the U.S.—on the basketball court or in my private life. We live in a crazy time. But there’s plenty of wonderful people here in the U.S. that are so much against it. We see the media going against it, and people around the country going against it. Hopefully this will go away as it came around, and that us as people will just come together and banish those who are trying to do those horrible things.

SK: One of the people in the NBA who’s been the most outspoken about this stuff is your new coach, Steve Kerr. Is that something that players around the league take notice of, when a coach is willing to speak out?

Of course. No question. It’s part of our life. I never really got into politics and stuff like that, but when things of that nature are coming around, you can’t just not appreciate people standing up to that. We definitely appreciate that.

SK: You say you’ve never gotten into politics, but you’re the sole representative of Israel in the NBA and there aren’t many Jewish players in the league. Do you feel like when there’s an important issue, whether it’s resurgent anti-Semitism or something to do with Israel, do you feel more of an obligation to speak up, now that your fellow players are speaking up about issues that are important to them as well?

It really depends what it is. I won’t get to who the president is, or whatever it is, but anti-Semitism is something that’s above politics. Anti-Semitism is something that I’m always going to stand up against, and be against it obviously and support my people. But I won’t get into conflicts—whether it’s conflicts in politics, the Middle East, whatever it is. It’s not my job. I’m an athlete and I don’t want to get into that. But anti-Semitism—and not only that, just racism in general, people going up against them because of the color of their skin, their race or their religion—I’m always going to stand up against that. But that would be about it.

(Note: SI spoke to Casspi earlier this month, before President Trump tweeted that he had “withdrawn” the Warriors’ White House invitation. On Sunday, Casspi addressed the incident. “The number one job of a president is bringing people together,” he said. “He’s the one who chose to be at the top, but he needs to bring people together. What he’s creating is a divide between the people.”)

SK: In August, you helped lead a Basketball Without Borders program in Tel Aviv, the first time Israel has hosted the event. Why do you think it’s important to bring together children of different faiths and backgrounds, and why do you think basketball is a good way to do that?

Sports in general is a great way to connect people from different communities. I’ve been in the league for eight years, and I’ve been working on bringing Basketball Without Borders to Israel for the past five years. I felt like this year one of the things I was really proud of, besides the fact that it’s so great for basketball in Israel and it’s creating such good attention for basketball and sports in Israel, but we had an opportunity to connect people from different communities outside of basketball. We did so much off the court work, bringing kids from the Muslim community and kids from the Jewish community, and by playing basketball and by talking in different group chats, creating a bridge of connecting people from different backgrounds. So many times, those kids, they don’t have that opportunity before. I felt like kids made friendships for a lifetime.

