Olympic Fencing action

The City of Joondalup has erected bollard fencing to stop illegal parking as locals complain about noise and driveway access.
Growing anger over Christmas lights display
The City of Joondalup has erected bollard fencing to stop illegal parking as locals complain about noise and driveway access.
The City of Joondalup has erected bollard fencing to stop illegal parking as locals complain about noise and driveway access.
Growing anger over Christmas lights display
The City of Joondalup has erected bollard fencing to stop illegal parking as locals complain about noise and driveway access.
Barbed wire lines fencing outside the Evolutionary Power Reactor (EPR) nuclear power plant, operated by Electricite de France SA (EDF), in Flamanville, France, on Wednesday, Nov. 16, 2016. EDF said it will start talks on reducing its stake in Areva SA's New NP reactor division after announcing a binding agreement to take control of the 2.5 billion-euro ($2.7 billion) business. Photographer: Marlene Awaad/Bloomberg
French Nuclear Delays Escalate as Contractors Fumble in Dark
Barbed wire lines fencing outside the Evolutionary Power Reactor (EPR) nuclear power plant, operated by Electricite de France SA (EDF), in Flamanville, France, on Wednesday, Nov. 16, 2016. EDF said it will start talks on reducing its stake in Areva SA's New NP reactor division after announcing a binding agreement to take control of the 2.5 billion-euro ($2.7 billion) business. Photographer: Marlene Awaad/Bloomberg
<p>How was <strong>Tom Savage</strong> allowed to return to the field so soon after suffering a concussion Sunday against the 49ers? The NFL announced Monday it had launched an investigation to answer that question, and to see if the established procedure for evaluating players during a game could be strengthened. Which raises an additional question: What exactly is that process again?</p><p>When a player receives impact to the head, he, a teammate, coach, NFL official, trainer, spotter, or independent neurological expert can remove him from play to conduct a sideline exam. From there, the player is either returned to play, sent to the locker room for further testing, or immediately placed in the concussion protocol, depending on the assessment by the head team trainer (who is assisted by an unaffiliated neurotrauma consultant). It&#39;s up to them—not any coaches—to determine whether a player is fit to play. They can use just about any evidence in making their ruling, including a player&#39;s speech pattern, his gait, his eye movement, his response to a set series of questions and—notably in this case—video review of the hit in question. </p><p>Video of Savage squirming after hitting the ground (diagnosed as a seizure by uneducated armchair neurologists, but more likely an instance of <a href="http://bleacherreport.com/articles/1494620-stevan-ridleys-concussion-biomechanics-of-his-injury-fencing-response" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:fencing response" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">fencing response</a>, an instinctual reaction to head trauma) was the main fuel for outrage on Sunday. Why didn&#39;t it prevent medical personnel from allowing Savage to re-enter the game and play three more downs? Two trained spotters in the booth have access to the TV feed, as does the sideline medical staff (though replays can&#39;t be viewed by coaches, for competitive strategy purposes). However, Texans coach <strong>Bill O&#39;Brien</strong> intimated that head Houston trainer <strong>Geoff Kaplan</strong> had not seen the hit and Savage&#39;s reaction before making his diagnosis; O&#39;Brien <a href="https://twitter.com/AaronWilson_NFL/status/940235133415776259" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:said" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">said</a> Monday, &quot;With benefit of seeing video . . . I would have never let that player back in the game and I don&#39;t believe that <strong>Geoff Kaplan</strong> would have allowed that player back in the game.&quot; So maybe that&#39;s where the process broke down in this case. Hopefully the league investigation provides answers.</p><p>The way to avoid that type of mistake could be to flip the testing paradigm around. Rather than having players re-enter the game unless they show obvious signs of concussion, doctors could keep them out until they are sure the player is healthy (maybe for a minimum of a quarter), allowing time for further evaluation of the player as well as the play that forced the testing. But teams and players will have to decide whether they can live with key players potentially staying on the sideline before it is revealed that they were not, in fact, concussed. </p><p><strong>Not getting this newsletter in your inbox yet?</strong> <a href="https://www.si.com/static/newsletter/signup" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Join The MMQB’s Morning Huddle" class="link rapid-noclick-resp"><em>Join The MMQB’s Morning Huddle</em></a><em>.</em></p><h3><strong>HOT READS</strong></h3><p><strong>NOW ON THE MMQB: </strong>Conor Orr <a href="https://www.si.com/nfl/2017/12/11/carson-wentz-torn-acl-injury-philadelphia-eagles?utm_campaign=mmqb&#38;utm_source=si.com&#38;utm_medium=email" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:stacks up" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">stacks up</a> the NFC playoff race post-Wentz ... Andy Benoit <a href="https://www.si.com/nfl/2017/12/11/ryan-shazier-injury-pittsburgh-steelers-replacements-patriots-game?utm_campaign=mmqb&#38;utm_source=si.com&#38;utm_medium=email" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:studies" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">studies</a> the Steelers without <strong>Ryan Shazier</strong> ... Peter King <a href="https://www.si.com/nfl/2017/12/11/week-14-awards-jaguars-fans-seahawks-player-mmqb?utm_campaign=mmqb&#38;utm_source=si.com&#38;utm_medium=email" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:hands out" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">hands out</a> awards ... <a href="https://www.si.com/nfl" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:and more" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">and more</a>. </p><p><b>LATER TODAY ON THE MMQB:</b> Our new Power Rankings poll ... Greg Bishop shows how painful an NFL Sunday is ... Jenny Vrentas recaps a week with the Eagles ... and more. <a href="https://www.si.com/nfl?utm_campaign=mmqb&#38;utm_source=si.com&#38;utm_medium=email" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Stay tuned" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Stay tuned</a>.</p><h3><b>PRESS COVERAGE</b></h3><p><strong>1. Dolphins 27, Patriots 20. </strong>With <strong>Rob Gronkowski</strong> suspended, the Dolphins held the visiting Patriots from converting a single third down (0-for-11). At 6-7, Miami is still in the wild-card hunt, while New England now heads to Pittsburgh, trailing the Steelers in the race for the conference&#39;s top seed.</p><p><strong>2. Carson Wentz </strong>had a message for fans after having his season ended by a torn ACL. “I promise,” he said on <a href="https://twitter.com/cj_wentz?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw&#38;ref_url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.philly.com%2Fphilly%2Fsports%2Fcarson-wentz-twitter-torn-acl-philadelphia-eagles-rams-20171211.html" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Twitter" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Twitter</a>. “This will not stop me and I will come back stronger than ever.” Stacey Burling <a href="http://www.philly.com/philly/health/carson-wentz-acl-tear-recovery-time-philadelphia-eagles-20171212.html" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:explains" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">explains</a> what&#39;s in store for Wentz now. </p><p><strong>3.</strong> During his first media availability since suffering a severe leg injury against the Saints, Bears tight end <strong>Zach Miller</strong> <a href="http://www.chicagotribune.com/g00/sports/football/bears/ct-spt-bears-zach-miller-wiederer-20171211-story.html?i10c.encReferrer=" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:said" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">said</a> he&#39;s undergone eight surgeries on that leg now. He bent it for the first time last Friday . . . painfully. He&#39;s not sure if he&#39;ll ever play football again; for now he&#39;s killing time playing Madden.</p><p><strong>4. </strong>The Seahawks may have avoided suspensions for their actions at the end of Sunday&#39;s game, but that doesn&#39;t mean <strong>Pete Carroll</strong> is happy about them. “Everybody is remorseful,’’ <a href="https://www.seattletimes.com/sports/seahawks/seahawks-coach-pete-carroll-on-end-of-game-melee-at-jacksonville-everybody-is-remorseful-we-dont-want-to-play-like-that/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Carroll said Monday" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Carroll said Monday</a>. “We don’t want to play like that. We don’t want to look like that, ever.’’</p><p><strong>5.</strong> With Wentz out of the picture, the Vikings suddenly have a clearer path to the Super Bowl. But will <a href="http://www.startribune.com/vikings-suddenly-unstable-offensive-line-feels-all-too-familiar-no-early-speculation-on-riley-reiff-s-status/463496723/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:offensive line instability" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">offensive line instability</a>, which doomed them after a 5-0 start a year ago, cost them again?</p><p><strong>6. </strong>The Lions are in a weird spot. At 7-6 with the Bears and Bengals next on the schedule, they&#39;re still alive in the playoff hunt. At the same time, <strong>Jim Caldwell </strong>seems to be coaching for his job. Despite that, he <a href="https://www.freep.com/story/sports/nfl/lions/2017/12/11/detroit-lions-jim-caldwell-team-resiliency/942753001/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:deflected credit" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">deflected credit</a> for Detroit&#39;s resiliency of late.</p><p><strong>7. </strong>In Esquire, <strong>Richard Sherman</strong> gave <a href="http://www.esquire.com/sports/a14323331/richard-sherman-nfl-protests-kaepernick-trump/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:a wide-ranging interview" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">a wide-ranging interview</a>. On the topic of head injuries, he said, &quot;the league hasn’t done much outside of appeasing public opinion.&quot; And that was just the second question.</p><p><strong>8.</strong> <strong>Ben McAdoo</strong> may be gone, but the chaos continues in East Rutherford. The latest scandal is <strong>Eli Apple</strong> <a href="https://www.newsday.com/sports/football/giants/eli-apple-giants-steve-spagnuolo-1.15419596" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:tweeting" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">tweeting</a> (including retweeting a Cowboys highlight) during Sunday&#39;s loss. Want the Giants&#39; 2017 in a sentence? &quot;Spagnuolo said he was not aware of the content of the tweets.&quot;</p><p><strong>9. </strong>Big news for non-Verizon customers: you could be able to <a href="https://www.recode.net/2017/12/11/16760394/verizon-nfl-games-stream-football-1-5-billion" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:watch local and national NFL games on your phone" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">watch local and national NFL games on your phone</a> as soon as January.</p><p><strong>10.</strong> Meet <a href="https://www.texasmonthly.com/the-daily-post/yellowjackets-womens-football/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:the Austin Yellow Jackets" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">the Austin Yellow Jackets</a>, Texas&#39;s Only Female Football Team Coached Solely by Women.</p><p><em><strong>Have a story you think we should include in tomorrow’s Press Coverage?</strong></em> <span><em>Let us know here.</em></span></p><h3><b>THE KICKER</b></h3><p>A week after <strong>Eli Manning</strong> was benched, another <a href="http://ftw.usatoday.com/2017/12/scott-hanson-redzone-bathroom-break-streak-four-years-nfl-network" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:historic streak" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">historic streak</a> came to an end.</p><p><strong>Question? Comment? Story idea?</strong><i> L</i><em>et the team know at <span>talkback@themmqb.com</span></em></p>
How Tom Savage's Concussion Should Have Been Handled

