Tennis star Rafael Nadal

Rafael Nadal pulled out of the London Olympics on Thursday due to injury.

How Kyle Edmund went from choker to Australian Open contender 6:49AM Edmund top of the charts The Briton's forehand has been his biggest weapon this tournament and has put his rivals in the shade. Forehand winners 2018 #AusOpen - Men Edmund 127 Dimitrov 93 Seppi 90 Cilc 88— Christopher Clarey (@christophclarey) January 23, 2018 6:47AM Nadal or Cilic up next for Kyle So Edmund is the first player in the men's draw through to the last four. He's also the first Briton other than Andy Murray since Tim Henman to reach the semi-finals of a major. Nice that Tim was on court to watch the 23-year-old book his spot. Edmund will now face the winner of tonight's clash between Rafael Nadal and Marin Cilic which is scheduled for 8am UK time. KYLE!!!!!!!!!!!!! OMG— Laura Robson (@laurarobson5) January 23, 2018 6:44AM Semi-finalist Edmund speaks It's an amazing feeling, I'm very happy. It was a hard match, I've had lots of matches so far. I tried to enjoy the moment. It's my first match on this court and it was special. He's (Dimitrov) played hard matches, I knew it was going to be tough. I had a dip in the second set, but I broke him at the end of the third had a blip in the fourth and at the end prayed that last ball was out. Edmund is told by Jim Courier he's the sixth British male to reach a major semi-final in the open era - what does it mean to join the illustrious club? It's great. You don't think of those things when you're playing. But I'm sure it's going to be something I'm going to be proud of. It's very pleasing. Of course I want to keep going! Edmund is asked what it's like to be centre of attention from the British press... Yeah, I know what it's like to be Andy Murray now for the last seven or eight years! It's a good pressure to have. 6:38AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 4-6 Edmund (*next server) Dimitrov slices short during the opening point, it throws Edmund momentarily and the Briton strikes long. The two engage in some slicing during the next rally but this time it's Dimitrov who can't control his forehand. Nervous times for Edmund as a double fault gifts Dimitrov a 15-30 advantage. But he's not the only man struggling for rhythm as Dimitrov strikes long again. An ace down the middle brings up match point. How are your nerves now, Kyle? The pair engage in a lengthy rally and Dimitrov over-eggs another reply. Was that out? It looked out. Edmund challenges it and Hawk-Eye duly responds. Edmund is only into his first ever major semi-final! GAME, SET AND MATCH: EDMUND BEATS DIMITROV TO REACH SEMI-FINALS. 6:32AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 4-5 Edmund* (*next server) Both men have won 114 points a pop at the start of this game and this contest could yet go either way. Edmund will have something to say about that and does at the start of this game, bending a forehand winner past the net-rushing Dimitrov to set himself up nicely. Some deep hitting draws an error from Dimitrov who is sent scampering down another ball into the corner. Dimitrov sends down a beautiful backhand which looks to land on the line, Edmund challenges. It's out, it's out, Edmund has two break points. He can't convert the first but does on the next as Dimitrov tightens up and pushes into the net. Wow. Edmund will come out SERVING FOR THE MATCH!! EDMUND BREAKS. This Edmund vs Dimitrov has everything you want for a men’s quarterfinals. Standard is so high. Come On Kyle.— Greg Rusedski (@GregRusedski1) January 23, 2018 6:27AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 4-4 Edmund (*next server) Edmund fires down his first ace of this set but then backs it up with an unwanted first double fault of the fourth set. The Briton draws one of the biggest rounds of applause for the set when he shows great reactions to catch one return from a missed serve and crucially at 30-all is happy to see a forehand from Dimitrov land long. Edmund steers out the game with a deep second serve. 6:22AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 4-3 Edmund* (*next server) Dimitrov challenges one exceptionally deep forehand from Edmund but he's out of luck as the Briton's groundstroke couldn't have been any better. Another rasping winner down his favoured wing from Edmund turns the heat back on Dimitrov's serve at 15-30. Dimitrov draws a long service return from his rival to save the danger for now. But wait, the Bulgarian over-strikes during the next point and then looks to his corner asking for inspiration. This time Dimitrov gets a first serve in which Edmund tamely puts into the middle. The Briton slaps his hip, he knows he missed a chance. Dimitrov takes advantage of the let off and sends down an ace for the game. 6:17AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 3-3 Edmund (*next server) Nice play from Dimitrov as he drills a groundstroke back deep at the feet of Edmund who can't make the pick up. It's early pressure here at 0-30. Edmund puts Dimitrov back in his box, and on his back by pushing a volley into the corner which catches the Bulgarian out. Dimitrov gets one reply back but Edmund keeps the pressure on. The Briton slightly loses his head on the next point, sending one stroke long and gifting two break points to his rival. The pair engage in tentative play during the next rally but Edmund goes for broke first and it doesn't pay off as he strikes into the lines. DIMITROV BREAKS. Dimitrov digs in! He breaks back to get it on serve. This is tense. #AusOpenpic.twitter.com/DXOdoP0eXM— #AusOpen (@AustralianOpen) January 23, 2018 6:12AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 2-3 Edmund* (*next server) Boom. Edmund shows his intent early on in this game by injecting some pace into an outswinging forehand which draws applause from one avid watcher on Rod Laver in 'Come on Tim' himself Mr Henman. Edmund pumps his fist in anticipation as Dimitrov drills a forehand into the lines and then has a break point opening when Dimitrov dumps a reply into the net. Nervy times now as Dimitrov misses his first serve and then drags a forehand wide to hand the Briton an early break in this set. EDMUND BREAKS. 6:08AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 2-2 Edmund (*next server) Edmund doesn't look like a man who is a set away from reaching a first ever semi-final at a major. He punches home a volley and maintains his solid first-service style as Dimitrov mulls over his options. Some fantastic deep striking and defensive work from Edmund keep the pressure on his opponent, forcing the Bulgarian to blink first. Dimitrov allows himself of a wry smile as Edmund closes out the game. Credit: AFP 6:04AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 2-1 Edmund* (*next server) Dimitrov has shaken off the effects of dropping serve deep into that third set to hold to love. A solid recovery from the Bulgarian at the start of a vital fourth set. 6:02AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 1-1 Edmund (*next server) Edmund lets rip with another forehand which is loaded with topspin to land flush on the line and draws gasps from the crowd on Rod Laver Arena. It's the Briton's biggest weapon. He uses it at game point, this time on the chase and we're level for the set. 5:58AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 1-0 Edmund* (*next server) Edmund flashes and misses at a couple of deep forehands before getting on the board when Dimitrov over-eggs his own ground stroke. Edmund places his hands on his hips after slapping a backhand into the tramlines and watches on as Dimitrov whips a forehand winner into the deuce court for a comfortable hold. 5:52AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 3-6 Edmund (*next server) Nervous opening from Edmund as Dimitrov turns aggressor before a rasping first serve from the Briton restores parity. Dimitrov is on the attack during the next rally, taking advantage again of Edmund's edginess but the Briton responds during the next point with an explosive forehand winner down the line. That would've helped settle him down. Edmund brings up set point when he darts onto a Dimitrov return that clips the tape. Edmund punches a volley into the advantage court and then sends down a solid first serve to take the third set. EDMUND WINS THIRD SET TO LEAD TWO SETS TO ONE How many sets away is @kyle8edmund from a Grand Slam semifinal? ☝️#AusOpenpic.twitter.com/SuGcb6r1vh— #AusOpen (@AustralianOpen) January 23, 2018 5:48AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 3-5 Edmund* (*next server) Edmund takes advantage of Dimitrov's first serve struggles by jumping on a second serve and dictating play in the rally. The Briton similarly dominants during the next one, catching Dimitrov with a forehand into the corner with the Bulgarian shifting his balance to the left. Dimitrov tentatively strikes long to hand Edmund two break points at 15-40. Edmund misses the first by dumping a serve into the middle. With two hours on the clock, Dimitrov hands in a double fault at the worst possible time and Edmund has a vital break this set. EDMUND BREAKS. Credit: Getty Images 5:43AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 3-4 Edmund (*next server) Great defence work from Edmund gets him out of a potential hole to blunt an aggressive Dimitrov who finally puts a drop shot into the lines. It moves Edmund to three game points and a strong first serve gets him over the line. 5:40AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 3-3 Edmund* (*next server) Dimitrov gives one service return short shrift en route to three game points. The clash of the pink men - in attire that is - remains level this set. 5:36AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 2-3 Edmund (*next server) Some solid serving bring up two game points for Edmund and third ace of this set and 10th overall allow him of a comfortable hold. 5:33AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 2-2 Edmund* (*next server) Edmund finds his range again with his forehand, pushing Dimitrov deep and working his way to the net to show soft hands with a deft drop shot for 15-30. Edmund mistimes a forehand during the next point but then flashes a superb service return past his rival to set up a first break point of the set. In the bright sunshine and afternoon heat of the day in Melbourne, Edmund tries to dictate play from the back of the court but Dimitrov is able to turn defence into attack when he seizes on a shorter reply from Edmund and he saves the break and rescues the game. 5:26AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 1-2 Edmund (*next server) Oooh er. Edmund pushes a drop shot into the net to open up on his next service game and is reeled back to 30-all when great athleticism and reactions from Dimitrov see the Bulgarian chase down an Edmund reply that deflected off the tape and appeared to land favourably for the Briton. Dimitrov wasn't having any of it, retrieving the short ball and sending back a drop shot which was out of Edmund's reach. The No 3 keeps the heat on by forcing deuce but Edmund shows great resolve to close it out with a looping forehand at an acute angle. He edges back in front this set. 5:21AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 1-1 Edmund* (*next server) Edmund missing quite a few groundstrokes at moment as Dimitrov tries to take control of the match. A serve down the T brings up a comfortable hold for the world No 3. 5:18AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 0-1 Edmund (*next server) Edmund doesn't let dropping that last set affect his concentration as he races to 30-0. Dimitrov gets a board on the board this set when Edmund puts too much on a forehand and reels the Briton in when another forehand lands in the tramlines. From a solid start and three unforced errors hand Dimitrov an early break. Thankfully Dimitrov can't get enough on a service return and Edmund breaths a sigh of relief. A second serve and solid first serve get Edmund over the line. Strap yourselves in. ��@GrigorDimitrov psychs himself up as he draws level in this quarterfinal. #AusOpenpic.twitter.com/i3DhvlD2vJ— #AusOpen (@AustralianOpen) January 23, 2018 5:13AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3 Edmund* (*next server) Dimitrov looks well set at 30-0 before a deep forehand return from Edmund catches him out on the baseline. The Briton mixes it up during the next point. Switching from slicing, to explosive power, Edmund's heavy strokes finally wear Dimitrov down. Edmund misses a great chance to set up break point when he drifts a forehand into the tape and brings up a set point for the Bulgarian. He takes it when Edmund can't get enough on a first serve return. DIMITROV WINS SECOND SET. 5:10AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 5-3 Edmund (*next server) Edmund ensures he makes Dimitrov serve for the second set as the Briton smashes game point at the net. 5:06AM Dimitrov 4-6, 5-2 Edmund* (*next server) Edmund drinks water between games Edmund is down to one challenge after questioning a call that landed on the line right in front of him. He battles his way back to deuce. A double fault gives him a break back point. A big first serve from Dimitrov takes it back to deuce. "A crushingly mediocre set from these two quarter-finalists so far," says the always quotable John McEnroe. And that's it. Game to the Bulgarian and Edmund must serve to hang in the set. 5:01AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 4-2 Edmund (*next server) Edmund hangs on. Someone in the crowd shouts, “Looking good, Kyle.” 4:55AM Dimitrov 4-6, 4-1 Edmund* (*next server) Dimitrov holds comfortably. A real test for Edmund now. He needs to start holding his own serve without giving up so much energy. 4:52AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 3-1 Edmund (*next server) Edmund puts himself in a 0-30 hole but plays a nice shot cross court to bring things even, before finding himself out of position and down a break point. He shuts things down at the net and finishes things off with a smash to bring it to deuce. Odd point with both players pausing as if they heard something to make them stop. It's a battle out there but finally Edmund keeps the set alive by holding serve. You felt he needed that. 4:43AM Dimitrov 4-6, 3-0 Edmund Five points in a row there for Dimitrov - after dropping the first three and putting himself in trouble - and Edmund is down three games in the second set in rapid fashion. Edmund finds the line, but Dimitrov is finding form. The Bulgarian saves three break points to take a 3-0 lead in the second set. #AusOpenpic.twitter.com/5dLQ2poYSv— #AusOpen (@AustralianOpen) January 23, 2018 4:39AM Dimitrov 4-6, 2-0 Edmund Edmund is making heavy weather of this. The players exchange groundstrokes at break-point but then the sound of the ball coming off Edmund's racquet's rim marks the end, and it flies long. That's a break gone. 4:35AM Dimitrov 4-6, 1-0 Edmund Dimitrov comes back at full tilt, winning the first game of the second set to love. 4:30AM Dimitrov 4-6 Edmund Dimitrov earns two break-back points putting Edmund in a tough spot. The Brit comes back with fearsome serve that Dimitrov cannot control. It looks hot down there. This might come down to who can better get through the temperature. Back to deuce and into a battle of groundstrokes before Dimitrov closes in on the net and hits a winner, earning another break point. Another unreturnable serve brings it back to deuce again. Edmund needs two goes at it, but he eventually closes out the set to earn the early lead. 4:21AM Dimitrov 4-5 Edmund Edmund goes long on break point and challenges but the replay shows the ball was just out. He takes the game on the next point with a decisive return, giving him a chance to serve for the set. He lets out an explosive raw. 4:17AM Dimitrov 4-4 Edmund Edmund gets him with the smash at the second attempt to close out a clinical game to 15. So far the two are dead even on points won.
Kyle Edmund blasts way into Australian Open semi-finals by ousting third seed Grigor Dimitrov
How Kyle Edmund went from choker to Australian Open contender 6:49AM Edmund top of the charts The Briton's forehand has been his biggest weapon this tournament and has put his rivals in the shade. Forehand winners 2018 #AusOpen - Men Edmund 127 Dimitrov 93 Seppi 90 Cilc 88— Christopher Clarey (@christophclarey) January 23, 2018 6:47AM Nadal or Cilic up next for Kyle So Edmund is the first player in the men's draw through to the last four. He's also the first Briton other than Andy Murray since Tim Henman to reach the semi-finals of a major. Nice that Tim was on court to watch the 23-year-old book his spot. Edmund will now face the winner of tonight's clash between Rafael Nadal and Marin Cilic which is scheduled for 8am UK time. KYLE!!!!!!!!!!!!! OMG— Laura Robson (@laurarobson5) January 23, 2018 6:44AM Semi-finalist Edmund speaks It's an amazing feeling, I'm very happy. It was a hard match, I've had lots of matches so far. I tried to enjoy the moment. It's my first match on this court and it was special. He's (Dimitrov) played hard matches, I knew it was going to be tough. I had a dip in the second set, but I broke him at the end of the third had a blip in the fourth and at the end prayed that last ball was out. Edmund is told by Jim Courier he's the sixth British male to reach a major semi-final in the open era - what does it mean to join the illustrious club? It's great. You don't think of those things when you're playing. But I'm sure it's going to be something I'm going to be proud of. It's very pleasing. Of course I want to keep going! Edmund is asked what it's like to be centre of attention from the British press... Yeah, I know what it's like to be Andy Murray now for the last seven or eight years! It's a good pressure to have. 6:38AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 4-6 Edmund (*next server) Dimitrov slices short during the opening point, it throws Edmund momentarily and the Briton strikes long. The two engage in some slicing during the next rally but this time it's Dimitrov who can't control his forehand. Nervous times for Edmund as a double fault gifts Dimitrov a 15-30 advantage. But he's not the only man struggling for rhythm as Dimitrov strikes long again. An ace down the middle brings up match point. How are your nerves now, Kyle? The pair engage in a lengthy rally and Dimitrov over-eggs another reply. Was that out? It looked out. Edmund challenges it and Hawk-Eye duly responds. Edmund is only into his first ever major semi-final! GAME, SET AND MATCH: EDMUND BEATS DIMITROV TO REACH SEMI-FINALS. 6:32AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 4-5 Edmund* (*next server) Both men have won 114 points a pop at the start of this game and this contest could yet go either way. Edmund will have something to say about that and does at the start of this game, bending a forehand winner past the net-rushing Dimitrov to set himself up nicely. Some deep hitting draws an error from Dimitrov who is sent scampering down another ball into the corner. Dimitrov sends down a beautiful backhand which looks to land on the line, Edmund challenges. It's out, it's out, Edmund has two break points. He can't convert the first but does on the next as Dimitrov tightens up and pushes into the net. Wow. Edmund will come out SERVING FOR THE MATCH!! EDMUND BREAKS. This Edmund vs Dimitrov has everything you want for a men’s quarterfinals. Standard is so high. Come On Kyle.— Greg Rusedski (@GregRusedski1) January 23, 2018 6:27AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 4-4 Edmund (*next server) Edmund fires down his first ace of this set but then backs it up with an unwanted first double fault of the fourth set. The Briton draws one of the biggest rounds of applause for the set when he shows great reactions to catch one return from a missed serve and crucially at 30-all is happy to see a forehand from Dimitrov land long. Edmund steers out the game with a deep second serve. 6:22AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 4-3 Edmund* (*next server) Dimitrov challenges one exceptionally deep forehand from Edmund but he's out of luck as the Briton's groundstroke couldn't have been any better. Another rasping winner down his favoured wing from Edmund turns the heat back on Dimitrov's serve at 15-30. Dimitrov draws a long service return from his rival to save the danger for now. But wait, the Bulgarian over-strikes during the next point and then looks to his corner asking for inspiration. This time Dimitrov gets a first serve in which Edmund tamely puts into the middle. The Briton slaps his hip, he knows he missed a chance. Dimitrov takes advantage of the let off and sends down an ace for the game. 6:17AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 3-3 Edmund (*next server) Nice play from Dimitrov as he drills a groundstroke back deep at the feet of Edmund who can't make the pick up. It's early pressure here at 0-30. Edmund puts Dimitrov back in his box, and on his back by pushing a volley into the corner which catches the Bulgarian out. Dimitrov gets one reply back but Edmund keeps the pressure on. The Briton slightly loses his head on the next point, sending one stroke long and gifting two break points to his rival. The pair engage in tentative play during the next rally but Edmund goes for broke first and it doesn't pay off as he strikes into the lines. DIMITROV BREAKS. Dimitrov digs in! He breaks back to get it on serve. This is tense. #AusOpenpic.twitter.com/DXOdoP0eXM— #AusOpen (@AustralianOpen) January 23, 2018 6:12AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 2-3 Edmund* (*next server) Boom. Edmund shows his intent early on in this game by injecting some pace into an outswinging forehand which draws applause from one avid watcher on Rod Laver in 'Come on Tim' himself Mr Henman. Edmund pumps his fist in anticipation as Dimitrov drills a forehand into the lines and then has a break point opening when Dimitrov dumps a reply into the net. Nervy times now as Dimitrov misses his first serve and then drags a forehand wide to hand the Briton an early break in this set. EDMUND BREAKS. 6:08AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 2-2 Edmund (*next server) Edmund doesn't look like a man who is a set away from reaching a first ever semi-final at a major. He punches home a volley and maintains his solid first-service style as Dimitrov mulls over his options. Some fantastic deep striking and defensive work from Edmund keep the pressure on his opponent, forcing the Bulgarian to blink first. Dimitrov allows himself of a wry smile as Edmund closes out the game. Credit: AFP 6:04AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 2-1 Edmund* (*next server) Dimitrov has shaken off the effects of dropping serve deep into that third set to hold to love. A solid recovery from the Bulgarian at the start of a vital fourth set. 6:02AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 1-1 Edmund (*next server) Edmund lets rip with another forehand which is loaded with topspin to land flush on the line and draws gasps from the crowd on Rod Laver Arena. It's the Briton's biggest weapon. He uses it at game point, this time on the chase and we're level for the set. 5:58AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 1-0 Edmund* (*next server) Edmund flashes and misses at a couple of deep forehands before getting on the board when Dimitrov over-eggs his own ground stroke. Edmund places his hands on his hips after slapping a backhand into the tramlines and watches on as Dimitrov whips a forehand winner into the deuce court for a comfortable hold. 5:52AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 3-6 Edmund (*next server) Nervous opening from Edmund as Dimitrov turns aggressor before a rasping first serve from the Briton restores parity. Dimitrov is on the attack during the next rally, taking advantage again of Edmund's edginess but the Briton responds during the next point with an explosive forehand winner down the line. That would've helped settle him down. Edmund brings up set point when he darts onto a Dimitrov return that clips the tape. Edmund punches a volley into the advantage court and then sends down a solid first serve to take the third set. EDMUND WINS THIRD SET TO LEAD TWO SETS TO ONE How many sets away is @kyle8edmund from a Grand Slam semifinal? ☝️#AusOpenpic.twitter.com/SuGcb6r1vh— #AusOpen (@AustralianOpen) January 23, 2018 5:48AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 3-5 Edmund* (*next server) Edmund takes advantage of Dimitrov's first serve struggles by jumping on a second serve and dictating play in the rally. The Briton similarly dominants during the next one, catching Dimitrov with a forehand into the corner with the Bulgarian shifting his balance to the left. Dimitrov tentatively strikes long to hand Edmund two break points at 15-40. Edmund misses the first by dumping a serve into the middle. With two hours on the clock, Dimitrov hands in a double fault at the worst possible time and Edmund has a vital break this set. EDMUND BREAKS. Credit: Getty Images 5:43AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 3-4 Edmund (*next server) Great defence work from Edmund gets him out of a potential hole to blunt an aggressive Dimitrov who finally puts a drop shot into the lines. It moves Edmund to three game points and a strong first serve gets him over the line. 5:40AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 3-3 Edmund* (*next server) Dimitrov gives one service return short shrift en route to three game points. The clash of the pink men - in attire that is - remains level this set. 5:36AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 2-3 Edmund (*next server) Some solid serving bring up two game points for Edmund and third ace of this set and 10th overall allow him of a comfortable hold. 5:33AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 2-2 Edmund* (*next server) Edmund finds his range again with his forehand, pushing Dimitrov deep and working his way to the net to show soft hands with a deft drop shot for 15-30. Edmund mistimes a forehand during the next point but then flashes a superb service return past his rival to set up a first break point of the set. In the bright sunshine and afternoon heat of the day in Melbourne, Edmund tries to dictate play from the back of the court but Dimitrov is able to turn defence into attack when he seizes on a shorter reply from Edmund and he saves the break and rescues the game. 5:26AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 1-2 Edmund (*next server) Oooh er. Edmund pushes a drop shot into the net to open up on his next service game and is reeled back to 30-all when great athleticism and reactions from Dimitrov see the Bulgarian chase down an Edmund reply that deflected off the tape and appeared to land favourably for the Briton. Dimitrov wasn't having any of it, retrieving the short ball and sending back a drop shot which was out of Edmund's reach. The No 3 keeps the heat on by forcing deuce but Edmund shows great resolve to close it out with a looping forehand at an acute angle. He edges back in front this set. 5:21AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 1-1 Edmund* (*next server) Edmund missing quite a few groundstrokes at moment as Dimitrov tries to take control of the match. A serve down the T brings up a comfortable hold for the world No 3. 5:18AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 0-1 Edmund (*next server) Edmund doesn't let dropping that last set affect his concentration as he races to 30-0. Dimitrov gets a board on the board this set when Edmund puts too much on a forehand and reels the Briton in when another forehand lands in the tramlines. From a solid start and three unforced errors hand Dimitrov an early break. Thankfully Dimitrov can't get enough on a service return and Edmund breaths a sigh of relief. A second serve and solid first serve get Edmund over the line. Strap yourselves in. ��@GrigorDimitrov psychs himself up as he draws level in this quarterfinal. #AusOpenpic.twitter.com/i3DhvlD2vJ— #AusOpen (@AustralianOpen) January 23, 2018 5:13AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3 Edmund* (*next server) Dimitrov looks well set at 30-0 before a deep forehand return from Edmund catches him out on the baseline. The Briton mixes it up during the next point. Switching from slicing, to explosive power, Edmund's heavy strokes finally wear Dimitrov down. Edmund misses a great chance to set up break point when he drifts a forehand into the tape and brings up a set point for the Bulgarian. He takes it when Edmund can't get enough on a first serve return. DIMITROV WINS SECOND SET. 5:10AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 5-3 Edmund (*next server) Edmund ensures he makes Dimitrov serve for the second set as the Briton smashes game point at the net. 5:06AM Dimitrov 4-6, 5-2 Edmund* (*next server) Edmund drinks water between games Edmund is down to one challenge after questioning a call that landed on the line right in front of him. He battles his way back to deuce. A double fault gives him a break back point. A big first serve from Dimitrov takes it back to deuce. "A crushingly mediocre set from these two quarter-finalists so far," says the always quotable John McEnroe. And that's it. Game to the Bulgarian and Edmund must serve to hang in the set. 5:01AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 4-2 Edmund (*next server) Edmund hangs on. Someone in the crowd shouts, “Looking good, Kyle.” 4:55AM Dimitrov 4-6, 4-1 Edmund* (*next server) Dimitrov holds comfortably. A real test for Edmund now. He needs to start holding his own serve without giving up so much energy. 4:52AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 3-1 Edmund (*next server) Edmund puts himself in a 0-30 hole but plays a nice shot cross court to bring things even, before finding himself out of position and down a break point. He shuts things down at the net and finishes things off with a smash to bring it to deuce. Odd point with both players pausing as if they heard something to make them stop. It's a battle out there but finally Edmund keeps the set alive by holding serve. You felt he needed that. 4:43AM Dimitrov 4-6, 3-0 Edmund Five points in a row there for Dimitrov - after dropping the first three and putting himself in trouble - and Edmund is down three games in the second set in rapid fashion. Edmund finds the line, but Dimitrov is finding form. The Bulgarian saves three break points to take a 3-0 lead in the second set. #AusOpenpic.twitter.com/5dLQ2poYSv— #AusOpen (@AustralianOpen) January 23, 2018 4:39AM Dimitrov 4-6, 2-0 Edmund Edmund is making heavy weather of this. The players exchange groundstrokes at break-point but then the sound of the ball coming off Edmund's racquet's rim marks the end, and it flies long. That's a break gone. 4:35AM Dimitrov 4-6, 1-0 Edmund Dimitrov comes back at full tilt, winning the first game of the second set to love. 4:30AM Dimitrov 4-6 Edmund Dimitrov earns two break-back points putting Edmund in a tough spot. The Brit comes back with fearsome serve that Dimitrov cannot control. It looks hot down there. This might come down to who can better get through the temperature. Back to deuce and into a battle of groundstrokes before Dimitrov closes in on the net and hits a winner, earning another break point. Another unreturnable serve brings it back to deuce again. Edmund needs two goes at it, but he eventually closes out the set to earn the early lead. 4:21AM Dimitrov 4-5 Edmund Edmund goes long on break point and challenges but the replay shows the ball was just out. He takes the game on the next point with a decisive return, giving him a chance to serve for the set. He lets out an explosive raw. 4:17AM Dimitrov 4-4 Edmund Edmund gets him with the smash at the second attempt to close out a clinical game to 15. So far the two are dead even on points won.
