Tennis star Rafael Nadal

Rafael Nadal pulled out of the London Olympics on Thursday due to injury.

Rafael Nadal began his bid for an 11th Monte Carlo title with a straightforward win (AFP Photo/VALERY HACHE)
Rafael Nadal began his bid for an 11th Monte Carlo title with a straightforward win
Rafael Nadal began his bid for an 11th Monte Carlo title with a straightforward win (AFP Photo/VALERY HACHE)
Tennis - ATP - Monte Carlo Masters - Monte-Carlo Country Club, Monte Carlo, Monaco - April 18, 2018 A bead of sweat drops off of Spain's Rafael Nadal as he prepares to serve during his second round match against Slovenia's Aljaz Bedene REUTERS/Eric Gaillard
ATP - Monte Carlo Masters
Tennis - ATP - Monte Carlo Masters - Monte-Carlo Country Club, Monte Carlo, Monaco - April 18, 2018 A bead of sweat drops off of Spain's Rafael Nadal as he prepares to serve during his second round match against Slovenia's Aljaz Bedene REUTERS/Eric Gaillard
Tennis - ATP - Monte Carlo Masters - Monte-Carlo Country Club, Monte Carlo, Monaco - April 18, 2018 Slovenia's Aljaz Bedene in action during his second round match against Spain's Rafael Nadal REUTERS/Eric Gaillard
ATP - Monte Carlo Masters
Tennis - ATP - Monte Carlo Masters - Monte-Carlo Country Club, Monte Carlo, Monaco - April 18, 2018 Slovenia's Aljaz Bedene in action during his second round match against Spain's Rafael Nadal REUTERS/Eric Gaillard
Tennis - ATP - Monte Carlo Masters - Monte-Carlo Country Club, Monte Carlo, Monaco - April 18, 2018 Slovenia's Aljaz Bedene in action during his second round match against Spain's Rafael Nadal REUTERS/Eric Gaillard
ATP - Monte Carlo Masters
Tennis - ATP - Monte Carlo Masters - Monte-Carlo Country Club, Monte Carlo, Monaco - April 18, 2018 Slovenia's Aljaz Bedene in action during his second round match against Spain's Rafael Nadal REUTERS/Eric Gaillard
Tennis - ATP - Monte Carlo Masters - Monte-Carlo Country Club, Monte Carlo, Monaco - April 18, 2018 Spain's Rafael Nadal celebrates winning his second round match against Slovenia's Aljaz Bedene REUTERS/Eric Gaillard
ATP - Monte Carlo Masters
Tennis - ATP - Monte Carlo Masters - Monte-Carlo Country Club, Monte Carlo, Monaco - April 18, 2018 Spain's Rafael Nadal celebrates winning his second round match against Slovenia's Aljaz Bedene REUTERS/Eric Gaillard
Tennis - ATP - Monte Carlo Masters - Monte-Carlo Country Club, Monte Carlo, Monaco - April 18, 2018 Spain's Rafael Nadal celebrates winning his second round match against Slovenia's Aljaz Bedene REUTERS/Eric Gaillard
ATP - Monte Carlo Masters
Tennis - ATP - Monte Carlo Masters - Monte-Carlo Country Club, Monte Carlo, Monaco - April 18, 2018 Spain's Rafael Nadal celebrates winning his second round match against Slovenia's Aljaz Bedene REUTERS/Eric Gaillard
FILE - In this Sunday April 8, 2018 file photo, Spain's Rafael Nadal returns the ball to Germany's Alexander Zverev during a World Group quarterfinal Davis Cup tennis match between Spain and Germany at the bullring in Valencia, Spain. Rafael Nadal is wary of saying hes fully recovered from a troublesome right thigh injury as he defends his Monte Carlo Masters title. The top-ranked Spaniard only recently returned to action at the Davis Cup, after a recurrence of the injury forced him out of the Mexico Open and then Masters tournaments at Indian Wells and Miami last month. (AP Photo/Alberto Saiz, File)
Djokovic needs 10 match points to reach 3rd round in Monaco
FILE - In this Sunday April 8, 2018 file photo, Spain's Rafael Nadal returns the ball to Germany's Alexander Zverev during a World Group quarterfinal Davis Cup tennis match between Spain and Germany at the bullring in Valencia, Spain. Rafael Nadal is wary of saying hes fully recovered from a troublesome right thigh injury as he defends his Monte Carlo Masters title. The top-ranked Spaniard only recently returned to action at the Davis Cup, after a recurrence of the injury forced him out of the Mexico Open and then Masters tournaments at Indian Wells and Miami last month. (AP Photo/Alberto Saiz, File)
Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic were among the winners at the Monte Carlo Masters on Wednesday.
Nadal and Djokovic seal Monte Carlo progression
Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic were among the winners at the Monte Carlo Masters on Wednesday.
Rafael Nadal is playing his first ATP Tour event since January's Australian Open (AFP Photo/YANN COATSALIOU)
Rafael Nadal is playing his first ATP Tour event since January's Australian Open
Rafael Nadal is playing his first ATP Tour event since January's Australian Open (AFP Photo/YANN COATSALIOU)
After surging through his opening match in Monte Carlo in commanding style, world No 1 Rafael Nadal told reporters that he cannot see himself skipping whole sections of the tennis calendar in the manner of his old rival Roger Federer. Nadal needed only 78 minutes to subdue Aljaz Bedene by a 6-1, 6-3 scoreline and earn a third-round meeting with the dynamic young Russian Karen Khachanov. But the talking point afterwards was the scheduling decision which has denied Nadal the prospect of facing Federer on clay this season. Asked if he would ever perform a similar manoeuvre to Federer, who plans to return to the tour on the grass of Stuttgart, Nadal replied “It is not in my plan, but I can't say 'never' because I cannot predict what's going to be in the future. When you get older, you need to adjust a little bit more the efforts and the calendar. But for me it is difficult to say I'm not going to play, for example, grass, or I'm not going to play hard. “There are tournaments that I can't imagine missing on purpose, because it is the tournaments that I love to play. So I don't see myself missing Monte Carlo on purpose. I don't see myself missing Wimbledon on purpose, or the US Open, or the Australian, or Rome.” In the previous match on Court Rainier III, Novak Djokovic had become a little shaky in the final stages of his 7-6, 7-5 victory over Croatia’s Borna Coric. Still short of matchplay after the elbow operation that restricted the first part of his season, Djokovic needed no fewer than ten match points to get over the line. Novak Djokovic needed 10 match points before finally wrapping up his win over Borna Coric Credit: Getty Images Overall, though, he seems to be gathering momentum ahead of tomorrow's third-round meeting with Dominic Thiem, the man who delivered one of the most chastening defeats of his career at last year’s French Open. “He’s got it all, the entire game for clay,” said Djokovic of Thiem, who concluded that beat-down in June last year by inflicting a third-set bagel. Secret Service | Evert part of Simon Briggs' weekly column Djokovic also confirmed that he has removed some weight from his racket – a big deal for any player, in this sport of tiny margins – in order to take some pressure off that vulnerable right elbow. Asked if he had lost power as a result, he replied “Actually, it feels like I gained more power, especially on the serve. I gained more angle. The racket is the most important tool that we have, but it's not more important than our body and our mind, our movements. So it is a tool that helps, but it doesn't play for you.”