<p>On Dec. 28, 2015, Omri Casspi had arguably the best game of his career: The veteran forward scored a career–high 36 points, including nine three-pointers, on the road against the defending champion Warriors. That’s the player the Warriors hope they added this summer, when Casspi joined Golden State on a one-year contract.</p><p>Casspi is at a crucial juncture in his career. After eight years in the league, most recently a down season that saw him play for three different teams, the Israeli forward might have to fight for minutes this season with the loaded Warriors. Still, his ability to shoot threes—he’s a 36.7% career shooter from beyond the arc—could make him an invaluable role player.</p><p>Before stepping on the court for his new team, Casspi traveled to his home country with NBA commissioner Adam Silver, Basketball Hall of Famer David Robinson and several NBA players for a Basketball Without Borders camp, which brought together kids from 22 different countries and a variety of religious backgrounds. <a href="http://SI.com" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:SI.com" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">SI.com</a> recently spoke to Casspi about the Warriors, Basketball without Borders, representing Israel and more. </p><p><em>This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.</em></p><p><strong>Stanley Kay: What has the reaction been like in your home country to the news that you</strong><strong>’re joining the NBA champions?</strong></p><p><strong>Omri Casspi: </strong>It was crazy. The Warriors—one thing about them, besides the fact that they’re champions—people really love them. They really love the way they play, they love their players, they love their personnel, they love the way the organization is being handled from the ownership down to the GM, coaches and everybody else. And I remember the next day—I went to sleep, and since 6 a.m. my phone was blowing up. I had 400 missed calls, texts from all over, the prime minister, the minister of sport, and a crazy amount of love really. People were really excited about it. And I felt like it’s a dream come true. You have the opportunity to join this caliber of an organization with this caliber of people, of personalities, of people that are working in this organization. It’s just a dream come true, and I’m looking forward to that challenge.</p><p><strong>SK: What did Bibi [Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu] text you?</strong></p><p><strong>OC: </strong>Yeah, he was really excited. I talked to him, and I talked to the minister of sport on the phone. They said they’re really proud and they’re looking forward to the opportunity of me playing there and coming to watch. It was overwhelming, in a sense. When I got drafted, people were going crazy back home and this was even crazier.</p><p><strong>SK: You</strong><strong>’ve yet to actually participate in a playoff game in your career. How big of a factor was it to join a contender?</strong></p><p><strong>OC: </strong>It was very big. So many times there are good players on bad teams and they don’t get the credit that they sometimes deserve to. I felt that we had years in Sacramento that we played as individuals maybe we played better than as a team. We never really got the credit that we deserved to, and I felt that I’ve been in the league for eight years now, I’m 29, there’s nothing I want more than to win. And there’s nothing that I want more than to help my team win basketball games, whether it’s on the court or off the court.</p><p>Obviously there will be games that I might play, and that I might not play. So I want to be the best teammate I can be to my teammates, the most supportive and the guy that does all the things that need to be done to help the team win. And obviously great that a team like the Warriors reached out and gave me that opportunity. I’ve been around long enough now to understand what I’m getting into, and I’m looking forward to that challenge.</p><p><strong>SK: You dropped 36 points on the Warriors a couple years ago. I imagine that ranks highly on your career highlights.</strong></p><p><strong>OC: </strong>No question. It was definitely a night to remember. Sometimes you have big nights, but it doesn’t really happen like that when you go back and forth with one of the greatest shooters of all-time, if not the greatest. It was obviously a night to remember.</p><p><strong>SK: Say it</strong><strong>’s in the end of the game, a couple seconds left on the clock, Warriors down by three. You</strong><strong>’ve got the ball, and somehow Kevin Durant, Klay Thompson and Steph Curry are all open behind the three-point arc. Who are you passing to?</strong></p><p><strong>OC: </strong>[Laughs] That’s a good question. I’d take a timeout, I’d think about it. Honestly, I don’t know—they’re all great. Really, honestly, it depends who has the best game. With that caliber of shooters, and as good as teammates as they are, I feel like if one guy got it going, that’s the smart play to do.</p><p><strong>SK: Or maybe you could just pull up.</strong></p><p><strong>OC: </strong>Oh, yeah. I don’t think Steve Kerr would be too happy with that. [Laughs]</p><p><strong>SK: You</strong><strong>’ve been in the United States for eight years now. Have you managed to </strong><a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/19/sports/basketball/19casspi.html?mcubz=3" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:find good hummus yet" class="link rapid-noclick-resp"><strong>find good hummus yet</strong></a><strong>?</strong></p><p><strong>OC: </strong>[Laughs] Actually there is. There’s one in L.A. that really resembles home. It’s called Dr. Sandwich. It’s actually an Israeli guy that does really good hummus and really good shawarma.</p><p><strong>SK: At least in my experience at grocery stores, I</strong><strong>’ve never found anything like the hummus I ate in Israel when I visited.</strong></p><p><strong>OC: </strong>Oh, no question.</p><p><strong>SK: Obviously you</strong><strong>’ve brought a lot of NBA players to Israel over the years. What NBA player would you most want to bring to Israel that you haven</strong><strong>’t been able to bring yet?</strong></p><p><strong>OC: </strong>I don’t know, that’s a very good question. I always felt that bringing NBA guys to Israel is obviously great for them to see Israel and to kind of interact with fans all over the world that they have and see the history, etc. But it’s also great for the country. It’s creating a great P.R. for a beautiful country that gets so much bad P.R. at times. My thought was always just helping basketball develop and helping our country have a very good atmosphere and buzz around it. Because it deserves it.</p><p><strong>SK: You mentioned</strong><strong> good P.R. for Israel. What was your reaction when the NFL player Michael Bennett decided to withdraw from a sponsored trip to Israel over concerns that he was being used for public relations?</strong></p><p><strong>OC: </strong>When things are coming out this way, it creates a negativity in a sense. Creating good P.R. is obviously a thought, but it’s not the purpose of the trip. The purpose of the trip is us having fun. And I never ask any of my guys to upload pictures or to talk about Israel or what not. It happens naturally. Because guys are coming and they have a good time and they see the love. We went to the Western Wall on a Friday night one day, and we had thousands of people following us around and taking pictures and showing so much love. I don’t think they ever get love like that anywhere. Sometimes we do work for the communities and bring kids from different communities and do the work, and that alone creates great atmosphere. So when football players decide not to be used, I can understand. He doesn’t need to be used. He’s a grown man, and we’re all grown men. Whether they come in and they like the country or not, it’s up to them.</p><p><strong>SK: Have you ever encountered a similar situation where maybe a player you invite has concerns about the trip, and if so how do you handle that?</strong></p><p><strong>OC: </strong>No, never, because it was never about it. This is not what it was about. It was always about us going and having a good time, and having a summer together. And sometimes with my teammates, it’s getting to know each other. I had Caron Butler and Rudy Gay and DeMarcus Cousins all coming together and working out, and going to drink wine at night and talking about the season and what it’s going to be like, and what we can do to help the team win. So it’s never really about creating a P.R. It happens naturally because people are having a good time.</p><p><strong>SK: Was going to the Dead Sea with Boogie Cousins as fun as it looked in that picture?</strong></p><p><strong>OC: </strong>That was a day to remember. We had a great time.</p><p><strong>SK: On a more serious note, we</strong><strong>’ve seen resurgent anti-Semitism in the U.S. The Anti-Defamation League </strong><a href="https://www.adl.org/news/press-releases/us-anti-semitic-incidents-spike-86-percent-so-far-in-2017" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:said" class="link rapid-noclick-resp"><strong>said</strong></a><strong> anti-Semitic incidents were up 86% in the first three months of this year.</strong><strong> How close of attention have you paid to this resurgence of anti-Semitism in your adopted home?</strong></p><p><strong>OC:</strong> I always do. I’m always concerned for the wellbeing of my family and the people I know around me and the Jewish communities around the country. I don’t think that what happened in Virginia resembled the U.S. I never felt, in my personal life, anti-Semitism from people, especially in the U.S.—on the basketball court or in my private life. We live in a crazy time. But there’s plenty of wonderful people here in the U.S. that are so much against it. We see the media going against it, and people around the country going against it. Hopefully this will go away as it came around, and that us as people will just come together and banish those who are trying to do those horrible things.</p><p><strong>SK: One of the people in the NBA who</strong><strong>’s been the most outspoken about this stuff is your new coach, Steve Kerr. Is that something that players around the league take notice of, when a coach is willing to speak out?</strong></p><p>Of course. No question. It’s part of our life. I never really got into politics and stuff like that, but when things of that nature are coming around, you can’t just not appreciate people standing up to that. We definitely appreciate that.</p><p><strong>SK: You say you</strong><strong>’ve never gotten into politics, but you</strong><strong>’re the sole representative of Israel in the NBA and there aren</strong><strong>’t many Jewish players in the league. Do you feel like when there</strong><strong>’s an important issue</strong><strong>, whether it</strong><strong>’s resurgent anti-Semitism or something to do with Israel, do you feel more of an obligation to speak up, now that your fellow players are speaking up about issues that are important to them as well?</strong></p><p>It really depends what it is. I won’t get to who the president is, or whatever it is, but anti-Semitism is something that’s above politics. Anti-Semitism is something that I’m always going to stand up against, and be against it obviously and support my people. But I won’t get into conflicts—whether it’s conflicts in politics, the Middle East, whatever it is. It’s not my job. I’m an athlete and I don’t want to get into that. But anti-Semitism—and not only that, just racism in general, people going up against them because of the color of their skin, their race or their religion—I’m always going to stand up against that. But that would be about it.</p><p><em>(Note: SI spoke to Casspi earlier this month, before President Trump tweeted that he had </em><em>“withdrawn</em><em>” the Warriors</em><em>’ White House invitation. On Sunday, Casspi addressed the incident. </em><em>“The number one job of a president is bringing people together,</em><em>” he </em><a href="http://www.haaretz.com/world-news/americas/1.813866" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:said" class="link rapid-noclick-resp"><em>said</em></a><em>. </em><em>“He</em><em>’s the one who chose to be at the top, but he needs to bring people together. What he</em><em>’s creating is a divide between the people.</em><em>”)</em></p><p><strong>SK: In August, you helped lead a Basketball Without Borders program in Tel Aviv, the first time Israel has hosted the event. Why do you think it</strong><strong>’s important to bring together children of different faiths and backgrounds, and why do you think basketball is a good way to do that?</strong></p><p>Sports in general is a great way to connect people from different communities. I’ve been in the league for eight years, and I’ve been working on bringing Basketball Without Borders to Israel for the past five years. I felt like this year one of the things I was really proud of, besides the fact that it’s so great for basketball in Israel and it’s creating such good attention for basketball and sports in Israel, but we had an opportunity to connect people from different communities outside of basketball. We did so much off the court work, bringing kids from the Muslim community and kids from the Jewish community, and by playing basketball and by talking in different group chats, creating a bridge of connecting people from different backgrounds. So many times, those kids, they don’t have that opportunity before. I felt like kids made friendships for a lifetime.</p>
Omri Casspi Q&A: The Warriors, Israel and Basketball Without Borders

On Dec. 28, 2015, Omri Casspi had arguably the best game of his career: The veteran forward scored a career–high 36 points, including nine three-pointers, on the road against the defending champion Warriors. That’s the player the Warriors hope they added this summer, when Casspi joined Golden State on a one-year contract.

Casspi is at a crucial juncture in his career. After eight years in the league, most recently a down season that saw him play for three different teams, the Israeli forward might have to fight for minutes this season with the loaded Warriors. Still, his ability to shoot threes—he’s a 36.7% career shooter from beyond the arc—could make him an invaluable role player.

Before stepping on the court for his new team, Casspi traveled to his home country with NBA commissioner Adam Silver, Basketball Hall of Famer David Robinson and several NBA players for a Basketball Without Borders camp, which brought together kids from 22 different countries and a variety of religious backgrounds. SI.com recently spoke to Casspi about the Warriors, Basketball without Borders, representing Israel and more.

This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.

Stanley Kay: What has the reaction been like in your home country to the news that you’re joining the NBA champions?

Omri Casspi: It was crazy. The Warriors—one thing about them, besides the fact that they’re champions—people really love them. They really love the way they play, they love their players, they love their personnel, they love the way the organization is being handled from the ownership down to the GM, coaches and everybody else. And I remember the next day—I went to sleep, and since 6 a.m. my phone was blowing up. I had 400 missed calls, texts from all over, the prime minister, the minister of sport, and a crazy amount of love really. People were really excited about it. And I felt like it’s a dream come true. You have the opportunity to join this caliber of an organization with this caliber of people, of personalities, of people that are working in this organization. It’s just a dream come true, and I’m looking forward to that challenge.