How Kyle Edmund went from choker to Australian Open contender 6:49AM Edmund top of the charts The Briton's forehand has been his biggest weapon this tournament and has put his rivals in the shade. Forehand winners 2018 #AusOpen - Men Edmund 127 Dimitrov 93 Seppi 90 Cilc 88— Christopher Clarey (@christophclarey) January 23, 2018 6:47AM Nadal or Cilic up next for Kyle So Edmund is the first player in the men's draw through to the last four. He's also the first Briton other than Andy Murray since Tim Henman to reach the semi-finals of a major. Nice that Tim was on court to watch the 23-year-old book his spot. Edmund will now face the winner of tonight's clash between Rafael Nadal and Marin Cilic which is scheduled for 8am UK time. KYLE!!!!!!!!!!!!! OMG— Laura Robson (@laurarobson5) January 23, 2018 6:44AM Semi-finalist Edmund speaks It's an amazing feeling, I'm very happy. It was a hard match, I've had lots of matches so far. I tried to enjoy the moment. It's my first match on this court and it was special. He's (Dimitrov) played hard matches, I knew it was going to be tough. I had a dip in the second set, but I broke him at the end of the third had a blip in the fourth and at the end prayed that last ball was out. Edmund is told by Jim Courier he's the sixth British male to reach a major semi-final in the open era - what does it mean to join the illustrious club? It's great. You don't think of those things when you're playing. But I'm sure it's going to be something I'm going to be proud of. It's very pleasing. Of course I want to keep going! Edmund is asked what it's like to be centre of attention from the British press... Yeah, I know what it's like to be Andy Murray now for the last seven or eight years! It's a good pressure to have. 6:38AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 4-6 Edmund (*next server) Dimitrov slices short during the opening point, it throws Edmund momentarily and the Briton strikes long. The two engage in some slicing during the next rally but this time it's Dimitrov who can't control his forehand. Nervous times for Edmund as a double fault gifts Dimitrov a 15-30 advantage. But he's not the only man struggling for rhythm as Dimitrov strikes long again. An ace down the middle brings up match point. How are your nerves now, Kyle? The pair engage in a lengthy rally and Dimitrov over-eggs another reply. Was that out? It looked out. Edmund challenges it and Hawk-Eye duly responds. Edmund is only into his first ever major semi-final! GAME, SET AND MATCH: EDMUND BEATS DIMITROV TO REACH SEMI-FINALS. 6:32AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 4-5 Edmund* (*next server) Both men have won 114 points a pop at the start of this game and this contest could yet go either way. Edmund will have something to say about that and does at the start of this game, bending a forehand winner past the net-rushing Dimitrov to set himself up nicely. Some deep hitting draws an error from Dimitrov who is sent scampering down another ball into the corner. Dimitrov sends down a beautiful backhand which looks to land on the line, Edmund challenges. It's out, it's out, Edmund has two break points. He can't convert the first but does on the next as Dimitrov tightens up and pushes into the net. Wow. Edmund will come out SERVING FOR THE MATCH!! EDMUND BREAKS. This Edmund vs Dimitrov has everything you want for a men’s quarterfinals. Standard is so high. Come On Kyle.— Greg Rusedski (@GregRusedski1) January 23, 2018 6:27AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 4-4 Edmund (*next server) Edmund fires down his first ace of this set but then backs it up with an unwanted first double fault of the fourth set. The Briton draws one of the biggest rounds of applause for the set when he shows great reactions to catch one return from a missed serve and crucially at 30-all is happy to see a forehand from Dimitrov land long. Edmund steers out the game with a deep second serve. 6:22AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 4-3 Edmund* (*next server) Dimitrov challenges one exceptionally deep forehand from Edmund but he's out of luck as the Briton's groundstroke couldn't have been any better. Another rasping winner down his favoured wing from Edmund turns the heat back on Dimitrov's serve at 15-30. Dimitrov draws a long service return from his rival to save the danger for now. But wait, the Bulgarian over-strikes during the next point and then looks to his corner asking for inspiration. This time Dimitrov gets a first serve in which Edmund tamely puts into the middle. The Briton slaps his hip, he knows he missed a chance. Dimitrov takes advantage of the let off and sends down an ace for the game. 6:17AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 3-3 Edmund (*next server) Nice play from Dimitrov as he drills a groundstroke back deep at the feet of Edmund who can't make the pick up. It's early pressure here at 0-30. Edmund puts Dimitrov back in his box, and on his back by pushing a volley into the corner which catches the Bulgarian out. Dimitrov gets one reply back but Edmund keeps the pressure on. The Briton slightly loses his head on the next point, sending one stroke long and gifting two break points to his rival. The pair engage in tentative play during the next rally but Edmund goes for broke first and it doesn't pay off as he strikes into the lines. DIMITROV BREAKS. Dimitrov digs in! He breaks back to get it on serve. This is tense. #AusOpenpic.twitter.com/DXOdoP0eXM— #AusOpen (@AustralianOpen) January 23, 2018 6:12AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 2-3 Edmund* (*next server) Boom. Edmund shows his intent early on in this game by injecting some pace into an outswinging forehand which draws applause from one avid watcher on Rod Laver in 'Come on Tim' himself Mr Henman. Edmund pumps his fist in anticipation as Dimitrov drills a forehand into the lines and then has a break point opening when Dimitrov dumps a reply into the net. Nervy times now as Dimitrov misses his first serve and then drags a forehand wide to hand the Briton an early break in this set. EDMUND BREAKS. 6:08AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 2-2 Edmund (*next server) Edmund doesn't look like a man who is a set away from reaching a first ever semi-final at a major. He punches home a volley and maintains his solid first-service style as Dimitrov mulls over his options. Some fantastic deep striking and defensive work from Edmund keep the pressure on his opponent, forcing the Bulgarian to blink first. Dimitrov allows himself of a wry smile as Edmund closes out the game. Credit: AFP 6:04AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 2-1 Edmund* (*next server) Dimitrov has shaken off the effects of dropping serve deep into that third set to hold to love. A solid recovery from the Bulgarian at the start of a vital fourth set. 6:02AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 1-1 Edmund (*next server) Edmund lets rip with another forehand which is loaded with topspin to land flush on the line and draws gasps from the crowd on Rod Laver Arena. It's the Briton's biggest weapon. He uses it at game point, this time on the chase and we're level for the set. 5:58AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 1-0 Edmund* (*next server) Edmund flashes and misses at a couple of deep forehands before getting on the board when Dimitrov over-eggs his own ground stroke. Edmund places his hands on his hips after slapping a backhand into the tramlines and watches on as Dimitrov whips a forehand winner into the deuce court for a comfortable hold. 5:52AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 3-6 Edmund (*next server) Nervous opening from Edmund as Dimitrov turns aggressor before a rasping first serve from the Briton restores parity. Dimitrov is on the attack during the next rally, taking advantage again of Edmund's edginess but the Briton responds during the next point with an explosive forehand winner down the line. That would've helped settle him down. Edmund brings up set point when he darts onto a Dimitrov return that clips the tape. Edmund punches a volley into the advantage court and then sends down a solid first serve to take the third set. EDMUND WINS THIRD SET TO LEAD TWO SETS TO ONE How many sets away is @kyle8edmund from a Grand Slam semifinal? ☝️#AusOpenpic.twitter.com/SuGcb6r1vh— #AusOpen (@AustralianOpen) January 23, 2018 5:48AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 3-5 Edmund* (*next server) Edmund takes advantage of Dimitrov's first serve struggles by jumping on a second serve and dictating play in the rally. The Briton similarly dominants during the next one, catching Dimitrov with a forehand into the corner with the Bulgarian shifting his balance to the left. Dimitrov tentatively strikes long to hand Edmund two break points at 15-40. Edmund misses the first by dumping a serve into the middle. With two hours on the clock, Dimitrov hands in a double fault at the worst possible time and Edmund has a vital break this set. EDMUND BREAKS. Credit: Getty Images 5:43AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 3-4 Edmund (*next server) Great defence work from Edmund gets him out of a potential hole to blunt an aggressive Dimitrov who finally puts a drop shot into the lines. It moves Edmund to three game points and a strong first serve gets him over the line. 5:40AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 3-3 Edmund* (*next server) Dimitrov gives one service return short shrift en route to three game points. The clash of the pink men - in attire that is - remains level this set. 5:36AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 2-3 Edmund (*next server) Some solid serving bring up two game points for Edmund and third ace of this set and 10th overall allow him of a comfortable hold. 5:33AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 2-2 Edmund* (*next server) Edmund finds his range again with his forehand, pushing Dimitrov deep and working his way to the net to show soft hands with a deft drop shot for 15-30. Edmund mistimes a forehand during the next point but then flashes a superb service return past his rival to set up a first break point of the set. In the bright sunshine and afternoon heat of the day in Melbourne, Edmund tries to dictate play from the back of the court but Dimitrov is able to turn defence into attack when he seizes on a shorter reply from Edmund and he saves the break and rescues the game. 5:26AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 1-2 Edmund (*next server) Oooh er. Edmund pushes a drop shot into the net to open up on his next service game and is reeled back to 30-all when great athleticism and reactions from Dimitrov see the Bulgarian chase down an Edmund reply that deflected off the tape and appeared to land favourably for the Briton. Dimitrov wasn't having any of it, retrieving the short ball and sending back a drop shot which was out of Edmund's reach. The No 3 keeps the heat on by forcing deuce but Edmund shows great resolve to close it out with a looping forehand at an acute angle. He edges back in front this set. 5:21AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 1-1 Edmund* (*next server) Edmund missing quite a few groundstrokes at moment as Dimitrov tries to take control of the match. A serve down the T brings up a comfortable hold for the world No 3. 5:18AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 0-1 Edmund (*next server) Edmund doesn't let dropping that last set affect his concentration as he races to 30-0. Dimitrov gets a board on the board this set when Edmund puts too much on a forehand and reels the Briton in when another forehand lands in the tramlines. From a solid start and three unforced errors hand Dimitrov an early break. Thankfully Dimitrov can't get enough on a service return and Edmund breaths a sigh of relief. A second serve and solid first serve get Edmund over the line. Strap yourselves in. ��@GrigorDimitrov psychs himself up as he draws level in this quarterfinal. #AusOpenpic.twitter.com/i3DhvlD2vJ— #AusOpen (@AustralianOpen) January 23, 2018 5:13AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3 Edmund* (*next server) Dimitrov looks well set at 30-0 before a deep forehand return from Edmund catches him out on the baseline. The Briton mixes it up during the next point. Switching from slicing, to explosive power, Edmund's heavy strokes finally wear Dimitrov down. Edmund misses a great chance to set up break point when he drifts a forehand into the tape and brings up a set point for the Bulgarian. He takes it when Edmund can't get enough on a first serve return. DIMITROV WINS SECOND SET. 5:10AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 5-3 Edmund (*next server) Edmund ensures he makes Dimitrov serve for the second set as the Briton smashes game point at the net. 5:06AM Dimitrov 4-6, 5-2 Edmund* (*next server) Edmund drinks water between games Edmund is down to one challenge after questioning a call that landed on the line right in front of him. He battles his way back to deuce. A double fault gives him a break back point. A big first serve from Dimitrov takes it back to deuce. "A crushingly mediocre set from these two quarter-finalists so far," says the always quotable John McEnroe. And that's it. Game to the Bulgarian and Edmund must serve to hang in the set. 5:01AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 4-2 Edmund (*next server) Edmund hangs on. Someone in the crowd shouts, “Looking good, Kyle.” 4:55AM Dimitrov 4-6, 4-1 Edmund* (*next server) Dimitrov holds comfortably. A real test for Edmund now. He needs to start holding his own serve without giving up so much energy. 4:52AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 3-1 Edmund (*next server) Edmund puts himself in a 0-30 hole but plays a nice shot cross court to bring things even, before finding himself out of position and down a break point. He shuts things down at the net and finishes things off with a smash to bring it to deuce. Odd point with both players pausing as if they heard something to make them stop. It's a battle out there but finally Edmund keeps the set alive by holding serve. You felt he needed that. 4:43AM Dimitrov 4-6, 3-0 Edmund Five points in a row there for Dimitrov - after dropping the first three and putting himself in trouble - and Edmund is down three games in the second set in rapid fashion. Edmund finds the line, but Dimitrov is finding form. The Bulgarian saves three break points to take a 3-0 lead in the second set. #AusOpenpic.twitter.com/5dLQ2poYSv— #AusOpen (@AustralianOpen) January 23, 2018 4:39AM Dimitrov 4-6, 2-0 Edmund Edmund is making heavy weather of this. The players exchange groundstrokes at break-point but then the sound of the ball coming off Edmund's racquet's rim marks the end, and it flies long. That's a break gone. 4:35AM Dimitrov 4-6, 1-0 Edmund Dimitrov comes back at full tilt, winning the first game of the second set to love. 4:30AM Dimitrov 4-6 Edmund Dimitrov earns two break-back points putting Edmund in a tough spot. The Brit comes back with fearsome serve that Dimitrov cannot control. It looks hot down there. This might come down to who can better get through the temperature. Back to deuce and into a battle of groundstrokes before Dimitrov closes in on the net and hits a winner, earning another break point. Another unreturnable serve brings it back to deuce again. Edmund needs two goes at it, but he eventually closes out the set to earn the early lead. 4:21AM Dimitrov 4-5 Edmund Edmund goes long on break point and challenges but the replay shows the ball was just out. He takes the game on the next point with a decisive return, giving him a chance to serve for the set. He lets out an explosive raw. 4:17AM Dimitrov 4-4 Edmund Edmund gets him with the smash at the second attempt to close out a clinical game to 15. So far the two are dead even on points won.
Kyle Edmund blasts way into Australian Open semi-finals by ousting third seed Grigor Dimitrov
How Kyle Edmund went from choker to Australian Open contender 6:49AM Edmund top of the charts The Briton's forehand has been his biggest weapon this tournament and has put his rivals in the shade. Forehand winners 2018 #AusOpen - Men Edmund 127 Dimitrov 93 Seppi 90 Cilc 88— Christopher Clarey (@christophclarey) January 23, 2018 6:47AM Nadal or Cilic up next for Kyle So Edmund is the first player in the men's draw through to the last four. He's also the first Briton other than Andy Murray since Tim Henman to reach the semi-finals of a major. Nice that Tim was on court to watch the 23-year-old book his spot. Edmund will now face the winner of tonight's clash between Rafael Nadal and Marin Cilic which is scheduled for 8am UK time. KYLE!!!!!!!!!!!!! OMG— Laura Robson (@laurarobson5) January 23, 2018 6:44AM Semi-finalist Edmund speaks It's an amazing feeling, I'm very happy. It was a hard match, I've had lots of matches so far. I tried to enjoy the moment. It's my first match on this court and it was special. He's (Dimitrov) played hard matches, I knew it was going to be tough. I had a dip in the second set, but I broke him at the end of the third had a blip in the fourth and at the end prayed that last ball was out. Edmund is told by Jim Courier he's the sixth British male to reach a major semi-final in the open era - what does it mean to join the illustrious club? It's great. You don't think of those things when you're playing. But I'm sure it's going to be something I'm going to be proud of. It's very pleasing. Of course I want to keep going! Edmund is asked what it's like to be centre of attention from the British press... Yeah, I know what it's like to be Andy Murray now for the last seven or eight years! It's a good pressure to have. 6:38AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 4-6 Edmund (*next server) Dimitrov slices short during the opening point, it throws Edmund momentarily and the Briton strikes long. The two engage in some slicing during the next rally but this time it's Dimitrov who can't control his forehand. Nervous times for Edmund as a double fault gifts Dimitrov a 15-30 advantage. But he's not the only man struggling for rhythm as Dimitrov strikes long again. An ace down the middle brings up match point. How are your nerves now, Kyle? The pair engage in a lengthy rally and Dimitrov over-eggs another reply. Was that out? It looked out. Edmund challenges it and Hawk-Eye duly responds. Edmund is only into his first ever major semi-final! GAME, SET AND MATCH: EDMUND BEATS DIMITROV TO REACH SEMI-FINALS. 6:32AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 4-5 Edmund* (*next server) Both men have won 114 points a pop at the start of this game and this contest could yet go either way. Edmund will have something to say about that and does at the start of this game, bending a forehand winner past the net-rushing Dimitrov to set himself up nicely. Some deep hitting draws an error from Dimitrov who is sent scampering down another ball into the corner. Dimitrov sends down a beautiful backhand which looks to land on the line, Edmund challenges. It's out, it's out, Edmund has two break points. He can't convert the first but does on the next as Dimitrov tightens up and pushes into the net. Wow. Edmund will come out SERVING FOR THE MATCH!! EDMUND BREAKS. This Edmund vs Dimitrov has everything you want for a men’s quarterfinals. Standard is so high. Come On Kyle.— Greg Rusedski (@GregRusedski1) January 23, 2018 6:27AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 4-4 Edmund (*next server) Edmund fires down his first ace of this set but then backs it up with an unwanted first double fault of the fourth set. The Briton draws one of the biggest rounds of applause for the set when he shows great reactions to catch one return from a missed serve and crucially at 30-all is happy to see a forehand from Dimitrov land long. Edmund steers out the game with a deep second serve. 6:22AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 4-3 Edmund* (*next server) Dimitrov challenges one exceptionally deep forehand from Edmund but he's out of luck as the Briton's groundstroke couldn't have been any better. Another rasping winner down his favoured wing from Edmund turns the heat back on Dimitrov's serve at 15-30. Dimitrov draws a long service return from his rival to save the danger for now. But wait, the Bulgarian over-strikes during the next point and then looks to his corner asking for inspiration. This time Dimitrov gets a first serve in which Edmund tamely puts into the middle. The Briton slaps his hip, he knows he missed a chance. Dimitrov takes advantage of the let off and sends down an ace for the game. 6:17AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 3-3 Edmund (*next server) Nice play from Dimitrov as he drills a groundstroke back deep at the feet of Edmund who can't make the pick up. It's early pressure here at 0-30. Edmund puts Dimitrov back in his box, and on his back by pushing a volley into the corner which catches the Bulgarian out. Dimitrov gets one reply back but Edmund keeps the pressure on. The Briton slightly loses his head on the next point, sending one stroke long and gifting two break points to his rival. The pair engage in tentative play during the next rally but Edmund goes for broke first and it doesn't pay off as he strikes into the lines. DIMITROV BREAKS. Dimitrov digs in! He breaks back to get it on serve. This is tense. #AusOpenpic.twitter.com/DXOdoP0eXM— #AusOpen (@AustralianOpen) January 23, 2018 6:12AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 2-3 Edmund* (*next server) Boom. Edmund shows his intent early on in this game by injecting some pace into an outswinging forehand which draws applause from one avid watcher on Rod Laver in 'Come on Tim' himself Mr Henman. Edmund pumps his fist in anticipation as Dimitrov drills a forehand into the lines and then has a break point opening when Dimitrov dumps a reply into the net. Nervy times now as Dimitrov misses his first serve and then drags a forehand wide to hand the Briton an early break in this set. EDMUND BREAKS. 6:08AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 2-2 Edmund (*next server) Edmund doesn't look like a man who is a set away from reaching a first ever semi-final at a major. He punches home a volley and maintains his solid first-service style as Dimitrov mulls over his options. Some fantastic deep striking and defensive work from Edmund keep the pressure on his opponent, forcing the Bulgarian to blink first. Dimitrov allows himself of a wry smile as Edmund closes out the game. Credit: AFP 6:04AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 2-1 Edmund* (*next server) Dimitrov has shaken off the effects of dropping serve deep into that third set to hold to love. A solid recovery from the Bulgarian at the start of a vital fourth set. 6:02AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 1-1 Edmund (*next server) Edmund lets rip with another forehand which is loaded with topspin to land flush on the line and draws gasps from the crowd on Rod Laver Arena. It's the Briton's biggest weapon. He uses it at game point, this time on the chase and we're level for the set. 5:58AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 1-0 Edmund* (*next server) Edmund flashes and misses at a couple of deep forehands before getting on the board when Dimitrov over-eggs his own ground stroke. Edmund places his hands on his hips after slapping a backhand into the tramlines and watches on as Dimitrov whips a forehand winner into the deuce court for a comfortable hold. 5:52AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 3-6 Edmund (*next server) Nervous opening from Edmund as Dimitrov turns aggressor before a rasping first serve from the Briton restores parity. Dimitrov is on the attack during the next rally, taking advantage again of Edmund's edginess but the Briton responds during the next point with an explosive forehand winner down the line. That would've helped settle him down. Edmund brings up set point when he darts onto a Dimitrov return that clips the tape. Edmund punches a volley into the advantage court and then sends down a solid first serve to take the third set. EDMUND WINS THIRD SET TO LEAD TWO SETS TO ONE How many sets away is @kyle8edmund from a Grand Slam semifinal? ☝️#AusOpenpic.twitter.com/SuGcb6r1vh— #AusOpen (@AustralianOpen) January 23, 2018 5:48AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 3-5 Edmund* (*next server) Edmund takes advantage of Dimitrov's first serve struggles by jumping on a second serve and dictating play in the rally. The Briton similarly dominants during the next one, catching Dimitrov with a forehand into the corner with the Bulgarian shifting his balance to the left. Dimitrov tentatively strikes long to hand Edmund two break points at 15-40. Edmund misses the first by dumping a serve into the middle. With two hours on the clock, Dimitrov hands in a double fault at the worst possible time and Edmund has a vital break this set. EDMUND BREAKS. Credit: Getty Images 5:43AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 3-4 Edmund (*next server) Great defence work from Edmund gets him out of a potential hole to blunt an aggressive Dimitrov who finally puts a drop shot into the lines. It moves Edmund to three game points and a strong first serve gets him over the line. 5:40AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 3-3 Edmund* (*next server) Dimitrov gives one service return short shrift en route to three game points. The clash of the pink men - in attire that is - remains level this set. 5:36AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 2-3 Edmund (*next server) Some solid serving bring up two game points for Edmund and third ace of this set and 10th overall allow him of a comfortable hold. 5:33AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 2-2 Edmund* (*next server) Edmund finds his range again with his forehand, pushing Dimitrov deep and working his way to the net to show soft hands with a deft drop shot for 15-30. Edmund mistimes a forehand during the next point but then flashes a superb service return past his rival to set up a first break point of the set. In the bright sunshine and afternoon heat of the day in Melbourne, Edmund tries to dictate play from the back of the court but Dimitrov is able to turn defence into attack when he seizes on a shorter reply from Edmund and he saves the break and rescues the game. 5:26AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 1-2 Edmund (*next server) Oooh er. Edmund pushes a drop shot into the net to open up on his next service game and is reeled back to 30-all when great athleticism and reactions from Dimitrov see the Bulgarian chase down an Edmund reply that deflected off the tape and appeared to land favourably for the Briton. Dimitrov wasn't having any of it, retrieving the short ball and sending back a drop shot which was out of Edmund's reach. The No 3 keeps the heat on by forcing deuce but Edmund shows great resolve to close it out with a looping forehand at an acute angle. He edges back in front this set. 5:21AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 1-1 Edmund* (*next server) Edmund missing quite a few groundstrokes at moment as Dimitrov tries to take control of the match. A serve down the T brings up a comfortable hold for the world No 3. 5:18AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 0-1 Edmund (*next server) Edmund doesn't let dropping that last set affect his concentration as he races to 30-0. Dimitrov gets a board on the board this set when Edmund puts too much on a forehand and reels the Briton in when another forehand lands in the tramlines. From a solid start and three unforced errors hand Dimitrov an early break. Thankfully Dimitrov can't get enough on a service return and Edmund breaths a sigh of relief. A second serve and solid first serve get Edmund over the line. Strap yourselves in. ��@GrigorDimitrov psychs himself up as he draws level in this quarterfinal. #AusOpenpic.twitter.com/i3DhvlD2vJ— #AusOpen (@AustralianOpen) January 23, 2018 5:13AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3 Edmund* (*next server) Dimitrov looks well set at 30-0 before a deep forehand return from Edmund catches him out on the baseline. The Briton mixes it up during the next point. Switching from slicing, to explosive power, Edmund's heavy strokes finally wear Dimitrov down. Edmund misses a great chance to set up break point when he drifts a forehand into the tape and brings up a set point for the Bulgarian. He takes it when Edmund can't get enough on a first serve return. DIMITROV WINS SECOND SET. 5:10AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 5-3 Edmund (*next server) Edmund ensures he makes Dimitrov serve for the second set as the Briton smashes game point at the net. 5:06AM Dimitrov 4-6, 5-2 Edmund* (*next server) Edmund drinks water between games Edmund is down to one challenge after questioning a call that landed on the line right in front of him. He battles his way back to deuce. A double fault gives him a break back point. A big first serve from Dimitrov takes it back to deuce. "A crushingly mediocre set from these two quarter-finalists so far," says the always quotable John McEnroe. And that's it. Game to the Bulgarian and Edmund must serve to hang in the set. 5:01AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 4-2 Edmund (*next server) Edmund hangs on. Someone in the crowd shouts, “Looking good, Kyle.” 4:55AM Dimitrov 4-6, 4-1 Edmund* (*next server) Dimitrov holds comfortably. A real test for Edmund now. He needs to start holding his own serve without giving up so much energy. 4:52AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 3-1 Edmund (*next server) Edmund puts himself in a 0-30 hole but plays a nice shot cross court to bring things even, before finding himself out of position and down a break point. He shuts things down at the net and finishes things off with a smash to bring it to deuce. Odd point with both players pausing as if they heard something to make them stop. It's a battle out there but finally Edmund keeps the set alive by holding serve. You felt he needed that. 4:43AM Dimitrov 4-6, 3-0 Edmund Five points in a row there for Dimitrov - after dropping the first three and putting himself in trouble - and Edmund is down three games in the second set in rapid fashion. Edmund finds the line, but Dimitrov is finding form. The Bulgarian saves three break points to take a 3-0 lead in the second set. #AusOpenpic.twitter.com/5dLQ2poYSv— #AusOpen (@AustralianOpen) January 23, 2018 4:39AM Dimitrov 4-6, 2-0 Edmund Edmund is making heavy weather of this. The players exchange groundstrokes at break-point but then the sound of the ball coming off Edmund's racquet's rim marks the end, and it flies long. That's a break gone. 4:35AM Dimitrov 4-6, 1-0 Edmund Dimitrov comes back at full tilt, winning the first game of the second set to love. 4:30AM Dimitrov 4-6 Edmund Dimitrov earns two break-back points putting Edmund in a tough spot. The Brit comes back with fearsome serve that Dimitrov cannot control. It looks hot down there. This might come down to who can better get through the temperature. Back to deuce and into a battle of groundstrokes before Dimitrov closes in on the net and hits a winner, earning another break point. Another unreturnable serve brings it back to deuce again. Edmund needs two goes at it, but he eventually closes out the set to earn the early lead. 4:21AM Dimitrov 4-5 Edmund Edmund goes long on break point and challenges but the replay shows the ball was just out. He takes the game on the next point with a decisive return, giving him a chance to serve for the set. He lets out an explosive raw. 4:17AM Dimitrov 4-4 Edmund Edmund gets him with the smash at the second attempt to close out a clinical game to 15. So far the two are dead even on points won.