Rafael Nadal can't see himself skipping whole sections of calendar like Roger Federer
After surging through his opening match in Monte Carlo in commanding style, world No 1 Rafael Nadal told reporters that he cannot see himself skipping whole sections of the tennis calendar in the manner of his old rival Roger Federer. Nadal needed only 78 minutes to subdue Aljaz Bedene by a 6-1, 6-3 scoreline and earn a third-round meeting with the dynamic young Russian Karen Khachanov. But the talking point afterwards was the scheduling decision which has denied Nadal the prospect of facing Federer on clay this season. Asked if he would ever perform a similar manoeuvre to Federer, who plans to return to the tour on the grass of Stuttgart, Nadal replied “It is not in my plan, but I can't say 'never' because I cannot predict what's going to be in the future. When you get older, you need to adjust a little bit more the efforts and the calendar. But for me it is difficult to say I'm not going to play, for example, grass, or I'm not going to play hard. “There are tournaments that I can't imagine missing on purpose, because it is the tournaments that I love to play. So I don't see myself missing Monte Carlo on purpose. I don't see myself missing Wimbledon on purpose, or the US Open, or the Australian, or Rome.” In the previous match on Court Rainier III, Novak Djokovic had become a little shaky in the final stages of his 7-6, 7-5 victory over Croatia’s Borna Coric. Still short of matchplay after the elbow operation that restricted the first part of his season, Djokovic needed no fewer than ten match points to get over the line. Novak Djokovic needed 10 match points before finally wrapping up his win over Borna Coric Credit: Getty Images Overall, though, he seems to be gathering momentum ahead of tomorrow's third-round meeting with Dominic Thiem, the man who delivered one of the most chastening defeats of his career at last year’s French Open. “He’s got it all, the entire game for clay,” said Djokovic of Thiem, who concluded that beat-down in June last year by inflicting a third-set bagel. Secret Service | Evert part of Simon Briggs' weekly column Djokovic also confirmed that he has removed some weight from his racket – a big deal for any player, in this sport of tiny margins – in order to take some pressure off that vulnerable right elbow. Asked if he had lost power as a result, he replied “Actually, it feels like I gained more power, especially on the serve. I gained more angle. The racket is the most important tool that we have, but it's not more important than our body and our mind, our movements. So it is a tool that helps, but it doesn't play for you.”
After surging through his opening match in Monte Carlo in commanding style, world No 1 Rafael Nadal told reporters that he cannot see himself skipping whole sections of the tennis calendar in the manner of his old rival Roger Federer. Nadal needed only 78 minutes to subdue Aljaz Bedene by a 6-1, 6-3 scoreline and earn a third-round meeting with the dynamic young Russian Karen Khachanov. But the talking point afterwards was the scheduling decision which has denied Nadal the prospect of facing Federer on clay this season. Asked if he would ever perform a similar manoeuvre to Federer, who plans to return to the tour on the grass of Stuttgart, Nadal replied “It is not in my plan, but I can't say 'never' because I cannot predict what's going to be in the future. When you get older, you need to adjust a little bit more the efforts and the calendar. But for me it is difficult to say I'm not going to play, for example, grass, or I'm not going to play hard. “There are tournaments that I can't imagine missing on purpose, because it is the tournaments that I love to play. So I don't see myself missing Monte Carlo on purpose. I don't see myself missing Wimbledon on purpose, or the US Open, or the Australian, or Rome.” In the previous match on Court Rainier III, Novak Djokovic had become a little shaky in the final stages of his 7-6, 7-5 victory over Croatia’s Borna Coric. Still short of matchplay after the elbow operation that restricted the first part of his season, Djokovic needed no fewer than ten match points to get over the line. Novak Djokovic needed 10 match points before finally wrapping up his win over Borna Coric Credit: Getty Images Overall, though, he seems to be gathering momentum ahead of tomorrow's third-round meeting with Dominic Thiem, the man who delivered one of the most chastening defeats of his career at last year’s French Open. “He’s got it all, the entire game for clay,” said Djokovic of Thiem, who concluded that beat-down in June last year by inflicting a third-set bagel. Secret Service | Evert part of Simon Briggs' weekly column Djokovic also confirmed that he has removed some weight from his racket – a big deal for any player, in this sport of tiny margins – in order to take some pressure off that vulnerable right elbow. Asked if he had lost power as a result, he replied “Actually, it feels like I gained more power, especially on the serve. I gained more angle. The racket is the most important tool that we have, but it's not more important than our body and our mind, our movements. So it is a tool that helps, but it doesn't play for you.”
Rafael Nadal can't see himself skipping whole sections of calendar like Roger Federer
After surging through his opening match in Monte Carlo in commanding style, world No 1 Rafael Nadal told reporters that he cannot see himself skipping whole sections of the tennis calendar in the manner of his old rival Roger Federer. Nadal needed only 78 minutes to subdue Aljaz Bedene by a 6-1, 6-3 scoreline and earn a third-round meeting with the dynamic young Russian Karen Khachanov. But the talking point afterwards was the scheduling decision which has denied Nadal the prospect of facing Federer on clay this season. Asked if he would ever perform a similar manoeuvre to Federer, who plans to return to the tour on the grass of Stuttgart, Nadal replied “It is not in my plan, but I can't say 'never' because I cannot predict what's going to be in the future. When you get older, you need to adjust a little bit more the efforts and the calendar. But for me it is difficult to say I'm not going to play, for example, grass, or I'm not going to play hard. “There are tournaments that I can't imagine missing on purpose, because it is the tournaments that I love to play. So I don't see myself missing Monte Carlo on purpose. I don't see myself missing Wimbledon on purpose, or the US Open, or the Australian, or Rome.” In the previous match on Court Rainier III, Novak Djokovic had become a little shaky in the final stages of his 7-6, 7-5 victory over Croatia’s Borna Coric. Still short of matchplay after the elbow operation that restricted the first part of his season, Djokovic needed no fewer than ten match points to get over the line. Novak Djokovic needed 10 match points before finally wrapping up his win over Borna Coric Credit: Getty Images Overall, though, he seems to be gathering momentum ahead of tomorrow's third-round meeting with Dominic Thiem, the man who delivered one of the most chastening defeats of his career at last year’s French Open. “He’s got it all, the entire game for clay,” said Djokovic of Thiem, who concluded that beat-down in June last year by inflicting a third-set bagel. Secret Service | Evert part of Simon Briggs' weekly column Djokovic also confirmed that he has removed some weight from his racket – a big deal for any player, in this sport of tiny margins – in order to take some pressure off that vulnerable right elbow. Asked if he had lost power as a result, he replied “Actually, it feels like I gained more power, especially on the serve. I gained more angle. The racket is the most important tool that we have, but it's not more important than our body and our mind, our movements. So it is a tool that helps, but it doesn't play for you.”