How was Tom Savage allowed to return to the field so soon after suffering a concussion Sunday against the 49ers? The NFL announced Monday it had launched an investigation to answer that question, and to see if the established procedure for evaluating players during a game could be strengthened. Which raises an additional question: What exactly is that process again?

When a player receives impact to the head, he, a teammate, coach, NFL official, trainer, spotter, or independent neurological expert can remove him from play to conduct a sideline exam. From there, the player is either returned to play, sent to the locker room for further testing, or immediately placed in the concussion protocol, depending on the assessment by the head team trainer (who is assisted by an unaffiliated neurotrauma consultant). It's up to them—not any coaches—to determine whether a player is fit to play. They can use just about any evidence in making their ruling, including a player's speech pattern, his gait, his eye movement, his response to a set series of questions and—notably in this case—video review of the hit in question.

Video of Savage squirming after hitting the ground (diagnosed as a seizure by uneducated armchair neurologists, but more likely an instance of fencing response, an instinctual reaction to head trauma) was the main fuel for outrage on Sunday. Why didn't it prevent medical personnel from allowing Savage to re-enter the game and play three more downs? Two trained spotters in the booth have access to the TV feed, as does the sideline medical staff (though replays can't be viewed by coaches, for competitive strategy purposes). However, Texans coach Bill O'Brien intimated that head Houston trainer Geoff Kaplan had not seen the hit and Savage's reaction before making his diagnosis; O'Brien said Monday, "With benefit of seeing video . . . I would have never let that player back in the game and I don't believe that Geoff Kaplan would have allowed that player back in the game." So maybe that's where the process broke down in this case. Hopefully the league investigation provides answers.

The way to avoid that type of mistake could be to flip the testing paradigm around. Rather than having players re-enter the game unless they show obvious signs of concussion, doctors could keep them out until they are sure the player is healthy (maybe for a minimum of a quarter), allowing time for further evaluation of the player as well as the play that forced the testing. But teams and players will have to decide whether they can live with key players potentially staying on the sideline before it is revealed that they were not, in fact, concussed.

Not getting this newsletter in your inbox yet? Join The MMQB’s Morning Huddle.

HOT READS

NOW ON THE MMQB: Conor Orr stacks up the NFC playoff race post-Wentz ... Andy Benoit studies the Steelers without Ryan Shazier ... Peter King hands out awards ... and more.

LATER TODAY ON THE MMQB: Our new Power Rankings poll ... Greg Bishop shows how painful an NFL Sunday is ... Jenny Vrentas recaps a week with the Eagles ... and more. Stay tuned.