How Kyle Edmund went from choker to Australian Open contender 6:49AM Edmund top of the charts The Briton's forehand has been his biggest weapon this tournament and has put his rivals in the shade. Forehand winners 2018 #AusOpen - Men Edmund 127 Dimitrov 93 Seppi 90 Cilc 88— Christopher Clarey (@christophclarey) January 23, 2018 6:47AM Nadal or Cilic up next for Kyle So Edmund is the first player in the men's draw through to the last four. He's also the first Briton other than Andy Murray since Tim Henman to reach the semi-finals of a major. Nice that Tim was on court to watch the 23-year-old book his spot. Edmund will now face the winner of tonight's clash between Rafael Nadal and Marin Cilic which is scheduled for 8am UK time. KYLE!!!!!!!!!!!!! OMG— Laura Robson (@laurarobson5) January 23, 2018 6:44AM Semi-finalist Edmund speaks It's an amazing feeling, I'm very happy. It was a hard match, I've had lots of matches so far. I tried to enjoy the moment. It's my first match on this court and it was special. He's (Dimitrov) played hard matches, I knew it was going to be tough. I had a dip in the second set, but I broke him at the end of the third had a blip in the fourth and at the end prayed that last ball was out. Edmund is told by Jim Courier he's the sixth British male to reach a major semi-final in the open era - what does it mean to join the illustrious club? It's great. You don't think of those things when you're playing. But I'm sure it's going to be something I'm going to be proud of. It's very pleasing. Of course I want to keep going! Edmund is asked what it's like to be centre of attention from the British press... Yeah, I know what it's like to be Andy Murray now for the last seven or eight years! It's a good pressure to have. 6:38AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 4-6 Edmund (*next server) Dimitrov slices short during the opening point, it throws Edmund momentarily and the Briton strikes long. The two engage in some slicing during the next rally but this time it's Dimitrov who can't control his forehand. Nervous times for Edmund as a double fault gifts Dimitrov a 15-30 advantage. But he's not the only man struggling for rhythm as Dimitrov strikes long again. An ace down the middle brings up match point. How are your nerves now, Kyle? The pair engage in a lengthy rally and Dimitrov over-eggs another reply. Was that out? It looked out. Edmund challenges it and Hawk-Eye duly responds. Edmund is only into his first ever major semi-final! GAME, SET AND MATCH: EDMUND BEATS DIMITROV TO REACH SEMI-FINALS. 6:32AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 4-5 Edmund* (*next server) Both men have won 114 points a pop at the start of this game and this contest could yet go either way. Edmund will have something to say about that and does at the start of this game, bending a forehand winner past the net-rushing Dimitrov to set himself up nicely. Some deep hitting draws an error from Dimitrov who is sent scampering down another ball into the corner. Dimitrov sends down a beautiful backhand which looks to land on the line, Edmund challenges. It's out, it's out, Edmund has two break points. He can't convert the first but does on the next as Dimitrov tightens up and pushes into the net. Wow. Edmund will come out SERVING FOR THE MATCH!! EDMUND BREAKS. This Edmund vs Dimitrov has everything you want for a men’s quarterfinals. Standard is so high. Come On Kyle.— Greg Rusedski (@GregRusedski1) January 23, 2018 6:27AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 4-4 Edmund (*next server) Edmund fires down his first ace of this set but then backs it up with an unwanted first double fault of the fourth set. The Briton draws one of the biggest rounds of applause for the set when he shows great reactions to catch one return from a missed serve and crucially at 30-all is happy to see a forehand from Dimitrov land long. Edmund steers out the game with a deep second serve. 6:22AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 4-3 Edmund* (*next server) Dimitrov challenges one exceptionally deep forehand from Edmund but he's out of luck as the Briton's groundstroke couldn't have been any better. Another rasping winner down his favoured wing from Edmund turns the heat back on Dimitrov's serve at 15-30. Dimitrov draws a long service return from his rival to save the danger for now. But wait, the Bulgarian over-strikes during the next point and then looks to his corner asking for inspiration. This time Dimitrov gets a first serve in which Edmund tamely puts into the middle. The Briton slaps his hip, he knows he missed a chance. Dimitrov takes advantage of the let off and sends down an ace for the game. 6:17AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 3-3 Edmund (*next server) Nice play from Dimitrov as he drills a groundstroke back deep at the feet of Edmund who can't make the pick up. It's early pressure here at 0-30. Edmund puts Dimitrov back in his box, and on his back by pushing a volley into the corner which catches the Bulgarian out. Dimitrov gets one reply back but Edmund keeps the pressure on. The Briton slightly loses his head on the next point, sending one stroke long and gifting two break points to his rival. The pair engage in tentative play during the next rally but Edmund goes for broke first and it doesn't pay off as he strikes into the lines. DIMITROV BREAKS. Dimitrov digs in! He breaks back to get it on serve. This is tense. #AusOpenpic.twitter.com/DXOdoP0eXM— #AusOpen (@AustralianOpen) January 23, 2018 6:12AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 2-3 Edmund* (*next server) Boom. Edmund shows his intent early on in this game by injecting some pace into an outswinging forehand which draws applause from one avid watcher on Rod Laver in 'Come on Tim' himself Mr Henman. Edmund pumps his fist in anticipation as Dimitrov drills a forehand into the lines and then has a break point opening when Dimitrov dumps a reply into the net. Nervy times now as Dimitrov misses his first serve and then drags a forehand wide to hand the Briton an early break in this set. EDMUND BREAKS. 6:08AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 2-2 Edmund (*next server) Edmund doesn't look like a man who is a set away from reaching a first ever semi-final at a major. He punches home a volley and maintains his solid first-service style as Dimitrov mulls over his options. Some fantastic deep striking and defensive work from Edmund keep the pressure on his opponent, forcing the Bulgarian to blink first. Dimitrov allows himself of a wry smile as Edmund closes out the game. Credit: AFP 6:04AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 2-1 Edmund* (*next server) Dimitrov has shaken off the effects of dropping serve deep into that third set to hold to love. A solid recovery from the Bulgarian at the start of a vital fourth set. 6:02AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 1-1 Edmund (*next server) Edmund lets rip with another forehand which is loaded with topspin to land flush on the line and draws gasps from the crowd on Rod Laver Arena. It's the Briton's biggest weapon. He uses it at game point, this time on the chase and we're level for the set. 5:58AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 1-0 Edmund* (*next server) Edmund flashes and misses at a couple of deep forehands before getting on the board when Dimitrov over-eggs his own ground stroke. Edmund places his hands on his hips after slapping a backhand into the tramlines and watches on as Dimitrov whips a forehand winner into the deuce court for a comfortable hold. 5:52AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 3-6 Edmund (*next server) Nervous opening from Edmund as Dimitrov turns aggressor before a rasping first serve from the Briton restores parity. Dimitrov is on the attack during the next rally, taking advantage again of Edmund's edginess but the Briton responds during the next point with an explosive forehand winner down the line. That would've helped settle him down. Edmund brings up set point when he darts onto a Dimitrov return that clips the tape. Edmund punches a volley into the advantage court and then sends down a solid first serve to take the third set. EDMUND WINS THIRD SET TO LEAD TWO SETS TO ONE How many sets away is @kyle8edmund from a Grand Slam semifinal? ☝️#AusOpenpic.twitter.com/SuGcb6r1vh— #AusOpen (@AustralianOpen) January 23, 2018 5:48AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 3-5 Edmund* (*next server) Edmund takes advantage of Dimitrov's first serve struggles by jumping on a second serve and dictating play in the rally. The Briton similarly dominants during the next one, catching Dimitrov with a forehand into the corner with the Bulgarian shifting his balance to the left. Dimitrov tentatively strikes long to hand Edmund two break points at 15-40. Edmund misses the first by dumping a serve into the middle. With two hours on the clock, Dimitrov hands in a double fault at the worst possible time and Edmund has a vital break this set. EDMUND BREAKS. Credit: Getty Images 5:43AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 3-4 Edmund (*next server) Great defence work from Edmund gets him out of a potential hole to blunt an aggressive Dimitrov who finally puts a drop shot into the lines. It moves Edmund to three game points and a strong first serve gets him over the line. 5:40AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 3-3 Edmund* (*next server) Dimitrov gives one service return short shrift en route to three game points. The clash of the pink men - in attire that is - remains level this set. 5:36AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 2-3 Edmund (*next server) Some solid serving bring up two game points for Edmund and third ace of this set and 10th overall allow him of a comfortable hold. 5:33AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 2-2 Edmund* (*next server) Edmund finds his range again with his forehand, pushing Dimitrov deep and working his way to the net to show soft hands with a deft drop shot for 15-30. Edmund mistimes a forehand during the next point but then flashes a superb service return past his rival to set up a first break point of the set. In the bright sunshine and afternoon heat of the day in Melbourne, Edmund tries to dictate play from the back of the court but Dimitrov is able to turn defence into attack when he seizes on a shorter reply from Edmund and he saves the break and rescues the game. 5:26AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 1-2 Edmund (*next server) Oooh er. Edmund pushes a drop shot into the net to open up on his next service game and is reeled back to 30-all when great athleticism and reactions from Dimitrov see the Bulgarian chase down an Edmund reply that deflected off the tape and appeared to land favourably for the Briton. Dimitrov wasn't having any of it, retrieving the short ball and sending back a drop shot which was out of Edmund's reach. The No 3 keeps the heat on by forcing deuce but Edmund shows great resolve to close it out with a looping forehand at an acute angle. He edges back in front this set. 5:21AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 1-1 Edmund* (*next server) Edmund missing quite a few groundstrokes at moment as Dimitrov tries to take control of the match. A serve down the T brings up a comfortable hold for the world No 3. 5:18AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 0-1 Edmund (*next server) Edmund doesn't let dropping that last set affect his concentration as he races to 30-0. Dimitrov gets a board on the board this set when Edmund puts too much on a forehand and reels the Briton in when another forehand lands in the tramlines. From a solid start and three unforced errors hand Dimitrov an early break. Thankfully Dimitrov can't get enough on a service return and Edmund breaths a sigh of relief. A second serve and solid first serve get Edmund over the line. Strap yourselves in. ��@GrigorDimitrov psychs himself up as he draws level in this quarterfinal. #AusOpenpic.twitter.com/i3DhvlD2vJ— #AusOpen (@AustralianOpen) January 23, 2018 5:13AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3 Edmund* (*next server) Dimitrov looks well set at 30-0 before a deep forehand return from Edmund catches him out on the baseline. The Briton mixes it up during the next point. Switching from slicing, to explosive power, Edmund's heavy strokes finally wear Dimitrov down. Edmund misses a great chance to set up break point when he drifts a forehand into the tape and brings up a set point for the Bulgarian. He takes it when Edmund can't get enough on a first serve return. DIMITROV WINS SECOND SET. 5:10AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 5-3 Edmund (*next server) Edmund ensures he makes Dimitrov serve for the second set as the Briton smashes game point at the net. 5:06AM Dimitrov 4-6, 5-2 Edmund* (*next server) Edmund drinks water between games Edmund is down to one challenge after questioning a call that landed on the line right in front of him. He battles his way back to deuce. A double fault gives him a break back point. A big first serve from Dimitrov takes it back to deuce. "A crushingly mediocre set from these two quarter-finalists so far," says the always quotable John McEnroe. And that's it. Game to the Bulgarian and Edmund must serve to hang in the set. 5:01AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 4-2 Edmund (*next server) Edmund hangs on. Someone in the crowd shouts, “Looking good, Kyle.” 4:55AM Dimitrov 4-6, 4-1 Edmund* (*next server) Dimitrov holds comfortably. A real test for Edmund now. He needs to start holding his own serve without giving up so much energy. 4:52AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 3-1 Edmund (*next server) Edmund puts himself in a 0-30 hole but plays a nice shot cross court to bring things even, before finding himself out of position and down a break point. He shuts things down at the net and finishes things off with a smash to bring it to deuce. Odd point with both players pausing as if they heard something to make them stop. It's a battle out there but finally Edmund keeps the set alive by holding serve. You felt he needed that. 4:43AM Dimitrov 4-6, 3-0 Edmund Five points in a row there for Dimitrov - after dropping the first three and putting himself in trouble - and Edmund is down three games in the second set in rapid fashion. Edmund finds the line, but Dimitrov is finding form. The Bulgarian saves three break points to take a 3-0 lead in the second set. #AusOpenpic.twitter.com/5dLQ2poYSv— #AusOpen (@AustralianOpen) January 23, 2018 4:39AM Dimitrov 4-6, 2-0 Edmund Edmund is making heavy weather of this. The players exchange groundstrokes at break-point but then the sound of the ball coming off Edmund's racquet's rim marks the end, and it flies long. That's a break gone. 4:35AM Dimitrov 4-6, 1-0 Edmund Dimitrov comes back at full tilt, winning the first game of the second set to love. 4:30AM Dimitrov 4-6 Edmund Dimitrov earns two break-back points putting Edmund in a tough spot. The Brit comes back with fearsome serve that Dimitrov cannot control. It looks hot down there. This might come down to who can better get through the temperature. Back to deuce and into a battle of groundstrokes before Dimitrov closes in on the net and hits a winner, earning another break point. Another unreturnable serve brings it back to deuce again. Edmund needs two goes at it, but he eventually closes out the set to earn the early lead. 4:21AM Dimitrov 4-5 Edmund Edmund goes long on break point and challenges but the replay shows the ball was just out. He takes the game on the next point with a decisive return, giving him a chance to serve for the set. He lets out an explosive raw. 4:17AM Dimitrov 4-4 Edmund Edmund gets him with the smash at the second attempt to close out a clinical game to 15. So far the two are dead even on points won.
Kyle Edmund blasts way into Australian Open semi-finals by ousting third seed Grigor Dimitrov
How Kyle Edmund went from choker to Australian Open contender 6:49AM Edmund top of the charts The Briton's forehand has been his biggest weapon this tournament and has put his rivals in the shade. Forehand winners 2018 #AusOpen - Men Edmund 127 Dimitrov 93 Seppi 90 Cilc 88— Christopher Clarey (@christophclarey) January 23, 2018 6:47AM Nadal or Cilic up next for Kyle So Edmund is the first player in the men's draw through to the last four. He's also the first Briton other than Andy Murray since Tim Henman to reach the semi-finals of a major. Nice that Tim was on court to watch the 23-year-old book his spot. Edmund will now face the winner of tonight's clash between Rafael Nadal and Marin Cilic which is scheduled for 8am UK time. KYLE!!!!!!!!!!!!! OMG— Laura Robson (@laurarobson5) January 23, 2018 6:44AM Semi-finalist Edmund speaks It's an amazing feeling, I'm very happy. It was a hard match, I've had lots of matches so far. I tried to enjoy the moment. It's my first match on this court and it was special. He's (Dimitrov) played hard matches, I knew it was going to be tough. I had a dip in the second set, but I broke him at the end of the third had a blip in the fourth and at the end prayed that last ball was out. Edmund is told by Jim Courier he's the sixth British male to reach a major semi-final in the open era - what does it mean to join the illustrious club? It's great. You don't think of those things when you're playing. But I'm sure it's going to be something I'm going to be proud of. It's very pleasing. Of course I want to keep going! Edmund is asked what it's like to be centre of attention from the British press... Yeah, I know what it's like to be Andy Murray now for the last seven or eight years! It's a good pressure to have. 6:38AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 4-6 Edmund (*next server) Dimitrov slices short during the opening point, it throws Edmund momentarily and the Briton strikes long. The two engage in some slicing during the next rally but this time it's Dimitrov who can't control his forehand. Nervous times for Edmund as a double fault gifts Dimitrov a 15-30 advantage. But he's not the only man struggling for rhythm as Dimitrov strikes long again. An ace down the middle brings up match point. How are your nerves now, Kyle? The pair engage in a lengthy rally and Dimitrov over-eggs another reply. Was that out? It looked out. Edmund challenges it and Hawk-Eye duly responds. Edmund is only into his first ever major semi-final! GAME, SET AND MATCH: EDMUND BEATS DIMITROV TO REACH SEMI-FINALS. 6:32AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 4-5 Edmund* (*next server) Both men have won 114 points a pop at the start of this game and this contest could yet go either way. Edmund will have something to say about that and does at the start of this game, bending a forehand winner past the net-rushing Dimitrov to set himself up nicely. Some deep hitting draws an error from Dimitrov who is sent scampering down another ball into the corner. Dimitrov sends down a beautiful backhand which looks to land on the line, Edmund challenges. It's out, it's out, Edmund has two break points. He can't convert the first but does on the next as Dimitrov tightens up and pushes into the net. Wow. Edmund will come out SERVING FOR THE MATCH!! EDMUND BREAKS. This Edmund vs Dimitrov has everything you want for a men’s quarterfinals. Standard is so high. Come On Kyle.— Greg Rusedski (@GregRusedski1) January 23, 2018 6:27AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 4-4 Edmund (*next server) Edmund fires down his first ace of this set but then backs it up with an unwanted first double fault of the fourth set. The Briton draws one of the biggest rounds of applause for the set when he shows great reactions to catch one return from a missed serve and crucially at 30-all is happy to see a forehand from Dimitrov land long. Edmund steers out the game with a deep second serve. 6:22AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 4-3 Edmund* (*next server) Dimitrov challenges one exceptionally deep forehand from Edmund but he's out of luck as the Briton's groundstroke couldn't have been any better. Another rasping winner down his favoured wing from Edmund turns the heat back on Dimitrov's serve at 15-30. Dimitrov draws a long service return from his rival to save the danger for now. But wait, the Bulgarian over-strikes during the next point and then looks to his corner asking for inspiration. This time Dimitrov gets a first serve in which Edmund tamely puts into the middle. The Briton slaps his hip, he knows he missed a chance. Dimitrov takes advantage of the let off and sends down an ace for the game. 6:17AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 3-3 Edmund (*next server) Nice play from Dimitrov as he drills a groundstroke back deep at the feet of Edmund who can't make the pick up. It's early pressure here at 0-30. Edmund puts Dimitrov back in his box, and on his back by pushing a volley into the corner which catches the Bulgarian out. Dimitrov gets one reply back but Edmund keeps the pressure on. The Briton slightly loses his head on the next point, sending one stroke long and gifting two break points to his rival. The pair engage in tentative play during the next rally but Edmund goes for broke first and it doesn't pay off as he strikes into the lines. DIMITROV BREAKS. Dimitrov digs in! He breaks back to get it on serve. This is tense. #AusOpenpic.twitter.com/DXOdoP0eXM— #AusOpen (@AustralianOpen) January 23, 2018 6:12AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 2-3 Edmund* (*next server) Boom. Edmund shows his intent early on in this game by injecting some pace into an outswinging forehand which draws applause from one avid watcher on Rod Laver in 'Come on Tim' himself Mr Henman. Edmund pumps his fist in anticipation as Dimitrov drills a forehand into the lines and then has a break point opening when Dimitrov dumps a reply into the net. Nervy times now as Dimitrov misses his first serve and then drags a forehand wide to hand the Briton an early break in this set. EDMUND BREAKS. 6:08AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 2-2 Edmund (*next server) Edmund doesn't look like a man who is a set away from reaching a first ever semi-final at a major. He punches home a volley and maintains his solid first-service style as Dimitrov mulls over his options. Some fantastic deep striking and defensive work from Edmund keep the pressure on his opponent, forcing the Bulgarian to blink first. Dimitrov allows himself of a wry smile as Edmund closes out the game. Credit: AFP 6:04AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 2-1 Edmund* (*next server) Dimitrov has shaken off the effects of dropping serve deep into that third set to hold to love. A solid recovery from the Bulgarian at the start of a vital fourth set. 6:02AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 1-1 Edmund (*next server) Edmund lets rip with another forehand which is loaded with topspin to land flush on the line and draws gasps from the crowd on Rod Laver Arena. It's the Briton's biggest weapon. He uses it at game point, this time on the chase and we're level for the set. 5:58AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 1-0 Edmund* (*next server) Edmund flashes and misses at a couple of deep forehands before getting on the board when Dimitrov over-eggs his own ground stroke. Edmund places his hands on his hips after slapping a backhand into the tramlines and watches on as Dimitrov whips a forehand winner into the deuce court for a comfortable hold. 5:52AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 3-6 Edmund (*next server) Nervous opening from Edmund as Dimitrov turns aggressor before a rasping first serve from the Briton restores parity. Dimitrov is on the attack during the next rally, taking advantage again of Edmund's edginess but the Briton responds during the next point with an explosive forehand winner down the line. That would've helped settle him down. Edmund brings up set point when he darts onto a Dimitrov return that clips the tape. Edmund punches a volley into the advantage court and then sends down a solid first serve to take the third set. EDMUND WINS THIRD SET TO LEAD TWO SETS TO ONE How many sets away is @kyle8edmund from a Grand Slam semifinal? ☝️#AusOpenpic.twitter.com/SuGcb6r1vh— #AusOpen (@AustralianOpen) January 23, 2018 5:48AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 3-5 Edmund* (*next server) Edmund takes advantage of Dimitrov's first serve struggles by jumping on a second serve and dictating play in the rally. The Briton similarly dominants during the next one, catching Dimitrov with a forehand into the corner with the Bulgarian shifting his balance to the left. Dimitrov tentatively strikes long to hand Edmund two break points at 15-40. Edmund misses the first by dumping a serve into the middle. With two hours on the clock, Dimitrov hands in a double fault at the worst possible time and Edmund has a vital break this set. EDMUND BREAKS. Credit: Getty Images 5:43AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 3-4 Edmund (*next server) Great defence work from Edmund gets him out of a potential hole to blunt an aggressive Dimitrov who finally puts a drop shot into the lines. It moves Edmund to three game points and a strong first serve gets him over the line. 5:40AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 3-3 Edmund* (*next server) Dimitrov gives one service return short shrift en route to three game points. The clash of the pink men - in attire that is - remains level this set. 5:36AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 2-3 Edmund (*next server) Some solid serving bring up two game points for Edmund and third ace of this set and 10th overall allow him of a comfortable hold. 5:33AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 2-2 Edmund* (*next server) Edmund finds his range again with his forehand, pushing Dimitrov deep and working his way to the net to show soft hands with a deft drop shot for 15-30. Edmund mistimes a forehand during the next point but then flashes a superb service return past his rival to set up a first break point of the set. In the bright sunshine and afternoon heat of the day in Melbourne, Edmund tries to dictate play from the back of the court but Dimitrov is able to turn defence into attack when he seizes on a shorter reply from Edmund and he saves the break and rescues the game. 5:26AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 1-2 Edmund (*next server) Oooh er. Edmund pushes a drop shot into the net to open up on his next service game and is reeled back to 30-all when great athleticism and reactions from Dimitrov see the Bulgarian chase down an Edmund reply that deflected off the tape and appeared to land favourably for the Briton. Dimitrov wasn't having any of it, retrieving the short ball and sending back a drop shot which was out of Edmund's reach. The No 3 keeps the heat on by forcing deuce but Edmund shows great resolve to close it out with a looping forehand at an acute angle. He edges back in front this set. 5:21AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 1-1 Edmund* (*next server) Edmund missing quite a few groundstrokes at moment as Dimitrov tries to take control of the match. A serve down the T brings up a comfortable hold for the world No 3. 5:18AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 0-1 Edmund (*next server) Edmund doesn't let dropping that last set affect his concentration as he races to 30-0. Dimitrov gets a board on the board this set when Edmund puts too much on a forehand and reels the Briton in when another forehand lands in the tramlines. From a solid start and three unforced errors hand Dimitrov an early break. Thankfully Dimitrov can't get enough on a service return and Edmund breaths a sigh of relief. A second serve and solid first serve get Edmund over the line. Strap yourselves in. ��@GrigorDimitrov psychs himself up as he draws level in this quarterfinal. #AusOpenpic.twitter.com/i3DhvlD2vJ— #AusOpen (@AustralianOpen) January 23, 2018 5:13AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3 Edmund* (*next server) Dimitrov looks well set at 30-0 before a deep forehand return from Edmund catches him out on the baseline. The Briton mixes it up during the next point. Switching from slicing, to explosive power, Edmund's heavy strokes finally wear Dimitrov down. Edmund misses a great chance to set up break point when he drifts a forehand into the tape and brings up a set point for the Bulgarian. He takes it when Edmund can't get enough on a first serve return. DIMITROV WINS SECOND SET. 5:10AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 5-3 Edmund (*next server) Edmund ensures he makes Dimitrov serve for the second set as the Briton smashes game point at the net. 5:06AM Dimitrov 4-6, 5-2 Edmund* (*next server) Edmund drinks water between games Edmund is down to one challenge after questioning a call that landed on the line right in front of him. He battles his way back to deuce. A double fault gives him a break back point. A big first serve from Dimitrov takes it back to deuce. "A crushingly mediocre set from these two quarter-finalists so far," says the always quotable John McEnroe. And that's it. Game to the Bulgarian and Edmund must serve to hang in the set. 5:01AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 4-2 Edmund (*next server) Edmund hangs on. Someone in the crowd shouts, “Looking good, Kyle.” 4:55AM Dimitrov 4-6, 4-1 Edmund* (*next server) Dimitrov holds comfortably. A real test for Edmund now. He needs to start holding his own serve without giving up so much energy. 4:52AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 3-1 Edmund (*next server) Edmund puts himself in a 0-30 hole but plays a nice shot cross court to bring things even, before finding himself out of position and down a break point. He shuts things down at the net and finishes things off with a smash to bring it to deuce. Odd point with both players pausing as if they heard something to make them stop. It's a battle out there but finally Edmund keeps the set alive by holding serve. You felt he needed that. 4:43AM Dimitrov 4-6, 3-0 Edmund Five points in a row there for Dimitrov - after dropping the first three and putting himself in trouble - and Edmund is down three games in the second set in rapid fashion. Edmund finds the line, but Dimitrov is finding form. The Bulgarian saves three break points to take a 3-0 lead in the second set. #AusOpenpic.twitter.com/5dLQ2poYSv— #AusOpen (@AustralianOpen) January 23, 2018 4:39AM Dimitrov 4-6, 2-0 Edmund Edmund is making heavy weather of this. The players exchange groundstrokes at break-point but then the sound of the ball coming off Edmund's racquet's rim marks the end, and it flies long. That's a break gone. 4:35AM Dimitrov 4-6, 1-0 Edmund Dimitrov comes back at full tilt, winning the first game of the second set to love. 4:30AM Dimitrov 4-6 Edmund Dimitrov earns two break-back points putting Edmund in a tough spot. The Brit comes back with fearsome serve that Dimitrov cannot control. It looks hot down there. This might come down to who can better get through the temperature. Back to deuce and into a battle of groundstrokes before Dimitrov closes in on the net and hits a winner, earning another break point. Another unreturnable serve brings it back to deuce again. Edmund needs two goes at it, but he eventually closes out the set to earn the early lead. 4:21AM Dimitrov 4-5 Edmund Edmund goes long on break point and challenges but the replay shows the ball was just out. He takes the game on the next point with a decisive return, giving him a chance to serve for the set. He lets out an explosive raw. 4:17AM Dimitrov 4-4 Edmund Edmund gets him with the smash at the second attempt to close out a clinical game to 15. So far the two are dead even on points won.
How Kyle Edmund went from choker to Australian Open contender 6:49AM Edmund top of the charts The Briton's forehand has been his biggest weapon this tournament and has put his rivals in the shade. Forehand winners 2018 #AusOpen - Men Edmund 127 Dimitrov 93 Seppi 90 Cilc 88— Christopher Clarey (@christophclarey) January 23, 2018 6:47AM Nadal or Cilic up next for Kyle So Edmund is the first player in the men's draw through to the last four. He's also the first Briton other than Andy Murray since Tim Henman to reach the semi-finals of a major. Nice that Tim was on court to watch the 23-year-old book his spot. Edmund will now face the winner of tonight's clash between Rafael Nadal and Marin Cilic which is scheduled for 8am UK time. KYLE!!!!!!!!!!!!! OMG— Laura Robson (@laurarobson5) January 23, 2018 6:44AM Semi-finalist Edmund speaks It's an amazing feeling, I'm very happy. It was a hard match, I've had lots of matches so far. I tried to enjoy the moment. It's my first match on this court and it was special. He's (Dimitrov) played hard matches, I knew it was going to be tough. I had a dip in the second set, but I broke him at the end of the third had a blip in the fourth and at the end prayed that last ball was out. Edmund is told by Jim Courier he's the sixth British male to reach a major semi-final in the open era - what does it mean to join the illustrious club? It's great. You don't think of those things when you're playing. But I'm sure it's going to be something I'm going to be proud of. It's very pleasing. Of course I want to keep going! Edmund is asked what it's like to be centre of attention from the British press... Yeah, I know what it's like to be Andy Murray now for the last seven or eight years! It's a good pressure to have. 6:38AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 4-6 Edmund (*next server) Dimitrov slices short during the opening point, it throws Edmund momentarily and the Briton strikes long. The two engage in some slicing during the next rally but this time it's Dimitrov who can't control his forehand. Nervous times for Edmund as a double fault gifts Dimitrov a 15-30 advantage. But he's not the only man struggling for rhythm as Dimitrov strikes long again. An ace down the middle brings up match point. How are your nerves now, Kyle? The pair engage in a lengthy rally and Dimitrov over-eggs another reply. Was that out? It looked out. Edmund challenges it and Hawk-Eye duly responds. Edmund is only into his first ever major semi-final! GAME, SET AND MATCH: EDMUND BEATS DIMITROV TO REACH SEMI-FINALS. 6:32AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 4-5 Edmund* (*next server) Both men have won 114 points a pop at the start of this game and this contest could yet go either way. Edmund will have something to say about that and does at the start of this game, bending a forehand winner past the net-rushing Dimitrov to set himself up nicely. Some deep hitting draws an error from Dimitrov who is sent scampering down another ball into the corner. Dimitrov sends down a beautiful backhand which looks to land on the line, Edmund challenges. It's out, it's out, Edmund has two break points. He can't convert the first but does on the next as Dimitrov tightens up and pushes into the net. Wow. Edmund will come out SERVING FOR THE MATCH!! EDMUND BREAKS. This Edmund vs Dimitrov has everything you want for a men’s quarterfinals. Standard is so high. Come On Kyle.— Greg Rusedski (@GregRusedski1) January 23, 2018 6:27AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 4-4 Edmund (*next server) Edmund fires down his first ace of this set but then backs it up with an unwanted first double fault of the fourth set. The Briton draws one of the biggest rounds of applause for the set when he shows great reactions to catch one return from a missed serve and crucially at 30-all is happy to see a forehand from Dimitrov land long. Edmund steers out the game with a deep second serve. 6:22AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 4-3 Edmund* (*next server) Dimitrov challenges one exceptionally deep forehand from Edmund but he's out of luck as the Briton's groundstroke couldn't have been any better. Another rasping winner down his favoured wing from Edmund turns the heat back on Dimitrov's serve at 15-30. Dimitrov draws a long service return from his rival to save the danger for now. But wait, the Bulgarian over-strikes during the next point and then looks to his corner asking for inspiration. This time Dimitrov gets a first serve in which Edmund tamely puts into the middle. The Briton slaps his hip, he knows he missed a chance. Dimitrov takes advantage of the let off and sends down an ace for the game. 6:17AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 3-3 Edmund (*next server) Nice play from Dimitrov as he drills a groundstroke back deep at the feet of Edmund who can't make the pick up. It's early pressure here at 0-30. Edmund puts Dimitrov back in his box, and on his back by pushing a volley into the corner which catches the Bulgarian out. Dimitrov gets one reply back but Edmund keeps the pressure on. The Briton slightly loses his head on the next point, sending one stroke long and gifting two break points to his rival. The pair engage in tentative play during the next rally but Edmund goes for broke first and it doesn't pay off as he strikes into the lines. DIMITROV BREAKS. Dimitrov digs in! He breaks back to get it on serve. This is tense. #AusOpenpic.twitter.com/DXOdoP0eXM— #AusOpen (@AustralianOpen) January 23, 2018 6:12AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 2-3 Edmund* (*next server) Boom. Edmund shows his intent early on in this game by injecting some pace into an outswinging forehand which draws applause from one avid watcher on Rod Laver in 'Come on Tim' himself Mr Henman. Edmund pumps his fist in anticipation as Dimitrov drills a forehand into the lines and then has a break point opening when Dimitrov dumps a reply into the net. Nervy times now as Dimitrov misses his first serve and then drags a forehand wide to hand the Briton an early break in this set. EDMUND BREAKS. 6:08AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 2-2 Edmund (*next server) Edmund doesn't look like a man who is a set away from reaching a first ever semi-final at a major. He punches home a volley and maintains his solid first-service style as Dimitrov mulls over his options. Some fantastic deep striking and defensive work from Edmund keep the pressure on his opponent, forcing the Bulgarian to blink first. Dimitrov allows himself of a wry smile as Edmund closes out the game. Credit: AFP 6:04AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 2-1 Edmund* (*next server) Dimitrov has shaken off the effects of dropping serve deep into that third set to hold to love. A solid recovery from the Bulgarian at the start of a vital fourth set. 6:02AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 1-1 Edmund (*next server) Edmund lets rip with another forehand which is loaded with topspin to land flush on the line and draws gasps from the crowd on Rod Laver Arena. It's the Briton's biggest weapon. He uses it at game point, this time on the chase and we're level for the set. 5:58AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 1-0 Edmund* (*next server) Edmund flashes and misses at a couple of deep forehands before getting on the board when Dimitrov over-eggs his own ground stroke. Edmund places his hands on his hips after slapping a backhand into the tramlines and watches on as Dimitrov whips a forehand winner into the deuce court for a comfortable hold. 5:52AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 3-6 Edmund (*next server) Nervous opening from Edmund as Dimitrov turns aggressor before a rasping first serve from the Briton restores parity. Dimitrov is on the attack during the next rally, taking advantage again of Edmund's edginess but the Briton responds during the next point with an explosive forehand winner down the line. That would've helped settle him down. Edmund brings up set point when he darts onto a Dimitrov return that clips the tape. Edmund punches a volley into the advantage court and then sends down a solid first serve to take the third set. EDMUND WINS THIRD SET TO LEAD TWO SETS TO ONE How many sets away is @kyle8edmund from a Grand Slam semifinal? ☝️#AusOpenpic.twitter.com/SuGcb6r1vh— #AusOpen (@AustralianOpen) January 23, 2018 5:48AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 3-5 Edmund* (*next server) Edmund takes advantage of Dimitrov's first serve struggles by jumping on a second serve and dictating play in the rally. The Briton similarly dominants during the next one, catching Dimitrov with a forehand into the corner with the Bulgarian shifting his balance to the left. Dimitrov tentatively strikes long to hand Edmund two break points at 15-40. Edmund misses the first by dumping a serve into the middle. With two hours on the clock, Dimitrov hands in a double fault at the worst possible time and Edmund has a vital break this set. EDMUND BREAKS. Credit: Getty Images 5:43AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 3-4 Edmund (*next server) Great defence work from Edmund gets him out of a potential hole to blunt an aggressive Dimitrov who finally puts a drop shot into the lines. It moves Edmund to three game points and a strong first serve gets him over the line. 5:40AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 3-3 Edmund* (*next server) Dimitrov gives one service return short shrift en route to three game points. The clash of the pink men - in attire that is - remains level this set. 5:36AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 2-3 Edmund (*next server) Some solid serving bring up two game points for Edmund and third ace of this set and 10th overall allow him of a comfortable hold. 5:33AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 2-2 Edmund* (*next server) Edmund finds his range again with his forehand, pushing Dimitrov deep and working his way to the net to show soft hands with a deft drop shot for 15-30. Edmund mistimes a forehand during the next point but then flashes a superb service return past his rival to set up a first break point of the set. In the bright sunshine and afternoon heat of the day in Melbourne, Edmund tries to dictate play from the back of the court but Dimitrov is able to turn defence into attack when he seizes on a shorter reply from Edmund and he saves the break and rescues the game. 5:26AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 1-2 Edmund (*next server) Oooh er. Edmund pushes a drop shot into the net to open up on his next service game and is reeled back to 30-all when great athleticism and reactions from Dimitrov see the Bulgarian chase down an Edmund reply that deflected off the tape and appeared to land favourably for the Briton. Dimitrov wasn't having any of it, retrieving the short ball and sending back a drop shot which was out of Edmund's reach. The No 3 keeps the heat on by forcing deuce but Edmund shows great resolve to close it out with a looping forehand at an acute angle. He edges back in front this set. 5:21AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 1-1 Edmund* (*next server) Edmund missing quite a few groundstrokes at moment as Dimitrov tries to take control of the match. A serve down the T brings up a comfortable hold for the world No 3. 5:18AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 0-1 Edmund (*next server) Edmund doesn't let dropping that last set affect his concentration as he races to 30-0. Dimitrov gets a board on the board this set when Edmund puts too much on a forehand and reels the Briton in when another forehand lands in the tramlines. From a solid start and three unforced errors hand Dimitrov an early break. Thankfully Dimitrov can't get enough on a service return and Edmund breaths a sigh of relief. A second serve and solid first serve get Edmund over the line. Strap yourselves in. ��@GrigorDimitrov psychs himself up as he draws level in this quarterfinal. #AusOpenpic.twitter.com/i3DhvlD2vJ— #AusOpen (@AustralianOpen) January 23, 2018 5:13AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3 Edmund* (*next server) Dimitrov looks well set at 30-0 before a deep forehand return from Edmund catches him out on the baseline. The Briton mixes it up during the next point. Switching from slicing, to explosive power, Edmund's heavy strokes finally wear Dimitrov down. Edmund misses a great chance to set up break point when he drifts a forehand into the tape and brings up a set point for the Bulgarian. He takes it when Edmund can't get enough on a first serve return. DIMITROV WINS SECOND SET. 5:10AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 5-3 Edmund (*next server) Edmund ensures he makes Dimitrov serve for the second set as the Briton smashes game point at the net. 5:06AM Dimitrov 4-6, 5-2 Edmund* (*next server) Edmund drinks water between games Edmund is down to one challenge after questioning a call that landed on the line right in front of him. He battles his way back to deuce. A double fault gives him a break back point. A big first serve from Dimitrov takes it back to deuce. "A crushingly mediocre set from these two quarter-finalists so far," says the always quotable John McEnroe. And that's it. Game to the Bulgarian and Edmund must serve to hang in the set. 5:01AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 4-2 Edmund (*next server) Edmund hangs on. Someone in the crowd shouts, “Looking good, Kyle.” 4:55AM Dimitrov 4-6, 4-1 Edmund* (*next server) Dimitrov holds comfortably. A real test for Edmund now. He needs to start holding his own serve without giving up so much energy. 4:52AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 3-1 Edmund (*next server) Edmund puts himself in a 0-30 hole but plays a nice shot cross court to bring things even, before finding himself out of position and down a break point. He shuts things down at the net and finishes things off with a smash to bring it to deuce. Odd point with both players pausing as if they heard something to make them stop. It's a battle out there but finally Edmund keeps the set alive by holding serve. You felt he needed that. 4:43AM Dimitrov 4-6, 3-0 Edmund Five points in a row there for Dimitrov - after dropping the first three and putting himself in trouble - and Edmund is down three games in the second set in rapid fashion. Edmund finds the line, but Dimitrov is finding form. The Bulgarian saves three break points to take a 3-0 lead in the second set. #AusOpenpic.twitter.com/5dLQ2poYSv— #AusOpen (@AustralianOpen) January 23, 2018 4:39AM Dimitrov 4-6, 2-0 Edmund Edmund is making heavy weather of this. The players exchange groundstrokes at break-point but then the sound of the ball coming off Edmund's racquet's rim marks the end, and it flies long. That's a break gone. 4:35AM Dimitrov 4-6, 1-0 Edmund Dimitrov comes back at full tilt, winning the first game of the second set to love. 4:30AM Dimitrov 4-6 Edmund Dimitrov earns two break-back points putting Edmund in a tough spot. The Brit comes back with fearsome serve that Dimitrov cannot control. It looks hot down there. This might come down to who can better get through the temperature. Back to deuce and into a battle of groundstrokes before Dimitrov closes in on the net and hits a winner, earning another break point. Another unreturnable serve brings it back to deuce again. Edmund needs two goes at it, but he eventually closes out the set to earn the early lead. 4:21AM Dimitrov 4-5 Edmund Edmund goes long on break point and challenges but the replay shows the ball was just out. He takes the game on the next point with a decisive return, giving him a chance to serve for the set. He lets out an explosive raw. 4:17AM Dimitrov 4-4 Edmund Edmund gets him with the smash at the second attempt to close out a clinical game to 15. So far the two are dead even on points won.