Rafael Nadal won his tenth Monte Carlo, Barcelona and French Open titles in 2017. The Tennis Podcast team are picking him to make it 11 titles at each of those destinations this year. Nadal got his Monte Carlo campaign off to a flying start with a win over Aljaz Bedene, and in previewing the clay court season on the latest podcast, produced in association with Telegraph Sport, presenters Catherine Whitaker and David Law couldn’t think of anyone that is likely to stop him if he is fully fit. The podcast looks back on Kyle Edmund reaching a first ATP final last week and assesses his progress, as well as analysing the re-connection of Novak Djokovic and his old coach Marian Vajda. Whitaker and Law also continue their debate about the merits of the Wimbledon queue and ballot versus those of the other Grand Slam tournaments, and reminisce about some of the greatest performances they have seen from players on their least favourite surfaces. The Tennis Podcast is produced weekly throughout the year and daily during the Grand Slam tournaments, in association with Telegraph Sport and Eurosport, and presented by Catherine Whitaker (Eurosport) and David Law (BBC 5 Live). How to listen: iTunes - https://ec.yimg.com/ec?url=http%3a%2f%2fpo.st%2fTP401Apple&t=1524173327&sig=Fi7pE0xQ9hdaj22Bnz_gXw--~D Acast - http://po.st/TP401 Download - http://po.st/TP401Download
The Tennis Podcast: Rafael Nadal will win 11th titles in Monte Carlo, Barcelona and Paris
Rafael Nadal won his tenth Monte Carlo, Barcelona and French Open titles in 2017. The Tennis Podcast team are picking him to make it 11 titles at each of those destinations this year. Nadal got his Monte Carlo campaign off to a flying start with a win over Aljaz Bedene, and in previewing the clay court season on the latest podcast, produced in association with Telegraph Sport, presenters Catherine Whitaker and David Law couldn’t think of anyone that is likely to stop him if he is fully fit. The podcast looks back on Kyle Edmund reaching a first ATP final last week and assesses his progress, as well as analysing the re-connection of Novak Djokovic and his old coach Marian Vajda. Whitaker and Law also continue their debate about the merits of the Wimbledon queue and ballot versus those of the other Grand Slam tournaments, and reminisce about some of the greatest performances they have seen from players on their least favourite surfaces. The Tennis Podcast is produced weekly throughout the year and daily during the Grand Slam tournaments, in association with Telegraph Sport and Eurosport, and presented by Catherine Whitaker (Eurosport) and David Law (BBC 5 Live). How to listen: iTunes - http://po.st/TP401Apple Acast - http://po.st/TP401 Download - http://po.st/TP401Download
Rafael Nadal up and running in Monte-Carlo Masters as Novak Djokovic books spot in third round
Rafael Nadal up and running in Monte-Carlo Masters as Novak Djokovic books spot in third round
Rafael Nadal up and running in Monte-Carlo Masters as Novak Djokovic books spot in third round
Rafael Nadal up and running in Monte-Carlo Masters as Novak Djokovic books spot in third round
Rafael Nadal up and running in Monte-Carlo Masters as Novak Djokovic books spot in third round
Rafael Nadal up and running in Monte-Carlo Masters as Novak Djokovic books spot in third round
Aljaz Bedene was swept aside by Rafael Nadal in the second round of the Monte Carlo Masters.
Nadal blasts past Bedene in Monte Carlo opener
Aljaz Bedene was swept aside by Rafael Nadal in the second round of the Monte Carlo Masters.
Kyle Edmund’s season has an all-or-nothing feel to it so far. After the excitement of his first ATP final on Sunday, the British No 1 found himself banished to the crummiest court in Monte Carlo on Tuesday, and had soon gone down to a three-set defeat at the hands of Italy’s Andreas Seppi. The result might not come as a surprise to those who know Edmund. He arrived here late on Sunday night – having crossed the continents in uncharacteristically showy style in the cabin of a private jet – and then only had time for a light practice session on Monday. A methodical man, Edmund dislikes doing things on the hoof. He never seemed to fully settle on a surface where the bounce was as up-and-down as his recent results. The first set was particularly disappointing, as he allowed Seppi to stride out to a 5-1 lead in a matter of minutes. And although he fought his way back into the match, he was fading badly towards the end of this 6-3, 5-7, 6-2 reverse. Now standing at a career high of No 23 in the world, Edmund might have expected a slightly better draw than Court 9. The view from the single creaky stand is still spectacular, with the millionaires’ mansions and their helipads looming from the cliff above. But the run-backs were short and Edmund once seemed at risk of colliding with the courtside barrier as he chased one of Seppi’s sharply angled forehands. These two players had already met this season in the fourth round of the Australian Open, a match that Edmund managed to turn around after losing the first set. He knows that Seppi is a supreme timer of the ball, using deft hands and clean technique to make up for a slight physique. This is a contrast with Edmund’s own technique, which is to whirl into every forehand like a hammer thrower beginning his first revolution. The run-backs on court nine were short and Edmund once seemed at risk of colliding with the courtside barrier Credit: Getty Images In hotter and livelier conditions, Edmund might have been able to barge Seppi back off the baseline with his extra weight of shot. But it was relatively cool on the Riviera, despite the sunshine reflecting off the Mediterranean. Seppi stood tall and dictated traffic with his wrists, lifting his level so well at the big moments that he saved nine of the 11 break points he faced. The most important of these points arrived in the second game of the deciding set, when Edmund became involved in a lengthy backhand-to-backhand exchange, and then blinked first by going for a down-the-line winner. Had he made it, he would probably be playing Guillermo Garcia-Lopez – the world No 68 – in the juiciest of second rounds tomorrow. As it was, the ball strayed into the tramlines, and Edmund never threatened again. “What you want is to control things you have in your power,” said a crestfallen Edmund afterwards. “I just didn’t do that well enough today. He was pretty solid. I wasn’t too far off, but sometimes it was really up and down, which was probably the most frustrating thing. I had some chances but just didn’t take them, and at the high levels you have to take those sort of things. I would have liked to really hammer home those situations. I guess that’s what cost me today.” Secret Service | Evert part of Simon Briggs' weekly column Nevertheless, Edmund is unlikely to fall too far in the rankings – and might even climb, given the right combination of results – because he only loses 35 points after his second-round exit here last year. Indeed, he is perfectly placed to break the world’s top 20 for the first time in the coming weeks, with only 45 more points to defend before the French Open. The Monte Carlo Masters will continue tomorrow with the return of ten-time champion Rafael Nadal, who faces Aljaz Bedene in the third match scheduled on Court Rainier III. Meanwhile Jared Donaldson, the American who tried to intimidate umpire Arnaud Gabas on the same court on Monday, received a fine of €5,000 for unsportsmanlike conduct. Given that Donaldson also earned €17,350 simply for going out in the first round here, he will still make a profit overall.