SK: What did Bibi [Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu] text you?

OC: Yeah, he was really excited. I talked to him, and I talked to the minister of sport on the phone. They said they’re really proud and they’re looking forward to the opportunity of me playing there and coming to watch. It was overwhelming, in a sense. When I got drafted, people were going crazy back home and this was even crazier.

SK: You’ve yet to actually participate in a playoff game in your career. How big of a factor was it to join a contender?

OC: It was very big. So many times there are good players on bad teams and they don’t get the credit that they sometimes deserve to. I felt that we had years in Sacramento that we played as individuals maybe we played better than as a team. We never really got the credit that we deserved to, and I felt that I’ve been in the league for eight years now, I’m 29, there’s nothing I want more than to win. And there’s nothing that I want more than to help my team win basketball games, whether it’s on the court or off the court.

Obviously there will be games that I might play, and that I might not play. So I want to be the best teammate I can be to my teammates, the most supportive and the guy that does all the things that need to be done to help the team win. And obviously great that a team like the Warriors reached out and gave me that opportunity. I’ve been around long enough now to understand what I’m getting into, and I’m looking forward to that challenge.

SK: You dropped 36 points on the Warriors a couple years ago. I imagine that ranks highly on your career highlights.

OC: No question. It was definitely a night to remember. Sometimes you have big nights, but it doesn’t really happen like that when you go back and forth with one of the greatest shooters of all-time, if not the greatest. It was obviously a night to remember.

SK: Say it’s in the end of the game, a couple seconds left on the clock, Warriors down by three. You’ve got the ball, and somehow Kevin Durant, Klay Thompson and Steph Curry are all open behind the three-point arc. Who are you passing to?

OC: [Laughs] That’s a good question. I’d take a timeout, I’d think about it. Honestly, I don’t know—they’re all great. Really, honestly, it depends who has the best game. With that caliber of shooters, and as good as teammates as they are, I feel like if one guy got it going, that’s the smart play to do.

SK: Or maybe you could just pull up.

OC: Oh, yeah. I don’t think Steve Kerr would be too happy with that. [Laughs]

SK: You’ve been in the United States for eight years now. Have you managed to find good hummus yet?

OC: [Laughs] Actually there is. There’s one in L.A. that really resembles home. It’s called Dr. Sandwich. It’s actually an Israeli guy that does really good hummus and really good shawarma.

SK: At least in my experience at grocery stores, I’ve never found anything like the hummus I ate in Israel when I visited.

OC: Oh, no question.

SK: Obviously you’ve brought a lot of NBA players to Israel over the years. What NBA player would you most want to bring to Israel that you haven’t been able to bring yet?

OC: I don’t know, that’s a very good question. I always felt that bringing NBA guys to Israel is obviously great for them to see Israel and to kind of interact with fans all over the world that they have and see the history, etc. But it’s also great for the country. It’s creating a great P.R. for a beautiful country that gets so much bad P.R. at times. My thought was always just helping basketball develop and helping our country have a very good atmosphere and buzz around it. Because it deserves it.

SK: You mentioned good P.R. for Israel. What was your reaction when the NFL player Michael Bennett decided to withdraw from a sponsored trip to Israel over concerns that he was being used for public relations?

OC: When things are coming out this way, it creates a negativity in a sense. Creating good P.R. is obviously a thought, but it’s not the purpose of the trip. The purpose of the trip is us having fun. And I never ask any of my guys to upload pictures or to talk about Israel or what not. It happens naturally. Because guys are coming and they have a good time and they see the love. We went to the Western Wall on a Friday night one day, and we had thousands of people following us around and taking pictures and showing so much love. I don’t think they ever get love like that anywhere. Sometimes we do work for the communities and bring kids from different communities and do the work, and that alone creates great atmosphere. So when football players decide not to be used, I can understand. He doesn’t need to be used. He’s a grown man, and we’re all grown men. Whether they come in and they like the country or not, it’s up to them.

SK: Have you ever encountered a similar situation where maybe a player you invite has concerns about the trip, and if so how do you handle that?

OC: No, never, because it was never about it. This is not what it was about. It was always about us going and having a good time, and having a summer together. And sometimes with my teammates, it’s getting to know each other. I had Caron Butler and Rudy Gay and DeMarcus Cousins all coming together and working out, and going to drink wine at night and talking about the season and what it’s going to be like, and what we can do to help the team win. So it’s never really about creating a P.R. It happens naturally because people are having a good time.

SK: Was going to the Dead Sea with Boogie Cousins as fun as it looked in that picture?

OC: That was a day to remember. We had a great time.

SK: On a more serious note, we’ve seen resurgent anti-Semitism in the U.S. The Anti-Defamation League said anti-Semitic incidents were up 86% in the first three months of this year. How close of attention have you paid to this resurgence of anti-Semitism in your adopted home?

OC: I always do. I’m always concerned for the wellbeing of my family and the people I know around me and the Jewish communities around the country. I don’t think that what happened in Virginia resembled the U.S. I never felt, in my personal life, anti-Semitism from people, especially in the U.S.—on the basketball court or in my private life. We live in a crazy time. But there’s plenty of wonderful people here in the U.S. that are so much against it. We see the media going against it, and people around the country going against it. Hopefully this will go away as it came around, and that us as people will just come together and banish those who are trying to do those horrible things.

SK: One of the people in the NBA who’s been the most outspoken about this stuff is your new coach, Steve Kerr. Is that something that players around the league take notice of, when a coach is willing to speak out?

Of course. No question. It’s part of our life. I never really got into politics and stuff like that, but when things of that nature are coming around, you can’t just not appreciate people standing up to that. We definitely appreciate that.

SK: You say you’ve never gotten into politics, but you’re the sole representative of Israel in the NBA and there aren’t many Jewish players in the league. Do you feel like when there’s an important issue, whether it’s resurgent anti-Semitism or something to do with Israel, do you feel more of an obligation to speak up, now that your fellow players are speaking up about issues that are important to them as well?

It really depends what it is. I won’t get to who the president is, or whatever it is, but anti-Semitism is something that’s above politics. Anti-Semitism is something that I’m always going to stand up against, and be against it obviously and support my people. But I won’t get into conflicts—whether it’s conflicts in politics, the Middle East, whatever it is. It’s not my job. I’m an athlete and I don’t want to get into that. But anti-Semitism—and not only that, just racism in general, people going up against them because of the color of their skin, their race or their religion—I’m always going to stand up against that. But that would be about it.

(Note: SI spoke to Casspi earlier this month, before President Trump tweeted that he had “withdrawn” the Warriors’ White House invitation. On Sunday, Casspi addressed the incident. “The number one job of a president is bringing people together,” he said. “He’s the one who chose to be at the top, but he needs to bring people together. What he’s creating is a divide between the people.”)

SK: In August, you helped lead a Basketball Without Borders program in Tel Aviv, the first time Israel has hosted the event. Why do you think it’s important to bring together children of different faiths and backgrounds, and why do you think basketball is a good way to do that?

Sports in general is a great way to connect people from different communities. I’ve been in the league for eight years, and I’ve been working on bringing Basketball Without Borders to Israel for the past five years. I felt like this year one of the things I was really proud of, besides the fact that it’s so great for basketball in Israel and it’s creating such good attention for basketball and sports in Israel, but we had an opportunity to connect people from different communities outside of basketball. We did so much off the court work, bringing kids from the Muslim community and kids from the Jewish community, and by playing basketball and by talking in different group chats, creating a bridge of connecting people from different backgrounds. So many times, those kids, they don’t have that opportunity before. I felt like kids made friendships for a lifetime.