PRESS COVERAGE

1. Dolphins 27, Patriots 20. With Rob Gronkowski suspended, the Dolphins held the visiting Patriots from converting a single third down (0-for-11). At 6-7, Miami is still in the wild-card hunt, while New England now heads to Pittsburgh, trailing the Steelers in the race for the conference's top seed.

2. Carson Wentz had a message for fans after having his season ended by a torn ACL. “I promise,” he said on Twitter. “This will not stop me and I will come back stronger than ever.” Stacey Burling explains what's in store for Wentz now.

3. During his first media availability since suffering a severe leg injury against the Saints, Bears tight end Zach Miller said he's undergone eight surgeries on that leg now. He bent it for the first time last Friday . . . painfully. He's not sure if he'll ever play football again; for now he's killing time playing Madden.

4. The Seahawks may have avoided suspensions for their actions at the end of Sunday's game, but that doesn't mean Pete Carroll is happy about them. “Everybody is remorseful,’’ Carroll said Monday. “We don’t want to play like that. We don’t want to look like that, ever.’’

5. With Wentz out of the picture, the Vikings suddenly have a clearer path to the Super Bowl. But will offensive line instability, which doomed them after a 5-0 start a year ago, cost them again?

6. The Lions are in a weird spot. At 7-6 with the Bears and Bengals next on the schedule, they're still alive in the playoff hunt. At the same time, Jim Caldwell seems to be coaching for his job. Despite that, he deflected credit for Detroit's resiliency of late.

7. In Esquire, Richard Sherman gave a wide-ranging interview. On the topic of head injuries, he said, "the league hasn’t done much outside of appeasing public opinion." And that was just the second question.

8. Ben McAdoo may be gone, but the chaos continues in East Rutherford. The latest scandal is Eli Apple tweeting (including retweeting a Cowboys highlight) during Sunday's loss. Want the Giants' 2017 in a sentence? "Spagnuolo said he was not aware of the content of the tweets."

9. Big news for non-Verizon customers: you could be able to watch local and national NFL games on your phone as soon as January.

10. Meet the Austin Yellow Jackets, Texas's Only Female Football Team Coached Solely by Women.

Have a story you think we should include in tomorrow’s Press Coverage? Let us know here.

THE KICKER

A week after Eli Manning was benched, another historic streak came to an end.