Kyle Edmund blasts way into Australian Open semi-finals by ousting third seed Grigor Dimitrov
How Kyle Edmund went from choker to Australian Open contender 6:49AM Edmund top of the charts The Briton's forehand has been his biggest weapon this tournament and has put his rivals in the shade. Forehand winners 2018 #AusOpen - Men Edmund 127 Dimitrov 93 Seppi 90 Cilc 88— Christopher Clarey (@christophclarey) January 23, 2018 6:47AM Nadal or Cilic up next for Kyle So Edmund is the first player in the men's draw through to the last four. He's also the first Briton other than Andy Murray since Tim Henman to reach the semi-finals of a major. Nice that Tim was on court to watch the 23-year-old book his spot. Edmund will now face the winner of tonight's clash between Rafael Nadal and Marin Cilic which is scheduled for 8am UK time. KYLE!!!!!!!!!!!!! OMG— Laura Robson (@laurarobson5) January 23, 2018 6:44AM Semi-finalist Edmund speaks It's an amazing feeling, I'm very happy. It was a hard match, I've had lots of matches so far. I tried to enjoy the moment. It's my first match on this court and it was special. He's (Dimitrov) played hard matches, I knew it was going to be tough. I had a dip in the second set, but I broke him at the end of the third had a blip in the fourth and at the end prayed that last ball was out. Edmund is told by Jim Courier he's the sixth British male to reach a major semi-final in the open era - what does it mean to join the illustrious club? It's great. You don't think of those things when you're playing. But I'm sure it's going to be something I'm going to be proud of. It's very pleasing. Of course I want to keep going! Edmund is asked what it's like to be centre of attention from the British press... Yeah, I know what it's like to be Andy Murray now for the last seven or eight years! It's a good pressure to have. 6:38AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 4-6 Edmund (*next server) Dimitrov slices short during the opening point, it throws Edmund momentarily and the Briton strikes long. The two engage in some slicing during the next rally but this time it's Dimitrov who can't control his forehand. Nervous times for Edmund as a double fault gifts Dimitrov a 15-30 advantage. But he's not the only man struggling for rhythm as Dimitrov strikes long again. An ace down the middle brings up match point. How are your nerves now, Kyle? The pair engage in a lengthy rally and Dimitrov over-eggs another reply. Was that out? It looked out. Edmund challenges it and Hawk-Eye duly responds. Edmund is only into his first ever major semi-final! GAME, SET AND MATCH: EDMUND BEATS DIMITROV TO REACH SEMI-FINALS. 6:32AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 4-5 Edmund* (*next server) Both men have won 114 points a pop at the start of this game and this contest could yet go either way. Edmund will have something to say about that and does at the start of this game, bending a forehand winner past the net-rushing Dimitrov to set himself up nicely. Some deep hitting draws an error from Dimitrov who is sent scampering down another ball into the corner. Dimitrov sends down a beautiful backhand which looks to land on the line, Edmund challenges. It's out, it's out, Edmund has two break points. He can't convert the first but does on the next as Dimitrov tightens up and pushes into the net. Wow. Edmund will come out SERVING FOR THE MATCH!! EDMUND BREAKS. This Edmund vs Dimitrov has everything you want for a men’s quarterfinals. Standard is so high. Come On Kyle.— Greg Rusedski (@GregRusedski1) January 23, 2018 6:27AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 4-4 Edmund (*next server) Edmund fires down his first ace of this set but then backs it up with an unwanted first double fault of the fourth set. The Briton draws one of the biggest rounds of applause for the set when he shows great reactions to catch one return from a missed serve and crucially at 30-all is happy to see a forehand from Dimitrov land long. Edmund steers out the game with a deep second serve. 6:22AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 4-3 Edmund* (*next server) Dimitrov challenges one exceptionally deep forehand from Edmund but he's out of luck as the Briton's groundstroke couldn't have been any better. Another rasping winner down his favoured wing from Edmund turns the heat back on Dimitrov's serve at 15-30. Dimitrov draws a long service return from his rival to save the danger for now. But wait, the Bulgarian over-strikes during the next point and then looks to his corner asking for inspiration. This time Dimitrov gets a first serve in which Edmund tamely puts into the middle. The Briton slaps his hip, he knows he missed a chance. Dimitrov takes advantage of the let off and sends down an ace for the game. 6:17AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 3-3 Edmund (*next server) Nice play from Dimitrov as he drills a groundstroke back deep at the feet of Edmund who can't make the pick up. It's early pressure here at 0-30. Edmund puts Dimitrov back in his box, and on his back by pushing a volley into the corner which catches the Bulgarian out. Dimitrov gets one reply back but Edmund keeps the pressure on. The Briton slightly loses his head on the next point, sending one stroke long and gifting two break points to his rival. The pair engage in tentative play during the next rally but Edmund goes for broke first and it doesn't pay off as he strikes into the lines. DIMITROV BREAKS. Dimitrov digs in! He breaks back to get it on serve. This is tense. #AusOpenpic.twitter.com/DXOdoP0eXM— #AusOpen (@AustralianOpen) January 23, 2018 6:12AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 2-3 Edmund* (*next server) Boom. Edmund shows his intent early on in this game by injecting some pace into an outswinging forehand which draws applause from one avid watcher on Rod Laver in 'Come on Tim' himself Mr Henman. Edmund pumps his fist in anticipation as Dimitrov drills a forehand into the lines and then has a break point opening when Dimitrov dumps a reply into the net. Nervy times now as Dimitrov misses his first serve and then drags a forehand wide to hand the Briton an early break in this set. EDMUND BREAKS. 6:08AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 2-2 Edmund (*next server) Edmund doesn't look like a man who is a set away from reaching a first ever semi-final at a major. He punches home a volley and maintains his solid first-service style as Dimitrov mulls over his options. Some fantastic deep striking and defensive work from Edmund keep the pressure on his opponent, forcing the Bulgarian to blink first. Dimitrov allows himself of a wry smile as Edmund closes out the game. Credit: AFP 6:04AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 2-1 Edmund* (*next server) Dimitrov has shaken off the effects of dropping serve deep into that third set to hold to love. A solid recovery from the Bulgarian at the start of a vital fourth set. 6:02AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 1-1 Edmund (*next server) Edmund lets rip with another forehand which is loaded with topspin to land flush on the line and draws gasps from the crowd on Rod Laver Arena. It's the Briton's biggest weapon. He uses it at game point, this time on the chase and we're level for the set. 5:58AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 1-0 Edmund* (*next server) Edmund flashes and misses at a couple of deep forehands before getting on the board when Dimitrov over-eggs his own ground stroke. Edmund places his hands on his hips after slapping a backhand into the tramlines and watches on as Dimitrov whips a forehand winner into the deuce court for a comfortable hold. 5:52AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 3-6 Edmund (*next server) Nervous opening from Edmund as Dimitrov turns aggressor before a rasping first serve from the Briton restores parity. Dimitrov is on the attack during the next rally, taking advantage again of Edmund's edginess but the Briton responds during the next point with an explosive forehand winner down the line. That would've helped settle him down. Edmund brings up set point when he darts onto a Dimitrov return that clips the tape. Edmund punches a volley into the advantage court and then sends down a solid first serve to take the third set. EDMUND WINS THIRD SET TO LEAD TWO SETS TO ONE How many sets away is @kyle8edmund from a Grand Slam semifinal? ☝️#AusOpenpic.twitter.com/SuGcb6r1vh— #AusOpen (@AustralianOpen) January 23, 2018 5:48AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 3-5 Edmund* (*next server) Edmund takes advantage of Dimitrov's first serve struggles by jumping on a second serve and dictating play in the rally. The Briton similarly dominants during the next one, catching Dimitrov with a forehand into the corner with the Bulgarian shifting his balance to the left. Dimitrov tentatively strikes long to hand Edmund two break points at 15-40. Edmund misses the first by dumping a serve into the middle. With two hours on the clock, Dimitrov hands in a double fault at the worst possible time and Edmund has a vital break this set. EDMUND BREAKS. Credit: Getty Images 5:43AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 3-4 Edmund (*next server) Great defence work from Edmund gets him out of a potential hole to blunt an aggressive Dimitrov who finally puts a drop shot into the lines. It moves Edmund to three game points and a strong first serve gets him over the line. 5:40AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 3-3 Edmund* (*next server) Dimitrov gives one service return short shrift en route to three game points. The clash of the pink men - in attire that is - remains level this set. 5:36AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 2-3 Edmund (*next server) Some solid serving bring up two game points for Edmund and third ace of this set and 10th overall allow him of a comfortable hold. 5:33AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 2-2 Edmund* (*next server) Edmund finds his range again with his forehand, pushing Dimitrov deep and working his way to the net to show soft hands with a deft drop shot for 15-30. Edmund mistimes a forehand during the next point but then flashes a superb service return past his rival to set up a first break point of the set. In the bright sunshine and afternoon heat of the day in Melbourne, Edmund tries to dictate play from the back of the court but Dimitrov is able to turn defence into attack when he seizes on a shorter reply from Edmund and he saves the break and rescues the game. 5:26AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 1-2 Edmund (*next server) Oooh er. Edmund pushes a drop shot into the net to open up on his next service game and is reeled back to 30-all when great athleticism and reactions from Dimitrov see the Bulgarian chase down an Edmund reply that deflected off the tape and appeared to land favourably for the Briton. Dimitrov wasn't having any of it, retrieving the short ball and sending back a drop shot which was out of Edmund's reach. The No 3 keeps the heat on by forcing deuce but Edmund shows great resolve to close it out with a looping forehand at an acute angle. He edges back in front this set. 5:21AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3, 1-1 Edmund* (*next server) Edmund missing quite a few groundstrokes at moment as Dimitrov tries to take control of the match. A serve down the T brings up a comfortable hold for the world No 3. 5:18AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 6-3, 0-1 Edmund (*next server) Edmund doesn't let dropping that last set affect his concentration as he races to 30-0. Dimitrov gets a board on the board this set when Edmund puts too much on a forehand and reels the Briton in when another forehand lands in the tramlines. From a solid start and three unforced errors hand Dimitrov an early break. Thankfully Dimitrov can't get enough on a service return and Edmund breaths a sigh of relief. A second serve and solid first serve get Edmund over the line. Strap yourselves in. ��@GrigorDimitrov psychs himself up as he draws level in this quarterfinal. #AusOpenpic.twitter.com/i3DhvlD2vJ— #AusOpen (@AustralianOpen) January 23, 2018 5:13AM Dimitrov 4-6, 6-3 Edmund* (*next server) Dimitrov looks well set at 30-0 before a deep forehand return from Edmund catches him out on the baseline. The Briton mixes it up during the next point. Switching from slicing, to explosive power, Edmund's heavy strokes finally wear Dimitrov down. Edmund misses a great chance to set up break point when he drifts a forehand into the tape and brings up a set point for the Bulgarian. He takes it when Edmund can't get enough on a first serve return. DIMITROV WINS SECOND SET. 5:10AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 5-3 Edmund (*next server) Edmund ensures he makes Dimitrov serve for the second set as the Briton smashes game point at the net. 5:06AM Dimitrov 4-6, 5-2 Edmund* (*next server) Edmund drinks water between games Edmund is down to one challenge after questioning a call that landed on the line right in front of him. He battles his way back to deuce. A double fault gives him a break back point. A big first serve from Dimitrov takes it back to deuce. "A crushingly mediocre set from these two quarter-finalists so far," says the always quotable John McEnroe. And that's it. Game to the Bulgarian and Edmund must serve to hang in the set. 5:01AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 4-2 Edmund (*next server) Edmund hangs on. Someone in the crowd shouts, “Looking good, Kyle.” 4:55AM Dimitrov 4-6, 4-1 Edmund* (*next server) Dimitrov holds comfortably. A real test for Edmund now. He needs to start holding his own serve without giving up so much energy. 4:52AM Dimitrov* 4-6, 3-1 Edmund (*next server) Edmund puts himself in a 0-30 hole but plays a nice shot cross court to bring things even, before finding himself out of position and down a break point. He shuts things down at the net and finishes things off with a smash to bring it to deuce. Odd point with both players pausing as if they heard something to make them stop. It's a battle out there but finally Edmund keeps the set alive by holding serve. You felt he needed that. 4:43AM Dimitrov 4-6, 3-0 Edmund Five points in a row there for Dimitrov - after dropping the first three and putting himself in trouble - and Edmund is down three games in the second set in rapid fashion. Edmund finds the line, but Dimitrov is finding form. The Bulgarian saves three break points to take a 3-0 lead in the second set. #AusOpenpic.twitter.com/5dLQ2poYSv— #AusOpen (@AustralianOpen) January 23, 2018 4:39AM Dimitrov 4-6, 2-0 Edmund Edmund is making heavy weather of this. The players exchange groundstrokes at break-point but then the sound of the ball coming off Edmund's racquet's rim marks the end, and it flies long. That's a break gone. 4:35AM Dimitrov 4-6, 1-0 Edmund Dimitrov comes back at full tilt, winning the first game of the second set to love. 4:30AM Dimitrov 4-6 Edmund Dimitrov earns two break-back points putting Edmund in a tough spot. The Brit comes back with fearsome serve that Dimitrov cannot control. It looks hot down there. This might come down to who can better get through the temperature. Back to deuce and into a battle of groundstrokes before Dimitrov closes in on the net and hits a winner, earning another break point. Another unreturnable serve brings it back to deuce again. Edmund needs two goes at it, but he eventually closes out the set to earn the early lead. 4:21AM Dimitrov 4-5 Edmund Edmund goes long on break point and challenges but the replay shows the ball was just out. He takes the game on the next point with a decisive return, giving him a chance to serve for the set. He lets out an explosive raw. 4:17AM Dimitrov 4-4 Edmund Edmund gets him with the smash at the second attempt to close out a clinical game to 15. So far the two are dead even on points won.
Spain's Rafael Nadal serves to Argentina's Diego Schwartzman during their fourth round match at the Australian Open tennis championships in Melbourne, Australia Sunday, Jan. 21, 2018. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)
Mertens reaches semifinals on debut at Australian Open
Spain's Rafael Nadal serves to Argentina's Diego Schwartzman during their fourth round match at the Australian Open tennis championships in Melbourne, Australia Sunday, Jan. 21, 2018. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)
Mark Philippoussis believes Marin Cilic can cause an upset by beating Rafael Nadal at the Australian Open.
'Dangerous' Cilic can beat Nadal, says Philippoussis
Mark Philippoussis believes Marin Cilic can cause an upset by beating Rafael Nadal at the Australian Open.
Tennis - US Open - Mens Final - New York, U.S. - September 10, 2017 - Rupert Murdoch, Chairman of Fox News Channel stands before Rafael Nadal of Spain plays against Kevin Anderson of South Africa. REUTERS/Mike Segar
Tennis - US Open
Tennis - US Open - Mens Final - New York, U.S. - September 10, 2017 - Rupert Murdoch, Chairman of Fox News Channel stands before Rafael Nadal of Spain plays against Kevin Anderson of South Africa. REUTERS/Mike Segar
Spain's Rafael Nadal celebrates after defeating Argentina's Diego Schwartzman in their fourth round match at the Australian Open tennis championships in Melbourne, Australia Sunday, Jan. 21, 2018. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)
Australian Open: A look ahead to Tuesday and recap of Monday
Spain's Rafael Nadal celebrates after defeating Argentina's Diego Schwartzman in their fourth round match at the Australian Open tennis championships in Melbourne, Australia Sunday, Jan. 21, 2018. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)
As a haunted looking Kyle Edmund walked off the court in Paris last November, it was hard to shake off the feeling that for a while at least, this was a player would be defined by his close defeats. A devastated Edmund had just been beaten in a third set-tie break against Jack Sock having led 5-1 in the second set and twice failed to serve out the match. It was a fitting end to a year that had promised much but ultimately felt like a bit of a disappointment. On numerous occasions, Edmund had got himself into promising positions only to lose narrowly in the final set. Shortly before that Sock defeat, Edmund realised that something had to change, and like a football team rebuilding at the end of a disappointing season, he made wholesale changes. From a commercial point of view, Edmund joined Stan Wawrinka and Gael Monfils, among others, at the StarWing sports management group - presumably to cash in on the marketability of an established British tennis player other than Andy Murray. He also moved his residency from Beverly to the Bahamas, and most crucially of all made a key signing - the Swedish coach Fredrik Rosengren, who has worked previously with grand slam finalists Magnus Norman and Robin Soderling. Fast forward a few months, and Edmund stands on the brink of a grand slam semi-final. Edmund used to be known for struggling physically and losing close matches Credit: AFP Back in September when Rosengren was settling into his new coaching position, it was plain for him to see that Edmund's booming serve and monster forehand meant he had a potential top-20 player on his hands. The issues with Edmund, who turned 23 in January, were more mental. There were two elements of Edmund's psyche in particular that Rosengren identified as areas where he could improve. The first was the Brit's habit of tightening up on big points and losing close matches, such as that agonising Sock defeat. The second was making Edmund, a naturally shy and reserved character away from tennis, more imposing on the court. Rosengren explains that: "For me, tennis is a mental game. So it’s all about belief at this level. You have to manage the pressure and on certain points you have to step up and play well. "I heard this was not his strength in the past, so we are talking a lot about this. To play to win, not to play to avoid losing, to have the heart. It's good to see that Kyle can grow as a person, and also be out there to enjoy it. This is his profession, he makes his money from tennis, but you have to also enjoy the ride." The results have been striking. Edmund has come from behind in three of his four Australian Open matches, and on two of them has held his nerve in a fifth set played in furnace-like conditions. Now the man who was once too shy to order his dinner when out with the British Davis Cup team has been talking up his grand slam chances. “You have to believe it,” Edmund said when asked if he could win the Australian Open. “That’s why I'm in the quarter-finals. Because every time I step on the court, I believe I'm going to win.” Beyond the Baseline | Read Charlie Eccleshare's three-part series on the unseen side of top-level tennis Edmund also been visibly more animated in his matches over the last few weeks, regularly fist pumping and puffing out his chest to remind opponents of his alpha-male status. Almost overnight, the wallflower has become a warrior. The 2002 Australian Open champion Thomas Johansson said of Edmund's transformation: "He’s taken a big step in the last couple of months. What I like about Kyle now is that he shows a lot more emotions on the court. He’s much more positive and I think that has made a big difference.” Edmund's greater mental strength has also been augmented by his improved fitness, with physical trainer Ian Prangley helping to ensure the Brit began the 2018 season in peak physical condition. Edmund has been fascinated by the potential for physical gains ever since he spent his off-season two years ago with the master of masochism Andy Murray. Like a member of a secret society being given their initiation, Edmund was introduced to the world of versaclimbers and self-punishment by Murray in December 2015. Edmund was awestruck, and said shortly after: "The training camp with Andy in Dubai was the most intense pre-season block I've ever done. The main thing I've picked up from spending time with him is the work ethic and the intensity. I was mostly hitting with Andy and he's not the world No.2 for no reason - he works so hard and he deserves to be there. Kyle has taken a big step in the last couple of months. He’s much more positive and I think that has made a big difference.Former Australian Open champion Thomas Johansson "He's there because of the hours he puts in and because of the intensity he trains at. Watching him practice at such a high intensity, you can see why he can compete at the highest level for four or five hours, and why he is going so deep into grand slams." Until this year though, Edmund often struggled with his fitness, and was known to regularly fade in grand slam matches. The most dispiriting setback came at last year's US Open when Edmund had to withdraw from his third-round match against the teenager Denis Shapovalov because of a back spasm. At the Australian Open by contrast, Edmund has played with the endurance of a seasoned marathon runner. His matches have lasted an average of almost three hours, with his third-round win against Nikoloz Basilashvili in 40-degree heat the acid test of his physical improvement. With his mental and physical frailties seemingly a thing of the past, Edmund has set about making the most of his considerable weapons. The tennis world has long known about Edmund's phenomenally powerful serve and forehands, so the challenge for Rosengren has been to refine them and make them even more potent. On a technical level, Rosengren has urged Edmund to use his legs more when serving, and in the main he has been delighted with the results. After his fourth-round win against Andreas Seppi, Edmund took himself to fifth place on the Australian Open aces leaderboard with 65, and he has held serve 90 per cent of the time in Melbourne. Edmund's game is built around a huge forehand Credit: Getty Images On the rare occasions this tournament when the serve hasn't been quite on point - such as in the early stages of his win against Kevin Anderson - Edmund has been able to rely on his flamethrower of a forehand that is regularly the most powerful on the ATP Tour. The speed Edmund generates on his forehand largely comes from the wrist, and his quick feet mean he is able to run around backhands and hit bone-crunching "off-forehands" either inside-in (down the line) or inside-out (crosscourt). Seeing Edmund's forehand up close is terrifying, as I was fortunate enough to do earlier this year when he was limbering up for the Davis Cup tie against France. Even former Australian Open champions find themselves puffing out their cheeks when witnessing a shot that has helped Edmund hit more winners than any other player at the Australian Open so far. After practicing with him today Johansson said: "His forehand is huge, it’s massive." World No 1 Rafael Nadal meanwhile said on Sunday. "He has a huge serve, huge forehand, and he hit very strong the ball, no? So I really think he gonna have a great year." Rosengren added: "I have been in this business for 30 years, and you always have big players out there. But he has a damn good forehand, damn good." Satisfyingly for player and coach, all of the component parts have come together for Edmund in the last week at Melbourne Park. Up next is a quarter-final on Tuesday against the world No 3 Grigor Dimitrov. On each of their previous meetings - including earlier this month in Brisbane - Edmund performed well but went down narrowly in the final set. A win for Edmund tomorrow would well and truly lay the nearly man tag to rest.
How Kyle Edmund went from choker to Australian Open contender
As a haunted looking Kyle Edmund walked off the court in Paris last November, it was hard to shake off the feeling that for a while at least, this was a player would be defined by his close defeats. A devastated Edmund had just been beaten in a third set-tie break against Jack Sock having led 5-1 in the second set and twice failed to serve out the match. It was a fitting end to a year that had promised much but ultimately felt like a bit of a disappointment. On numerous occasions, Edmund had got himself into promising positions only to lose narrowly in the final set. Shortly before that Sock defeat, Edmund realised that something had to change, and like a football team rebuilding at the end of a disappointing season, he made wholesale changes. From a commercial point of view, Edmund joined Stan Wawrinka and Gael Monfils, among others, at the StarWing sports management group - presumably to cash in on the marketability of an established British tennis player other than Andy Murray. He also moved his residency from Beverly to the Bahamas, and most crucially of all made a key signing - the Swedish coach Fredrik Rosengren, who has worked previously with grand slam finalists Magnus Norman and Robin Soderling. Fast forward a few months, and Edmund stands on the brink of a grand slam semi-final. Edmund used to be known for struggling physically and losing close matches Credit: AFP Back in September when Rosengren was settling into his new coaching position, it was plain for him to see that Edmund's booming serve and monster forehand meant he had a potential top-20 player on his hands. The issues with Edmund, who turned 23 in January, were more mental. There were two elements of Edmund's psyche in particular that Rosengren identified as areas where he could improve. The first was the Brit's habit of tightening up on big points and losing close matches, such as that agonising Sock defeat. The second was making Edmund, a naturally shy and reserved character away from tennis, more imposing on the court. Rosengren explains that: "For me, tennis is a mental game. So it’s all about belief at this level. You have to manage the pressure and on certain points you have to step up and play well. "I heard this was not his strength in the past, so we are talking a lot about this. To play to win, not to play to avoid losing, to have the heart. It's good to see that Kyle can grow as a person, and also be out there to enjoy it. This is his profession, he makes his money from tennis, but you have to also enjoy the ride." The results have been striking. Edmund has come from behind in three of his four Australian Open matches, and on two of them has held his nerve in a fifth set played in furnace-like conditions. Now the man who was once too shy to order his dinner when out with the British Davis Cup team has been talking up his grand slam chances. “You have to believe it,” Edmund said when asked if he could win the Australian Open. “That’s why I'm in the quarter-finals. Because every time I step on the court, I believe I'm going to win.” Beyond the Baseline | Read Charlie Eccleshare's three-part series on the unseen side of top-level tennis Edmund also been visibly more animated in his matches over the last few weeks, regularly fist pumping and puffing out his chest to remind opponents of his alpha-male status. Almost overnight, the wallflower has become a warrior. The 2002 Australian Open champion Thomas Johansson said of Edmund's transformation: "He’s taken a big step in the last couple of months. What I like about Kyle now is that he shows a lot more emotions on the court. He’s much more positive and I think that has made a big difference.” Edmund's greater mental strength has also been augmented by his improved fitness, with physical trainer Ian Prangley helping to ensure the Brit began the 2018 season in peak physical condition. Edmund has been fascinated by the potential for physical gains ever since he spent his off-season two years ago with the master of masochism Andy Murray. Like a member of a secret society being given their initiation, Edmund was introduced to the world of versaclimbers and self-punishment by Murray in December 2015. Edmund was awestruck, and said shortly after: "The training camp with Andy in Dubai was the most intense pre-season block I've ever done. The main thing I've picked up from spending time with him is the work ethic and the intensity. I was mostly hitting with Andy and he's not the world No.2 for no reason - he works so hard and he deserves to be there. Kyle has taken a big step in the last couple of months. He’s much more positive and I think that has made a big difference.Former Australian Open champion Thomas Johansson "He's there because of the hours he puts in and because of the intensity he trains at. Watching him practice at such a high intensity, you can see why he can compete at the highest level for four or five hours, and why he is going so deep into grand slams." Until this year though, Edmund often struggled with his fitness, and was known to regularly fade in grand slam matches. The most dispiriting setback came at last year's US Open when Edmund had to withdraw from his third-round match against the teenager Denis Shapovalov because of a back spasm. At the Australian Open by contrast, Edmund has played with the endurance of a seasoned marathon runner. His matches have lasted an average of almost three hours, with his third-round win against Nikoloz Basilashvili in 40-degree heat the acid test of his physical improvement. With his mental and physical frailties seemingly a thing of the past, Edmund has set about making the most of his considerable weapons. The tennis world has long known about Edmund's phenomenally powerful serve and forehands, so the challenge for Rosengren has been to refine them and make them even more potent. On a technical level, Rosengren has urged Edmund to use his legs more when serving, and in the main he has been delighted with the results. After his fourth-round win against Andreas Seppi, Edmund took himself to fifth place on the Australian Open aces leaderboard with 65, and he has held serve 90 per cent of the time in Melbourne. Edmund's game is built around a huge forehand Credit: Getty Images On the rare occasions this tournament when the serve hasn't been quite on point - such as in the early stages of his win against Kevin Anderson - Edmund has been able to rely on his flamethrower of a forehand that is regularly the most powerful on the ATP Tour. The speed Edmund generates on his forehand largely comes from the wrist, and his quick feet mean he is able to run around backhands and hit bone-crunching "off-forehands" either inside-in (down the line) or inside-out (crosscourt). Seeing Edmund's forehand up close is terrifying, as I was fortunate enough to do earlier this year when he was limbering up for the Davis Cup tie against France. Even former Australian Open champions find themselves puffing out their cheeks when witnessing a shot that has helped Edmund hit more winners than any other player at the Australian Open so far. After practicing with him today Johansson said: "His forehand is huge, it’s massive." World No 1 Rafael Nadal meanwhile said on Sunday. "He has a huge serve, huge forehand, and he hit very strong the ball, no? So I really think he gonna have a great year." Rosengren added: "I have been in this business for 30 years, and you always have big players out there. But he has a damn good forehand, damn good." Satisfyingly for player and coach, all of the component parts have come together for Edmund in the last week at Melbourne Park. Up next is a quarter-final on Tuesday against the world No 3 Grigor Dimitrov. On each of their previous meetings - including earlier this month in Brisbane - Edmund performed well but went down narrowly in the final set. A win for Edmund tomorrow would well and truly lay the nearly man tag to rest.