<p>On Dec. 28, 2015, Omri Casspi had arguably the best game of his career: The veteran forward scored a career–high 36 points, including nine three-pointers, on the road against the defending champion Warriors. That’s the player the Warriors hope they added this summer, when Casspi joined Golden State on a one-year contract.</p><p>Casspi is at a crucial juncture in his career. After eight years in the league, most recently a down season that saw him play for three different teams, the Israeli forward might have to fight for minutes this season with the loaded Warriors. Still, his ability to shoot threes—he’s a 36.7% career shooter from beyond the arc—could make him an invaluable role player.</p><p>Before stepping on the court for his new team, Casspi traveled to his home country with NBA commissioner Adam Silver, Basketball Hall of Famer David Robinson and several NBA players for a Basketball Without Borders camp, which brought together kids from 22 different countries and a variety of religious backgrounds. <a href="http://SI.com" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:SI.com" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">SI.com</a> recently spoke to Casspi about the Warriors, Basketball without Borders, representing Israel and more. </p><p><em>This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.</em></p><p><strong>Stanley Kay: What has the reaction been like in your home country to the news that you</strong><strong>’re joining the NBA champions?</strong></p><p><strong>Omri Casspi: </strong>It was crazy. The Warriors—one thing about them, besides the fact that they’re champions—people really love them. They really love the way they play, they love their players, they love their personnel, they love the way the organization is being handled from the ownership down to the GM, coaches and everybody else. And I remember the next day—I went to sleep, and since 6 a.m. my phone was blowing up. I had 400 missed calls, texts from all over, the prime minister, the minister of sport, and a crazy amount of love really. People were really excited about it. And I felt like it’s a dream come true. You have the opportunity to join this caliber of an organization with this caliber of people, of personalities, of people that are working in this organization. It’s just a dream come true, and I’m looking forward to that challenge.</p><p><strong>SK: What did Bibi [Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu] text you?</strong></p><p><strong>OC: </strong>Yeah, he was really excited. I talked to him, and I talked to the minister of sport on the phone. They said they’re really proud and they’re looking forward to the opportunity of me playing there and coming to watch. It was overwhelming, in a sense. When I got drafted, people were going crazy back home and this was even crazier.</p><p><strong>SK: You</strong><strong>’ve yet to actually participate in a playoff game in your career. How big of a factor was it to join a contender?</strong></p><p><strong>OC: </strong>It was very big. So many times there are good players on bad teams and they don’t get the credit that they sometimes deserve to. I felt that we had years in Sacramento that we played as individuals maybe we played better than as a team. We never really got the credit that we deserved to, and I felt that I’ve been in the league for eight years now, I’m 29, there’s nothing I want more than to win. And there’s nothing that I want more than to help my team win basketball games, whether it’s on the court or off the court.</p><p>Obviously there will be games that I might play, and that I might not play. So I want to be the best teammate I can be to my teammates, the most supportive and the guy that does all the things that need to be done to help the team win. And obviously great that a team like the Warriors reached out and gave me that opportunity. I’ve been around long enough now to understand what I’m getting into, and I’m looking forward to that challenge.</p><p><strong>SK: You dropped 36 points on the Warriors a couple years ago. I imagine that ranks highly on your career highlights.</strong></p><p><strong>OC: </strong>No question. It was definitely a night to remember. Sometimes you have big nights, but it doesn’t really happen like that when you go back and forth with one of the greatest shooters of all-time, if not the greatest. It was obviously a night to remember.</p><p><strong>SK: Say it</strong><strong>’s in the end of the game, a couple seconds left on the clock, Warriors down by three. You</strong><strong>’ve got the ball, and somehow Kevin Durant, Klay Thompson and Steph Curry are all open behind the three-point arc. Who are you passing to?</strong></p><p><strong>OC: </strong>[Laughs] That’s a good question. I’d take a timeout, I’d think about it. Honestly, I don’t know—they’re all great. Really, honestly, it depends who has the best game. With that caliber of shooters, and as good as teammates as they are, I feel like if one guy got it going, that’s the smart play to do.</p><p><strong>SK: Or maybe you could just pull up.</strong></p><p><strong>OC: </strong>Oh, yeah. I don’t think Steve Kerr would be too happy with that. [Laughs]</p><p><strong>SK: You</strong><strong>’ve been in the United States for eight years now. Have you managed to </strong><a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/19/sports/basketball/19casspi.html?mcubz=3" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:find good hummus yet" class="link rapid-noclick-resp"><strong>find good hummus yet</strong></a><strong>?</strong></p><p><strong>OC: </strong>[Laughs] Actually there is. There’s one in L.A. that really resembles home. It’s called Dr. Sandwich. It’s actually an Israeli guy that does really good hummus and really good shawarma.</p><p><strong>SK: At least in my experience at grocery stores, I</strong><strong>’ve never found anything like the hummus I ate in Israel when I visited.</strong></p><p><strong>OC: </strong>Oh, no question.</p><p><strong>SK: Obviously you</strong><strong>’ve brought a lot of NBA players to Israel over the years. What NBA player would you most want to bring to Israel that you haven</strong><strong>’t been able to bring yet?</strong></p><p><strong>OC: </strong>I don’t know, that’s a very good question. I always felt that bringing NBA guys to Israel is obviously great for them to see Israel and to kind of interact with fans all over the world that they have and see the history, etc. But it’s also great for the country. It’s creating a great P.R. for a beautiful country that gets so much bad P.R. at times. My thought was always just helping basketball develop and helping our country have a very good atmosphere and buzz around it. Because it deserves it.</p><p><strong>SK: You mentioned</strong><strong> good P.R. for Israel. What was your reaction when the NFL player Michael Bennett decided to withdraw from a sponsored trip to Israel over concerns that he was being used for public relations?</strong></p><p><strong>OC: </strong>When things are coming out this way, it creates a negativity in a sense. Creating good P.R. is obviously a thought, but it’s not the purpose of the trip. The purpose of the trip is us having fun. And I never ask any of my guys to upload pictures or to talk about Israel or what not. It happens naturally. Because guys are coming and they have a good time and they see the love. We went to the Western Wall on a Friday night one day, and we had thousands of people following us around and taking pictures and showing so much love. I don’t think they ever get love like that anywhere. Sometimes we do work for the communities and bring kids from different communities and do the work, and that alone creates great atmosphere. So when football players decide not to be used, I can understand. He doesn’t need to be used. He’s a grown man, and we’re all grown men. Whether they come in and they like the country or not, it’s up to them.</p><p><strong>SK: Have you ever encountered a similar situation where maybe a player you invite has concerns about the trip, and if so how do you handle that?</strong></p><p><strong>OC: </strong>No, never, because it was never about it. This is not what it was about. It was always about us going and having a good time, and having a summer together. And sometimes with my teammates, it’s getting to know each other. I had Caron Butler and Rudy Gay and DeMarcus Cousins all coming together and working out, and going to drink wine at night and talking about the season and what it’s going to be like, and what we can do to help the team win. So it’s never really about creating a P.R. It happens naturally because people are having a good time.</p><p><strong>SK: Was going to the Dead Sea with Boogie Cousins as fun as it looked in that picture?</strong></p><p><strong>OC: </strong>That was a day to remember. We had a great time.</p><p><strong>SK: On a more serious note, we</strong><strong>’ve seen resurgent anti-Semitism in the U.S. The Anti-Defamation League </strong><a href="https://www.adl.org/news/press-releases/us-anti-semitic-incidents-spike-86-percent-so-far-in-2017" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:said" class="link rapid-noclick-resp"><strong>said</strong></a><strong> anti-Semitic incidents were up 86% in the first three months of this year.</strong><strong> How close of attention have you paid to this resurgence of anti-Semitism in your adopted home?</strong></p><p><strong>OC:</strong> I always do. I’m always concerned for the wellbeing of my family and the people I know around me and the Jewish communities around the country. I don’t think that what happened in Virginia resembled the U.S. I never felt, in my personal life, anti-Semitism from people, especially in the U.S.—on the basketball court or in my private life. We live in a crazy time. But there’s plenty of wonderful people here in the U.S. that are so much against it. We see the media going against it, and people around the country going against it. Hopefully this will go away as it came around, and that us as people will just come together and banish those who are trying to do those horrible things.</p><p><strong>SK: One of the people in the NBA who</strong><strong>’s been the most outspoken about this stuff is your new coach, Steve Kerr. Is that something that players around the league take notice of, when a coach is willing to speak out?</strong></p><p>Of course. No question. It’s part of our life. I never really got into politics and stuff like that, but when things of that nature are coming around, you can’t just not appreciate people standing up to that. We definitely appreciate that.</p><p><strong>SK: You say you</strong><strong>’ve never gotten into politics, but you</strong><strong>’re the sole representative of Israel in the NBA and there aren</strong><strong>’t many Jewish players in the league. Do you feel like when there</strong><strong>’s an important issue</strong><strong>, whether it</strong><strong>’s resurgent anti-Semitism or something to do with Israel, do you feel more of an obligation to speak up, now that your fellow players are speaking up about issues that are important to them as well?</strong></p><p>It really depends what it is. I won’t get to who the president is, or whatever it is, but anti-Semitism is something that’s above politics. Anti-Semitism is something that I’m always going to stand up against, and be against it obviously and support my people. But I won’t get into conflicts—whether it’s conflicts in politics, the Middle East, whatever it is. It’s not my job. I’m an athlete and I don’t want to get into that. But anti-Semitism—and not only that, just racism in general, people going up against them because of the color of their skin, their race or their religion—I’m always going to stand up against that. But that would be about it.</p><p><em>(Note: SI spoke to Casspi earlier this month, before President Trump tweeted that he had </em><em>“withdrawn</em><em>” the Warriors</em><em>’ White House invitation. On Sunday, Casspi addressed the incident. </em><em>“The number one job of a president is bringing people together,</em><em>” he </em><a href="http://www.haaretz.com/world-news/americas/1.813866" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:said" class="link rapid-noclick-resp"><em>said</em></a><em>. </em><em>“He</em><em>’s the one who chose to be at the top, but he needs to bring people together. What he</em><em>’s creating is a divide between the people.</em><em>”)</em></p><p><strong>SK: In August, you helped lead a Basketball Without Borders program in Tel Aviv, the first time Israel has hosted the event. Why do you think it</strong><strong>’s important to bring together children of different faiths and backgrounds, and why do you think basketball is a good way to do that?</strong></p><p>Sports in general is a great way to connect people from different communities. I’ve been in the league for eight years, and I’ve been working on bringing Basketball Without Borders to Israel for the past five years. I felt like this year one of the things I was really proud of, besides the fact that it’s so great for basketball in Israel and it’s creating such good attention for basketball and sports in Israel, but we had an opportunity to connect people from different communities outside of basketball. We did so much off the court work, bringing kids from the Muslim community and kids from the Jewish community, and by playing basketball and by talking in different group chats, creating a bridge of connecting people from different backgrounds. So many times, those kids, they don’t have that opportunity before. I felt like kids made friendships for a lifetime.</p>
Omri Casspi Q&A: The Warriors, Israel and Basketball Without Borders