Question? Comment? Story idea? Let the team know at talkback@themmqb.com

<p>How was <strong>Tom Savage</strong> allowed to return to the field so soon after suffering a concussion Sunday against the 49ers? The NFL announced Monday it had launched an investigation to answer that question, and to see if the established procedure for evaluating players during a game could be strengthened. Which raises an additional question: What exactly is that process again?</p><p>When a player receives impact to the head, he, a teammate, coach, NFL official, trainer, spotter, or independent neurological expert can remove him from play to conduct a sideline exam. From there, the player is either returned to play, sent to the locker room for further testing, or immediately placed in the concussion protocol, depending on the assessment by the head team trainer (who is assisted by an unaffiliated neurotrauma consultant). It&#39;s up to them—not any coaches—to determine whether a player is fit to play. They can use just about any evidence in making their ruling, including a player&#39;s speech pattern, his gait, his eye movement, his response to a set series of questions and—notably in this case—video review of the hit in question. </p><p>Video of Savage squirming after hitting the ground (diagnosed as a seizure by uneducated armchair neurologists, but more likely an instance of <a href="http://bleacherreport.com/articles/1494620-stevan-ridleys-concussion-biomechanics-of-his-injury-fencing-response" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:fencing response" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">fencing response</a>, an instinctual reaction to head trauma) was the main fuel for outrage on Sunday. Why didn&#39;t it prevent medical personnel from allowing Savage to re-enter the game and play three more downs? Two trained spotters in the booth have access to the TV feed, as does the sideline medical staff (though replays can&#39;t be viewed by coaches, for competitive strategy purposes). However, Texans coach <strong>Bill O&#39;Brien</strong> intimated that head Houston trainer <strong>Geoff Kaplan</strong> had not seen the hit and Savage&#39;s reaction before making his diagnosis; O&#39;Brien <a href="https://twitter.com/AaronWilson_NFL/status/940235133415776259" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:said" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">said</a> Monday, &quot;With benefit of seeing video . . . I would have never let that player back in the game and I don&#39;t believe that <strong>Geoff Kaplan</strong> would have allowed that player back in the game.&quot; So maybe that&#39;s where the process broke down in this case. Hopefully the league investigation provides answers.</p><p>The way to avoid that type of mistake could be to flip the testing paradigm around. Rather than having players re-enter the game unless they show obvious signs of concussion, doctors could keep them out until they are sure the player is healthy (maybe for a minimum of a quarter), allowing time for further evaluation of the player as well as the play that forced the testing. But teams and players will have to decide whether they can live with key players potentially staying on the sideline before it is revealed that they were not, in fact, concussed. </p><p><strong>Not getting this newsletter in your inbox yet?</strong> <a href="https://www.si.com/static/newsletter/signup" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Join The MMQB’s Morning Huddle" class="link rapid-noclick-resp"><em>Join The MMQB’s Morning Huddle</em></a><em>.</em></p><h3><strong>HOT READS</strong></h3><p><strong>NOW ON THE MMQB: </strong>Conor Orr <a href="https://www.si.com/nfl/2017/12/11/carson-wentz-torn-acl-injury-philadelphia-eagles?utm_campaign=mmqb&#38;utm_source=si.com&#38;utm_medium=email" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:stacks up" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">stacks up</a> the NFC playoff race post-Wentz ... Andy Benoit <a href="https://www.si.com/nfl/2017/12/11/ryan-shazier-injury-pittsburgh-steelers-replacements-patriots-game?utm_campaign=mmqb&#38;utm_source=si.com&#38;utm_medium=email" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:studies" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">studies</a> the Steelers without <strong>Ryan Shazier</strong> ... Peter King <a href="https://www.si.com/nfl/2017/12/11/week-14-awards-jaguars-fans-seahawks-player-mmqb?utm_campaign=mmqb&#38;utm_source=si.com&#38;utm_medium=email" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:hands out" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">hands out</a> awards ... <a href="https://www.si.com/nfl" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:and more" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">and more</a>. </p><p><b>LATER TODAY ON THE MMQB:</b> Our new Power Rankings poll ... Greg Bishop shows how painful an NFL Sunday is ... Jenny Vrentas recaps a week with the Eagles ... and more. <a href="https://www.si.com/nfl?utm_campaign=mmqb&#38;utm_source=si.com&#38;utm_medium=email" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Stay tuned" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Stay tuned</a>.</p><h3><b>PRESS COVERAGE</b></h3><p><strong>1. Dolphins 27, Patriots 20. </strong>With <strong>Rob Gronkowski</strong> suspended, the Dolphins held the visiting Patriots from converting a single third down (0-for-11). At 6-7, Miami is still in the wild-card hunt, while New England now heads to Pittsburgh, trailing the Steelers in the race for the conference&#39;s top seed.</p><p><strong>2. Carson Wentz </strong>had a message for fans after having his season ended by a torn ACL. “I promise,” he said on <a href="https://twitter.com/cj_wentz?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw&#38;ref_url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.philly.com%2Fphilly%2Fsports%2Fcarson-wentz-twitter-torn-acl-philadelphia-eagles-rams-20171211.html" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Twitter" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Twitter</a>. “This will not stop me and I will come back stronger than ever.” Stacey Burling <a href="http://www.philly.com/philly/health/carson-wentz-acl-tear-recovery-time-philadelphia-eagles-20171212.html" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:explains" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">explains</a> what&#39;s in store for Wentz now. </p><p><strong>3.</strong> During his first media availability since suffering a severe leg injury against the Saints, Bears tight end <strong>Zach Miller</strong> <a href="http://www.chicagotribune.com/g00/sports/football/bears/ct-spt-bears-zach-miller-wiederer-20171211-story.html?i10c.encReferrer=" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:said" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">said</a> he&#39;s undergone eight surgeries on that leg now. He bent it for the first time last Friday . . . painfully. He&#39;s not sure if he&#39;ll ever play football again; for now he&#39;s killing time playing Madden.</p><p><strong>4. </strong>The Seahawks may have avoided suspensions for their actions at the end of Sunday&#39;s game, but that doesn&#39;t mean <strong>Pete Carroll</strong> is happy about them. “Everybody is remorseful,’’ <a href="https://www.seattletimes.com/sports/seahawks/seahawks-coach-pete-carroll-on-end-of-game-melee-at-jacksonville-everybody-is-remorseful-we-dont-want-to-play-like-that/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Carroll said Monday" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Carroll said Monday</a>. “We don’t want to play like that. We don’t want to look like that, ever.’’</p><p><strong>5.</strong> With Wentz out of the picture, the Vikings suddenly have a clearer path to the Super Bowl. But will <a href="http://www.startribune.com/vikings-suddenly-unstable-offensive-line-feels-all-too-familiar-no-early-speculation-on-riley-reiff-s-status/463496723/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:offensive line instability" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">offensive line instability</a>, which doomed them after a 5-0 start a year ago, cost them again?</p><p><strong>6. </strong>The Lions are in a weird spot. At 7-6 with the Bears and Bengals next on the schedule, they&#39;re still alive in the playoff hunt. At the same time, <strong>Jim Caldwell </strong>seems to be coaching for his job. Despite that, he <a href="https://www.freep.com/story/sports/nfl/lions/2017/12/11/detroit-lions-jim-caldwell-team-resiliency/942753001/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:deflected credit" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">deflected credit</a> for Detroit&#39;s resiliency of late.</p><p><strong>7. </strong>In Esquire, <strong>Richard Sherman</strong> gave <a href="http://www.esquire.com/sports/a14323331/richard-sherman-nfl-protests-kaepernick-trump/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:a wide-ranging interview" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">a wide-ranging interview</a>. On the topic of head injuries, he said, &quot;the league hasn’t done much outside of appeasing public opinion.&quot; And that was just the second question.</p><p><strong>8.</strong> <strong>Ben McAdoo</strong> may be gone, but the chaos continues in East Rutherford. The latest scandal is <strong>Eli Apple</strong> <a href="https://www.newsday.com/sports/football/giants/eli-apple-giants-steve-spagnuolo-1.15419596" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:tweeting" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">tweeting</a> (including retweeting a Cowboys highlight) during Sunday&#39;s loss. Want the Giants&#39; 2017 in a sentence? &quot;Spagnuolo said he was not aware of the content of the tweets.&quot;</p><p><strong>9. </strong>Big news for non-Verizon customers: you could be able to <a href="https://www.recode.net/2017/12/11/16760394/verizon-nfl-games-stream-football-1-5-billion" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:watch local and national NFL games on your phone" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">watch local and national NFL games on your phone</a> as soon as January.</p><p><strong>10.</strong> Meet <a href="https://www.texasmonthly.com/the-daily-post/yellowjackets-womens-football/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:the Austin Yellow Jackets" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">the Austin Yellow Jackets</a>, Texas&#39;s Only Female Football Team Coached Solely by Women.</p><p><em><strong>Have a story you think we should include in tomorrow’s Press Coverage?</strong></em> <span><em>Let us know here.</em></span></p><h3><b>THE KICKER</b></h3><p>A week after <strong>Eli Manning</strong> was benched, another <a href="http://ftw.usatoday.com/2017/12/scott-hanson-redzone-bathroom-break-streak-four-years-nfl-network" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:historic streak" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">historic streak</a> came to an end.</p><p><strong>Question? Comment? Story idea?</strong><i> L</i><em>et the team know at <span>talkback@themmqb.com</span></em></p>
How Tom Savage's Concussion Should Have Been Handled

How was Tom Savage allowed to return to the field so soon after suffering a concussion Sunday against the 49ers? The NFL announced Monday it had launched an investigation to answer that question, and to see if the established procedure for evaluating players during a game could be strengthened. Which raises an additional question: What exactly is that process again?

When a player receives impact to the head, he, a teammate, coach, NFL official, trainer, spotter, or independent neurological expert can remove him from play to conduct a sideline exam. From there, the player is either returned to play, sent to the locker room for further testing, or immediately placed in the concussion protocol, depending on the assessment by the head team trainer (who is assisted by an unaffiliated neurotrauma consultant). It's up to them—not any coaches—to determine whether a player is fit to play. They can use just about any evidence in making their ruling, including a player's speech pattern, his gait, his eye movement, his response to a set series of questions and—notably in this case—video review of the hit in question.

Video of Savage squirming after hitting the ground (diagnosed as a seizure by uneducated armchair neurologists, but more likely an instance of fencing response, an instinctual reaction to head trauma) was the main fuel for outrage on Sunday. Why didn't it prevent medical personnel from allowing Savage to re-enter the game and play three more downs? Two trained spotters in the booth have access to the TV feed, as does the sideline medical staff (though replays can't be viewed by coaches, for competitive strategy purposes). However, Texans coach Bill O'Brien intimated that head Houston trainer Geoff Kaplan had not seen the hit and Savage's reaction before making his diagnosis; O'Brien said Monday, "With benefit of seeing video . . . I would have never let that player back in the game and I don't believe that Geoff Kaplan would have allowed that player back in the game." So maybe that's where the process broke down in this case. Hopefully the league investigation provides answers.