Kyle Edmund crashes out of Monte Carlo Masters with loss to Andreas Seppi
Kyle Edmund’s season has an all-or-nothing feel to it so far. After the excitement of his first ATP final on Sunday, the British No 1 found himself banished to the crummiest court in Monte Carlo on Tuesday, and had soon gone down to a three-set defeat at the hands of Italy’s Andreas Seppi. The result might not come as a surprise to those who know Edmund. He arrived here late on Sunday night – having crossed the continents in uncharacteristically showy style in the cabin of a private jet – and then only had time for a light practice session on Monday. A methodical man, Edmund dislikes doing things on the hoof. He never seemed to fully settle on a surface where the bounce was as up-and-down as his recent results. The first set was particularly disappointing, as he allowed Seppi to stride out to a 5-1 lead in a matter of minutes. And although he fought his way back into the match, he was fading badly towards the end of this 6-3, 5-7, 6-2 reverse. Now standing at a career high of No 23 in the world, Edmund might have expected a slightly better draw than Court 9. The view from the single creaky stand is still spectacular, with the millionaires’ mansions and their helipads looming from the cliff above. But the run-backs were short and Edmund once seemed at risk of colliding with the courtside barrier as he chased one of Seppi’s sharply angled forehands. These two players had already met this season in the fourth round of the Australian Open, a match that Edmund managed to turn around after losing the first set. He knows that Seppi is a supreme timer of the ball, using deft hands and clean technique to make up for a slight physique. This is a contrast with Edmund’s own technique, which is to whirl into every forehand like a hammer thrower beginning his first revolution. The run-backs on court nine were short and Edmund once seemed at risk of colliding with the courtside barrier Credit: Getty Images In hotter and livelier conditions, Edmund might have been able to barge Seppi back off the baseline with his extra weight of shot. But it was relatively cool on the Riviera, despite the sunshine reflecting off the Mediterranean. Seppi stood tall and dictated traffic with his wrists, lifting his level so well at the big moments that he saved nine of the 11 break points he faced. The most important of these points arrived in the second game of the deciding set, when Edmund became involved in a lengthy backhand-to-backhand exchange, and then blinked first by going for a down-the-line winner. Had he made it, he would probably be playing Guillermo Garcia-Lopez – the world No 68 – in the juiciest of second rounds tomorrow. As it was, the ball strayed into the tramlines, and Edmund never threatened again. “What you want is to control things you have in your power,” said a crestfallen Edmund afterwards. “I just didn’t do that well enough today. He was pretty solid. I wasn’t too far off, but sometimes it was really up and down, which was probably the most frustrating thing. I had some chances but just didn’t take them, and at the high levels you have to take those sort of things. I would have liked to really hammer home those situations. I guess that’s what cost me today.” Secret Service | Evert part of Simon Briggs' weekly column Nevertheless, Edmund is unlikely to fall too far in the rankings – and might even climb, given the right combination of results – because he only loses 35 points after his second-round exit here last year. Indeed, he is perfectly placed to break the world’s top 20 for the first time in the coming weeks, with only 45 more points to defend before the French Open. The Monte Carlo Masters will continue tomorrow with the return of ten-time champion Rafael Nadal, who faces Aljaz Bedene in the third match scheduled on Court Rainier III. Meanwhile Jared Donaldson, the American who tried to intimidate umpire Arnaud Gabas on the same court on Monday, received a fine of €5,000 for unsportsmanlike conduct. Given that Donaldson also earned €17,350 simply for going out in the first round here, he will still make a profit overall.
Kyle Edmund’s season has an all-or-nothing feel to it so far. After the excitement of his first ATP final on Sunday, the British No 1 found himself banished to the crummiest court in Monte Carlo on Tuesday, and had soon gone down to a three-set defeat at the hands of Italy’s Andreas Seppi. The result might not come as a surprise to those who know Edmund. He arrived here late on Sunday night – having crossed the continents in uncharacteristically showy style in the cabin of a private jet – and then only had time for a light practice session on Monday. A methodical man, Edmund dislikes doing things on the hoof. He never seemed to fully settle on a surface where the bounce was as up-and-down as his recent results. The first set was particularly disappointing, as he allowed Seppi to stride out to a 5-1 lead in a matter of minutes. And although he fought his way back into the match, he was fading badly towards the end of this 6-3, 5-7, 6-2 reverse. Now standing at a career high of No 23 in the world, Edmund might have expected a slightly better draw than Court 9. The view from the single creaky stand is still spectacular, with the millionaires’ mansions and their helipads looming from the cliff above. But the run-backs were short and Edmund once seemed at risk of colliding with the courtside barrier as he chased one of Seppi’s sharply angled forehands. These two players had already met this season in the fourth round of the Australian Open, a match that Edmund managed to turn around after losing the first set. He knows that Seppi is a supreme timer of the ball, using deft hands and clean technique to make up for a slight physique. This is a contrast with Edmund’s own technique, which is to whirl into every forehand like a hammer thrower beginning his first revolution. The run-backs on court nine were short and Edmund once seemed at risk of colliding with the courtside barrier Credit: Getty Images In hotter and livelier conditions, Edmund might have been able to barge Seppi back off the baseline with his extra weight of shot. But it was relatively cool on the Riviera, despite the sunshine reflecting off the Mediterranean. Seppi stood tall and dictated traffic with his wrists, lifting his level so well at the big moments that he saved nine of the 11 break points he faced. The most important of these points arrived in the second game of the deciding set, when Edmund became involved in a lengthy backhand-to-backhand exchange, and then blinked first by going for a down-the-line winner. Had he made it, he would probably be playing Guillermo Garcia-Lopez – the world No 68 – in the juiciest of second rounds tomorrow. As it was, the ball strayed into the tramlines, and Edmund never threatened again. “What you want is to control things you have in your power,” said a crestfallen Edmund afterwards. “I just didn’t do that well enough today. He was pretty solid. I wasn’t too far off, but sometimes it was really up and down, which was probably the most frustrating thing. I had some chances but just didn’t take them, and at the high levels you have to take those sort of things. I would have liked to really hammer home those situations. I guess that’s what cost me today.” Secret Service | Evert part of Simon Briggs' weekly column Nevertheless, Edmund is unlikely to fall too far in the rankings – and might even climb, given the right combination of results – because he only loses 35 points after his second-round exit here last year. Indeed, he is perfectly placed to break the world’s top 20 for the first time in the coming weeks, with only 45 more points to defend before the French Open. The Monte Carlo Masters will continue tomorrow with the return of ten-time champion Rafael Nadal, who faces Aljaz Bedene in the third match scheduled on Court Rainier III. Meanwhile Jared Donaldson, the American who tried to intimidate umpire Arnaud Gabas on the same court on Monday, received a fine of €5,000 for unsportsmanlike conduct. Given that Donaldson also earned €17,350 simply for going out in the first round here, he will still make a profit overall.