As a haunted looking Kyle Edmund walked off the court in Paris last November, it was hard to shake off the feeling that for a while at least, this was a player would be defined by his close defeats. A devastated Edmund had just been beaten in a third set-tie break against Jack Sock having led 5-1 in the second set and twice failed to serve out the match. It was a fitting end to a year that had promised much but ultimately felt like a bit of a disappointment. On numerous occasions, Edmund had got himself into promising positions only to lose narrowly in the final set. Shortly before that Sock defeat, Edmund realised that something had to change, and like a football team rebuilding at the end of a disappointing season, he made wholesale changes. From a commercial point of view, Edmund joined Stan Wawrinka and Gael Monfils, among others, at the StarWing sports management group - presumably to cash in on the marketability of an established British tennis player other than Andy Murray. He also moved his residency from Beverly to the Bahamas, and most crucially of all made a key signing - the Swedish coach Fredrik Rosengren, who has worked previously with grand slam finalists Magnus Norman and Robin Soderling. Fast forward a few months, and Edmund stands on the brink of a grand slam semi-final. Edmund used to be known for struggling physically and losing close matches Credit: AFP Back in September when Rosengren was settling into his new coaching position, it was plain for him to see that Edmund's booming serve and monster forehand meant he had a potential top-20 player on his hands. The issues with Edmund, who turned 23 in January, were more mental. There were two elements of Edmund's psyche in particular that Rosengren identified as areas where he could improve. The first was the Brit's habit of tightening up on big points and losing close matches, such as that agonising Sock defeat. The second was making Edmund, a naturally shy and reserved character away from tennis, more imposing on the court. Rosengren explains that: "For me, tennis is a mental game. So it’s all about belief at this level. You have to manage the pressure and on certain points you have to step up and play well. "I heard this was not his strength in the past, so we are talking a lot about this. To play to win, not to play to avoid losing, to have the heart. It's good to see that Kyle can grow as a person, and also be out there to enjoy it. This is his profession, he makes his money from tennis, but you have to also enjoy the ride." The results have been striking. Edmund has come from behind in three of his four Australian Open matches, and on two of them has held his nerve in a fifth set played in furnace-like conditions. Now the man who was once too shy to order his dinner when out with the British Davis Cup team has been talking up his grand slam chances. “You have to believe it,” Edmund said when asked if he could win the Australian Open. “That’s why I'm in the quarter-finals. Because every time I step on the court, I believe I'm going to win.” Beyond the Baseline | Read Charlie Eccleshare's three-part series on the unseen side of top-level tennis Edmund also been visibly more animated in his matches over the last few weeks, regularly fist pumping and puffing out his chest to remind opponents of his alpha-male status. Almost overnight, the wallflower has become a warrior. The 2002 Australian Open champion Thomas Johansson said of Edmund's transformation: "He’s taken a big step in the last couple of months. What I like about Kyle now is that he shows a lot more emotions on the court. He’s much more positive and I think that has made a big difference.” Edmund's greater mental strength has also been augmented by his improved fitness, with physical trainer Ian Prangley helping to ensure the Brit began the 2018 season in peak physical condition. Edmund has been fascinated by the potential for physical gains ever since he spent his off-season two years ago with the master of masochism Andy Murray. Like a member of a secret society being given their initiation, Edmund was introduced to the world of versaclimbers and self-punishment by Murray in December 2015. Edmund was awestruck, and said shortly after: "The training camp with Andy in Dubai was the most intense pre-season block I've ever done. The main thing I've picked up from spending time with him is the work ethic and the intensity. I was mostly hitting with Andy and he's not the world No.2 for no reason - he works so hard and he deserves to be there. Kyle has taken a big step in the last couple of months. He’s much more positive and I think that has made a big difference.Former Australian Open champion Thomas Johansson "He's there because of the hours he puts in and because of the intensity he trains at. Watching him practice at such a high intensity, you can see why he can compete at the highest level for four or five hours, and why he is going so deep into grand slams." Until this year though, Edmund often struggled with his fitness, and was known to regularly fade in grand slam matches. The most dispiriting setback came at last year's US Open when Edmund had to withdraw from his third-round match against the teenager Denis Shapovalov because of a back spasm. At the Australian Open by contrast, Edmund has played with the endurance of a seasoned marathon runner. His matches have lasted an average of almost three hours, with his third-round win against Nikoloz Basilashvili in 40-degree heat the acid test of his physical improvement. With his mental and physical frailties seemingly a thing of the past, Edmund has set about making the most of his considerable weapons. The tennis world has long known about Edmund's phenomenally powerful serve and forehands, so the challenge for Rosengren has been to refine them and make them even more potent. On a technical level, Rosengren has urged Edmund to use his legs more when serving, and in the main he has been delighted with the results. After his fourth-round win against Andreas Seppi, Edmund took himself to fifth place on the Australian Open aces leaderboard with 65, and he has held serve 90 per cent of the time in Melbourne. Edmund's game is built around a huge forehand Credit: Getty Images On the rare occasions this tournament when the serve hasn't been quite on point - such as in the early stages of his win against Kevin Anderson - Edmund has been able to rely on his flamethrower of a forehand that is regularly the most powerful on the ATP Tour. The speed Edmund generates on his forehand largely comes from the wrist, and his quick feet mean he is able to run around backhands and hit bone-crunching "off-forehands" either inside-in (down the line) or inside-out (crosscourt). Seeing Edmund's forehand up close is terrifying, as I was fortunate enough to do earlier this year when he was limbering up for the Davis Cup tie against France. Even former Australian Open champions find themselves puffing out their cheeks when witnessing a shot that has helped Edmund hit more winners than any other player at the Australian Open so far. After practicing with him today Johansson said: "His forehand is huge, it’s massive." World No 1 Rafael Nadal meanwhile said on Sunday. "He has a huge serve, huge forehand, and he hit very strong the ball, no? So I really think he gonna have a great year." Rosengren added: "I have been in this business for 30 years, and you always have big players out there. But he has a damn good forehand, damn good." Satisfyingly for player and coach, all of the component parts have come together for Edmund in the last week at Melbourne Park. Up next is a quarter-final on Tuesday against the world No 3 Grigor Dimitrov. On each of their previous meetings - including earlier this month in Brisbane - Edmund performed well but went down narrowly in the final set. A win for Edmund tomorrow would well and truly lay the nearly man tag to rest.
How Kyle Edmund went from choker to Australian Open contender
As a haunted looking Kyle Edmund walked off the court in Paris last November, it was hard to shake off the feeling that for a while at least, this was a player would be defined by his close defeats. A devastated Edmund had just been beaten in a third set-tie break against Jack Sock having led 5-1 in the second set and twice failed to serve out the match. It was a fitting end to a year that had promised much but ultimately felt like a bit of a disappointment. On numerous occasions, Edmund had got himself into promising positions only to lose narrowly in the final set. Shortly before that Sock defeat, Edmund realised that something had to change, and like a football team rebuilding at the end of a disappointing season, he made wholesale changes. From a commercial point of view, Edmund joined Stan Wawrinka and Gael Monfils, among others, at the StarWing sports management group - presumably to cash in on the marketability of an established British tennis player other than Andy Murray. He also moved his residency from Beverly to the Bahamas, and most crucially of all made a key signing - the Swedish coach Fredrik Rosengren, who has worked previously with grand slam finalists Magnus Norman and Robin Soderling. Fast forward a few months, and Edmund stands on the brink of a grand slam semi-final. Edmund used to be known for struggling physically and losing close matches Credit: AFP Back in September when Rosengren was settling into his new coaching position, it was plain for him to see that Edmund's booming serve and monster forehand meant he had a potential top-20 player on his hands. The issues with Edmund, who turned 23 in January, were more mental. There were two elements of Edmund's psyche in particular that Rosengren identified as areas where he could improve. The first was the Brit's habit of tightening up on big points and losing close matches, such as that agonising Sock defeat. The second was making Edmund, a naturally shy and reserved character away from tennis, more imposing on the court. Rosengren explains that: "For me, tennis is a mental game. So it’s all about belief at this level. You have to manage the pressure and on certain points you have to step up and play well. "I heard this was not his strength in the past, so we are talking a lot about this. To play to win, not to play to avoid losing, to have the heart. It's good to see that Kyle can grow as a person, and also be out there to enjoy it. This is his profession, he makes his money from tennis, but you have to also enjoy the ride." The results have been striking. Edmund has come from behind in three of his four Australian Open matches, and on two of them has held his nerve in a fifth set played in furnace-like conditions. Now the man who was once too shy to order his dinner when out with the British Davis Cup team has been talking up his grand slam chances. “You have to believe it,” Edmund said when asked if he could win the Australian Open. “That’s why I'm in the quarter-finals. Because every time I step on the court, I believe I'm going to win.” Beyond the Baseline | Read Charlie Eccleshare's three-part series on the unseen side of top-level tennis Edmund also been visibly more animated in his matches over the last few weeks, regularly fist pumping and puffing out his chest to remind opponents of his alpha-male status. Almost overnight, the wallflower has become a warrior. The 2002 Australian Open champion Thomas Johansson said of Edmund's transformation: "He’s taken a big step in the last couple of months. What I like about Kyle now is that he shows a lot more emotions on the court. He’s much more positive and I think that has made a big difference.” Edmund's greater mental strength has also been augmented by his improved fitness, with physical trainer Ian Prangley helping to ensure the Brit began the 2018 season in peak physical condition. Edmund has been fascinated by the potential for physical gains ever since he spent his off-season two years ago with the master of masochism Andy Murray. Like a member of a secret society being given their initiation, Edmund was introduced to the world of versaclimbers and self-punishment by Murray in December 2015. Edmund was awestruck, and said shortly after: "The training camp with Andy in Dubai was the most intense pre-season block I've ever done. The main thing I've picked up from spending time with him is the work ethic and the intensity. I was mostly hitting with Andy and he's not the world No.2 for no reason - he works so hard and he deserves to be there. Kyle has taken a big step in the last couple of months. He’s much more positive and I think that has made a big difference.Former Australian Open champion Thomas Johansson "He's there because of the hours he puts in and because of the intensity he trains at. Watching him practice at such a high intensity, you can see why he can compete at the highest level for four or five hours, and why he is going so deep into grand slams." Until this year though, Edmund often struggled with his fitness, and was known to regularly fade in grand slam matches. The most dispiriting setback came at last year's US Open when Edmund had to withdraw from his third-round match against the teenager Denis Shapovalov because of a back spasm. At the Australian Open by contrast, Edmund has played with the endurance of a seasoned marathon runner. His matches have lasted an average of almost three hours, with his third-round win against Nikoloz Basilashvili in 40-degree heat the acid test of his physical improvement. With his mental and physical frailties seemingly a thing of the past, Edmund has set about making the most of his considerable weapons. The tennis world has long known about Edmund's phenomenally powerful serve and forehands, so the challenge for Rosengren has been to refine them and make them even more potent. On a technical level, Rosengren has urged Edmund to use his legs more when serving, and in the main he has been delighted with the results. After his fourth-round win against Andreas Seppi, Edmund took himself to fifth place on the Australian Open aces leaderboard with 65, and he has held serve 90 per cent of the time in Melbourne. Edmund's game is built around a huge forehand Credit: Getty Images On the rare occasions this tournament when the serve hasn't been quite on point - such as in the early stages of his win against Kevin Anderson - Edmund has been able to rely on his flamethrower of a forehand that is regularly the most powerful on the ATP Tour. The speed Edmund generates on his forehand largely comes from the wrist, and his quick feet mean he is able to run around backhands and hit bone-crunching "off-forehands" either inside-in (down the line) or inside-out (crosscourt). Seeing Edmund's forehand up close is terrifying, as I was fortunate enough to do earlier this year when he was limbering up for the Davis Cup tie against France. Even former Australian Open champions find themselves puffing out their cheeks when witnessing a shot that has helped Edmund hit more winners than any other player at the Australian Open so far. After practicing with him today Johansson said: "His forehand is huge, it’s massive." World No 1 Rafael Nadal meanwhile said on Sunday. "He has a huge serve, huge forehand, and he hit very strong the ball, no? So I really think he gonna have a great year." Rosengren added: "I have been in this business for 30 years, and you always have big players out there. But he has a damn good forehand, damn good." Satisfyingly for player and coach, all of the component parts have come together for Edmund in the last week at Melbourne Park. Up next is a quarter-final on Tuesday against the world No 3 Grigor Dimitrov. On each of their previous meetings - including earlier this month in Brisbane - Edmund performed well but went down narrowly in the final set. A win for Edmund tomorrow would well and truly lay the nearly man tag to rest.
As a haunted looking Kyle Edmund walked off the court in Paris last November, it was hard to shake off the feeling that for a while at least, this was a player would be defined by his close defeats. A devastated Edmund had just been beaten in a third set-tie break against Jack Sock having led 5-1 in the second set and twice failed to serve out the match. It was a fitting end to a year that had promised much but ultimately felt like a bit of a disappointment. On numerous occasions, Edmund had got himself into promising positions only to lose narrowly in the final set. Shortly before that Sock defeat, Edmund realised that something had to change, and like a football team rebuilding at the end of a disappointing season, he made wholesale changes. From a commercial point of view, Edmund joined Stan Wawrinka and Gael Monfils, among others, at the StarWing sports management group - presumably to cash in on the marketability of an established British tennis player other than Andy Murray. He also moved his residency from Beverly to the Bahamas, and most crucially of all made a key signing - the Swedish coach Fredrik Rosengren, who has worked previously with grand slam finalists Magnus Norman and Robin Soderling. Fast forward a few months, and Edmund stands on the brink of a grand slam semi-final. Edmund used to be known for struggling physically and losing close matches Credit: AFP Back in September when Rosengren was settling into his new coaching position, it was plain for him to see that Edmund's booming serve and monster forehand meant he had a potential top-20 player on his hands. The issues with Edmund, who turned 23 in January, were more mental. There were two elements of Edmund's psyche in particular that Rosengren identified as areas where he could improve. The first was the Brit's habit of tightening up on big points and losing close matches, such as that agonising Sock defeat. The second was making Edmund, a naturally shy and reserved character away from tennis, more imposing on the court. Rosengren explains that: "For me, tennis is a mental game. So it’s all about belief at this level. You have to manage the pressure and on certain points you have to step up and play well. "I heard this was not his strength in the past, so we are talking a lot about this. To play to win, not to play to avoid losing, to have the heart. It's good to see that Kyle can grow as a person, and also be out there to enjoy it. This is his profession, he makes his money from tennis, but you have to also enjoy the ride." The results have been striking. Edmund has come from behind in three of his four Australian Open matches, and on two of them has held his nerve in a fifth set played in furnace-like conditions. Now the man who was once too shy to order his dinner when out with the British Davis Cup team has been talking up his grand slam chances. “You have to believe it,” Edmund said when asked if he could win the Australian Open. “That’s why I'm in the quarter-finals. Because every time I step on the court, I believe I'm going to win.” Beyond the Baseline | Read Charlie Eccleshare's three-part series on the unseen side of top-level tennis Edmund also been visibly more animated in his matches over the last few weeks, regularly fist pumping and puffing out his chest to remind opponents of his alpha-male status. Almost overnight, the wallflower has become a warrior. The 2002 Australian Open champion Thomas Johansson said of Edmund's transformation: "He’s taken a big step in the last couple of months. What I like about Kyle now is that he shows a lot more emotions on the court. He’s much more positive and I think that has made a big difference.” Edmund's greater mental strength has also been augmented by his improved fitness, with physical trainer Ian Prangley helping to ensure the Brit began the 2018 season in peak physical condition. Edmund has been fascinated by the potential for physical gains ever since he spent his off-season two years ago with the master of masochism Andy Murray. Like a member of a secret society being given their initiation, Edmund was introduced to the world of versaclimbers and self-punishment by Murray in December 2015. Edmund was awestruck, and said shortly after: "The training camp with Andy in Dubai was the most intense pre-season block I've ever done. The main thing I've picked up from spending time with him is the work ethic and the intensity. I was mostly hitting with Andy and he's not the world No.2 for no reason - he works so hard and he deserves to be there. Kyle has taken a big step in the last couple of months. He’s much more positive and I think that has made a big difference.Former Australian Open champion Thomas Johansson "He's there because of the hours he puts in and because of the intensity he trains at. Watching him practice at such a high intensity, you can see why he can compete at the highest level for four or five hours, and why he is going so deep into grand slams." Until this year though, Edmund often struggled with his fitness, and was known to regularly fade in grand slam matches. The most dispiriting setback came at last year's US Open when Edmund had to withdraw from his third-round match against the teenager Denis Shapovalov because of a back spasm. At the Australian Open by contrast, Edmund has played with the endurance of a seasoned marathon runner. His matches have lasted an average of almost three hours, with his third-round win against Nikoloz Basilashvili in 40-degree heat the acid test of his physical improvement. With his mental and physical frailties seemingly a thing of the past, Edmund has set about making the most of his considerable weapons. The tennis world has long known about Edmund's phenomenally powerful serve and forehands, so the challenge for Rosengren has been to refine them and make them even more potent. On a technical level, Rosengren has urged Edmund to use his legs more when serving, and in the main he has been delighted with the results. After his fourth-round win against Andreas Seppi, Edmund took himself to fifth place on the Australian Open aces leaderboard with 65, and he has held serve 90 per cent of the time in Melbourne. Edmund's game is built around a huge forehand Credit: Getty Images On the rare occasions this tournament when the serve hasn't been quite on point - such as in the early stages of his win against Kevin Anderson - Edmund has been able to rely on his flamethrower of a forehand that is regularly the most powerful on the ATP Tour. The speed Edmund generates on his forehand largely comes from the wrist, and his quick feet mean he is able to run around backhands and hit bone-crunching "off-forehands" either inside-in (down the line) or inside-out (crosscourt). Seeing Edmund's forehand up close is terrifying, as I was fortunate enough to do earlier this year when he was limbering up for the Davis Cup tie against France. Even former Australian Open champions find themselves puffing out their cheeks when witnessing a shot that has helped Edmund hit more winners than any other player at the Australian Open so far. After practicing with him today Johansson said: "His forehand is huge, it’s massive." World No 1 Rafael Nadal meanwhile said on Sunday. "He has a huge serve, huge forehand, and he hit very strong the ball, no? So I really think he gonna have a great year." Rosengren added: "I have been in this business for 30 years, and you always have big players out there. But he has a damn good forehand, damn good." Satisfyingly for player and coach, all of the component parts have come together for Edmund in the last week at Melbourne Park. Up next is a quarter-final on Tuesday against the world No 3 Grigor Dimitrov. On each of their previous meetings - including earlier this month in Brisbane - Edmund performed well but went down narrowly in the final set. A win for Edmund tomorrow would well and truly lay the nearly man tag to rest.
How Kyle Edmund went from choker to Australian Open contender
As a haunted looking Kyle Edmund walked off the court in Paris last November, it was hard to shake off the feeling that for a while at least, this was a player would be defined by his close defeats. A devastated Edmund had just been beaten in a third set-tie break against Jack Sock having led 5-1 in the second set and twice failed to serve out the match. It was a fitting end to a year that had promised much but ultimately felt like a bit of a disappointment. On numerous occasions, Edmund had got himself into promising positions only to lose narrowly in the final set. Shortly before that Sock defeat, Edmund realised that something had to change, and like a football team rebuilding at the end of a disappointing season, he made wholesale changes. From a commercial point of view, Edmund joined Stan Wawrinka and Gael Monfils, among others, at the StarWing sports management group - presumably to cash in on the marketability of an established British tennis player other than Andy Murray. He also moved his residency from Beverly to the Bahamas, and most crucially of all made a key signing - the Swedish coach Fredrik Rosengren, who has worked previously with grand slam finalists Magnus Norman and Robin Soderling. Fast forward a few months, and Edmund stands on the brink of a grand slam semi-final. Edmund used to be known for struggling physically and losing close matches Credit: AFP Back in September when Rosengren was settling into his new coaching position, it was plain for him to see that Edmund's booming serve and monster forehand meant he had a potential top-20 player on his hands. The issues with Edmund, who turned 23 in January, were more mental. There were two elements of Edmund's psyche in particular that Rosengren identified as areas where he could improve. The first was the Brit's habit of tightening up on big points and losing close matches, such as that agonising Sock defeat. The second was making Edmund, a naturally shy and reserved character away from tennis, more imposing on the court. Rosengren explains that: "For me, tennis is a mental game. So it’s all about belief at this level. You have to manage the pressure and on certain points you have to step up and play well. "I heard this was not his strength in the past, so we are talking a lot about this. To play to win, not to play to avoid losing, to have the heart. It's good to see that Kyle can grow as a person, and also be out there to enjoy it. This is his profession, he makes his money from tennis, but you have to also enjoy the ride." The results have been striking. Edmund has come from behind in three of his four Australian Open matches, and on two of them has held his nerve in a fifth set played in furnace-like conditions. Now the man who was once too shy to order his dinner when out with the British Davis Cup team has been talking up his grand slam chances. “You have to believe it,” Edmund said when asked if he could win the Australian Open. “That’s why I'm in the quarter-finals. Because every time I step on the court, I believe I'm going to win.” Beyond the Baseline | Read Charlie Eccleshare's three-part series on the unseen side of top-level tennis Edmund also been visibly more animated in his matches over the last few weeks, regularly fist pumping and puffing out his chest to remind opponents of his alpha-male status. Almost overnight, the wallflower has become a warrior. The 2002 Australian Open champion Thomas Johansson said of Edmund's transformation: "He’s taken a big step in the last couple of months. What I like about Kyle now is that he shows a lot more emotions on the court. He’s much more positive and I think that has made a big difference.” Edmund's greater mental strength has also been augmented by his improved fitness, with physical trainer Ian Prangley helping to ensure the Brit began the 2018 season in peak physical condition. Edmund has been fascinated by the potential for physical gains ever since he spent his off-season two years ago with the master of masochism Andy Murray. Like a member of a secret society being given their initiation, Edmund was introduced to the world of versaclimbers and self-punishment by Murray in December 2015. Edmund was awestruck, and said shortly after: "The training camp with Andy in Dubai was the most intense pre-season block I've ever done. The main thing I've picked up from spending time with him is the work ethic and the intensity. I was mostly hitting with Andy and he's not the world No.2 for no reason - he works so hard and he deserves to be there. Kyle has taken a big step in the last couple of months. He’s much more positive and I think that has made a big difference.Former Australian Open champion Thomas Johansson "He's there because of the hours he puts in and because of the intensity he trains at. Watching him practice at such a high intensity, you can see why he can compete at the highest level for four or five hours, and why he is going so deep into grand slams." Until this year though, Edmund often struggled with his fitness, and was known to regularly fade in grand slam matches. The most dispiriting setback came at last year's US Open when Edmund had to withdraw from his third-round match against the teenager Denis Shapovalov because of a back spasm. At the Australian Open by contrast, Edmund has played with the endurance of a seasoned marathon runner. His matches have lasted an average of almost three hours, with his third-round win against Nikoloz Basilashvili in 40-degree heat the acid test of his physical improvement. With his mental and physical frailties seemingly a thing of the past, Edmund has set about making the most of his considerable weapons. The tennis world has long known about Edmund's phenomenally powerful serve and forehands, so the challenge for Rosengren has been to refine them and make them even more potent. On a technical level, Rosengren has urged Edmund to use his legs more when serving, and in the main he has been delighted with the results. After his fourth-round win against Andreas Seppi, Edmund took himself to fifth place on the Australian Open aces leaderboard with 65, and he has held serve 90 per cent of the time in Melbourne. Edmund's game is built around a huge forehand Credit: Getty Images On the rare occasions this tournament when the serve hasn't been quite on point - such as in the early stages of his win against Kevin Anderson - Edmund has been able to rely on his flamethrower of a forehand that is regularly the most powerful on the ATP Tour. The speed Edmund generates on his forehand largely comes from the wrist, and his quick feet mean he is able to run around backhands and hit bone-crunching "off-forehands" either inside-in (down the line) or inside-out (crosscourt). Seeing Edmund's forehand up close is terrifying, as I was fortunate enough to do earlier this year when he was limbering up for the Davis Cup tie against France. Even former Australian Open champions find themselves puffing out their cheeks when witnessing a shot that has helped Edmund hit more winners than any other player at the Australian Open so far. After practicing with him today Johansson said: "His forehand is huge, it’s massive." World No 1 Rafael Nadal meanwhile said on Sunday. "He has a huge serve, huge forehand, and he hit very strong the ball, no? So I really think he gonna have a great year." Rosengren added: "I have been in this business for 30 years, and you always have big players out there. But he has a damn good forehand, damn good." Satisfyingly for player and coach, all of the component parts have come together for Edmund in the last week at Melbourne Park. Up next is a quarter-final on Tuesday against the world No 3 Grigor Dimitrov. On each of their previous meetings - including earlier this month in Brisbane - Edmund performed well but went down narrowly in the final set. A win for Edmund tomorrow would well and truly lay the nearly man tag to rest.
Tennis - Australian Open - Rod Laver Arena, Melbourne, Australia, January 21, 2018. Rafael Nadal of Spain hits a shot against Diego Schwartzman of Argentina. REUTERS/Edgar Su
Tennis - Australian Open - Rod Laver Arena, Melbourne, Australia
Tennis - Australian Open - Rod Laver Arena, Melbourne, Australia, January 21, 2018. Rafael Nadal of Spain hits a shot against Diego Schwartzman of Argentina. REUTERS/Edgar Su
Kyle Edmund’s newfound swagger and self-belief will carry him all the way to the world’s top ten, in the view of the former Australian Open champion Thomas Johansson. Johansson spent this morning hitting with Edmund on the practice court. Afterwards, he declared himself overwhelmed by the power of Edmund’s forehand, and predicted more significant scalps to come. “It’s been very impressive,” said Johansson of Edmund’s four wins in Melbourne to date. “I had the privilege to hit with him today because he’s coached by a Swedish guy, Fredrik [Rosengren], who I know very well. “His forehand is huge, it’s massive. I think he’s also improved his serve a lot. He’s more accurate and I think he’s using it a lot better than he did before. I think he has a big potential to get into the top ten.” After ousting Andreas Seppi on Sunday to reach his first grand-slam quarter-final, Edmund is guaranteed to claim a new career-high ranking of around No. 35 next week. And should he somehow get past third seed Grigor Dimitrov on Rod Laver Arena tomorrow, that would boost him into the mid-20s. Dimitrov – who produced some superb tennis of his own to beat Nick Kyrgios last night – will start as the clear favourite. But Johansson is confident that, win or lose, Edmund is already on the right track. Victory over Grigor Dimitrov will take Edmund into the top 30 Credit: Getty Images “He’s taken a big step in the last couple of months,” Johansson said. “He had a great run in Brisbane as well. What I like about Kyle now is that he shows a lot more emotions on the court. He’s much more positive and I think that has made a big difference.” Johansson, who nipped in to win his lone grand slam as the 16th seed here in 2002, is one of the few Swedish players of his generation who has never been coached by Rosengren, a figure of vast experience who entered this field in 1988. Rosengren’s cv lists Magnus Norman, Jonas Bjorkman and Mario Ancic among his many famous ex-clients. As Johansson explained today, “Fredrik is one of the best coaches in the world. He’s very tough. He’s been in this business for many, many years, so I think he has great knowledge. Pretty well all the players he’s coached have reached the top ten. And I think he’s on a good run with Kyle at the moment. “There are of course certain areas where Kyle has to improve a little bit, like his volleys. He is hitting so strong from the baseline and he can learn how to how to come in and hit maybe one volley rather than two. Because he’s so powerful from the baseline, he’s a lot of fun to watch.” And what about the 17 sets – lasting a fraction under 12 hours – that Edmund has put himself through over the last week? Only Dominic Thiem has spent anything like the same amount of time on court at this event. Won’t there be a danger of fatigue? Edmund will be able to cope with the rigor of spending so much time out on court, according to Johansson Credit: Getty Images Johansson grinned. “He is a beast. He is very, very strong. So I think he’ll cope. But Grigor is playing really well at the moment. Yesterday he has shown everybody that he is No. 3 in the world, that he plays really well when he needs to. It’s going to be a tough game for Kyle because Grigor is a master of breaking the rhythm, he is a little bit like Roger [Federer] in that sense, so Kyle has to be ready and he has to know exactly what to do. “This year it’s quite open. I always enjoy Rafa [Nadal] and Roger playing the final but of course it would be fun to have someone else as well. I like what I see now, the youngsters are coming up, which I’ve been waiting for for a couple of years. I love to see Kyle, I love to see Nick, I love to see [Hyeon] Chung.” Edmund has already faced Dimitrov once this season, in the Brisbane quarter-final three weeks ago. It was a closely fought contest, which only titled decisively in Dimitrov’s favour when Edmund rolled an ankle three games before the end. Speaking after Edmund’s fourth-round win over Seppi on Sunday, Rosengren identified that Brisbane match as the best performance he has yet seen from his new charge – at least until the injury struck. “I loved the way he played the third set, and I loved the way he stepped up in the second set tie-break,” said Rosengren. “That was Kyle on his best.” Australian Open 2018 prize money So what will Rosengren say before Edmund walks out for his first appearance on Melbourne Park’s main court? “I will tell him of my experience. I have had six guys go deep here, and Magnus was in the semi-final. I have had players telling me they’re so nervous they can’t go on. And I have to tell Kyle that is fine, that is normal, to feel like that. “If you don’t tell me how you feel I can’t help you. So I hope he will open up and tell me exactly how he feels, so I can help him. With my experience, that’s the only thing I can do.” The British contingent in Melbourne has now shrunk to two players – in the senior ranks at least – after Jamie Murray and his partner Latisha Chan were eliminated from the mixed doubles in the second round. Murray won the mixed-doubles event at both the last two grand slams, playing alongside the now-retired Martina Hingis. But despite forming a new team with Chan, Hingis’s former partner in the women’s doubles, he was unable to prevent a 7-6, 6-4 defeat at the hands of Marc Polmans and Storm Sanders. The other Briton still standing is Davis Cup regular Dominic Inglot, who moved into the quarter-finals of the men’s doubles today when he and his partner Marcus Daniell beat Hans Podlipnik-Castillo and Andrei Vasilevski in straight sets: 6-4, 6-3.