The way to avoid that type of mistake could be to flip the testing paradigm around. Rather than having players re-enter the game unless they show obvious signs of concussion, doctors could keep them out until they are sure the player is healthy (maybe for a minimum of a quarter), allowing time for further evaluation of the player as well as the play that forced the testing. But teams and players will have to decide whether they can live with key players potentially staying on the sideline before it is revealed that they were not, in fact, concussed.

Not getting this newsletter in your inbox yet? Join The MMQB’s Morning Huddle.

HOT READS

NOW ON THE MMQB: Conor Orr stacks up the NFC playoff race post-Wentz ... Andy Benoit studies the Steelers without Ryan Shazier ... Peter King hands out awards ... and more.

LATER TODAY ON THE MMQB: Our new Power Rankings poll ... Greg Bishop shows how painful an NFL Sunday is ... Jenny Vrentas recaps a week with the Eagles ... and more. Stay tuned.

PRESS COVERAGE

1. Dolphins 27, Patriots 20. With Rob Gronkowski suspended, the Dolphins held the visiting Patriots from converting a single third down (0-for-11). At 6-7, Miami is still in the wild-card hunt, while New England now heads to Pittsburgh, trailing the Steelers in the race for the conference's top seed.

2. Carson Wentz had a message for fans after having his season ended by a torn ACL. “I promise,” he said on Twitter. “This will not stop me and I will come back stronger than ever.” Stacey Burling explains what's in store for Wentz now.

3. During his first media availability since suffering a severe leg injury against the Saints, Bears tight end Zach Miller said he's undergone eight surgeries on that leg now. He bent it for the first time last Friday . . . painfully. He's not sure if he'll ever play football again; for now he's killing time playing Madden.

4. The Seahawks may have avoided suspensions for their actions at the end of Sunday's game, but that doesn't mean Pete Carroll is happy about them. “Everybody is remorseful,’’ Carroll said Monday. “We don’t want to play like that. We don’t want to look like that, ever.’’

5. With Wentz out of the picture, the Vikings suddenly have a clearer path to the Super Bowl. But will offensive line instability, which doomed them after a 5-0 start a year ago, cost them again?

6. The Lions are in a weird spot. At 7-6 with the Bears and Bengals next on the schedule, they're still alive in the playoff hunt. At the same time, Jim Caldwell seems to be coaching for his job. Despite that, he deflected credit for Detroit's resiliency of late.

7. In Esquire, Richard Sherman gave a wide-ranging interview. On the topic of head injuries, he said, "the league hasn’t done much outside of appeasing public opinion." And that was just the second question.

8. Ben McAdoo may be gone, but the chaos continues in East Rutherford. The latest scandal is Eli Apple tweeting (including retweeting a Cowboys highlight) during Sunday's loss. Want the Giants' 2017 in a sentence? "Spagnuolo said he was not aware of the content of the tweets."

9. Big news for non-Verizon customers: you could be able to watch local and national NFL games on your phone as soon as January.

10. Meet the Austin Yellow Jackets, Texas's Only Female Football Team Coached Solely by Women.

Have a story you think we should include in tomorrow’s Press Coverage? Let us know here.

THE KICKER

A week after Eli Manning was benched, another historic streak came to an end.