Kyle Edmund crashes out of Monte Carlo Masters with loss to Andreas Seppi
Kyle Edmund’s season has an all-or-nothing feel to it so far. After the excitement of his first ATP final on Sunday, the British No 1 found himself banished to the crummiest court in Monte Carlo on Tuesday, and had soon gone down to a three-set defeat at the hands of Italy’s Andreas Seppi. The result might not come as a surprise to those who know Edmund. He arrived here late on Sunday night – having crossed the continents in uncharacteristically showy style in the cabin of a private jet – and then only had time for a light practice session on Monday. A methodical man, Edmund dislikes doing things on the hoof. He never seemed to fully settle on a surface where the bounce was as up-and-down as his recent results. The first set was particularly disappointing, as he allowed Seppi to stride out to a 5-1 lead in a matter of minutes. And although he fought his way back into the match, he was fading badly towards the end of this 6-3, 5-7, 6-2 reverse. Now standing at a career high of No 23 in the world, Edmund might have expected a slightly better draw than Court 9. The view from the single creaky stand is still spectacular, with the millionaires’ mansions and their helipads looming from the cliff above. But the run-backs were short and Edmund once seemed at risk of colliding with the courtside barrier as he chased one of Seppi’s sharply angled forehands. These two players had already met this season in the fourth round of the Australian Open, a match that Edmund managed to turn around after losing the first set. He knows that Seppi is a supreme timer of the ball, using deft hands and clean technique to make up for a slight physique. This is a contrast with Edmund’s own technique, which is to whirl into every forehand like a hammer thrower beginning his first revolution. The run-backs on court nine were short and Edmund once seemed at risk of colliding with the courtside barrier Credit: Getty Images In hotter and livelier conditions, Edmund might have been able to barge Seppi back off the baseline with his extra weight of shot. But it was relatively cool on the Riviera, despite the sunshine reflecting off the Mediterranean. Seppi stood tall and dictated traffic with his wrists, lifting his level so well at the big moments that he saved nine of the 11 break points he faced. The most important of these points arrived in the second game of the deciding set, when Edmund became involved in a lengthy backhand-to-backhand exchange, and then blinked first by going for a down-the-line winner. Had he made it, he would probably be playing Guillermo Garcia-Lopez – the world No 68 – in the juiciest of second rounds tomorrow. As it was, the ball strayed into the tramlines, and Edmund never threatened again. “What you want is to control things you have in your power,” said a crestfallen Edmund afterwards. “I just didn’t do that well enough today. He was pretty solid. I wasn’t too far off, but sometimes it was really up and down, which was probably the most frustrating thing. I had some chances but just didn’t take them, and at the high levels you have to take those sort of things. I would have liked to really hammer home those situations. I guess that’s what cost me today.” Secret Service | Evert part of Simon Briggs' weekly column Nevertheless, Edmund is unlikely to fall too far in the rankings – and might even climb, given the right combination of results – because he only loses 35 points after his second-round exit here last year. Indeed, he is perfectly placed to break the world’s top 20 for the first time in the coming weeks, with only 45 more points to defend before the French Open. The Monte Carlo Masters will continue tomorrow with the return of ten-time champion Rafael Nadal, who faces Aljaz Bedene in the third match scheduled on Court Rainier III. Meanwhile Jared Donaldson, the American who tried to intimidate umpire Arnaud Gabas on the same court on Monday, received a fine of €5,000 for unsportsmanlike conduct. Given that Donaldson also earned €17,350 simply for going out in the first round here, he will still make a profit overall.
After one of the flattest months in the history of the ATP tour, world No 1 Rafael Nadal made a welcome return to the stage in Monte Carlo on Sunday, and immediately livened things up with a sly dig at his old ­rival Roger Federer. Asked about Federer’s decision not to contest a single clay-court event for the second straight season, Nadal grinned broadly. “He says he will love to play against me again in best-of-five sets on clay,” came the reply. “He said that a couple of days ago – and I thought he would play Roland Garros. Then a few days later he says he will not play in one event, so there’s a little bit of controversy with that.” Nadal did not go into further detail, but clearly he feels that Federer has chickened out. Over the past 15 months, Federer has reshaped the story of their 14-year rivalry by ­winning four straight meetings, all on hard courts. Were they to play on clay, though, Nadal would be heavily favoured to extend his ­overall advantage, which now stands at 23 wins from 38 matches. Red clay is the blood that runs through Nadal’s veins. For the past decade and more, the eight weeks that run from the start of Monte Carlo to the end of the French Open have been his property. Others might nip in and pick up the odd title – even a slam, in the case of Novak Djokovic (2016), Stan Wawrinka (2015) and Federer himself (2009). But they always feel like crumbs stolen from the giant’s table. Now Nadal is building up for another crimson-stained campaign, probably starting on Wednesday when he faces either Aljaz Bedene or Mirza Basic here in the second round. “I feel good,” he said during a media appointment at one of Monte Carlo’s many terrace restaurants. “I’m practising well, I am playing with the right intensity I think.” Underneath the high-class linen, one suspected he might have been pawing at the ground. Federer revealed he would miss the clay court season again when he lost early on in Miami Credit: Getty Images Admittedly, Nadal’s fitness record has been dreadful of late. He has failed to complete the past three tournaments he has entered – a run dating back to November’s Paris Masters – and did not even bother turning up for Indian Wells or ­Miami. Yet some would argue that Nadal’s most recent niggle – the recurrence of a hip injury which he announced on Feb 27, a couple of days before his first match in ­Acapulco – might have been exaggerated. The sceptics suggest that Nadal has effectively been playing the same game as Federer, only ­saving himself for the clay instead of the grass. The theory makes logical sense, even if it stands in the unprovable category. Either way, it feels like a terrible waste that we will have to wait until Wimbledon for the next theoretical chance of enjoying Federer-Nadal XXXIX. Even there, the prospects are remote, given that Nadal has not reached a quarter-final on Centre Court since 2011. Federer vs Nadal - The five ages of tennis's greatest rivalry Nadal’s return to Monte Carlo ­derives a little extra kudos from the fact that tennis’s most bankable names – Federer, Nadal, Djokovic, Murray, Wawrinka, Williams, Sharapova – have failed to win a match between them on the tour since March 17. Nadal did, however, produce a pair of strong performances in Valencia just over a week ago to help Spain through a thrilling Davis Cup quarter-final against Germany. In the absence of these legends, we have seen some unexpected first-time winners, including John Isner claiming his maiden Masters title in Miami. But British No 1 Kyle Edmund fluffed his lines as he played his own first ATP final in Marrakesh. Having swept through the first four rounds without dropping a set, Edmund managed only two service holds in his 6-2, 6-2 defeat at the hands of Pablo Andujar, the world No 598. Andujar’s ranking is deceptive, though, as he had stood as high as No 32 before suffering a series of ­elbow injuries, and had previously won the Marrakesh title twice. “It was not the result I wanted but, nevertheless, a good week for me,” said Edmund, who will climb to a new career high of No 23 when tomorrow’s chart is published.