Kyle Edmund's swagger and self-belief will take him into world top ten, says former Australian Open champion
Kyle Edmund’s newfound swagger and self-belief will carry him all the way to the world’s top ten, in the view of the former Australian Open champion Thomas Johansson. Johansson spent this morning hitting with Edmund on the practice court. Afterwards, he declared himself overwhelmed by the power of Edmund’s forehand, and predicted more significant scalps to come. “It’s been very impressive,” said Johansson of Edmund’s four wins in Melbourne to date. “I had the privilege to hit with him today because he’s coached by a Swedish guy, Fredrik [Rosengren], who I know very well. “His forehand is huge, it’s massive. I think he’s also improved his serve a lot. He’s more accurate and I think he’s using it a lot better than he did before. I think he has a big potential to get into the top ten.” After ousting Andreas Seppi on Sunday to reach his first grand-slam quarter-final, Edmund is guaranteed to claim a new career-high ranking of around No. 35 next week. And should he somehow get past third seed Grigor Dimitrov on Rod Laver Arena tomorrow, that would boost him into the mid-20s. Dimitrov – who produced some superb tennis of his own to beat Nick Kyrgios last night – will start as the clear favourite. But Johansson is confident that, win or lose, Edmund is already on the right track. Victory over Grigor Dimitrov will take Edmund into the top 30 Credit: Getty Images “He’s taken a big step in the last couple of months,” Johansson said. “He had a great run in Brisbane as well. What I like about Kyle now is that he shows a lot more emotions on the court. He’s much more positive and I think that has made a big difference.” Johansson, who nipped in to win his lone grand slam as the 16th seed here in 2002, is one of the few Swedish players of his generation who has never been coached by Rosengren, a figure of vast experience who entered this field in 1988. Rosengren’s cv lists Magnus Norman, Jonas Bjorkman and Mario Ancic among his many famous ex-clients. As Johansson explained today, “Fredrik is one of the best coaches in the world. He’s very tough. He’s been in this business for many, many years, so I think he has great knowledge. Pretty well all the players he’s coached have reached the top ten. And I think he’s on a good run with Kyle at the moment. “There are of course certain areas where Kyle has to improve a little bit, like his volleys. He is hitting so strong from the baseline and he can learn how to how to come in and hit maybe one volley rather than two. Because he’s so powerful from the baseline, he’s a lot of fun to watch.” And what about the 17 sets – lasting a fraction under 12 hours – that Edmund has put himself through over the last week? Only Dominic Thiem has spent anything like the same amount of time on court at this event. Won’t there be a danger of fatigue? Edmund will be able to cope with the rigor of spending so much time out on court, according to Johansson Credit: Getty Images Johansson grinned. “He is a beast. He is very, very strong. So I think he’ll cope. But Grigor is playing really well at the moment. Yesterday he has shown everybody that he is No. 3 in the world, that he plays really well when he needs to. It’s going to be a tough game for Kyle because Grigor is a master of breaking the rhythm, he is a little bit like Roger [Federer] in that sense, so Kyle has to be ready and he has to know exactly what to do. “This year it’s quite open. I always enjoy Rafa [Nadal] and Roger playing the final but of course it would be fun to have someone else as well. I like what I see now, the youngsters are coming up, which I’ve been waiting for for a couple of years. I love to see Kyle, I love to see Nick, I love to see [Hyeon] Chung.” Edmund has already faced Dimitrov once this season, in the Brisbane quarter-final three weeks ago. It was a closely fought contest, which only titled decisively in Dimitrov’s favour when Edmund rolled an ankle three games before the end. Speaking after Edmund’s fourth-round win over Seppi on Sunday, Rosengren identified that Brisbane match as the best performance he has yet seen from his new charge – at least until the injury struck. “I loved the way he played the third set, and I loved the way he stepped up in the second set tie-break,” said Rosengren. “That was Kyle on his best.” Australian Open 2018 prize money So what will Rosengren say before Edmund walks out for his first appearance on Melbourne Park’s main court? “I will tell him of my experience. I have had six guys go deep here, and Magnus was in the semi-final. I have had players telling me they’re so nervous they can’t go on. And I have to tell Kyle that is fine, that is normal, to feel like that. “If you don’t tell me how you feel I can’t help you. So I hope he will open up and tell me exactly how he feels, so I can help him. With my experience, that’s the only thing I can do.” The British contingent in Melbourne has now shrunk to two players – in the senior ranks at least – after Jamie Murray and his partner Latisha Chan were eliminated from the mixed doubles in the second round. Murray won the mixed-doubles event at both the last two grand slams, playing alongside the now-retired Martina Hingis. But despite forming a new team with Chan, Hingis’s former partner in the women’s doubles, he was unable to prevent a 7-6, 6-4 defeat at the hands of Marc Polmans and Storm Sanders. The other Briton still standing is Davis Cup regular Dominic Inglot, who moved into the quarter-finals of the men’s doubles today when he and his partner Marcus Daniell beat Hans Podlipnik-Castillo and Andrei Vasilevski in straight sets: 6-4, 6-3.
Kyle Edmund’s newfound swagger and self-belief will carry him all the way to the world’s top ten, in the view of the former Australian Open champion Thomas Johansson. Johansson spent this morning hitting with Edmund on the practice court. Afterwards, he declared himself overwhelmed by the power of Edmund’s forehand, and predicted more significant scalps to come. “It’s been very impressive,” said Johansson of Edmund’s four wins in Melbourne to date. “I had the privilege to hit with him today because he’s coached by a Swedish guy, Fredrik [Rosengren], who I know very well. “His forehand is huge, it’s massive. I think he’s also improved his serve a lot. He’s more accurate and I think he’s using it a lot better than he did before. I think he has a big potential to get into the top ten.” After ousting Andreas Seppi on Sunday to reach his first grand-slam quarter-final, Edmund is guaranteed to claim a new career-high ranking of around No. 35 next week. And should he somehow get past third seed Grigor Dimitrov on Rod Laver Arena tomorrow, that would boost him into the mid-20s. Dimitrov – who produced some superb tennis of his own to beat Nick Kyrgios last night – will start as the clear favourite. But Johansson is confident that, win or lose, Edmund is already on the right track. Victory over Grigor Dimitrov will take Edmund into the top 30 Credit: Getty Images “He’s taken a big step in the last couple of months,” Johansson said. “He had a great run in Brisbane as well. What I like about Kyle now is that he shows a lot more emotions on the court. He’s much more positive and I think that has made a big difference.” Johansson, who nipped in to win his lone grand slam as the 16th seed here in 2002, is one of the few Swedish players of his generation who has never been coached by Rosengren, a figure of vast experience who entered this field in 1988. Rosengren’s cv lists Magnus Norman, Jonas Bjorkman and Mario Ancic among his many famous ex-clients. As Johansson explained today, “Fredrik is one of the best coaches in the world. He’s very tough. He’s been in this business for many, many years, so I think he has great knowledge. Pretty well all the players he’s coached have reached the top ten. And I think he’s on a good run with Kyle at the moment. “There are of course certain areas where Kyle has to improve a little bit, like his volleys. He is hitting so strong from the baseline and he can learn how to how to come in and hit maybe one volley rather than two. Because he’s so powerful from the baseline, he’s a lot of fun to watch.” And what about the 17 sets – lasting a fraction under 12 hours – that Edmund has put himself through over the last week? Only Dominic Thiem has spent anything like the same amount of time on court at this event. Won’t there be a danger of fatigue? Edmund will be able to cope with the rigor of spending so much time out on court, according to Johansson Credit: Getty Images Johansson grinned. “He is a beast. He is very, very strong. So I think he’ll cope. But Grigor is playing really well at the moment. Yesterday he has shown everybody that he is No. 3 in the world, that he plays really well when he needs to. It’s going to be a tough game for Kyle because Grigor is a master of breaking the rhythm, he is a little bit like Roger [Federer] in that sense, so Kyle has to be ready and he has to know exactly what to do. “This year it’s quite open. I always enjoy Rafa [Nadal] and Roger playing the final but of course it would be fun to have someone else as well. I like what I see now, the youngsters are coming up, which I’ve been waiting for for a couple of years. I love to see Kyle, I love to see Nick, I love to see [Hyeon] Chung.” Edmund has already faced Dimitrov once this season, in the Brisbane quarter-final three weeks ago. It was a closely fought contest, which only titled decisively in Dimitrov’s favour when Edmund rolled an ankle three games before the end. Speaking after Edmund’s fourth-round win over Seppi on Sunday, Rosengren identified that Brisbane match as the best performance he has yet seen from his new charge – at least until the injury struck. “I loved the way he played the third set, and I loved the way he stepped up in the second set tie-break,” said Rosengren. “That was Kyle on his best.” Australian Open 2018 prize money So what will Rosengren say before Edmund walks out for his first appearance on Melbourne Park’s main court? “I will tell him of my experience. I have had six guys go deep here, and Magnus was in the semi-final. I have had players telling me they’re so nervous they can’t go on. And I have to tell Kyle that is fine, that is normal, to feel like that. “If you don’t tell me how you feel I can’t help you. So I hope he will open up and tell me exactly how he feels, so I can help him. With my experience, that’s the only thing I can do.” The British contingent in Melbourne has now shrunk to two players – in the senior ranks at least – after Jamie Murray and his partner Latisha Chan were eliminated from the mixed doubles in the second round. Murray won the mixed-doubles event at both the last two grand slams, playing alongside the now-retired Martina Hingis. But despite forming a new team with Chan, Hingis’s former partner in the women’s doubles, he was unable to prevent a 7-6, 6-4 defeat at the hands of Marc Polmans and Storm Sanders. The other Briton still standing is Davis Cup regular Dominic Inglot, who moved into the quarter-finals of the men’s doubles today when he and his partner Marcus Daniell beat Hans Podlipnik-Castillo and Andrei Vasilevski in straight sets: 6-4, 6-3.
Kyle Edmund's swagger and self-belief will take him into world top ten, says former Australian Open champion
Kyle Edmund’s newfound swagger and self-belief will carry him all the way to the world’s top ten, in the view of the former Australian Open champion Thomas Johansson. Johansson spent this morning hitting with Edmund on the practice court. Afterwards, he declared himself overwhelmed by the power of Edmund’s forehand, and predicted more significant scalps to come. “It’s been very impressive,” said Johansson of Edmund’s four wins in Melbourne to date. “I had the privilege to hit with him today because he’s coached by a Swedish guy, Fredrik [Rosengren], who I know very well. “His forehand is huge, it’s massive. I think he’s also improved his serve a lot. He’s more accurate and I think he’s using it a lot better than he did before. I think he has a big potential to get into the top ten.” After ousting Andreas Seppi on Sunday to reach his first grand-slam quarter-final, Edmund is guaranteed to claim a new career-high ranking of around No. 35 next week. And should he somehow get past third seed Grigor Dimitrov on Rod Laver Arena tomorrow, that would boost him into the mid-20s. Dimitrov – who produced some superb tennis of his own to beat Nick Kyrgios last night – will start as the clear favourite. But Johansson is confident that, win or lose, Edmund is already on the right track. Victory over Grigor Dimitrov will take Edmund into the top 30 Credit: Getty Images “He’s taken a big step in the last couple of months,” Johansson said. “He had a great run in Brisbane as well. What I like about Kyle now is that he shows a lot more emotions on the court. He’s much more positive and I think that has made a big difference.” Johansson, who nipped in to win his lone grand slam as the 16th seed here in 2002, is one of the few Swedish players of his generation who has never been coached by Rosengren, a figure of vast experience who entered this field in 1988. Rosengren’s cv lists Magnus Norman, Jonas Bjorkman and Mario Ancic among his many famous ex-clients. As Johansson explained today, “Fredrik is one of the best coaches in the world. He’s very tough. He’s been in this business for many, many years, so I think he has great knowledge. Pretty well all the players he’s coached have reached the top ten. And I think he’s on a good run with Kyle at the moment. “There are of course certain areas where Kyle has to improve a little bit, like his volleys. He is hitting so strong from the baseline and he can learn how to how to come in and hit maybe one volley rather than two. Because he’s so powerful from the baseline, he’s a lot of fun to watch.” And what about the 17 sets – lasting a fraction under 12 hours – that Edmund has put himself through over the last week? Only Dominic Thiem has spent anything like the same amount of time on court at this event. Won’t there be a danger of fatigue? Edmund will be able to cope with the rigor of spending so much time out on court, according to Johansson Credit: Getty Images Johansson grinned. “He is a beast. He is very, very strong. So I think he’ll cope. But Grigor is playing really well at the moment. Yesterday he has shown everybody that he is No. 3 in the world, that he plays really well when he needs to. It’s going to be a tough game for Kyle because Grigor is a master of breaking the rhythm, he is a little bit like Roger [Federer] in that sense, so Kyle has to be ready and he has to know exactly what to do. “This year it’s quite open. I always enjoy Rafa [Nadal] and Roger playing the final but of course it would be fun to have someone else as well. I like what I see now, the youngsters are coming up, which I’ve been waiting for for a couple of years. I love to see Kyle, I love to see Nick, I love to see [Hyeon] Chung.” Edmund has already faced Dimitrov once this season, in the Brisbane quarter-final three weeks ago. It was a closely fought contest, which only titled decisively in Dimitrov’s favour when Edmund rolled an ankle three games before the end. Speaking after Edmund’s fourth-round win over Seppi on Sunday, Rosengren identified that Brisbane match as the best performance he has yet seen from his new charge – at least until the injury struck. “I loved the way he played the third set, and I loved the way he stepped up in the second set tie-break,” said Rosengren. “That was Kyle on his best.” Australian Open 2018 prize money So what will Rosengren say before Edmund walks out for his first appearance on Melbourne Park’s main court? “I will tell him of my experience. I have had six guys go deep here, and Magnus was in the semi-final. I have had players telling me they’re so nervous they can’t go on. And I have to tell Kyle that is fine, that is normal, to feel like that. “If you don’t tell me how you feel I can’t help you. So I hope he will open up and tell me exactly how he feels, so I can help him. With my experience, that’s the only thing I can do.” The British contingent in Melbourne has now shrunk to two players – in the senior ranks at least – after Jamie Murray and his partner Latisha Chan were eliminated from the mixed doubles in the second round. Murray won the mixed-doubles event at both the last two grand slams, playing alongside the now-retired Martina Hingis. But despite forming a new team with Chan, Hingis’s former partner in the women’s doubles, he was unable to prevent a 7-6, 6-4 defeat at the hands of Marc Polmans and Storm Sanders. The other Briton still standing is Davis Cup regular Dominic Inglot, who moved into the quarter-finals of the men’s doubles today when he and his partner Marcus Daniell beat Hans Podlipnik-Castillo and Andrei Vasilevski in straight sets: 6-4, 6-3.
Kyle Edmund’s newfound swagger and self-belief will carry him all the way to the world’s top ten, in the view of the former Australian Open champion Thomas Johansson. Johansson spent this morning hitting with Edmund on the practice court. Afterwards, he declared himself overwhelmed by the power of Edmund’s forehand, and predicted more significant scalps to come. “It’s been very impressive,” said Johansson of Edmund’s four wins in Melbourne to date. “I had the privilege to hit with him today because he’s coached by a Swedish guy, Fredrik [Rosengren], who I know very well. “His forehand is huge, it’s massive. I think he’s also improved his serve a lot. He’s more accurate and I think he’s using it a lot better than he did before. I think he has a big potential to get into the top ten.” After ousting Andreas Seppi on Sunday to reach his first grand-slam quarter-final, Edmund is guaranteed to claim a new career-high ranking of around No. 35 next week. And should he somehow get past third seed Grigor Dimitrov on Rod Laver Arena tomorrow, that would boost him into the mid-20s. Dimitrov – who produced some superb tennis of his own to beat Nick Kyrgios last night – will start as the clear favourite. But Johansson is confident that, win or lose, Edmund is already on the right track. Victory over Grigor Dimitrov will take Edmund into the top 30 Credit: Getty Images “He’s taken a big step in the last couple of months,” Johansson said. “He had a great run in Brisbane as well. What I like about Kyle now is that he shows a lot more emotions on the court. He’s much more positive and I think that has made a big difference.” Johansson, who nipped in to win his lone grand slam as the 16th seed here in 2002, is one of the few Swedish players of his generation who has never been coached by Rosengren, a figure of vast experience who entered this field in 1988. Rosengren’s cv lists Magnus Norman, Jonas Bjorkman and Mario Ancic among his many famous ex-clients. As Johansson explained today, “Fredrik is one of the best coaches in the world. He’s very tough. He’s been in this business for many, many years, so I think he has great knowledge. Pretty well all the players he’s coached have reached the top ten. And I think he’s on a good run with Kyle at the moment. “There are of course certain areas where Kyle has to improve a little bit, like his volleys. He is hitting so strong from the baseline and he can learn how to how to come in and hit maybe one volley rather than two. Because he’s so powerful from the baseline, he’s a lot of fun to watch.” And what about the 17 sets – lasting a fraction under 12 hours – that Edmund has put himself through over the last week? Only Dominic Thiem has spent anything like the same amount of time on court at this event. Won’t there be a danger of fatigue? Edmund will be able to cope with the rigor of spending so much time out on court, according to Johansson Credit: Getty Images Johansson grinned. “He is a beast. He is very, very strong. So I think he’ll cope. But Grigor is playing really well at the moment. Yesterday he has shown everybody that he is No. 3 in the world, that he plays really well when he needs to. It’s going to be a tough game for Kyle because Grigor is a master of breaking the rhythm, he is a little bit like Roger [Federer] in that sense, so Kyle has to be ready and he has to know exactly what to do. “This year it’s quite open. I always enjoy Rafa [Nadal] and Roger playing the final but of course it would be fun to have someone else as well. I like what I see now, the youngsters are coming up, which I’ve been waiting for for a couple of years. I love to see Kyle, I love to see Nick, I love to see [Hyeon] Chung.” Edmund has already faced Dimitrov once this season, in the Brisbane quarter-final three weeks ago. It was a closely fought contest, which only titled decisively in Dimitrov’s favour when Edmund rolled an ankle three games before the end. Speaking after Edmund’s fourth-round win over Seppi on Sunday, Rosengren identified that Brisbane match as the best performance he has yet seen from his new charge – at least until the injury struck. “I loved the way he played the third set, and I loved the way he stepped up in the second set tie-break,” said Rosengren. “That was Kyle on his best.” Australian Open 2018 prize money So what will Rosengren say before Edmund walks out for his first appearance on Melbourne Park’s main court? “I will tell him of my experience. I have had six guys go deep here, and Magnus was in the semi-final. I have had players telling me they’re so nervous they can’t go on. And I have to tell Kyle that is fine, that is normal, to feel like that. “If you don’t tell me how you feel I can’t help you. So I hope he will open up and tell me exactly how he feels, so I can help him. With my experience, that’s the only thing I can do.” The British contingent in Melbourne has now shrunk to two players – in the senior ranks at least – after Jamie Murray and his partner Latisha Chan were eliminated from the mixed doubles in the second round. Murray won the mixed-doubles event at both the last two grand slams, playing alongside the now-retired Martina Hingis. But despite forming a new team with Chan, Hingis’s former partner in the women’s doubles, he was unable to prevent a 7-6, 6-4 defeat at the hands of Marc Polmans and Storm Sanders. The other Briton still standing is Davis Cup regular Dominic Inglot, who moved into the quarter-finals of the men’s doubles today when he and his partner Marcus Daniell beat Hans Podlipnik-Castillo and Andrei Vasilevski in straight sets: 6-4, 6-3.
Kyle Edmund's swagger and self-belief will take him into world top ten, says former Australian Open champion
Kyle Edmund’s newfound swagger and self-belief will carry him all the way to the world’s top ten, in the view of the former Australian Open champion Thomas Johansson. Johansson spent this morning hitting with Edmund on the practice court. Afterwards, he declared himself overwhelmed by the power of Edmund’s forehand, and predicted more significant scalps to come. “It’s been very impressive,” said Johansson of Edmund’s four wins in Melbourne to date. “I had the privilege to hit with him today because he’s coached by a Swedish guy, Fredrik [Rosengren], who I know very well. “His forehand is huge, it’s massive. I think he’s also improved his serve a lot. He’s more accurate and I think he’s using it a lot better than he did before. I think he has a big potential to get into the top ten.” After ousting Andreas Seppi on Sunday to reach his first grand-slam quarter-final, Edmund is guaranteed to claim a new career-high ranking of around No. 35 next week. And should he somehow get past third seed Grigor Dimitrov on Rod Laver Arena tomorrow, that would boost him into the mid-20s. Dimitrov – who produced some superb tennis of his own to beat Nick Kyrgios last night – will start as the clear favourite. But Johansson is confident that, win or lose, Edmund is already on the right track. Victory over Grigor Dimitrov will take Edmund into the top 30 Credit: Getty Images “He’s taken a big step in the last couple of months,” Johansson said. “He had a great run in Brisbane as well. What I like about Kyle now is that he shows a lot more emotions on the court. He’s much more positive and I think that has made a big difference.” Johansson, who nipped in to win his lone grand slam as the 16th seed here in 2002, is one of the few Swedish players of his generation who has never been coached by Rosengren, a figure of vast experience who entered this field in 1988. Rosengren’s cv lists Magnus Norman, Jonas Bjorkman and Mario Ancic among his many famous ex-clients. As Johansson explained today, “Fredrik is one of the best coaches in the world. He’s very tough. He’s been in this business for many, many years, so I think he has great knowledge. Pretty well all the players he’s coached have reached the top ten. And I think he’s on a good run with Kyle at the moment. “There are of course certain areas where Kyle has to improve a little bit, like his volleys. He is hitting so strong from the baseline and he can learn how to how to come in and hit maybe one volley rather than two. Because he’s so powerful from the baseline, he’s a lot of fun to watch.” And what about the 17 sets – lasting a fraction under 12 hours – that Edmund has put himself through over the last week? Only Dominic Thiem has spent anything like the same amount of time on court at this event. Won’t there be a danger of fatigue? Edmund will be able to cope with the rigor of spending so much time out on court, according to Johansson Credit: Getty Images Johansson grinned. “He is a beast. He is very, very strong. So I think he’ll cope. But Grigor is playing really well at the moment. Yesterday he has shown everybody that he is No. 3 in the world, that he plays really well when he needs to. It’s going to be a tough game for Kyle because Grigor is a master of breaking the rhythm, he is a little bit like Roger [Federer] in that sense, so Kyle has to be ready and he has to know exactly what to do. “This year it’s quite open. I always enjoy Rafa [Nadal] and Roger playing the final but of course it would be fun to have someone else as well. I like what I see now, the youngsters are coming up, which I’ve been waiting for for a couple of years. I love to see Kyle, I love to see Nick, I love to see [Hyeon] Chung.” Edmund has already faced Dimitrov once this season, in the Brisbane quarter-final three weeks ago. It was a closely fought contest, which only titled decisively in Dimitrov’s favour when Edmund rolled an ankle three games before the end. Speaking after Edmund’s fourth-round win over Seppi on Sunday, Rosengren identified that Brisbane match as the best performance he has yet seen from his new charge – at least until the injury struck. “I loved the way he played the third set, and I loved the way he stepped up in the second set tie-break,” said Rosengren. “That was Kyle on his best.” Australian Open 2018 prize money So what will Rosengren say before Edmund walks out for his first appearance on Melbourne Park’s main court? “I will tell him of my experience. I have had six guys go deep here, and Magnus was in the semi-final. I have had players telling me they’re so nervous they can’t go on. And I have to tell Kyle that is fine, that is normal, to feel like that. “If you don’t tell me how you feel I can’t help you. So I hope he will open up and tell me exactly how he feels, so I can help him. With my experience, that’s the only thing I can do.” The British contingent in Melbourne has now shrunk to two players – in the senior ranks at least – after Jamie Murray and his partner Latisha Chan were eliminated from the mixed doubles in the second round. Murray won the mixed-doubles event at both the last two grand slams, playing alongside the now-retired Martina Hingis. But despite forming a new team with Chan, Hingis’s former partner in the women’s doubles, he was unable to prevent a 7-6, 6-4 defeat at the hands of Marc Polmans and Storm Sanders. The other Briton still standing is Davis Cup regular Dominic Inglot, who moved into the quarter-finals of the men’s doubles today when he and his partner Marcus Daniell beat Hans Podlipnik-Castillo and Andrei Vasilevski in straight sets: 6-4, 6-3.
Kyle Edmund’s newfound swagger and self-belief will carry him all the way to the world’s top ten, in the view of the former Australian Open champion Thomas Johansson. Johansson spent this morning hitting with Edmund on the practice court. Afterwards, he declared himself overwhelmed by the power of Edmund’s forehand, and predicted more significant scalps to come. “It’s been very impressive,” said Johansson of Edmund’s four wins in Melbourne to date. “I had the privilege to hit with him today because he’s coached by a Swedish guy, Fredrik [Rosengren], who I know very well. “His forehand is huge, it’s massive. I think he’s also improved his serve a lot. He’s more accurate and I think he’s using it a lot better than he did before. I think he has a big potential to get into the top ten.” After ousting Andreas Seppi on Sunday to reach his first grand-slam quarter-final, Edmund is guaranteed to claim a new career-high ranking of around No. 35 next week. And should he somehow get past third seed Grigor Dimitrov on Rod Laver Arena tomorrow, that would boost him into the mid-20s. Dimitrov – who produced some superb tennis of his own to beat Nick Kyrgios last night – will start as the clear favourite. But Johansson is confident that, win or lose, Edmund is already on the right track. Victory over Grigor Dimitrov will take Edmund into the top 30 Credit: Getty Images “He’s taken a big step in the last couple of months,” Johansson said. “He had a great run in Brisbane as well. What I like about Kyle now is that he shows a lot more emotions on the court. He’s much more positive and I think that has made a big difference.” Johansson, who nipped in to win his lone grand slam as the 16th seed here in 2002, is one of the few Swedish players of his generation who has never been coached by Rosengren, a figure of vast experience who entered this field in 1988. Rosengren’s cv lists Magnus Norman, Jonas Bjorkman and Mario Ancic among his many famous ex-clients. As Johansson explained today, “Fredrik is one of the best coaches in the world. He’s very tough. He’s been in this business for many, many years, so I think he has great knowledge. Pretty well all the players he’s coached have reached the top ten. And I think he’s on a good run with Kyle at the moment. “There are of course certain areas where Kyle has to improve a little bit, like his volleys. He is hitting so strong from the baseline and he can learn how to how to come in and hit maybe one volley rather than two. Because he’s so powerful from the baseline, he’s a lot of fun to watch.” And what about the 17 sets – lasting a fraction under 12 hours – that Edmund has put himself through over the last week? Only Dominic Thiem has spent anything like the same amount of time on court at this event. Won’t there be a danger of fatigue? Edmund will be able to cope with the rigor of spending so much time out on court, according to Johansson Credit: Getty Images Johansson grinned. “He is a beast. He is very, very strong. So I think he’ll cope. But Grigor is playing really well at the moment. Yesterday he has shown everybody that he is No. 3 in the world, that he plays really well when he needs to. It’s going to be a tough game for Kyle because Grigor is a master of breaking the rhythm, he is a little bit like Roger [Federer] in that sense, so Kyle has to be ready and he has to know exactly what to do. “This year it’s quite open. I always enjoy Rafa [Nadal] and Roger playing the final but of course it would be fun to have someone else as well. I like what I see now, the youngsters are coming up, which I’ve been waiting for for a couple of years. I love to see Kyle, I love to see Nick, I love to see [Hyeon] Chung.” Edmund has already faced Dimitrov once this season, in the Brisbane quarter-final three weeks ago. It was a closely fought contest, which only titled decisively in Dimitrov’s favour when Edmund rolled an ankle three games before the end. Speaking after Edmund’s fourth-round win over Seppi on Sunday, Rosengren identified that Brisbane match as the best performance he has yet seen from his new charge – at least until the injury struck. “I loved the way he played the third set, and I loved the way he stepped up in the second set tie-break,” said Rosengren. “That was Kyle on his best.” Australian Open 2018 prize money So what will Rosengren say before Edmund walks out for his first appearance on Melbourne Park’s main court? “I will tell him of my experience. I have had six guys go deep here, and Magnus was in the semi-final. I have had players telling me they’re so nervous they can’t go on. And I have to tell Kyle that is fine, that is normal, to feel like that. “If you don’t tell me how you feel I can’t help you. So I hope he will open up and tell me exactly how he feels, so I can help him. With my experience, that’s the only thing I can do.” The British contingent in Melbourne has now shrunk to two players – in the senior ranks at least – after Jamie Murray and his partner Latisha Chan were eliminated from the mixed doubles in the second round. Murray won the mixed-doubles event at both the last two grand slams, playing alongside the now-retired Martina Hingis. But despite forming a new team with Chan, Hingis’s former partner in the women’s doubles, he was unable to prevent a 7-6, 6-4 defeat at the hands of Marc Polmans and Storm Sanders. The other Briton still standing is Davis Cup regular Dominic Inglot, who moved into the quarter-finals of the men’s doubles today when he and his partner Marcus Daniell beat Hans Podlipnik-Castillo and Andrei Vasilevski in straight sets: 6-4, 6-3.