Question? Comment? Story idea? Let the team know at talkback@themmqb.com

<p>How was <strong>Tom Savage</strong> allowed to return to the field so soon after suffering a concussion Sunday against the 49ers? The NFL announced Monday it had launched an investigation to answer that question, and to see if the established procedure for evaluating players during a game could be strengthened. Which raises an additional question: What exactly is that process again?</p><p>When a player receives impact to the head, he, a teammate, coach, NFL official, trainer, spotter, or independent neurological expert can remove him from play to conduct a sideline exam. From there, the player is either returned to play, sent to the locker room for further testing, or immediately placed in the concussion protocol, depending on the assessment by the head team trainer (who is assisted by an unaffiliated neurotrauma consultant). It&#39;s up to them—not any coaches—to determine whether a player is fit to play. They can use just about any evidence in making their ruling, including a player&#39;s speech pattern, his gait, his eye movement, his response to a set series of questions and—notably in this case—video review of the hit in question. </p><p>Video of Savage squirming after hitting the ground (diagnosed as a seizure by uneducated armchair neurologists, but more likely an instance of <a href="http://bleacherreport.com/articles/1494620-stevan-ridleys-concussion-biomechanics-of-his-injury-fencing-response" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:fencing response" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">fencing response</a>, an instinctual reaction to head trauma) was the main fuel for outrage on Sunday. Why didn&#39;t it prevent medical personnel from allowing Savage to re-enter the game and play three more downs? Two trained spotters in the booth have access to the TV feed, as does the sideline medical staff (though replays can&#39;t be viewed by coaches, for competitive strategy purposes). However, Texans coach <strong>Bill O&#39;Brien</strong> intimated that head Houston trainer <strong>Geoff Kaplan</strong> had not seen the hit and Savage&#39;s reaction before making his diagnosis; O&#39;Brien <a href="https://twitter.com/AaronWilson_NFL/status/940235133415776259" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:said" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">said</a> Monday, &quot;With benefit of seeing video . . . I would have never let that player back in the game and I don&#39;t believe that <strong>Geoff Kaplan</strong> would have allowed that player back in the game.&quot; So maybe that&#39;s where the process broke down in this case. Hopefully the league investigation provides answers.</p><p>The way to avoid that type of mistake could be to flip the testing paradigm around. Rather than having players re-enter the game unless they show obvious signs of concussion, doctors could keep them out until they are sure the player is healthy (maybe for a minimum of a quarter), allowing time for further evaluation of the player as well as the play that forced the testing. But teams and players will have to decide whether they can live with key players potentially staying on the sideline before it is revealed that they were not, in fact, concussed. </p><p><strong>Not getting this newsletter in your inbox yet?</strong> <a href="https://www.si.com/static/newsletter/signup" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Join The MMQB’s Morning Huddle" class="link rapid-noclick-resp"><em>Join The MMQB’s Morning Huddle</em></a><em>.</em></p><h3><strong>HOT READS</strong></h3><p><strong>NOW ON THE MMQB: </strong>Conor Orr <a href="https://www.si.com/nfl/2017/12/11/carson-wentz-torn-acl-injury-philadelphia-eagles?utm_campaign=mmqb&#38;utm_source=si.com&#38;utm_medium=email" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:stacks up" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">stacks up</a> the NFC playoff race post-Wentz ... Andy Benoit <a href="https://www.si.com/nfl/2017/12/11/ryan-shazier-injury-pittsburgh-steelers-replacements-patriots-game?utm_campaign=mmqb&#38;utm_source=si.com&#38;utm_medium=email" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:studies" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">studies</a> the Steelers without <strong>Ryan Shazier</strong> ... Peter King <a href="https://www.si.com/nfl/2017/12/11/week-14-awards-jaguars-fans-seahawks-player-mmqb?utm_campaign=mmqb&#38;utm_source=si.com&#38;utm_medium=email" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:hands out" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">hands out</a> awards ... <a href="https://www.si.com/nfl" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:and more" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">and more</a>. </p><p><b>LATER TODAY ON THE MMQB:</b> Our new Power Rankings poll ... Greg Bishop shows how painful an NFL Sunday is ... Jenny Vrentas recaps a week with the Eagles ... and more. <a href="https://www.si.com/nfl?utm_campaign=mmqb&#38;utm_source=si.com&#38;utm_medium=email" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Stay tuned" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Stay tuned</a>.</p><h3><b>PRESS COVERAGE</b></h3><p><strong>1. Dolphins 27, Patriots 20. </strong>With <strong>Rob Gronkowski</strong> suspended, the Dolphins held the visiting Patriots from converting a single third down (0-for-11). At 6-7, Miami is still in the wild-card hunt, while New England now heads to Pittsburgh, trailing the Steelers in the race for the conference&#39;s top seed.</p><p><strong>2. Carson Wentz </strong>had a message for fans after having his season ended by a torn ACL. “I promise,” he said on <a href="https://twitter.com/cj_wentz?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw&#38;ref_url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.philly.com%2Fphilly%2Fsports%2Fcarson-wentz-twitter-torn-acl-philadelphia-eagles-rams-20171211.html" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Twitter" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Twitter</a>. “This will not stop me and I will come back stronger than ever.” Stacey Burling <a href="http://www.philly.com/philly/health/carson-wentz-acl-tear-recovery-time-philadelphia-eagles-20171212.html" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:explains" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">explains</a> what&#39;s in store for Wentz now. </p><p><strong>3.</strong> During his first media availability since suffering a severe leg injury against the Saints, Bears tight end <strong>Zach Miller</strong> <a href="http://www.chicagotribune.com/g00/sports/football/bears/ct-spt-bears-zach-miller-wiederer-20171211-story.html?i10c.encReferrer=" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:said" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">said</a> he&#39;s undergone eight surgeries on that leg now. He bent it for the first time last Friday . . . painfully. He&#39;s not sure if he&#39;ll ever play football again; for now he&#39;s killing time playing Madden.</p><p><strong>4. </strong>The Seahawks may have avoided suspensions for their actions at the end of Sunday&#39;s game, but that doesn&#39;t mean <strong>Pete Carroll</strong> is happy about them. “Everybody is remorseful,’’ <a href="https://www.seattletimes.com/sports/seahawks/seahawks-coach-pete-carroll-on-end-of-game-melee-at-jacksonville-everybody-is-remorseful-we-dont-want-to-play-like-that/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Carroll said Monday" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Carroll said Monday</a>. “We don’t want to play like that. We don’t want to look like that, ever.’’</p><p><strong>5.</strong> With Wentz out of the picture, the Vikings suddenly have a clearer path to the Super Bowl. But will <a href="http://www.startribune.com/vikings-suddenly-unstable-offensive-line-feels-all-too-familiar-no-early-speculation-on-riley-reiff-s-status/463496723/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:offensive line instability" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">offensive line instability</a>, which doomed them after a 5-0 start a year ago, cost them again?</p><p><strong>6. </strong>The Lions are in a weird spot. At 7-6 with the Bears and Bengals next on the schedule, they&#39;re still alive in the playoff hunt. At the same time, <strong>Jim Caldwell </strong>seems to be coaching for his job. Despite that, he <a href="https://www.freep.com/story/sports/nfl/lions/2017/12/11/detroit-lions-jim-caldwell-team-resiliency/942753001/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:deflected credit" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">deflected credit</a> for Detroit&#39;s resiliency of late.</p><p><strong>7. </strong>In Esquire, <strong>Richard Sherman</strong> gave <a href="http://www.esquire.com/sports/a14323331/richard-sherman-nfl-protests-kaepernick-trump/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:a wide-ranging interview" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">a wide-ranging interview</a>. On the topic of head injuries, he said, &quot;the league hasn’t done much outside of appeasing public opinion.&quot; And that was just the second question.</p><p><strong>8.</strong> <strong>Ben McAdoo</strong> may be gone, but the chaos continues in East Rutherford. The latest scandal is <strong>Eli Apple</strong> <a href="https://www.newsday.com/sports/football/giants/eli-apple-giants-steve-spagnuolo-1.15419596" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:tweeting" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">tweeting</a> (including retweeting a Cowboys highlight) during Sunday&#39;s loss. Want the Giants&#39; 2017 in a sentence? &quot;Spagnuolo said he was not aware of the content of the tweets.&quot;</p><p><strong>9. </strong>Big news for non-Verizon customers: you could be able to <a href="https://www.recode.net/2017/12/11/16760394/verizon-nfl-games-stream-football-1-5-billion" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:watch local and national NFL games on your phone" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">watch local and national NFL games on your phone</a> as soon as January.</p><p><strong>10.</strong> Meet <a href="https://www.texasmonthly.com/the-daily-post/yellowjackets-womens-football/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:the Austin Yellow Jackets" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">the Austin Yellow Jackets</a>, Texas&#39;s Only Female Football Team Coached Solely by Women.</p><p><em><strong>Have a story you think we should include in tomorrow’s Press Coverage?</strong></em> <span><em>Let us know here.</em></span></p><h3><b>THE KICKER</b></h3><p>A week after <strong>Eli Manning</strong> was benched, another <a href="http://ftw.usatoday.com/2017/12/scott-hanson-redzone-bathroom-break-streak-four-years-nfl-network" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:historic streak" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">historic streak</a> came to an end.</p><p><strong>Question? Comment? Story idea?</strong><i> L</i><em>et the team know at <span>talkback@themmqb.com</span></em></p>
How Tom Savage's Concussion Should Have Been Handled

How was Tom Savage allowed to return to the field so soon after suffering a concussion Sunday against the 49ers? The NFL announced Monday it had launched an investigation to answer that question, and to see if the established procedure for evaluating players during a game could be strengthened. Which raises an additional question: What exactly is that process again?