On Dec. 28, 2015, Omri Casspi had arguably the best game of his career: The veteran forward scored a career–high 36 points, including nine three-pointers, on the road against the defending champion Warriors. That’s the player the Warriors hope they added this summer, when Casspi joined Golden State on a one-year contract.

Casspi is at a crucial juncture in his career. After eight years in the league, most recently a down season that saw him play for three different teams, the Israeli forward might have to fight for minutes this season with the loaded Warriors. Still, his ability to shoot threes—he’s a 36.7% career shooter from beyond the arc—could make him an invaluable role player.

Before stepping on the court for his new team, Casspi traveled to his home country with NBA commissioner Adam Silver, Basketball Hall of Famer David Robinson and several NBA players for a Basketball Without Borders camp, which brought together kids from 22 different countries and a variety of religious backgrounds. SI.com recently spoke to Casspi about the Warriors, Basketball without Borders, representing Israel and more.

This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.

Stanley Kay: What has the reaction been like in your home country to the news that you’re joining the NBA champions?

Omri Casspi: It was crazy. The Warriors—one thing about them, besides the fact that they’re champions—people really love them. They really love the way they play, they love their players, they love their personnel, they love the way the organization is being handled from the ownership down to the GM, coaches and everybody else. And I remember the next day—I went to sleep, and since 6 a.m. my phone was blowing up. I had 400 missed calls, texts from all over, the prime minister, the minister of sport, and a crazy amount of love really. People were really excited about it. And I felt like it’s a dream come true. You have the opportunity to join this caliber of an organization with this caliber of people, of personalities, of people that are working in this organization. It’s just a dream come true, and I’m looking forward to that challenge.

SK: What did Bibi [Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu] text you?

OC: Yeah, he was really excited. I talked to him, and I talked to the minister of sport on the phone. They said they’re really proud and they’re looking forward to the opportunity of me playing there and coming to watch. It was overwhelming, in a sense. When I got drafted, people were going crazy back home and this was even crazier.

SK: You’ve yet to actually participate in a playoff game in your career. How big of a factor was it to join a contender?

OC: It was very big. So many times there are good players on bad teams and they don’t get the credit that they sometimes deserve to. I felt that we had years in Sacramento that we played as individuals maybe we played better than as a team. We never really got the credit that we deserved to, and I felt that I’ve been in the league for eight years now, I’m 29, there’s nothing I want more than to win. And there’s nothing that I want more than to help my team win basketball games, whether it’s on the court or off the court.

Obviously there will be games that I might play, and that I might not play. So I want to be the best teammate I can be to my teammates, the most supportive and the guy that does all the things that need to be done to help the team win. And obviously great that a team like the Warriors reached out and gave me that opportunity. I’ve been around long enough now to understand what I’m getting into, and I’m looking forward to that challenge.

SK: You dropped 36 points on the Warriors a couple years ago. I imagine that ranks highly on your career highlights.

OC: No question. It was definitely a night to remember. Sometimes you have big nights, but it doesn’t really happen like that when you go back and forth with one of the greatest shooters of all-time, if not the greatest. It was obviously a night to remember.

SK: Say it’s in the end of the game, a couple seconds left on the clock, Warriors down by three. You’ve got the ball, and somehow Kevin Durant, Klay Thompson and Steph Curry are all open behind the three-point arc. Who are you passing to?

OC: [Laughs] That’s a good question. I’d take a timeout, I’d think about it. Honestly, I don’t know—they’re all great. Really, honestly, it depends who has the best game. With that caliber of shooters, and as good as teammates as they are, I feel like if one guy got it going, that’s the smart play to do.

SK: Or maybe you could just pull up.

OC: Oh, yeah. I don’t think Steve Kerr would be too happy with that. [Laughs]

SK: You’ve been in the United States for eight years now. Have you managed to find good hummus yet?

OC: [Laughs] Actually there is. There’s one in L.A. that really resembles home. It’s called Dr. Sandwich. It’s actually an Israeli guy that does really good hummus and really good shawarma.

SK: At least in my experience at grocery stores, I’ve never found anything like the hummus I ate in Israel when I visited.

OC: Oh, no question.

SK: Obviously you’ve brought a lot of NBA players to Israel over the years. What NBA player would you most want to bring to Israel that you haven’t been able to bring yet?