Kyle Edmund's swagger and self-belief will take him into world top ten, says former Australian Open champion
Kyle Edmund’s newfound swagger and self-belief will carry him all the way to the world’s top ten, in the view of the former Australian Open champion Thomas Johansson. Johansson spent this morning hitting with Edmund on the practice court. Afterwards, he declared himself overwhelmed by the power of Edmund’s forehand, and predicted more significant scalps to come. “It’s been very impressive,” said Johansson of Edmund’s four wins in Melbourne to date. “I had the privilege to hit with him today because he’s coached by a Swedish guy, Fredrik [Rosengren], who I know very well. “His forehand is huge, it’s massive. I think he’s also improved his serve a lot. He’s more accurate and I think he’s using it a lot better than he did before. I think he has a big potential to get into the top ten.” After ousting Andreas Seppi on Sunday to reach his first grand-slam quarter-final, Edmund is guaranteed to claim a new career-high ranking of around No. 35 next week. And should he somehow get past third seed Grigor Dimitrov on Rod Laver Arena tomorrow, that would boost him into the mid-20s. Dimitrov – who produced some superb tennis of his own to beat Nick Kyrgios last night – will start as the clear favourite. But Johansson is confident that, win or lose, Edmund is already on the right track. Victory over Grigor Dimitrov will take Edmund into the top 30 Credit: Getty Images “He’s taken a big step in the last couple of months,” Johansson said. “He had a great run in Brisbane as well. What I like about Kyle now is that he shows a lot more emotions on the court. He’s much more positive and I think that has made a big difference.” Johansson, who nipped in to win his lone grand slam as the 16th seed here in 2002, is one of the few Swedish players of his generation who has never been coached by Rosengren, a figure of vast experience who entered this field in 1988. Rosengren’s cv lists Magnus Norman, Jonas Bjorkman and Mario Ancic among his many famous ex-clients. As Johansson explained today, “Fredrik is one of the best coaches in the world. He’s very tough. He’s been in this business for many, many years, so I think he has great knowledge. Pretty well all the players he’s coached have reached the top ten. And I think he’s on a good run with Kyle at the moment. “There are of course certain areas where Kyle has to improve a little bit, like his volleys. He is hitting so strong from the baseline and he can learn how to how to come in and hit maybe one volley rather than two. Because he’s so powerful from the baseline, he’s a lot of fun to watch.” And what about the 17 sets – lasting a fraction under 12 hours – that Edmund has put himself through over the last week? Only Dominic Thiem has spent anything like the same amount of time on court at this event. Won’t there be a danger of fatigue? Edmund will be able to cope with the rigor of spending so much time out on court, according to Johansson Credit: Getty Images Johansson grinned. “He is a beast. He is very, very strong. So I think he’ll cope. But Grigor is playing really well at the moment. Yesterday he has shown everybody that he is No. 3 in the world, that he plays really well when he needs to. It’s going to be a tough game for Kyle because Grigor is a master of breaking the rhythm, he is a little bit like Roger [Federer] in that sense, so Kyle has to be ready and he has to know exactly what to do. “This year it’s quite open. I always enjoy Rafa [Nadal] and Roger playing the final but of course it would be fun to have someone else as well. I like what I see now, the youngsters are coming up, which I’ve been waiting for for a couple of years. I love to see Kyle, I love to see Nick, I love to see [Hyeon] Chung.” Edmund has already faced Dimitrov once this season, in the Brisbane quarter-final three weeks ago. It was a closely fought contest, which only titled decisively in Dimitrov’s favour when Edmund rolled an ankle three games before the end. Speaking after Edmund’s fourth-round win over Seppi on Sunday, Rosengren identified that Brisbane match as the best performance he has yet seen from his new charge – at least until the injury struck. “I loved the way he played the third set, and I loved the way he stepped up in the second set tie-break,” said Rosengren. “That was Kyle on his best.” Australian Open 2018 prize money So what will Rosengren say before Edmund walks out for his first appearance on Melbourne Park’s main court? “I will tell him of my experience. I have had six guys go deep here, and Magnus was in the semi-final. I have had players telling me they’re so nervous they can’t go on. And I have to tell Kyle that is fine, that is normal, to feel like that. “If you don’t tell me how you feel I can’t help you. So I hope he will open up and tell me exactly how he feels, so I can help him. With my experience, that’s the only thing I can do.” The British contingent in Melbourne has now shrunk to two players – in the senior ranks at least – after Jamie Murray and his partner Latisha Chan were eliminated from the mixed doubles in the second round. Murray won the mixed-doubles event at both the last two grand slams, playing alongside the now-retired Martina Hingis. But despite forming a new team with Chan, Hingis’s former partner in the women’s doubles, he was unable to prevent a 7-6, 6-4 defeat at the hands of Marc Polmans and Storm Sanders. The other Briton still standing is Davis Cup regular Dominic Inglot, who moved into the quarter-finals of the men’s doubles today when he and his partner Marcus Daniell beat Hans Podlipnik-Castillo and Andrei Vasilevski in straight sets: 6-4, 6-3.
Having beaten Andreas Seppi in four sets, Britain’s new tennis hero Kyle Edmund was asked if he can win the Australian Open. “You have to believe it,” he replied. “That’s why I'm in the quarter-finals. Because every time I step on the court, I believe I'm going to win.” What a long way Edmund has come since his first hesitant steps into professional tennis. Selected for his first Davis Cup squad in 2014, he was still a callow teenager, so shy that his team-mates often ordered for him in restaurants. At that stage, his critics said he didn’t have the nerve for this game. How wrong they were. Today Edmund cuts an imposing figure, standing well over 6ft with shoulders like a second row’s. He has also shown a heart as big as Shergar’s over the past week, coming from behind in three of his four victories to date. We don’t know what will happen when he faces Grigor Dimitrov in Tuesday’s quarter-final. But if he loses, it won’t be on account of the occasion. By beating Seppi, Edmund became the first Englishman to reach the last eight of the Australian Open since John Lloyd in 1985. He also ensured a career-high ranking of around No 35 when the next chart is published. Were he to overcome Dimitrov as well, he would climb into the mid-20s, poised to overtake Andy Murray as British No 1 in a matter of weeks. Is that a feasible prospect? At the beginning of this tournament, Edmund and Dimitrov were living in different worlds. One of them was an international celebrity with a pop-star girlfriend, high-profile enough for Nike to prepare him a unique outfit to wear at this event. Edmund will now face Dimitrov for a place in the semi-finals Credit: AFP The other was “Our Kyle”, the understated boy next door from Beverley in Yorkshire, who stood at No 49 in the world and had only ever won a single main-draw match at this event. We knew he could stand toe-to-toe with the big boys, because he gave several of them – including Rafael Nadal and Milos Raonic – a real fright last year. What he wasn’t doing was getting himself over the line. That has changed since he signed the veteran Swedish coach Fredrik Rosengren in the autumn, and began working through the mental challenges of this head-scrambling sport. As Rosengren told him, “You will not win every time but you have to go out there and get it, because these guys will not give it to you for free.” After his superb display against Seppi, Edmund was asked whether he had ever doubted that he would put the “nearly-man” tag behind him. His answer was typically level-headed, as befits a player who - ever since his early teens – has been able to shrug off setbacks more easily than his peers. “I have known for a while that my game is dangerous, and it can beat a lot of players,” he said. “I just had to learn for myself where I hadn’t been getting it right. As you mature you become better and wiser and more experienced. So naturally you play a bit better.” We can identify two kinds of self-belief in tennis. There’s the confidence you take on the court on any given day, and which has grown visibly for Edmund over the last few weeks. And then there’s the long-term faith that you’re on the right path – an area where he has never wavered. “Not a surprise,” said Nadal, when asked about Edmund’s progress to the quarter-finals. “It's the normal thing. Was a little bit more surprising for me last year he lost a lot of close matches, I think. But, no, I really believe in his potential. He has a huge serve, huge forehand, and he hit very strong the ball, no? So I really think he gonna have a great year.” Edmund has known for a while he has a dangerous game Credit: AFP Despite all Edmund’s gifts, the match was an awkward assignment. Seppi is something of a Melbourne specialist, having beaten Roger Federer here three years ago and won 18 matches overall. He is a wily craftsman who - like a judoka - uses his opponent’s strength against him, deflecting the ball as much as hitting it. In the first set, Seppi kept correctly guessing where Edmund’s howitzer forehands would land, and bunting them back into space for winners. Edmund was understandably anxious, and coughed up no fewer than 23 errors in the first set, more than half his total for the match. But he refocused his mind after those opening exchanges and decided to trust his backhand more, which made his patterns of play less predictable. After an early exchange of breaks in the second set, Edmund spent the rest of the afternoon in predatory mode, prowling the court like some ginger-haired velociraptor. He was bullying Seppi with his sheer weight of shot, and eventually completed his 6-7, 7-5, 6-2, 6-3 victory in 2hr 57min. The statistics show that Edmund has hit many more clean winners at this stage of the tournament than anyone else. But this is a double-edged sword, because he has also spent more time on court than anyone else: 17 sets to date, and a fraction under 12 hours. Can he still win the tournament after such a demanding schedule? According to his coach, Edmund remains in pristine physical shape. “It’s all about the mindset,” said Rosengren. “He is not that tired. You have to play seven matches of best-of-five sets if you want to win this tournament. If you’re not prepared for that, why come?”
Kyle Edmund believes he can win Australian Open as once shy Briton finally makes himself heard
Having beaten Andreas Seppi in four sets, Britain’s new tennis hero Kyle Edmund was asked if he can win the Australian Open. “You have to believe it,” he replied. “That’s why I'm in the quarter-finals. Because every time I step on the court, I believe I'm going to win.” What a long way Edmund has come since his first hesitant steps into professional tennis. Selected for his first Davis Cup squad in 2014, he was still a callow teenager, so shy that his team-mates often ordered for him in restaurants. At that stage, his critics said he didn’t have the nerve for this game. How wrong they were. Today Edmund cuts an imposing figure, standing well over 6ft with shoulders like a second row’s. He has also shown a heart as big as Shergar’s over the past week, coming from behind in three of his four victories to date. We don’t know what will happen when he faces Grigor Dimitrov in Tuesday’s quarter-final. But if he loses, it won’t be on account of the occasion. By beating Seppi, Edmund became the first Englishman to reach the last eight of the Australian Open since John Lloyd in 1985. He also ensured a career-high ranking of around No 35 when the next chart is published. Were he to overcome Dimitrov as well, he would climb into the mid-20s, poised to overtake Andy Murray as British No 1 in a matter of weeks. Is that a feasible prospect? At the beginning of this tournament, Edmund and Dimitrov were living in different worlds. One of them was an international celebrity with a pop-star girlfriend, high-profile enough for Nike to prepare him a unique outfit to wear at this event. Edmund will now face Dimitrov for a place in the semi-finals Credit: AFP The other was “Our Kyle”, the understated boy next door from Beverley in Yorkshire, who stood at No 49 in the world and had only ever won a single main-draw match at this event. We knew he could stand toe-to-toe with the big boys, because he gave several of them – including Rafael Nadal and Milos Raonic – a real fright last year. What he wasn’t doing was getting himself over the line. That has changed since he signed the veteran Swedish coach Fredrik Rosengren in the autumn, and began working through the mental challenges of this head-scrambling sport. As Rosengren told him, “You will not win every time but you have to go out there and get it, because these guys will not give it to you for free.” After his superb display against Seppi, Edmund was asked whether he had ever doubted that he would put the “nearly-man” tag behind him. His answer was typically level-headed, as befits a player who - ever since his early teens – has been able to shrug off setbacks more easily than his peers. “I have known for a while that my game is dangerous, and it can beat a lot of players,” he said. “I just had to learn for myself where I hadn’t been getting it right. As you mature you become better and wiser and more experienced. So naturally you play a bit better.” We can identify two kinds of self-belief in tennis. There’s the confidence you take on the court on any given day, and which has grown visibly for Edmund over the last few weeks. And then there’s the long-term faith that you’re on the right path – an area where he has never wavered. “Not a surprise,” said Nadal, when asked about Edmund’s progress to the quarter-finals. “It's the normal thing. Was a little bit more surprising for me last year he lost a lot of close matches, I think. But, no, I really believe in his potential. He has a huge serve, huge forehand, and he hit very strong the ball, no? So I really think he gonna have a great year.” Edmund has known for a while he has a dangerous game Credit: AFP Despite all Edmund’s gifts, the match was an awkward assignment. Seppi is something of a Melbourne specialist, having beaten Roger Federer here three years ago and won 18 matches overall. He is a wily craftsman who - like a judoka - uses his opponent’s strength against him, deflecting the ball as much as hitting it. In the first set, Seppi kept correctly guessing where Edmund’s howitzer forehands would land, and bunting them back into space for winners. Edmund was understandably anxious, and coughed up no fewer than 23 errors in the first set, more than half his total for the match. But he refocused his mind after those opening exchanges and decided to trust his backhand more, which made his patterns of play less predictable. After an early exchange of breaks in the second set, Edmund spent the rest of the afternoon in predatory mode, prowling the court like some ginger-haired velociraptor. He was bullying Seppi with his sheer weight of shot, and eventually completed his 6-7, 7-5, 6-2, 6-3 victory in 2hr 57min. The statistics show that Edmund has hit many more clean winners at this stage of the tournament than anyone else. But this is a double-edged sword, because he has also spent more time on court than anyone else: 17 sets to date, and a fraction under 12 hours. Can he still win the tournament after such a demanding schedule? According to his coach, Edmund remains in pristine physical shape. “It’s all about the mindset,” said Rosengren. “He is not that tired. You have to play seven matches of best-of-five sets if you want to win this tournament. If you’re not prepared for that, why come?”
Enjoy the battle. Since Kyle Edmund hired his new coach Fredrik Rosengren last autumn, this has been the core message they have worked on together. It is no coincidence that, since the 2018 season began, Edmund has become one of the hardest men on tour to beat. “For me, tennis is a mental game,” explained Rosengren, a 57-year-old Swede with such extensive experience that Edmund is the sixth player he has coached to the later stages of the Australian Open. “So it’s all about belief at this level. You have to manage the pressure and on certain points you have to step up and play well. “I heard this was not his strength in the past, so we are talking a lot about this. To play to win, not to play to avoid losing, to have the heart. It's good to see that Kyle can grow as a person, and also be out there to enjoy it. This is his profession, he makes his money from tennis, but you have to also enjoy the ride.” The off-season was a big deal for Edmund, who has not only tightened up his mental game but added some important technical refinements to his serve. These have paid off in spades, as Edmund stands in fifth place on the aces chart after four rounds with 65. He is also holding serve 90 per cent of the time – an elite figure that puts him on a par with Rafael Nadal and Marin Cilic. According to Rosengren, “He is using his legs much more. It was not good against Anderson technically [in the first round], it was old Kyle. I wasn't happy with that. But these last three matches he has been serving really well. It's helping him with his confidence.” Edmund is holding serve 90 per cent of the time in Melbourne Credit: Getty Images And then there is the booming forehand, which leads the tournament statistics for clean winners by an absolute street. “I have been in this business for 30 years,” said Rosengren, “and you always have big players out there. But he has a damn good forehand, damn good.” Above all, though, it is Edmund’s sporting psychology which Rosengren – who is known to his friends as Fidde - has spent most time working on. “You have to believe you can do it in tough situations, serving out sets and matches. We talked a lot about expressing himself on court but at the same time he can’t use all his energy. It has to come natural. He shouldn’t pump his fist because he thinks I want him to. “He is a young man, he knows what he wants and I think he has a great temperament. Sometimes he could get his hair cut a bit more …” – at this point Rosengren ruffled up his own grey hair so that it pointed in all directions. “That’s something we say in Sweden when everything is too nice. But, seriously, he is doing a great job. We are a good team with Ian Prangley as his physical trainer and physio, and Mark Hilton also as a technical coach. We are all very happy for his quarters, and we hope this lifts his self-esteem.”
Kyle Edmund's coach Fredrik Rosengren on how Briton has become one of hardest men to beat on tour
Enjoy the battle. Since Kyle Edmund hired his new coach Fredrik Rosengren last autumn, this has been the core message they have worked on together. It is no coincidence that, since the 2018 season began, Edmund has become one of the hardest men on tour to beat. “For me, tennis is a mental game,” explained Rosengren, a 57-year-old Swede with such extensive experience that Edmund is the sixth player he has coached to the later stages of the Australian Open. “So it’s all about belief at this level. You have to manage the pressure and on certain points you have to step up and play well. “I heard this was not his strength in the past, so we are talking a lot about this. To play to win, not to play to avoid losing, to have the heart. It's good to see that Kyle can grow as a person, and also be out there to enjoy it. This is his profession, he makes his money from tennis, but you have to also enjoy the ride.” The off-season was a big deal for Edmund, who has not only tightened up his mental game but added some important technical refinements to his serve. These have paid off in spades, as Edmund stands in fifth place on the aces chart after four rounds with 65. He is also holding serve 90 per cent of the time – an elite figure that puts him on a par with Rafael Nadal and Marin Cilic. According to Rosengren, “He is using his legs much more. It was not good against Anderson technically [in the first round], it was old Kyle. I wasn't happy with that. But these last three matches he has been serving really well. It's helping him with his confidence.” Edmund is holding serve 90 per cent of the time in Melbourne Credit: Getty Images And then there is the booming forehand, which leads the tournament statistics for clean winners by an absolute street. “I have been in this business for 30 years,” said Rosengren, “and you always have big players out there. But he has a damn good forehand, damn good.” Above all, though, it is Edmund’s sporting psychology which Rosengren – who is known to his friends as Fidde - has spent most time working on. “You have to believe you can do it in tough situations, serving out sets and matches. We talked a lot about expressing himself on court but at the same time he can’t use all his energy. It has to come natural. He shouldn’t pump his fist because he thinks I want him to. “He is a young man, he knows what he wants and I think he has a great temperament. Sometimes he could get his hair cut a bit more …” – at this point Rosengren ruffled up his own grey hair so that it pointed in all directions. “That’s something we say in Sweden when everything is too nice. But, seriously, he is doing a great job. We are a good team with Ian Prangley as his physical trainer and physio, and Mark Hilton also as a technical coach. We are all very happy for his quarters, and we hope this lifts his self-esteem.”
Having beaten Andreas Seppi in four sets, Britain’s new tennis hero Kyle Edmund was asked if he can win the Australian Open. “You have to believe it,” he replied. “That’s why I'm in the quarter-finals. Because every time I step on the court, I believe I'm going to win.” What a long way Edmund has come since his first hesitant steps into professional tennis. Selected for his first Davis Cup squad in 2014, he was still a callow teenager, so shy that his team-mates often ordered for him in restaurants. At that stage, his critics said he didn’t have the nerve for this game. How wrong they were. Today Edmund cuts an imposing figure, standing well over 6ft with shoulders like a second row’s. He has also shown a heart as big as Shergar’s over the past week, coming from behind in three of his four victories to date. We don’t know what will happen when he faces Grigor Dimitrov in Tuesday’s quarter-final. But if he loses, it won’t be on account of the occasion. By beating Seppi, Edmund became the first Englishman to reach the last eight of the Australian Open since John Lloyd in 1985. He also ensured a career-high ranking of around No 35 when the next chart is published. Were he to overcome Dimitrov as well, he would climb into the mid-20s, poised to overtake Andy Murray as British No 1 in a matter of weeks. Is that a feasible prospect? At the beginning of this tournament, Edmund and Dimitrov were living in different worlds. One of them was an international celebrity with a pop-star girlfriend, high-profile enough for Nike to prepare him a unique outfit to wear at this event. Edmund will now face Dimitrov for a place in the semi-finals Credit: AFP The other was “Our Kyle”, the understated boy next door from Beverley in Yorkshire, who stood at No 49 in the world and had only ever won a single main-draw match at this event. We knew he could stand toe-to-toe with the big boys, because he gave several of them – including Rafael Nadal and Milos Raonic – a real fright last year. What he wasn’t doing was getting himself over the line. That has changed since he signed the veteran Swedish coach Fredrik Rosengren in the autumn, and began working through the mental challenges of this head-scrambling sport. As Rosengren told him, “You will not win every time but you have to go out there and get it, because these guys will not give it to you for free.” After his superb display against Seppi, Edmund was asked whether he had ever doubted that he would put the “nearly-man” tag behind him. His answer was typically level-headed, as befits a player who - ever since his early teens – has been able to shrug off setbacks more easily than his peers. “I have known for a while that my game is dangerous, and it can beat a lot of players,” he said. “I just had to learn for myself where I hadn’t been getting it right. As you mature you become better and wiser and more experienced. So naturally you play a bit better.” We can identify two kinds of self-belief in tennis. There’s the confidence you take on the court on any given day, and which has grown visibly for Edmund over the last few weeks. And then there’s the long-term faith that you’re on the right path – an area where he has never wavered. “Not a surprise,” said Nadal, when asked about Edmund’s progress to the quarter-finals. “It's the normal thing. Was a little bit more surprising for me last year he lost a lot of close matches, I think. But, no, I really believe in his potential. He has a huge serve, huge forehand, and he hit very strong the ball, no? So I really think he gonna have a great year.” Edmund has known for a while he has a dangerous game Credit: AFP Despite all Edmund’s gifts, the match was an awkward assignment. Seppi is something of a Melbourne specialist, having beaten Roger Federer here three years ago and won 18 matches overall. He is a wily craftsman who - like a judoka - uses his opponent’s strength against him, deflecting the ball as much as hitting it. In the first set, Seppi kept correctly guessing where Edmund’s howitzer forehands would land, and bunting them back into space for winners. Edmund was understandably anxious, and coughed up no fewer than 23 errors in the first set, more than half his total for the match. But he refocused his mind after those opening exchanges and decided to trust his backhand more, which made his patterns of play less predictable. After an early exchange of breaks in the second set, Edmund spent the rest of the afternoon in predatory mode, prowling the court like some ginger-haired velociraptor. He was bullying Seppi with his sheer weight of shot, and eventually completed his 6-7, 7-5, 6-2, 6-3 victory in 2hr 57min. The statistics show that Edmund has hit many more clean winners at this stage of the tournament than anyone else. But this is a double-edged sword, because he has also spent more time on court than anyone else: 17 sets to date, and a fraction under 12 hours. Can he still win the tournament after such a demanding schedule? According to his coach, Edmund remains in pristine physical shape. “It’s all about the mindset,” said Rosengren. “He is not that tired. You have to play seven matches of best-of-five sets if you want to win this tournament. If you’re not prepared for that, why come?”
Kyle Edmund believes he can win Australian Open as once shy Briton finally makes himself heard
Having beaten Andreas Seppi in four sets, Britain’s new tennis hero Kyle Edmund was asked if he can win the Australian Open. “You have to believe it,” he replied. “That’s why I'm in the quarter-finals. Because every time I step on the court, I believe I'm going to win.” What a long way Edmund has come since his first hesitant steps into professional tennis. Selected for his first Davis Cup squad in 2014, he was still a callow teenager, so shy that his team-mates often ordered for him in restaurants. At that stage, his critics said he didn’t have the nerve for this game. How wrong they were. Today Edmund cuts an imposing figure, standing well over 6ft with shoulders like a second row’s. He has also shown a heart as big as Shergar’s over the past week, coming from behind in three of his four victories to date. We don’t know what will happen when he faces Grigor Dimitrov in Tuesday’s quarter-final. But if he loses, it won’t be on account of the occasion. By beating Seppi, Edmund became the first Englishman to reach the last eight of the Australian Open since John Lloyd in 1985. He also ensured a career-high ranking of around No 35 when the next chart is published. Were he to overcome Dimitrov as well, he would climb into the mid-20s, poised to overtake Andy Murray as British No 1 in a matter of weeks. Is that a feasible prospect? At the beginning of this tournament, Edmund and Dimitrov were living in different worlds. One of them was an international celebrity with a pop-star girlfriend, high-profile enough for Nike to prepare him a unique outfit to wear at this event. Edmund will now face Dimitrov for a place in the semi-finals Credit: AFP The other was “Our Kyle”, the understated boy next door from Beverley in Yorkshire, who stood at No 49 in the world and had only ever won a single main-draw match at this event. We knew he could stand toe-to-toe with the big boys, because he gave several of them – including Rafael Nadal and Milos Raonic – a real fright last year. What he wasn’t doing was getting himself over the line. That has changed since he signed the veteran Swedish coach Fredrik Rosengren in the autumn, and began working through the mental challenges of this head-scrambling sport. As Rosengren told him, “You will not win every time but you have to go out there and get it, because these guys will not give it to you for free.” After his superb display against Seppi, Edmund was asked whether he had ever doubted that he would put the “nearly-man” tag behind him. His answer was typically level-headed, as befits a player who - ever since his early teens – has been able to shrug off setbacks more easily than his peers. “I have known for a while that my game is dangerous, and it can beat a lot of players,” he said. “I just had to learn for myself where I hadn’t been getting it right. As you mature you become better and wiser and more experienced. So naturally you play a bit better.” We can identify two kinds of self-belief in tennis. There’s the confidence you take on the court on any given day, and which has grown visibly for Edmund over the last few weeks. And then there’s the long-term faith that you’re on the right path – an area where he has never wavered. “Not a surprise,” said Nadal, when asked about Edmund’s progress to the quarter-finals. “It's the normal thing. Was a little bit more surprising for me last year he lost a lot of close matches, I think. But, no, I really believe in his potential. He has a huge serve, huge forehand, and he hit very strong the ball, no? So I really think he gonna have a great year.” Edmund has known for a while he has a dangerous game Credit: AFP Despite all Edmund’s gifts, the match was an awkward assignment. Seppi is something of a Melbourne specialist, having beaten Roger Federer here three years ago and won 18 matches overall. He is a wily craftsman who - like a judoka - uses his opponent’s strength against him, deflecting the ball as much as hitting it. In the first set, Seppi kept correctly guessing where Edmund’s howitzer forehands would land, and bunting them back into space for winners. Edmund was understandably anxious, and coughed up no fewer than 23 errors in the first set, more than half his total for the match. But he refocused his mind after those opening exchanges and decided to trust his backhand more, which made his patterns of play less predictable. After an early exchange of breaks in the second set, Edmund spent the rest of the afternoon in predatory mode, prowling the court like some ginger-haired velociraptor. He was bullying Seppi with his sheer weight of shot, and eventually completed his 6-7, 7-5, 6-2, 6-3 victory in 2hr 57min. The statistics show that Edmund has hit many more clean winners at this stage of the tournament than anyone else. But this is a double-edged sword, because he has also spent more time on court than anyone else: 17 sets to date, and a fraction under 12 hours. Can he still win the tournament after such a demanding schedule? According to his coach, Edmund remains in pristine physical shape. “It’s all about the mindset,” said Rosengren. “He is not that tired. You have to play seven matches of best-of-five sets if you want to win this tournament. If you’re not prepared for that, why come?”
Enjoy the battle. Since Kyle Edmund hired his new coach Fredrik Rosengren last autumn, this has been the core message they have worked on together. It is no coincidence that, since the 2018 season began, Edmund has become one of the hardest men on tour to beat. “For me, tennis is a mental game,” explained Rosengren, a 57-year-old Swede with such extensive experience that Edmund is the sixth player he has coached to the later stages of the Australian Open. “So it’s all about belief at this level. You have to manage the pressure and on certain points you have to step up and play well. “I heard this was not his strength in the past, so we are talking a lot about this. To play to win, not to play to avoid losing, to have the heart. It's good to see that Kyle can grow as a person, and also be out there to enjoy it. This is his profession, he makes his money from tennis, but you have to also enjoy the ride.” The off-season was a big deal for Edmund, who has not only tightened up his mental game but added some important technical refinements to his serve. These have paid off in spades, as Edmund stands in fifth place on the aces chart after four rounds with 65. He is also holding serve 90 per cent of the time – an elite figure that puts him on a par with Rafael Nadal and Marin Cilic. According to Rosengren, “He is using his legs much more. It was not good against Anderson technically [in the first round], it was old Kyle. I wasn't happy with that. But these last three matches he has been serving really well. It's helping him with his confidence.” Edmund is holding serve 90 per cent of the time in Melbourne Credit: Getty Images And then there is the booming forehand, which leads the tournament statistics for clean winners by an absolute street. “I have been in this business for 30 years,” said Rosengren, “and you always have big players out there. But he has a damn good forehand, damn good.” Above all, though, it is Edmund’s sporting psychology which Rosengren – who is known to his friends as Fidde - has spent most time working on. “You have to believe you can do it in tough situations, serving out sets and matches. We talked a lot about expressing himself on court but at the same time he can’t use all his energy. It has to come natural. He shouldn’t pump his fist because he thinks I want him to. “He is a young man, he knows what he wants and I think he has a great temperament. Sometimes he could get his hair cut a bit more …” – at this point Rosengren ruffled up his own grey hair so that it pointed in all directions. “That’s something we say in Sweden when everything is too nice. But, seriously, he is doing a great job. We are a good team with Ian Prangley as his physical trainer and physio, and Mark Hilton also as a technical coach. We are all very happy for his quarters, and we hope this lifts his self-esteem.”