Roger Federer is avoiding facing me on clay, suggests Rafael Nadal
After one of the flattest months in the history of the ATP tour, world No 1 Rafael Nadal made a welcome return to the stage in Monte Carlo on Sunday, and immediately livened things up with a sly dig at his old ­rival Roger Federer. Asked about Federer’s decision not to contest a single clay-court event for the second straight season, Nadal grinned broadly. “He says he will love to play against me again in best-of-five sets on clay,” came the reply. “He said that a couple of days ago – and I thought he would play Roland Garros. Then a few days later he says he will not play in one event, so there’s a little bit of controversy with that.” Nadal did not go into further detail, but clearly he feels that Federer has chickened out. Over the past 15 months, Federer has reshaped the story of their 14-year rivalry by ­winning four straight meetings, all on hard courts. Were they to play on clay, though, Nadal would be heavily favoured to extend his ­overall advantage, which now stands at 23 wins from 38 matches. Red clay is the blood that runs through Nadal’s veins. For the past decade and more, the eight weeks that run from the start of Monte Carlo to the end of the French Open have been his property. Others might nip in and pick up the odd title – even a slam, in the case of Novak Djokovic (2016), Stan Wawrinka (2015) and Federer himself (2009). But they always feel like crumbs stolen from the giant’s table. Now Nadal is building up for another crimson-stained campaign, probably starting on Wednesday when he faces either Aljaz Bedene or Mirza Basic here in the second round. “I feel good,” he said during a media appointment at one of Monte Carlo’s many terrace restaurants. “I’m practising well, I am playing with the right intensity I think.” Underneath the high-class linen, one suspected he might have been pawing at the ground. Federer revealed he would miss the clay court season again when he lost early on in Miami Credit: Getty Images Admittedly, Nadal’s fitness record has been dreadful of late. He has failed to complete the past three tournaments he has entered – a run dating back to November’s Paris Masters – and did not even bother turning up for Indian Wells or ­Miami. Yet some would argue that Nadal’s most recent niggle – the recurrence of a hip injury which he announced on Feb 27, a couple of days before his first match in ­Acapulco – might have been exaggerated. The sceptics suggest that Nadal has effectively been playing the same game as Federer, only ­saving himself for the clay instead of the grass. The theory makes logical sense, even if it stands in the unprovable category. Either way, it feels like a terrible waste that we will have to wait until Wimbledon for the next theoretical chance of enjoying Federer-Nadal XXXIX. Even there, the prospects are remote, given that Nadal has not reached a quarter-final on Centre Court since 2011. Federer vs Nadal - The five ages of tennis's greatest rivalry Nadal’s return to Monte Carlo ­derives a little extra kudos from the fact that tennis’s most bankable names – Federer, Nadal, Djokovic, Murray, Wawrinka, Williams, Sharapova – have failed to win a match between them on the tour since March 17. Nadal did, however, produce a pair of strong performances in Valencia just over a week ago to help Spain through a thrilling Davis Cup quarter-final against Germany. In the absence of these legends, we have seen some unexpected first-time winners, including John Isner claiming his maiden Masters title in Miami. But British No 1 Kyle Edmund fluffed his lines as he played his own first ATP final in Marrakesh. Having swept through the first four rounds without dropping a set, Edmund managed only two service holds in his 6-2, 6-2 defeat at the hands of Pablo Andujar, the world No 598. Andujar’s ranking is deceptive, though, as he had stood as high as No 32 before suffering a series of ­elbow injuries, and had previously won the Marrakesh title twice. “It was not the result I wanted but, nevertheless, a good week for me,” said Edmund, who will climb to a new career high of No 23 when tomorrow’s chart is published.
After one of the flattest months in the history of the ATP tour, world No 1 Rafael Nadal made a welcome return to the stage in Monte Carlo on Sunday, and immediately livened things up with a sly dig at his old ­rival Roger Federer. Asked about Federer’s decision not to contest a single clay-court event for the second straight season, Nadal grinned broadly. “He says he will love to play against me again in best-of-five sets on clay,” came the reply. “He said that a couple of days ago – and I thought he would play Roland Garros. Then a few days later he says he will not play in one event, so there’s a little bit of controversy with that.” Nadal did not go into further detail, but clearly he feels that Federer has chickened out. Over the past 15 months, Federer has reshaped the story of their 14-year rivalry by ­winning four straight meetings, all on hard courts. Were they to play on clay, though, Nadal would be heavily favoured to extend his ­overall advantage, which now stands at 23 wins from 38 matches. Red clay is the blood that runs through Nadal’s veins. For the past decade and more, the eight weeks that run from the start of Monte Carlo to the end of the French Open have been his property. Others might nip in and pick up the odd title – even a slam, in the case of Novak Djokovic (2016), Stan Wawrinka (2015) and Federer himself (2009). But they always feel like crumbs stolen from the giant’s table. Now Nadal is building up for another crimson-stained campaign, probably starting on Wednesday when he faces either Aljaz Bedene or Mirza Basic here in the second round. “I feel good,” he said during a media appointment at one of Monte Carlo’s many terrace restaurants. “I’m practising well, I am playing with the right intensity I think.” Underneath the high-class linen, one suspected he might have been pawing at the ground. Federer revealed he would miss the clay court season again when he lost early on in Miami Credit: Getty Images Admittedly, Nadal’s fitness record has been dreadful of late. He has failed to complete the past three tournaments he has entered – a run dating back to November’s Paris Masters – and did not even bother turning up for Indian Wells or ­Miami. Yet some would argue that Nadal’s most recent niggle – the recurrence of a hip injury which he announced on Feb 27, a couple of days before his first match in ­Acapulco – might have been exaggerated. The sceptics suggest that Nadal has effectively been playing the same game as Federer, only ­saving himself for the clay instead of the grass. The theory makes logical sense, even if it stands in the unprovable category. Either way, it feels like a terrible waste that we will have to wait until Wimbledon for the next theoretical chance of enjoying Federer-Nadal XXXIX. Even there, the prospects are remote, given that Nadal has not reached a quarter-final on Centre Court since 2011. Federer vs Nadal - The five ages of tennis's greatest rivalry Nadal’s return to Monte Carlo ­derives a little extra kudos from the fact that tennis’s most bankable names – Federer, Nadal, Djokovic, Murray, Wawrinka, Williams, Sharapova – have failed to win a match between them on the tour since March 17. Nadal did, however, produce a pair of strong performances in Valencia just over a week ago to help Spain through a thrilling Davis Cup quarter-final against Germany. In the absence of these legends, we have seen some unexpected first-time winners, including John Isner claiming his maiden Masters title in Miami. But British No 1 Kyle Edmund fluffed his lines as he played his own first ATP final in Marrakesh. Having swept through the first four rounds without dropping a set, Edmund managed only two service holds in his 6-2, 6-2 defeat at the hands of Pablo Andujar, the world No 598. Andujar’s ranking is deceptive, though, as he had stood as high as No 32 before suffering a series of ­elbow injuries, and had previously won the Marrakesh title twice. “It was not the result I wanted but, nevertheless, a good week for me,” said Edmund, who will climb to a new career high of No 23 when tomorrow’s chart is published.