OC: I don’t know, that’s a very good question. I always felt that bringing NBA guys to Israel is obviously great for them to see Israel and to kind of interact with fans all over the world that they have and see the history, etc. But it’s also great for the country. It’s creating a great P.R. for a beautiful country that gets so much bad P.R. at times. My thought was always just helping basketball develop and helping our country have a very good atmosphere and buzz around it. Because it deserves it.

SK: You mentioned good P.R. for Israel. What was your reaction when the NFL player Michael Bennett decided to withdraw from a sponsored trip to Israel over concerns that he was being used for public relations?

OC: When things are coming out this way, it creates a negativity in a sense. Creating good P.R. is obviously a thought, but it’s not the purpose of the trip. The purpose of the trip is us having fun. And I never ask any of my guys to upload pictures or to talk about Israel or what not. It happens naturally. Because guys are coming and they have a good time and they see the love. We went to the Western Wall on a Friday night one day, and we had thousands of people following us around and taking pictures and showing so much love. I don’t think they ever get love like that anywhere. Sometimes we do work for the communities and bring kids from different communities and do the work, and that alone creates great atmosphere. So when football players decide not to be used, I can understand. He doesn’t need to be used. He’s a grown man, and we’re all grown men. Whether they come in and they like the country or not, it’s up to them.

SK: Have you ever encountered a similar situation where maybe a player you invite has concerns about the trip, and if so how do you handle that?

OC: No, never, because it was never about it. This is not what it was about. It was always about us going and having a good time, and having a summer together. And sometimes with my teammates, it’s getting to know each other. I had Caron Butler and Rudy Gay and DeMarcus Cousins all coming together and working out, and going to drink wine at night and talking about the season and what it’s going to be like, and what we can do to help the team win. So it’s never really about creating a P.R. It happens naturally because people are having a good time.

SK: Was going to the Dead Sea with Boogie Cousins as fun as it looked in that picture?

OC: That was a day to remember. We had a great time.

SK: On a more serious note, we’ve seen resurgent anti-Semitism in the U.S. The Anti-Defamation League said anti-Semitic incidents were up 86% in the first three months of this year. How close of attention have you paid to this resurgence of anti-Semitism in your adopted home?

OC: I always do. I’m always concerned for the wellbeing of my family and the people I know around me and the Jewish communities around the country. I don’t think that what happened in Virginia resembled the U.S. I never felt, in my personal life, anti-Semitism from people, especially in the U.S.—on the basketball court or in my private life. We live in a crazy time. But there’s plenty of wonderful people here in the U.S. that are so much against it. We see the media going against it, and people around the country going against it. Hopefully this will go away as it came around, and that us as people will just come together and banish those who are trying to do those horrible things.

SK: One of the people in the NBA who’s been the most outspoken about this stuff is your new coach, Steve Kerr. Is that something that players around the league take notice of, when a coach is willing to speak out?

Of course. No question. It’s part of our life. I never really got into politics and stuff like that, but when things of that nature are coming around, you can’t just not appreciate people standing up to that. We definitely appreciate that.

SK: You say you’ve never gotten into politics, but you’re the sole representative of Israel in the NBA and there aren’t many Jewish players in the league. Do you feel like when there’s an important issue, whether it’s resurgent anti-Semitism or something to do with Israel, do you feel more of an obligation to speak up, now that your fellow players are speaking up about issues that are important to them as well?

It really depends what it is. I won’t get to who the president is, or whatever it is, but anti-Semitism is something that’s above politics. Anti-Semitism is something that I’m always going to stand up against, and be against it obviously and support my people. But I won’t get into conflicts—whether it’s conflicts in politics, the Middle East, whatever it is. It’s not my job. I’m an athlete and I don’t want to get into that. But anti-Semitism—and not only that, just racism in general, people going up against them because of the color of their skin, their race or their religion—I’m always going to stand up against that. But that would be about it.

(Note: SI spoke to Casspi earlier this month, before President Trump tweeted that he had “withdrawn” the Warriors’ White House invitation. On Sunday, Casspi addressed the incident. “The number one job of a president is bringing people together,” he said. “He’s the one who chose to be at the top, but he needs to bring people together. What he’s creating is a divide between the people.”)

SK: In August, you helped lead a Basketball Without Borders program in Tel Aviv, the first time Israel has hosted the event. Why do you think it’s important to bring together children of different faiths and backgrounds, and why do you think basketball is a good way to do that?

Sports in general is a great way to connect people from different communities. I’ve been in the league for eight years, and I’ve been working on bringing Basketball Without Borders to Israel for the past five years. I felt like this year one of the things I was really proud of, besides the fact that it’s so great for basketball in Israel and it’s creating such good attention for basketball and sports in Israel, but we had an opportunity to connect people from different communities outside of basketball. We did so much off the court work, bringing kids from the Muslim community and kids from the Jewish community, and by playing basketball and by talking in different group chats, creating a bridge of connecting people from different backgrounds. So many times, those kids, they don’t have that opportunity before. I felt like kids made friendships for a lifetime.