Kyle Edmund's coach Fredrik Rosengren on how Briton has become one of hardest men to beat on tour
Enjoy the battle. Since Kyle Edmund hired his new coach Fredrik Rosengren last autumn, this has been the core message they have worked on together. It is no coincidence that, since the 2018 season began, Edmund has become one of the hardest men on tour to beat. “For me, tennis is a mental game,” explained Rosengren, a 57-year-old Swede with such extensive experience that Edmund is the sixth player he has coached to the later stages of the Australian Open. “So it’s all about belief at this level. You have to manage the pressure and on certain points you have to step up and play well. “I heard this was not his strength in the past, so we are talking a lot about this. To play to win, not to play to avoid losing, to have the heart. It's good to see that Kyle can grow as a person, and also be out there to enjoy it. This is his profession, he makes his money from tennis, but you have to also enjoy the ride.” The off-season was a big deal for Edmund, who has not only tightened up his mental game but added some important technical refinements to his serve. These have paid off in spades, as Edmund stands in fifth place on the aces chart after four rounds with 65. He is also holding serve 90 per cent of the time – an elite figure that puts him on a par with Rafael Nadal and Marin Cilic. According to Rosengren, “He is using his legs much more. It was not good against Anderson technically [in the first round], it was old Kyle. I wasn't happy with that. But these last three matches he has been serving really well. It's helping him with his confidence.” Edmund is holding serve 90 per cent of the time in Melbourne Credit: Getty Images And then there is the booming forehand, which leads the tournament statistics for clean winners by an absolute street. “I have been in this business for 30 years,” said Rosengren, “and you always have big players out there. But he has a damn good forehand, damn good.” Above all, though, it is Edmund’s sporting psychology which Rosengren – who is known to his friends as Fidde - has spent most time working on. “You have to believe you can do it in tough situations, serving out sets and matches. We talked a lot about expressing himself on court but at the same time he can’t use all his energy. It has to come natural. He shouldn’t pump his fist because he thinks I want him to. “He is a young man, he knows what he wants and I think he has a great temperament. Sometimes he could get his hair cut a bit more …” – at this point Rosengren ruffled up his own grey hair so that it pointed in all directions. “That’s something we say in Sweden when everything is too nice. But, seriously, he is doing a great job. We are a good team with Ian Prangley as his physical trainer and physio, and Mark Hilton also as a technical coach. We are all very happy for his quarters, and we hope this lifts his self-esteem.”
Having beaten Andreas Seppi in four sets, Britain’s new tennis hero Kyle Edmund was asked if he can win the Australian Open. “You have to believe it,” he replied. “That’s why I'm in the quarter-finals. Because every time I step on the court, I believe I'm going to win.” What a long way Edmund has come since his first hesitant steps into professional tennis. Selected for his first Davis Cup squad in 2014, he was still a callow teenager, so shy that his team-mates often ordered for him in restaurants. At that stage, his critics said he didn’t have the nerve for this game. How wrong they were. Today Edmund cuts an imposing figure, standing well over 6ft with shoulders like a second row’s. He has also shown a heart as big as Shergar’s over the past week, coming from behind in three of his four victories to date. We don’t know what will happen when he faces Grigor Dimitrov in Tuesday’s quarter-final. But if he loses, it won’t be on account of the occasion. By beating Seppi, Edmund became the first Englishman to reach the last eight of the Australian Open since John Lloyd in 1985. He also ensured a career-high ranking of around No 35 when the next chart is published. Were he to overcome Dimitrov as well, he would climb into the mid-20s, poised to overtake Andy Murray as British No 1 in a matter of weeks. Is that a feasible prospect? At the beginning of this tournament, Edmund and Dimitrov were living in different worlds. One of them was an international celebrity with a pop-star girlfriend, high-profile enough for Nike to prepare him a unique outfit to wear at this event. Edmund will now face Dimitrov for a place in the semi-finals Credit: AFP The other was “Our Kyle”, the understated boy next door from Beverley in Yorkshire, who stood at No 49 in the world and had only ever won a single main-draw match at this event. We knew he could stand toe-to-toe with the big boys, because he gave several of them – including Rafael Nadal and Milos Raonic – a real fright last year. What he wasn’t doing was getting himself over the line. That has changed since he signed the veteran Swedish coach Fredrik Rosengren in the autumn, and began working through the mental challenges of this head-scrambling sport. As Rosengren told him, “You will not win every time but you have to go out there and get it, because these guys will not give it to you for free.” After his superb display against Seppi, Edmund was asked whether he had ever doubted that he would put the “nearly-man” tag behind him. His answer was typically level-headed, as befits a player who - ever since his early teens – has been able to shrug off setbacks more easily than his peers. “I have known for a while that my game is dangerous, and it can beat a lot of players,” he said. “I just had to learn for myself where I hadn’t been getting it right. As you mature you become better and wiser and more experienced. So naturally you play a bit better.” We can identify two kinds of self-belief in tennis. There’s the confidence you take on the court on any given day, and which has grown visibly for Edmund over the last few weeks. And then there’s the long-term faith that you’re on the right path – an area where he has never wavered. “Not a surprise,” said Nadal, when asked about Edmund’s progress to the quarter-finals. “It's the normal thing. Was a little bit more surprising for me last year he lost a lot of close matches, I think. But, no, I really believe in his potential. He has a huge serve, huge forehand, and he hit very strong the ball, no? So I really think he gonna have a great year.” Edmund has known for a while he has a dangerous game Credit: AFP Despite all Edmund’s gifts, the match was an awkward assignment. Seppi is something of a Melbourne specialist, having beaten Roger Federer here three years ago and won 18 matches overall. He is a wily craftsman who - like a judoka - uses his opponent’s strength against him, deflecting the ball as much as hitting it. In the first set, Seppi kept correctly guessing where Edmund’s howitzer forehands would land, and bunting them back into space for winners. Edmund was understandably anxious, and coughed up no fewer than 23 errors in the first set, more than half his total for the match. But he refocused his mind after those opening exchanges and decided to trust his backhand more, which made his patterns of play less predictable. After an early exchange of breaks in the second set, Edmund spent the rest of the afternoon in predatory mode, prowling the court like some ginger-haired velociraptor. He was bullying Seppi with his sheer weight of shot, and eventually completed his 6-7, 7-5, 6-2, 6-3 victory in 2hr 57min. The statistics show that Edmund has hit many more clean winners at this stage of the tournament than anyone else. But this is a double-edged sword, because he has also spent more time on court than anyone else: 17 sets to date, and a fraction under 12 hours. Can he still win the tournament after such a demanding schedule? According to his coach, Edmund remains in pristine physical shape. “It’s all about the mindset,” said Rosengren. “He is not that tired. You have to play seven matches of best-of-five sets if you want to win this tournament. If you’re not prepared for that, why come?”
Kyle Edmund believes he can win Australian Open as once shy Briton finally makes himself heard
Having beaten Andreas Seppi in four sets, Britain’s new tennis hero Kyle Edmund was asked if he can win the Australian Open. “You have to believe it,” he replied. “That’s why I'm in the quarter-finals. Because every time I step on the court, I believe I'm going to win.” What a long way Edmund has come since his first hesitant steps into professional tennis. Selected for his first Davis Cup squad in 2014, he was still a callow teenager, so shy that his team-mates often ordered for him in restaurants. At that stage, his critics said he didn’t have the nerve for this game. How wrong they were. Today Edmund cuts an imposing figure, standing well over 6ft with shoulders like a second row’s. He has also shown a heart as big as Shergar’s over the past week, coming from behind in three of his four victories to date. We don’t know what will happen when he faces Grigor Dimitrov in Tuesday’s quarter-final. But if he loses, it won’t be on account of the occasion. By beating Seppi, Edmund became the first Englishman to reach the last eight of the Australian Open since John Lloyd in 1985. He also ensured a career-high ranking of around No 35 when the next chart is published. Were he to overcome Dimitrov as well, he would climb into the mid-20s, poised to overtake Andy Murray as British No 1 in a matter of weeks. Is that a feasible prospect? At the beginning of this tournament, Edmund and Dimitrov were living in different worlds. One of them was an international celebrity with a pop-star girlfriend, high-profile enough for Nike to prepare him a unique outfit to wear at this event. Edmund will now face Dimitrov for a place in the semi-finals Credit: AFP The other was “Our Kyle”, the understated boy next door from Beverley in Yorkshire, who stood at No 49 in the world and had only ever won a single main-draw match at this event. We knew he could stand toe-to-toe with the big boys, because he gave several of them – including Rafael Nadal and Milos Raonic – a real fright last year. What he wasn’t doing was getting himself over the line. That has changed since he signed the veteran Swedish coach Fredrik Rosengren in the autumn, and began working through the mental challenges of this head-scrambling sport. As Rosengren told him, “You will not win every time but you have to go out there and get it, because these guys will not give it to you for free.” After his superb display against Seppi, Edmund was asked whether he had ever doubted that he would put the “nearly-man” tag behind him. His answer was typically level-headed, as befits a player who - ever since his early teens – has been able to shrug off setbacks more easily than his peers. “I have known for a while that my game is dangerous, and it can beat a lot of players,” he said. “I just had to learn for myself where I hadn’t been getting it right. As you mature you become better and wiser and more experienced. So naturally you play a bit better.” We can identify two kinds of self-belief in tennis. There’s the confidence you take on the court on any given day, and which has grown visibly for Edmund over the last few weeks. And then there’s the long-term faith that you’re on the right path – an area where he has never wavered. “Not a surprise,” said Nadal, when asked about Edmund’s progress to the quarter-finals. “It's the normal thing. Was a little bit more surprising for me last year he lost a lot of close matches, I think. But, no, I really believe in his potential. He has a huge serve, huge forehand, and he hit very strong the ball, no? So I really think he gonna have a great year.” Edmund has known for a while he has a dangerous game Credit: AFP Despite all Edmund’s gifts, the match was an awkward assignment. Seppi is something of a Melbourne specialist, having beaten Roger Federer here three years ago and won 18 matches overall. He is a wily craftsman who - like a judoka - uses his opponent’s strength against him, deflecting the ball as much as hitting it. In the first set, Seppi kept correctly guessing where Edmund’s howitzer forehands would land, and bunting them back into space for winners. Edmund was understandably anxious, and coughed up no fewer than 23 errors in the first set, more than half his total for the match. But he refocused his mind after those opening exchanges and decided to trust his backhand more, which made his patterns of play less predictable. After an early exchange of breaks in the second set, Edmund spent the rest of the afternoon in predatory mode, prowling the court like some ginger-haired velociraptor. He was bullying Seppi with his sheer weight of shot, and eventually completed his 6-7, 7-5, 6-2, 6-3 victory in 2hr 57min. The statistics show that Edmund has hit many more clean winners at this stage of the tournament than anyone else. But this is a double-edged sword, because he has also spent more time on court than anyone else: 17 sets to date, and a fraction under 12 hours. Can he still win the tournament after such a demanding schedule? According to his coach, Edmund remains in pristine physical shape. “It’s all about the mindset,” said Rosengren. “He is not that tired. You have to play seven matches of best-of-five sets if you want to win this tournament. If you’re not prepared for that, why come?”
After swatting last year’s Wimbledon semi-finalist Magdalena Rybarikova aside like a troublesome mosquito, the former world No 1 Caroline Wozniacki admitted that her narrow escape in the second round has helped her play with more freedom. Wozniacki hit 25 winners in a match that lasted only 15 games - an unusually high ratio for a woman who used to be known as a stubborn defender. If she keeps on swinging with such ambition, that long-awaited maiden grand-slam title could soon stand within her reach. “I feel good,” said Wozniacki after her comprehensive 6-3, 6-0 win. “I think being almost out of the tournament, you have nothing to lose after that. You just go out there and you enjoy yourself. I played really well from being down 5-1 [in the third set against unseeded Jana Fett in the second round]. Since then I've just kept that going basically.” Rybarikova is generally seen as an awkward opponent because of her wide range of options. Few women are so comfortable playing serve-and-volley or mixing attacking forehands with defensive slice backhands. But Wozniacki was only briefly disturbed by Rybarikova’s funky style. Having dropped her serve to trail 2-1 in the first set, she broke back immediately and then reeled off the last nine games to move into her first Australian Open quarter-final since 2012. Wozniack is into her first Australian Open quarter-final since 2012 Credit: Getty Images Afterwards, Wozniacki – who is 27 – explained that she had been inspired to keep working on her game by the example of Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal. “They come back year after year, and they play even better,” she said. “You're like, ‘How?’ I'm always thinking if they can get better, then I can too.” If Wozniacki should go on to lift the Daphne Akhurst Memorial Cup, she would become the fifth woman to do so after facing match point en route. The last example was provided by Angelique Kerber, who has described the match point she saved in the opening round of her 2016 campaign as “the most important one of my life”. Wozniacki will play the Spanish baseliner Carla Suarez Navarro in her quarter-final, while the other women’s match to be played on Tuesday will bring Elina Svitolina of Ukraine up against Belgium’s Elise Mertens.
Caroline Wozniacki says she's playing with more freedom after surviving match point scare
After swatting last year’s Wimbledon semi-finalist Magdalena Rybarikova aside like a troublesome mosquito, the former world No 1 Caroline Wozniacki admitted that her narrow escape in the second round has helped her play with more freedom. Wozniacki hit 25 winners in a match that lasted only 15 games - an unusually high ratio for a woman who used to be known as a stubborn defender. If she keeps on swinging with such ambition, that long-awaited maiden grand-slam title could soon stand within her reach. “I feel good,” said Wozniacki after her comprehensive 6-3, 6-0 win. “I think being almost out of the tournament, you have nothing to lose after that. You just go out there and you enjoy yourself. I played really well from being down 5-1 [in the third set against unseeded Jana Fett in the second round]. Since then I've just kept that going basically.” Rybarikova is generally seen as an awkward opponent because of her wide range of options. Few women are so comfortable playing serve-and-volley or mixing attacking forehands with defensive slice backhands. But Wozniacki was only briefly disturbed by Rybarikova’s funky style. Having dropped her serve to trail 2-1 in the first set, she broke back immediately and then reeled off the last nine games to move into her first Australian Open quarter-final since 2012. Wozniack is into her first Australian Open quarter-final since 2012 Credit: Getty Images Afterwards, Wozniacki – who is 27 – explained that she had been inspired to keep working on her game by the example of Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal. “They come back year after year, and they play even better,” she said. “You're like, ‘How?’ I'm always thinking if they can get better, then I can too.” If Wozniacki should go on to lift the Daphne Akhurst Memorial Cup, she would become the fifth woman to do so after facing match point en route. The last example was provided by Angelique Kerber, who has described the match point she saved in the opening round of her 2016 campaign as “the most important one of my life”. Wozniacki will play the Spanish baseliner Carla Suarez Navarro in her quarter-final, while the other women’s match to be played on Tuesday will bring Elina Svitolina of Ukraine up against Belgium’s Elise Mertens.
After swatting last year’s Wimbledon semi-finalist Magdalena Rybarikova aside like a troublesome mosquito, the former world No 1 Caroline Wozniacki admitted that her narrow escape in the second round has helped her play with more freedom. Wozniacki hit 25 winners in a match that lasted only 15 games - an unusually high ratio for a woman who used to be known as a stubborn defender. If she keeps on swinging with such ambition, that long-awaited maiden grand-slam title could soon stand within her reach. “I feel good,” said Wozniacki after her comprehensive 6-3, 6-0 win. “I think being almost out of the tournament, you have nothing to lose after that. You just go out there and you enjoy yourself. I played really well from being down 5-1 [in the third set against unseeded Jana Fett in the second round]. Since then I've just kept that going basically.” Rybarikova is generally seen as an awkward opponent because of her wide range of options. Few women are so comfortable playing serve-and-volley or mixing attacking forehands with defensive slice backhands. But Wozniacki was only briefly disturbed by Rybarikova’s funky style. Having dropped her serve to trail 2-1 in the first set, she broke back immediately and then reeled off the last nine games to move into her first Australian Open quarter-final since 2012. Wozniack is into her first Australian Open quarter-final since 2012 Credit: Getty Images Afterwards, Wozniacki – who is 27 – explained that she had been inspired to keep working on her game by the example of Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal. “They come back year after year, and they play even better,” she said. “You're like, ‘How?’ I'm always thinking if they can get better, then I can too.” If Wozniacki should go on to lift the Daphne Akhurst Memorial Cup, she would become the fifth woman to do so after facing match point en route. The last example was provided by Angelique Kerber, who has described the match point she saved in the opening round of her 2016 campaign as “the most important one of my life”. Wozniacki will play the Spanish baseliner Carla Suarez Navarro in her quarter-final, while the other women’s match to be played on Tuesday will bring Elina Svitolina of Ukraine up against Belgium’s Elise Mertens.
Caroline Wozniacki says she's playing with more freedom after surviving match point scare
After swatting last year’s Wimbledon semi-finalist Magdalena Rybarikova aside like a troublesome mosquito, the former world No 1 Caroline Wozniacki admitted that her narrow escape in the second round has helped her play with more freedom. Wozniacki hit 25 winners in a match that lasted only 15 games - an unusually high ratio for a woman who used to be known as a stubborn defender. If she keeps on swinging with such ambition, that long-awaited maiden grand-slam title could soon stand within her reach. “I feel good,” said Wozniacki after her comprehensive 6-3, 6-0 win. “I think being almost out of the tournament, you have nothing to lose after that. You just go out there and you enjoy yourself. I played really well from being down 5-1 [in the third set against unseeded Jana Fett in the second round]. Since then I've just kept that going basically.” Rybarikova is generally seen as an awkward opponent because of her wide range of options. Few women are so comfortable playing serve-and-volley or mixing attacking forehands with defensive slice backhands. But Wozniacki was only briefly disturbed by Rybarikova’s funky style. Having dropped her serve to trail 2-1 in the first set, she broke back immediately and then reeled off the last nine games to move into her first Australian Open quarter-final since 2012. Wozniack is into her first Australian Open quarter-final since 2012 Credit: Getty Images Afterwards, Wozniacki – who is 27 – explained that she had been inspired to keep working on her game by the example of Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal. “They come back year after year, and they play even better,” she said. “You're like, ‘How?’ I'm always thinking if they can get better, then I can too.” If Wozniacki should go on to lift the Daphne Akhurst Memorial Cup, she would become the fifth woman to do so after facing match point en route. The last example was provided by Angelique Kerber, who has described the match point she saved in the opening round of her 2016 campaign as “the most important one of my life”. Wozniacki will play the Spanish baseliner Carla Suarez Navarro in her quarter-final, while the other women’s match to be played on Tuesday will bring Elina Svitolina of Ukraine up against Belgium’s Elise Mertens.
Grigor Dimitrov’s win over Nick Kyrgios was ‘instant classic’ material, and in the view of The Tennis Podcast team good news for Kyle Edmund, who is into his first Grand Slam quarter-final. Presenter David Law said the match between Dimitrov and Kyrgios was a ‘win-win’ for tennis, and acknowledges that Dimitrov is a heavy favourite. So why does he rate Edmund’s chances better against Dimitrov than he would have done against Kyrgios? As for the matches themselves, did Kyrgios cross the line with his ranting in the direction of his player box? Or is it time to cut him some slack and celebrate a brilliant performance and an even better one from his opponent? Regarding Dimitrov, is he finally ready to fully deliver on his enormous talent? Edmund’s four-set win over Seppi again saw him fight back from behind to prevail, becoming the first British man not named Andy Murray to reach an Australian Open quarter-final in 33 years. The pod team were hugely impressed. There’s also discussion of Rafael Nadal and Marin Cilic’s tricky tussles as they set up a quarter-final clash, and the ever-improving Caroline Wozniacki who is looking more of a threat for the title with every match. The Australian Open will be live on Eurosport from midnight, with radio commentary available on BBC Radio 5 Live Sports Extra. The Tennis Podcast will be produced daily throughout the Australian Open, presented by Catherine Whitaker (Eurosport) and David Law (BBC 5 Live), in association with Telegraph Sport and Eurosport. How to listen: Acast - https://ec.yimg.com/ec?url=http%3a%2f%2fpo.st%2fTP383&t=1516753910&sig=ANedJnQHwSvmfGw1rT.y5A--~D Download - http://po.st/TP383Download Apple - http://po.st/TP383Apple Android - rss.acast.com/thetennispodcast (paste into a podcast app like ‘Overcast’)
Tennis podcast: Grigor Dimitrov’s win over Nick Kyrgios is good news for Kyle Edmund
Grigor Dimitrov’s win over Nick Kyrgios was ‘instant classic’ material, and in the view of The Tennis Podcast team good news for Kyle Edmund, who is into his first Grand Slam quarter-final. Presenter David Law said the match between Dimitrov and Kyrgios was a ‘win-win’ for tennis, and acknowledges that Dimitrov is a heavy favourite. So why does he rate Edmund’s chances better against Dimitrov than he would have done against Kyrgios? As for the matches themselves, did Kyrgios cross the line with his ranting in the direction of his player box? Or is it time to cut him some slack and celebrate a brilliant performance and an even better one from his opponent? Regarding Dimitrov, is he finally ready to fully deliver on his enormous talent? Edmund’s four-set win over Seppi again saw him fight back from behind to prevail, becoming the first British man not named Andy Murray to reach an Australian Open quarter-final in 33 years. The pod team were hugely impressed. There’s also discussion of Rafael Nadal and Marin Cilic’s tricky tussles as they set up a quarter-final clash, and the ever-improving Caroline Wozniacki who is looking more of a threat for the title with every match. The Australian Open will be live on Eurosport from midnight, with radio commentary available on BBC Radio 5 Live Sports Extra. The Tennis Podcast will be produced daily throughout the Australian Open, presented by Catherine Whitaker (Eurosport) and David Law (BBC 5 Live), in association with Telegraph Sport and Eurosport. How to listen: Acast - http://po.st/TP383 Download - http://po.st/TP383Download Apple - http://po.st/TP383Apple Android - rss.acast.com/thetennispodcast (paste into a podcast app like ‘Overcast’)
Australian hopes of a first home champion in 42 years were ended, as Nick Kygrios was beaten by Grigor Dimitrov in a thriller in the Australian Open in Melbourne on Sunday.
Story of the Day - Dimitrov wins Kyrgios classic; Nadal battles into last eight
Australian hopes of a first home champion in 42 years were ended, as Nick Kygrios was beaten by Grigor Dimitrov in a thriller in the Australian Open in Melbourne on Sunday.
Australian hopes of a first home champion in 42 years were ended, as Nick Kygrios was beaten by Grigor Dimitrov in a thriller in the Australian Open in Melbourne on Sunday.
Story of the Day - Dimitrov wins Kyrgios classic; Nadal battles into last eight
Australian hopes of a first home champion in 42 years were ended, as Nick Kygrios was beaten by Grigor Dimitrov in a thriller in the Australian Open in Melbourne on Sunday.
Australian hopes of a first home champion in 42 years were ended, as Nick Kygrios was beaten by Grigor Dimitrov in a thriller in the Australian Open in Melbourne on Sunday.
Story of the Day - Dimitrov wins Kyrgios classic; Nadal battles into last eight
Australian hopes of a first home champion in 42 years were ended, as Nick Kygrios was beaten by Grigor Dimitrov in a thriller in the Australian Open in Melbourne on Sunday.
Britain's Kyle Edmund hits a forehand return to Italy's Andreas Seppi during their fourth round match at the Australian Open tennis championships in Melbourne, Australia Sunday, Jan. 21, 2018. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
Nadal, Dimitrov advance to Australian Open quarterfinals
Britain's Kyle Edmund hits a forehand return to Italy's Andreas Seppi during their fourth round match at the Australian Open tennis championships in Melbourne, Australia Sunday, Jan. 21, 2018. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
Denmark's Caroline Wozniacki hits a forehand return to Slovakia's Magdalena Rybarikova during their fourth round match at the Australian Open tennis championships in Melbourne, Australia Sunday, Jan. 21, 2018. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)
Nadal, Dimitrov advance to Australian Open quarterfinals
Denmark's Caroline Wozniacki hits a forehand return to Slovakia's Magdalena Rybarikova during their fourth round match at the Australian Open tennis championships in Melbourne, Australia Sunday, Jan. 21, 2018. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)
Spain's Carla Suarez Navarro celebrates after defeating Anett Kontaveit of Estonia in their fourth round match at the Australian Open tennis championships in Melbourne, Australia Sunday, Jan. 21, 2018. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)
Nadal, Dimitrov advance to Australian Open quarterfinals
Spain's Carla Suarez Navarro celebrates after defeating Anett Kontaveit of Estonia in their fourth round match at the Australian Open tennis championships in Melbourne, Australia Sunday, Jan. 21, 2018. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)
Croatia's Marin Cilic celebrates after defeating Spain's Pablo Carreno Busta in their fourth round match at the Australian Open tennis championships in Melbourne, Australia Sunday, Jan. 21, 2018. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
Nadal, Dimitrov advance to Australian Open quarterfinals
Croatia's Marin Cilic celebrates after defeating Spain's Pablo Carreno Busta in their fourth round match at the Australian Open tennis championships in Melbourne, Australia Sunday, Jan. 21, 2018. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
Spain's Rafael Nadal celebrates after defeating Damir Dzumhur of Bosnia and Herzegovina in their third round match at the Australian Open tennis championships in Melbourne, Australia, Friday, Jan. 19, 2018. (AP Photo/Vincent Thian)
Nadal, Dimitrov advance to Australian Open quarterfinals
Spain's Rafael Nadal celebrates after defeating Damir Dzumhur of Bosnia and Herzegovina in their third round match at the Australian Open tennis championships in Melbourne, Australia, Friday, Jan. 19, 2018. (AP Photo/Vincent Thian)
Bulgaria's Grigor Dimitrov celebrates after defeating Australia's Nick Kyrgios in his fourth round match at the Australian Open tennis championships in Melbourne, Australia Sunday, Jan. 21, 2018. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)
Nadal, Dimitrov advance to Australian Open quarterfinals
Bulgaria's Grigor Dimitrov celebrates after defeating Australia's Nick Kyrgios in his fourth round match at the Australian Open tennis championships in Melbourne, Australia Sunday, Jan. 21, 2018. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)
Argentina's Diego Schwartzman reacts after losing a point to Spain's Rafael Nadal during their fourth round match at the Australian Open tennis championships in Melbourne, Australia Sunday, Jan. 21, 2018. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)
Nadal, Dimitrov advance to Australian Open quarterfinals
Argentina's Diego Schwartzman reacts after losing a point to Spain's Rafael Nadal during their fourth round match at the Australian Open tennis championships in Melbourne, Australia Sunday, Jan. 21, 2018. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)
Belgium's Elise Mertens makes a forehand return to Croatia's Petra Martic during their fourth round match at the Australian Open tennis championships in Melbourne, Australia Sunday, Jan. 21, 2018. (AP Photo/Andy Brownbill)
Nadal, Dimitrov advance to Australian Open quarterfinals
Belgium's Elise Mertens makes a forehand return to Croatia's Petra Martic during their fourth round match at the Australian Open tennis championships in Melbourne, Australia Sunday, Jan. 21, 2018. (AP Photo/Andy Brownbill)
Australia's Nick Kyrgios yells in frustration during his fourth round match against Bulgaria's Grigor Dimitrov at the Australian Open tennis championships in Melbourne, Australia Sunday, Jan. 21, 2018.(AP Photo/Andy Brownbill)
Nadal, Dimitrov advance to Australian Open quarterfinals
Australia's Nick Kyrgios yells in frustration during his fourth round match against Bulgaria's Grigor Dimitrov at the Australian Open tennis championships in Melbourne, Australia Sunday, Jan. 21, 2018.(AP Photo/Andy Brownbill)
Spain's Rafael Nadal celebrates after defeating Argentina's Diego Schwartzman during their fourth round match at the Australian Open tennis championships in Melbourne, Australia Sunday, Jan. 21, 2018. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)
Nadal, Dimitrov advance to Australian Open quarterfinals
Spain's Rafael Nadal celebrates after defeating Argentina's Diego Schwartzman during their fourth round match at the Australian Open tennis championships in Melbourne, Australia Sunday, Jan. 21, 2018. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)
Spain's Carla Suarez Navarro, right, shakes hands with Anett Kontaveit of Estonia after she won their fourth round match at the Australian Open tennis championships in Melbourne, Australia Sunday, Jan. 21, 2018. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)
Nadal, Dimitrov advance to Australian Open quarterfinals
Spain's Carla Suarez Navarro, right, shakes hands with Anett Kontaveit of Estonia after she won their fourth round match at the Australian Open tennis championships in Melbourne, Australia Sunday, Jan. 21, 2018. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)
Spain's Rafael Nadal makes backhand return to Argentina's Diego Schwartzman during their fourth round match at the Australian Open tennis championships in Melbourne, Australia Sunday, Jan. 21, 2018. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)
Nadal, Dimitrov advance to Australian Open quarterfinals
Spain's Rafael Nadal makes backhand return to Argentina's Diego Schwartzman during their fourth round match at the Australian Open tennis championships in Melbourne, Australia Sunday, Jan. 21, 2018. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)
Spain's Rafael Nadal signs autographs after defeating Damir Dzumhur of Bosnia and Herzegovina in their third round match at the Australian Open tennis championships in Melbourne, Australia, Friday, Jan. 19, 2018. (AP Photo/Vincent Thian)
Nadal, Dimitrov advance to Australian Open quarterfinals
Spain's Rafael Nadal signs autographs after defeating Damir Dzumhur of Bosnia and Herzegovina in their third round match at the Australian Open tennis championships in Melbourne, Australia, Friday, Jan. 19, 2018. (AP Photo/Vincent Thian)

What to Read Next