When a player receives impact to the head, he, a teammate, coach, NFL official, trainer, spotter, or independent neurological expert can remove him from play to conduct a sideline exam. From there, the player is either returned to play, sent to the locker room for further testing, or immediately placed in the concussion protocol, depending on the assessment by the head team trainer (who is assisted by an unaffiliated neurotrauma consultant). It's up to them—not any coaches—to determine whether a player is fit to play. They can use just about any evidence in making their ruling, including a player's speech pattern, his gait, his eye movement, his response to a set series of questions and—notably in this case—video review of the hit in question.

Video of Savage squirming after hitting the ground (diagnosed as a seizure by uneducated armchair neurologists, but more likely an instance of fencing response, an instinctual reaction to head trauma) was the main fuel for outrage on Sunday. Why didn't it prevent medical personnel from allowing Savage to re-enter the game and play three more downs? Two trained spotters in the booth have access to the TV feed, as does the sideline medical staff (though replays can't be viewed by coaches, for competitive strategy purposes). However, Texans coach Bill O'Brien intimated that head Houston trainer Geoff Kaplan had not seen the hit and Savage's reaction before making his diagnosis; O'Brien said Monday, "With benefit of seeing video . . . I would have never let that player back in the game and I don't believe that Geoff Kaplan would have allowed that player back in the game." So maybe that's where the process broke down in this case. Hopefully the league investigation provides answers.

The way to avoid that type of mistake could be to flip the testing paradigm around. Rather than having players re-enter the game unless they show obvious signs of concussion, doctors could keep them out until they are sure the player is healthy (maybe for a minimum of a quarter), allowing time for further evaluation of the player as well as the play that forced the testing. But teams and players will have to decide whether they can live with key players potentially staying on the sideline before it is revealed that they were not, in fact, concussed.

Not getting this newsletter in your inbox yet? Join The MMQB’s Morning Huddle.

HOT READS

NOW ON THE MMQB: Conor Orr stacks up the NFC playoff race post-Wentz ... Andy Benoit studies the Steelers without Ryan Shazier ... Peter King hands out awards ... and more.

LATER TODAY ON THE MMQB: Our new Power Rankings poll ... Greg Bishop shows how painful an NFL Sunday is ... Jenny Vrentas recaps a week with the Eagles ... and more. Stay tuned.

PRESS COVERAGE

1. Dolphins 27, Patriots 20. With Rob Gronkowski suspended, the Dolphins held the visiting Patriots from converting a single third down (0-for-11). At 6-7, Miami is still in the wild-card hunt, while New England now heads to Pittsburgh, trailing the Steelers in the race for the conference's top seed.

2. Carson Wentz had a message for fans after having his season ended by a torn ACL. “I promise,” he said on Twitter. “This will not stop me and I will come back stronger than ever.” Stacey Burling explains what's in store for Wentz now.

3. During his first media availability since suffering a severe leg injury against the Saints, Bears tight end Zach Miller said he's undergone eight surgeries on that leg now. He bent it for the first time last Friday . . . painfully. He's not sure if he'll ever play football again; for now he's killing time playing Madden.

4. The Seahawks may have avoided suspensions for their actions at the end of Sunday's game, but that doesn't mean Pete Carroll is happy about them. “Everybody is remorseful,’’ Carroll said Monday. “We don’t want to play like that. We don’t want to look like that, ever.’’

5. With Wentz out of the picture, the Vikings suddenly have a clearer path to the Super Bowl. But will offensive line instability, which doomed them after a 5-0 start a year ago, cost them again?

6. The Lions are in a weird spot. At 7-6 with the Bears and Bengals next on the schedule, they're still alive in the playoff hunt. At the same time, Jim Caldwell seems to be coaching for his job. Despite that, he deflected credit for Detroit's resiliency of late.

7. In Esquire, Richard Sherman gave a wide-ranging interview. On the topic of head injuries, he said, "the league hasn’t done much outside of appeasing public opinion." And that was just the second question.

8. Ben McAdoo may be gone, but the chaos continues in East Rutherford. The latest scandal is Eli Apple tweeting (including retweeting a Cowboys highlight) during Sunday's loss. Want the Giants' 2017 in a sentence? "Spagnuolo said he was not aware of the content of the tweets."

9. Big news for non-Verizon customers: you could be able to watch local and national NFL games on your phone as soon as January.

10. Meet the Austin Yellow Jackets, Texas's Only Female Football Team Coached Solely by Women.

Have a story you think we should include in tomorrow’s Press Coverage? Let us know here.

THE KICKER

A week after Eli Manning was benched, another historic streak came to an end.

Question? Comment? Story idea? Let the team know at talkback@themmqb.com

Attendees partake in the inauguration ceremonies to swear in Donald Trump as the 45th president of the United States at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S., January 20, 2017. Lucas Jackson: &quot;The assignment was simply to shoot the inauguration from the Washington Monument. To avoid confusion I made sure to transmit crowd pictures while Trump was onstage with the crowd at its peak. Twitter quickly erupted with claims that my images were taken early in the morning or photoshopped to remove attendees. At his first briefing, the President&#39;s new press secretary, Sean Spicer, said: &quot;Photographs of the inaugural proceedings were intentionally framed in a way, in one particular tweet, to minimize the enormous support that had gathered on the National Mall. This was also the first time that fencing and magnetometers went as far back on the Mall, preventing hundreds of thousands of people from being able to access the Mall as quickly as they had in inaugurations past.&quot; This was not true. It was a new experience to have the validity of such a straightforward image questioned. After that press conference the picture was everywhere. Later, CNN released an image it took from the portico of the U.S. Capitol as Trump was sworn in. That vantage point is several hundred feet lower than the Washington Monument so the crowd looks bigger than in my picture. A second wave of &#39;liar&#39; inundated me on Twitter. I ignored the noise but posted a copy of my image on Instagram with the caption: &quot;Perspective; it matters.&quot; Later people noticed that the clock on the Smithsonian building in my picture shows the time at 1:15. Social media tried to claim my images were taken over an hour after the inauguration once the crowd had thinned. But the Smithsonian said its clock was broken and was stuck on that time.&quot; REUTERS/Lucas Jackson/File photo SEARCH &quot;POY STORY&quot; FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH &quot;REUTERS POY&quot; FOR ALL BEST OF 2017 PACKAGES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY.
Pictures of the Year: A picture and its story
Attendees partake in the inauguration ceremonies to swear in Donald Trump as the 45th president of the United States at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S., January 20, 2017. Lucas Jackson: "The assignment was simply to shoot the inauguration from the Washington Monument. To avoid confusion I made sure to transmit crowd pictures while Trump was onstage with the crowd at its peak. Twitter quickly erupted with claims that my images were taken early in the morning or photoshopped to remove attendees. At his first briefing, the President's new press secretary, Sean Spicer, said: "Photographs of the inaugural proceedings were intentionally framed in a way, in one particular tweet, to minimize the enormous support that had gathered on the National Mall. This was also the first time that fencing and magnetometers went as far back on the Mall, preventing hundreds of thousands of people from being able to access the Mall as quickly as they had in inaugurations past." This was not true. It was a new experience to have the validity of such a straightforward image questioned. After that press conference the picture was everywhere. Later, CNN released an image it took from the portico of the U.S. Capitol as Trump was sworn in. That vantage point is several hundred feet lower than the Washington Monument so the crowd looks bigger than in my picture. A second wave of 'liar' inundated me on Twitter. I ignored the noise but posted a copy of my image on Instagram with the caption: "Perspective; it matters." Later people noticed that the clock on the Smithsonian building in my picture shows the time at 1:15. Social media tried to claim my images were taken over an hour after the inauguration once the crowd had thinned. But the Smithsonian said its clock was broken and was stuck on that time." REUTERS/Lucas Jackson/File photo SEARCH "POY STORY" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "REUTERS POY" FOR ALL BEST OF 2017 PACKAGES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY.
<p>Fencing&#39;s Russian boss attacks flag ban at Olympics</p>
Fencing's Russian boss attacks flag ban at Olympics