Members of U.S team show their medals after they won silver medals for the Men&#39;s Basketball Gold Medal Game at the 29th Summer Universiade in Taipei, Taiwan, Tuesday, Aug. 29, 2017. (AP Photo/Chiang Ying-ying)
Members of U.S team show their medals after they won silver medals for the Men's Basketball Gold Medal Game at the 29th Summer Universiade in Taipei, Taiwan, Tuesday, Aug. 29, 2017. (AP Photo/Chiang Ying-ying)
Members of U.S team show their medals after they won silver medals for the Men's Basketball Gold Medal Game at the 29th Summer Universiade in Taipei, Taiwan, Tuesday, Aug. 29, 2017. (AP Photo/Chiang Ying-ying)
Members of U.S team show their medals after they won silver medals for the Men&#39;s Basketball Gold Medal Game at the 29th Summer Universiade in Taipei, Taiwan, Tuesday, Aug. 29, 2017. (AP Photo/Chiang Ying-ying)
Members of U.S team show their medals after they won silver medals for the Men's Basketball Gold Medal Game at the 29th Summer Universiade in Taipei, Taiwan, Tuesday, Aug. 29, 2017. (AP Photo/Chiang Ying-ying)
Members of U.S team show their medals after they won silver medals for the Men's Basketball Gold Medal Game at the 29th Summer Universiade in Taipei, Taiwan, Tuesday, Aug. 29, 2017. (AP Photo/Chiang Ying-ying)
Members of U.S team show their medals after winning silver medals during the Men&#39;s Basketball Gold Medal Game at the 29th Summer Universiade in Taipei, Taiwan, Tuesday Aug. 29, 2017. (AP Photo/Chiang Ying-ying)
Members of U.S team show their medals after winning silver medals during the Men's Basketball Gold Medal Game at the 29th Summer Universiade in Taipei, Taiwan, Tuesday Aug. 29, 2017. (AP Photo/Chiang Ying-ying)
Members of U.S team show their medals after winning silver medals during the Men's Basketball Gold Medal Game at the 29th Summer Universiade in Taipei, Taiwan, Tuesday Aug. 29, 2017. (AP Photo/Chiang Ying-ying)
Serbia&#39;s Novak Topalovic, left, defends Eden Weing (5) of the U.S. go up for the basket during their Men&#39;s Basketball semifinal game at the 29th Summer Universiade in Taipei, Taiwan, Monday, Aug. 28, 2017. (AP Photo/Chiang Ying-ying)
Serbia's Novak Topalovic, left, defends Eden Weing (5) of the U.S. go up for the basket during their Men's Basketball semifinal game at the 29th Summer Universiade in Taipei, Taiwan, Monday, Aug. 28, 2017. (AP Photo/Chiang Ying-ying)
Serbia's Novak Topalovic, left, defends Eden Weing (5) of the U.S. go up for the basket during their Men's Basketball semifinal game at the 29th Summer Universiade in Taipei, Taiwan, Monday, Aug. 28, 2017. (AP Photo/Chiang Ying-ying)
Serbia&#39;s Andrija Matic (13) defends Eden Weing (5) of the U.S. go p for the basket during their Men&#39;s Basketball semifinal game at the 29th Summer Universiade in Taipei, Taiwan, Monday, Aug. 28, 2017. (AP Photo/Chiang Ying-ying)
Serbia's Andrija Matic (13) defends Eden Weing (5) of the U.S. go p for the basket during their Men's Basketball semifinal game at the 29th Summer Universiade in Taipei, Taiwan, Monday, Aug. 28, 2017. (AP Photo/Chiang Ying-ying)
Serbia's Andrija Matic (13) defends Eden Weing (5) of the U.S. go p for the basket during their Men's Basketball semifinal game at the 29th Summer Universiade in Taipei, Taiwan, Monday, Aug. 28, 2017. (AP Photo/Chiang Ying-ying)
Serbia&#39;s Milos Vranes (11) defends Aaron Wheeler, center, of the U.S. go up for the basket during their Men&#39;s Basketball semifinal game at the 29th Summer Universiade in Taipei, Taiwan, Monday, Aug. 28, 2017. (AP Photo/Chiang Ying-ying)
Serbia's Milos Vranes (11) defends Aaron Wheeler, center, of the U.S. go up for the basket during their Men's Basketball semifinal game at the 29th Summer Universiade in Taipei, Taiwan, Monday, Aug. 28, 2017. (AP Photo/Chiang Ying-ying)
Serbia's Milos Vranes (11) defends Aaron Wheeler, center, of the U.S. go up for the basket during their Men's Basketball semifinal game at the 29th Summer Universiade in Taipei, Taiwan, Monday, Aug. 28, 2017. (AP Photo/Chiang Ying-ying)
Isaac Haas (44) of the U.S. goes up for the basket defended by Serbia&#39;s Marko Tejic, left, and Veljko Brkic during the Men&#39;s Basketball semifinal game at the 29th Summer Universiade in Taipei, Taiwan, Monday, Aug. 28, 2017. (AP Photo/Chiang Ying-ying)
Isaac Haas (44) of the U.S. goes up for the basket defended by Serbia's Marko Tejic, left, and Veljko Brkic during the Men's Basketball semifinal game at the 29th Summer Universiade in Taipei, Taiwan, Monday, Aug. 28, 2017. (AP Photo/Chiang Ying-ying)
Isaac Haas (44) of the U.S. goes up for the basket defended by Serbia's Marko Tejic, left, and Veljko Brkic during the Men's Basketball semifinal game at the 29th Summer Universiade in Taipei, Taiwan, Monday, Aug. 28, 2017. (AP Photo/Chiang Ying-ying)
Carsen Edwards (3) of the U.S. and Serbia&#39;s Marko Tejic, left, fight for a loose ball during the Men&#39;s Basketball semifinal game at the 29th Summer Universiade in Taipei, Taiwan, Monday, Aug. 28, 2017. (AP Photo/Chiang Ying-ying)
Carsen Edwards (3) of the U.S. and Serbia's Marko Tejic, left, fight for a loose ball during the Men's Basketball semifinal game at the 29th Summer Universiade in Taipei, Taiwan, Monday, Aug. 28, 2017. (AP Photo/Chiang Ying-ying)
Carsen Edwards (3) of the U.S. and Serbia's Marko Tejic, left, fight for a loose ball during the Men's Basketball semifinal game at the 29th Summer Universiade in Taipei, Taiwan, Monday, Aug. 28, 2017. (AP Photo/Chiang Ying-ying)
Carsen Edwards (3) of the U.S. goes up for basket through Serbia&#39;s Carsen Edwards, left, and Novak Topalovic (20) during the Men&#39;s Basketball semifinal game at the 29th Summer Universiade in Taipei, Taiwan, Monday, Aug. 28, 2017. (AP Photo/Chiang Ying-ying)
Carsen Edwards (3) of the U.S. goes up for basket through Serbia's Carsen Edwards, left, and Novak Topalovic (20) during the Men's Basketball semifinal game at the 29th Summer Universiade in Taipei, Taiwan, Monday, Aug. 28, 2017. (AP Photo/Chiang Ying-ying)
Carsen Edwards (3) of the U.S. goes up for basket through Serbia's Carsen Edwards, left, and Novak Topalovic (20) during the Men's Basketball semifinal game at the 29th Summer Universiade in Taipei, Taiwan, Monday, Aug. 28, 2017. (AP Photo/Chiang Ying-ying)
Carsen Edwards, left, of the U.S. is defended by Serbia&#39;s Marko Tejic (15) and Andrija Sarenac (6) during the Men&#39;s Basketball semifinal game at the 29th Summer Universiade in Taipei, Taiwan, Monday, Aug. 28, 2017. (AP Photo/Chiang Ying-ying)
Carsen Edwards, left, of the U.S. is defended by Serbia's Marko Tejic (15) and Andrija Sarenac (6) during the Men's Basketball semifinal game at the 29th Summer Universiade in Taipei, Taiwan, Monday, Aug. 28, 2017. (AP Photo/Chiang Ying-ying)
Carsen Edwards, left, of the U.S. is defended by Serbia's Marko Tejic (15) and Andrija Sarenac (6) during the Men's Basketball semifinal game at the 29th Summer Universiade in Taipei, Taiwan, Monday, Aug. 28, 2017. (AP Photo/Chiang Ying-ying)
Carsen Edwards (3) of the U.S. drives past Serbia&#39;s Milos Vranes, center, during the Men&#39;s Basketball semifinal game at the 29th Summer Universiade in Taipei, Taiwan, Monday, Aug. 28, 2017. (AP Photo/Chiang Ying-ying)
Carsen Edwards (3) of the U.S. drives past Serbia's Milos Vranes, center, during the Men's Basketball semifinal game at the 29th Summer Universiade in Taipei, Taiwan, Monday, Aug. 28, 2017. (AP Photo/Chiang Ying-ying)
Carsen Edwards (3) of the U.S. drives past Serbia's Milos Vranes, center, during the Men's Basketball semifinal game at the 29th Summer Universiade in Taipei, Taiwan, Monday, Aug. 28, 2017. (AP Photo/Chiang Ying-ying)
FILE - In this June 2, 2016, file photo, television announcer Jeff Van Gundy speaks before Game 1 of basketball&#39;s NBA Finals between the Golden State Warriors and the Cleveland Cavaliers, in Oakland, Calif. Former NBA coach Jeff Van Gundy will lead the U.S. men’s basketball team through the early stages of qualifying for the 2019 Basketball World Cup. He will guide a team made up of mostly NBA G League players in this summer’s FIBA AmeriCup 2017 tournament and in qualifying games between November and September 2018. USA Basketball announced Van Gundy’s appointment Wednesday, July 5, 2017. (AP Photo/Ben Margot, File)
FILE - In this June 2, 2016, file photo, television announcer Jeff Van Gundy speaks before Game 1 of basketball's NBA Finals between the Golden State Warriors and the Cleveland Cavaliers, in Oakland, Calif. Former NBA coach Jeff Van Gundy will lead the U.S. men’s basketball team through the early stages of qualifying for the 2019 Basketball World Cup. He will guide a team made up of mostly NBA G League players in this summer’s FIBA AmeriCup 2017 tournament and in qualifying games between November and September 2018. USA Basketball announced Van Gundy’s appointment Wednesday, July 5, 2017. (AP Photo/Ben Margot, File)
FILE - In this June 2, 2016, file photo, television announcer Jeff Van Gundy speaks before Game 1 of basketball's NBA Finals between the Golden State Warriors and the Cleveland Cavaliers, in Oakland, Calif. Former NBA coach Jeff Van Gundy will lead the U.S. men’s basketball team through the early stages of qualifying for the 2019 Basketball World Cup. He will guide a team made up of mostly NBA G League players in this summer’s FIBA AmeriCup 2017 tournament and in qualifying games between November and September 2018. USA Basketball announced Van Gundy’s appointment Wednesday, July 5, 2017. (AP Photo/Ben Margot, File)
John Calipari would prefer to focus on the players he wants and the offense he’ll run. This time, there are other concerns. When he leads the U.S. basketball team into the Under-19 World Cup for men, they will travel to Egypt, home to enough violence lately that the Americans questioned whether it was safe enough […]
US steps up security for U19 basketball tournament in Egypt
John Calipari would prefer to focus on the players he wants and the offense he’ll run. This time, there are other concerns. When he leads the U.S. basketball team into the Under-19 World Cup for men, they will travel to Egypt, home to enough violence lately that the Americans questioned whether it was safe enough […]
John Calipari would prefer to focus on the players he wants and the offense he’ll run. This time, there are other concerns. When he leads the U.S. basketball team into the Under-19 World Cup for men, they will travel to Egypt, home to enough violence lately that the Americans questioned whether it was safe enough […]
US steps up security for U19 basketball tournament in Egypt
John Calipari would prefer to focus on the players he wants and the offense he’ll run. This time, there are other concerns. When he leads the U.S. basketball team into the Under-19 World Cup for men, they will travel to Egypt, home to enough violence lately that the Americans questioned whether it was safe enough […]
John Calipari would prefer to focus on the players he wants and the offense he’ll run. This time, there are other concerns. When he leads the U.S. basketball team into the Under-19 World Cup for men, they will travel to Egypt, home to enough violence lately that the Americans questioned whether it was safe enough […]
US steps up security for U19 basketball tournament in Egypt
John Calipari would prefer to focus on the players he wants and the offense he’ll run. This time, there are other concerns. When he leads the U.S. basketball team into the Under-19 World Cup for men, they will travel to Egypt, home to enough violence lately that the Americans questioned whether it was safe enough […]
FILE - In this March 26, 2017, file photo, Kentucky coach John Calipari gestures during the first half of the South Regional final against North Carolina in the NCAA college basketball tournament in Memphis, Tenn. When Calipari leads the U.S. men into the under-19 world basketball championship, they will travel to Egypt, home to enough violence lately that the Americans questioned whether it was safe enough to even go defend their title. Gen. Martin Dempsey, the former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, is now USA Basketballs chairman, and a conversation a few weeks ago that detailed the Americans security plans and procedures put Caliparis mind at ease. (AP Photo/Brandon Dill, File)
US steps up security for U19 basketball tournament in Egypt
FILE - In this March 26, 2017, file photo, Kentucky coach John Calipari gestures during the first half of the South Regional final against North Carolina in the NCAA college basketball tournament in Memphis, Tenn. When Calipari leads the U.S. men into the under-19 world basketball championship, they will travel to Egypt, home to enough violence lately that the Americans questioned whether it was safe enough to even go defend their title. Gen. Martin Dempsey, the former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, is now USA Basketballs chairman, and a conversation a few weeks ago that detailed the Americans security plans and procedures put Caliparis mind at ease. (AP Photo/Brandon Dill, File)
FILE - In this March 26, 2017, file photo, Kentucky coach John Calipari gestures during the first half of the South Regional final against North Carolina in the NCAA college basketball tournament in Memphis, Tenn. When Calipari leads the U.S. men into the under-19 world basketball championship, they will travel to Egypt, home to enough violence lately that the Americans questioned whether it was safe enough to even go defend their title. Gen. Martin Dempsey, the former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, is now USA Basketball’s chairman, and a conversation a few weeks ago that detailed the Americans’ security plans and procedures put Calipari’s mind at ease. (AP Photo/Brandon Dill, File)
FILE - In this March 26, 2017, file photo, Kentucky coach John Calipari gestures during the first half of the South Regional final against North Carolina in the NCAA college basketball tournament in Memphis, Tenn. When Calipari leads the U.S. men into the under-19 world basketball championship, they will travel to Egypt, home to enough violence lately that the Americans questioned whether it was safe enough to even go defend their title. Gen. Martin Dempsey, the former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, is now USA Basketball’s chairman, and a conversation a few weeks ago that detailed the Americans’ security plans and procedures put Calipari’s mind at ease. (AP Photo/Brandon Dill, File)
FILE - In this March 26, 2017, file photo, Kentucky coach John Calipari gestures during the first half of the South Regional final against North Carolina in the NCAA college basketball tournament in Memphis, Tenn. When Calipari leads the U.S. men into the under-19 world basketball championship, they will travel to Egypt, home to enough violence lately that the Americans questioned whether it was safe enough to even go defend their title. Gen. Martin Dempsey, the former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, is now USA Basketball’s chairman, and a conversation a few weeks ago that detailed the Americans’ security plans and procedures put Calipari’s mind at ease. (AP Photo/Brandon Dill, File)
<p> FILE - In this March 26, 2017, file photo, Kentucky coach John Calipari gestures during the first half of the South Regional final against North Carolina in the NCAA college basketball tournament in Memphis, Tenn. When Calipari leads the U.S. men into the under-19 world basketball championship, they will travel to Egypt, home to enough violence lately that the Americans questioned whether it was safe enough to even go defend their title. Gen. Martin Dempsey, the former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, is now USA Basketball’s chairman, and a conversation a few weeks ago that detailed the Americans’ security plans and procedures put Calipari’s mind at ease. (AP Photo/Brandon Dill, File) </p>
US steps up security for U19 basketball tournament in Egypt