Roger Federer is avoiding facing me on clay, suggests Rafael Nadal
After one of the flattest months in the history of the ATP tour, world No 1 Rafael Nadal made a welcome return to the stage in Monte Carlo on Sunday, and immediately livened things up with a sly dig at his old ­rival Roger Federer. Asked about Federer’s decision not to contest a single clay-court event for the second straight season, Nadal grinned broadly. “He says he will love to play against me again in best-of-five sets on clay,” came the reply. “He said that a couple of days ago – and I thought he would play Roland Garros. Then a few days later he says he will not play in one event, so there’s a little bit of controversy with that.” Nadal did not go into further detail, but clearly he feels that Federer has chickened out. Over the past 15 months, Federer has reshaped the story of their 14-year rivalry by ­winning four straight meetings, all on hard courts. Were they to play on clay, though, Nadal would be heavily favoured to extend his ­overall advantage, which now stands at 23 wins from 38 matches. Red clay is the blood that runs through Nadal’s veins. For the past decade and more, the eight weeks that run from the start of Monte Carlo to the end of the French Open have been his property. Others might nip in and pick up the odd title – even a slam, in the case of Novak Djokovic (2016), Stan Wawrinka (2015) and Federer himself (2009). But they always feel like crumbs stolen from the giant’s table. Now Nadal is building up for another crimson-stained campaign, probably starting on Wednesday when he faces either Aljaz Bedene or Mirza Basic here in the second round. “I feel good,” he said during a media appointment at one of Monte Carlo’s many terrace restaurants. “I’m practising well, I am playing with the right intensity I think.” Underneath the high-class linen, one suspected he might have been pawing at the ground. Federer revealed he would miss the clay court season again when he lost early on in Miami Credit: Getty Images Admittedly, Nadal’s fitness record has been dreadful of late. He has failed to complete the past three tournaments he has entered – a run dating back to November’s Paris Masters – and did not even bother turning up for Indian Wells or ­Miami. Yet some would argue that Nadal’s most recent niggle – the recurrence of a hip injury which he announced on Feb 27, a couple of days before his first match in ­Acapulco – might have been exaggerated. The sceptics suggest that Nadal has effectively been playing the same game as Federer, only ­saving himself for the clay instead of the grass. The theory makes logical sense, even if it stands in the unprovable category. Either way, it feels like a terrible waste that we will have to wait until Wimbledon for the next theoretical chance of enjoying Federer-Nadal XXXIX. Even there, the prospects are remote, given that Nadal has not reached a quarter-final on Centre Court since 2011. Federer vs Nadal - The five ages of tennis's greatest rivalry Nadal’s return to Monte Carlo ­derives a little extra kudos from the fact that tennis’s most bankable names – Federer, Nadal, Djokovic, Murray, Wawrinka, Williams, Sharapova – have failed to win a match between them on the tour since March 17. Nadal did, however, produce a pair of strong performances in Valencia just over a week ago to help Spain through a thrilling Davis Cup quarter-final against Germany. In the absence of these legends, we have seen some unexpected first-time winners, including John Isner claiming his maiden Masters title in Miami. But British No 1 Kyle Edmund fluffed his lines as he played his own first ATP final in Marrakesh. Having swept through the first four rounds without dropping a set, Edmund managed only two service holds in his 6-2, 6-2 defeat at the hands of Pablo Andujar, the world No 598. Andujar’s ranking is deceptive, though, as he had stood as high as No 32 before suffering a series of ­elbow injuries, and had previously won the Marrakesh title twice. “It was not the result I wanted but, nevertheless, a good week for me,” said Edmund, who will climb to a new career high of No 23 when tomorrow’s chart is published.
Roger Federer said he would love to play Rafael Nadal on clay before wiping his schedule, leading to a joke at his expense.
Nadal jokes Federer is 'contradictory' for skipping clay-court season
Roger Federer said he would love to play Rafael Nadal on clay before wiping his schedule, leading to a joke at his expense.
Rafael Nadal will return from three months away from the ATP Tour in Monte Carlo and he is not preoccupied with his hip issues.
Nadal: Acapulco setback hurt more than Australian Open retirement
Rafael Nadal will return from three months away from the ATP Tour in Monte Carlo and he is not preoccupied with his hip issues.
Refreshed and rehabilitated, Rafael Nadal returns to clay eager to recapture his best
Refreshed and rehabilitated, Rafael Nadal returns to clay eager to recapture his best
Refreshed and rehabilitated, Rafael Nadal returns to clay eager to recapture his best
Refreshed and rehabilitated, Rafael Nadal returns to clay eager to recapture his best
Refreshed and rehabilitated, Rafael Nadal returns to clay eager to recapture his best
Refreshed and rehabilitated, Rafael Nadal returns to clay eager to recapture his best
Refreshed and rehabilitated, Rafael Nadal returns to clay eager to recapture his best
Refreshed and rehabilitated, Rafael Nadal returns to clay eager to recapture his best
Refreshed and rehabilitated, Rafael Nadal returns to clay eager to recapture his best
Refreshed and rehabilitated, Rafael Nadal returns to clay eager to recapture his best
Refreshed and rehabilitated, Rafael Nadal returns to clay eager to recapture his best
Refreshed and rehabilitated, Rafael Nadal returns to clay eager to recapture his best
Refreshed and rehabilitated, Rafael Nadal returns to clay eager to recapture his best
Refreshed and rehabilitated, Rafael Nadal returns to clay eager to recapture his best
Refreshed and rehabilitated, Rafael Nadal returns to clay eager to recapture his best
Novak Djokovic has struggled this season, but is a possible quarter-final opponent for Nadal (AFP Photo/AL BELLO)
Novak Djokovic has struggled this season, but is a possible quarter-final opponent for Nadal
Novak Djokovic has struggled this season, but is a possible quarter-final opponent for Nadal (AFP Photo/AL BELLO)
Having sat out February and March with a hip injury, Rafael Nadal's coach says he is entering the clay-court season lacking in confidence.