FILE - In this March 26, 2017, file photo, Kentucky coach John Calipari gestures during the first half of the South Regional final against North Carolina in the NCAA college basketball tournament in Memphis, Tenn. When Calipari leads the U.S. men into the under-19 world basketball championship, they will travel to Egypt, home to enough violence lately that the Americans questioned whether it was safe enough to even go defend their title. Gen. Martin Dempsey, the former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, is now USA Basketball’s chairman, and a conversation a few weeks ago that detailed the Americans’ security plans and procedures put Calipari’s mind at ease. (AP Photo/Brandon Dill, File)

The Cincinnati men&#39;s basketball team holds a large U.S. flag as the national anthem is played on senior night before the team&#39;s NCAA college basketball game against Houston, Thursday, March 2, 2017, in Cincinnati. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
The Cincinnati men's basketball team holds a large U.S. flag as the national anthem is played on senior night before the team's NCAA college basketball game against Houston, Thursday, March 2, 2017, in Cincinnati. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
The Cincinnati men's basketball team holds a large U.S. flag as the national anthem is played on senior night before the team's NCAA college basketball game against Houston, Thursday, March 2, 2017, in Cincinnati. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
2016 Rio Olympics - Basketball - Quarterfinal - Men&#39;s Quarterfinal USA v Argentina - Carioca Arena 1 - Rio de Janeiro, Brazil - 17/8/2016. Former U.S. boxer Floyd Mayweather Jr gestures during the game. REUTERS/Jim Young/Files
Basketball - Men's Quarterfinal USA v Argentina
2016 Rio Olympics - Basketball - Quarterfinal - Men's Quarterfinal USA v Argentina - Carioca Arena 1 - Rio de Janeiro, Brazil - 17/8/2016. Former U.S. boxer Floyd Mayweather Jr gestures during the game. REUTERS/Jim Young/Files

What to Read Next