Nadal struggling for confidence after injury lay-off, reveals Moya
Having sat out February and March with a hip injury, Rafael Nadal's coach says he is entering the clay-court season lacking in confidence.
Rafael Nadal claimed his 10th Monte Carlo Masters title last year with victory over Albert Ramos Vinolas in the final (AFP Photo/VALERY HACHE)
Rafael Nadal claimed his 10th Monte Carlo Masters title last year with victory over Albert Ramos Vinolas in the final
Rafael Nadal claimed his 10th Monte Carlo Masters title last year with victory over Albert Ramos Vinolas in the final (AFP Photo/VALERY HACHE)
Tennis - Davis Cup - Quarter Final - Spain vs Germany - Plaza de Toros de Valencia, Valencia, Spain - April 8, 2018 Spain's David Ferrer, Rafael Nadal and team mates celebrate winning quarter final REUTERS/Heino Kalis
Davis Cup - Quarter Final - Spain vs Germany
Tennis - Davis Cup - Quarter Final - Spain vs Germany - Plaza de Toros de Valencia, Valencia, Spain - April 8, 2018 Spain's David Ferrer, Rafael Nadal and team mates celebrate winning quarter final REUTERS/Heino Kalis
Tennis - Davis Cup - Quarter Final - Spain vs Germany - Plaza de Toros de Valencia, Valencia, Spain - April 8, 2018 General view during the game between Spain's Rafael Nadal and Germany's Alexander Zverev REUTERS/Heino Kalis TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Davis Cup - Quarter Final - Spain vs Germany
Tennis - Davis Cup - Quarter Final - Spain vs Germany - Plaza de Toros de Valencia, Valencia, Spain - April 8, 2018 General view during the game between Spain's Rafael Nadal and Germany's Alexander Zverev REUTERS/Heino Kalis TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Tennis - Davis Cup - Quarter Final - Spain vs Germany - Plaza de Toros de Valencia, Valencia, Spain - April 8, 2018 Spain's David Ferrer, Rafael Nadal and team mates celebrate winning quarter final REUTERS/Heino Kalis
Davis Cup - Quarter Final - Spain vs Germany
Tennis - Davis Cup - Quarter Final - Spain vs Germany - Plaza de Toros de Valencia, Valencia, Spain - April 8, 2018 Spain's David Ferrer, Rafael Nadal and team mates celebrate winning quarter final REUTERS/Heino Kalis
Germany's Alexander Zverev reacts during his match against Spain's Rafael Nadal during a World Group Quarter final Davis Cup tennis match between Spain and Germany at the bullring in Valencia, Spain, Sunday April 8, 2018. (AP Photo/Alberto Saiz)
Davis Cup: Spain beats Germany 3-2 to reach semifinals
Germany's Alexander Zverev reacts during his match against Spain's Rafael Nadal during a World Group Quarter final Davis Cup tennis match between Spain and Germany at the bullring in Valencia, Spain, Sunday April 8, 2018. (AP Photo/Alberto Saiz)
Spain's Rafael Nadal return the ball to Germany's Alexander Zverev during a World Group Quarter final Davis Cup tennis match between Spain and Germany at the bullring in Valencia, Spain, Sunday April 8, 2018. (AP Photo/Alberto Saiz)
Davis Cup: Spain beats Germany 3-2 to reach semifinals
Spain's Rafael Nadal return the ball to Germany's Alexander Zverev during a World Group Quarter final Davis Cup tennis match between Spain and Germany at the bullring in Valencia, Spain, Sunday April 8, 2018. (AP Photo/Alberto Saiz)
Spain's Rafael Nadal celebrates after defeating Germany's Alexander Zverev 6-1, 6-4, 6-4 during a World Group Quarter final Davis Cup tennis match between Spain and Germany at the bullring in Valencia, Spain, Sunday April 8, 2018. (AP Photo/Alberto Saiz)
Davis Cup: Spain beats Germany 3-2 to reach semifinals
Spain's Rafael Nadal celebrates after defeating Germany's Alexander Zverev 6-1, 6-4, 6-4 during a World Group Quarter final Davis Cup tennis match between Spain and Germany at the bullring in Valencia, Spain, Sunday April 8, 2018. (AP Photo/Alberto Saiz)
Spain's Rafael Nadal return the ball to Germany's Alexander Zverev during a World Group Quarter final Davis Cup tennis match between Spain and Germany at the bullring in Valencia, Spain, Sunday April 8, 2018. (AP Photo/Alberto Saiz)
Davis Cup: Spain beats Germany 3-2 to reach semifinals
Spain's Rafael Nadal return the ball to Germany's Alexander Zverev during a World Group Quarter final Davis Cup tennis match between Spain and Germany at the bullring in Valencia, Spain, Sunday April 8, 2018. (AP Photo/Alberto Saiz)
Germany's Alexander Zverev reacts during his match against Spain's Rafael Nadal during a World Group Quarter final Davis Cup tennis match between Spain and Germany at the bullring in Valencia, Spain, Sunday April 8, 2018. (AP Photo/Alberto Saiz)
Davis Cup: Spain beats Germany 3-2 to reach semifinals
Germany's Alexander Zverev reacts during his match against Spain's Rafael Nadal during a World Group Quarter final Davis Cup tennis match between Spain and Germany at the bullring in Valencia, Spain, Sunday April 8, 2018. (AP Photo/Alberto Saiz)
Germany's Alexander Zverev returns the ball to Spain's Rafael Nadal during a World Group Quarter final Davis Cup tennis match between Spain and Germany at the bullring in Valencia, Spain, Sunday April 8, 2018. (AP Photo/Alberto Saiz)
Davis Cup: Spain beats Germany 3-2 to reach semifinals
Germany's Alexander Zverev returns the ball to Spain's Rafael Nadal during a World Group Quarter final Davis Cup tennis match between Spain and Germany at the bullring in Valencia, Spain, Sunday April 8, 2018. (AP Photo/Alberto Saiz)
Spain's Rafael Nadal celebrates after defeating Germany's Alexander Zverev 6-1, 6-4, 6-4 during a World Group Quarter final Davis Cup tennis match between Spain and Germany at the bullring in Valencia, Spain, Sunday April 8, 2018. (AP Photo/Alberto Saiz)
Davis Cup: Spain beats Germany 3-2 to reach semifinals
Spain's Rafael Nadal celebrates after defeating Germany's Alexander Zverev 6-1, 6-4, 6-4 during a World Group Quarter final Davis Cup tennis match between Spain and Germany at the bullring in Valencia, Spain, Sunday April 8, 2018. (AP Photo/Alberto Saiz)

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