Fencing's Russian boss attacks flag ban at Olympics

<p>Fencing&#39;s Russian boss attacks flag ban at Olympics</p>
Fencing's Russian boss attacks flag ban at Olympics

Fencing's Russian boss attacks flag ban at Olympics

A combination of photos taken at the National Mall shows the crowds attending the inauguration ceremonies to swear in U.S. President Donald Trump at 12:01pm (L) on January 20, 2017 and President Barack Obama sometime between 12:07pm and 12:26pm on January 20, 2009, Washington, U.S. Lucas Jackson: &quot;The assignment was simply to shoot the inauguration from the Washington Monument. To avoid confusion I made sure to transmit crowd pictures while Trump was onstage with the crowd at its peak. Twitter quickly erupted with claims that my images were taken early in the morning or photoshopped to remove attendees. At his first briefing, the President&#39;s new press secretary, Sean Spicer, said: &quot;Photographs of the inaugural proceedings were intentionally framed in a way, in one particular tweet, to minimize the enormous support that had gathered on the National Mall. This was also the first time that fencing and magnetometers went as far back on the Mall, preventing hundreds of thousands of people from being able to access the Mall as quickly as they had in inaugurations past.&quot; This was not true. It was a new experience to have the validity of such a straightforward image questioned. After that press conference the picture was everywhere. Later, CNN released an image it took from the portico of the U.S. Capitol as Trump was sworn in. That vantage point is several hundred feet lower than the Washington Monument so the crowd looks bigger than in my picture. A second wave of &#39;liar&#39; inundated me on Twitter. I ignored the noise but posted a copy of my image on Instagram with the caption: &quot;Perspective; it matters.&quot; Later people noticed that the clock on the Smithsonian building in my picture shows the time at 1:15. Social media tried to claim my images were taken over an hour after the inauguration once the crowd had thinned. But the Smithsonian said its clock was broken and was stuck on that time.&quot; REUTERS/Lucas Jackson (L), Stelios Varias
Pictures of the Year: U.S. Politics
A combination of photos taken at the National Mall shows the crowds attending the inauguration ceremonies to swear in U.S. President Donald Trump at 12:01pm (L) on January 20, 2017 and President Barack Obama sometime between 12:07pm and 12:26pm on January 20, 2009, Washington, U.S. Lucas Jackson: "The assignment was simply to shoot the inauguration from the Washington Monument. To avoid confusion I made sure to transmit crowd pictures while Trump was onstage with the crowd at its peak. Twitter quickly erupted with claims that my images were taken early in the morning or photoshopped to remove attendees. At his first briefing, the President's new press secretary, Sean Spicer, said: "Photographs of the inaugural proceedings were intentionally framed in a way, in one particular tweet, to minimize the enormous support that had gathered on the National Mall. This was also the first time that fencing and magnetometers went as far back on the Mall, preventing hundreds of thousands of people from being able to access the Mall as quickly as they had in inaugurations past." This was not true. It was a new experience to have the validity of such a straightforward image questioned. After that press conference the picture was everywhere. Later, CNN released an image it took from the portico of the U.S. Capitol as Trump was sworn in. That vantage point is several hundred feet lower than the Washington Monument so the crowd looks bigger than in my picture. A second wave of 'liar' inundated me on Twitter. I ignored the noise but posted a copy of my image on Instagram with the caption: "Perspective; it matters." Later people noticed that the clock on the Smithsonian building in my picture shows the time at 1:15. Social media tried to claim my images were taken over an hour after the inauguration once the crowd had thinned. But the Smithsonian said its clock was broken and was stuck on that time." REUTERS/Lucas Jackson (L), Stelios Varias
A combination of photos taken at the National Mall shows the crowds attending the inauguration ceremonies to swear in U.S. President Donald Trump at 12:01pm (L) on January 20, 2017 and President Barack Obama sometime between 12:07pm and 12:26pm on January 20, 2009, Washington, U.S. Lucas Jackson: &quot;The assignment was simply to shoot the inauguration from the Washington Monument. To avoid confusion I made sure to transmit crowd pictures while Trump was onstage with the crowd at its peak. Twitter quickly erupted with claims that my images were taken early in the morning or photoshopped to remove attendees. At his first briefing, the President&#39;s new press secretary, Sean Spicer, said: &quot;Photographs of the inaugural proceedings were intentionally framed in a way, in one particular tweet, to minimize the enormous support that had gathered on the National Mall. This was also the first time that fencing and magnetometers went as far back on the Mall, preventing hundreds of thousands of people from being able to access the Mall as quickly as they had in inaugurations past.&quot; This was not true. It was a new experience to have the validity of such a straightforward image questioned. After that press conference the picture was everywhere. Later, CNN released an image it took from the portico of the U.S. Capitol as Trump was sworn in. That vantage point is several hundred feet lower than the Washington Monument so the crowd looks bigger than in my picture. A second wave of &#39;liar&#39; inundated me on Twitter. I ignored the noise but posted a copy of my image on Instagram with the caption: &quot;Perspective; it matters.&quot; Later people noticed that the clock on the Smithsonian building in my picture shows the time at 1:15. Social media tried to claim my images were taken over an hour after the inauguration once the crowd had thinned. But the Smithsonian said its clock was broken and was stuck on that time.&quot; REUTERS/Lucas Jackson (L), Stelios Varias SEARCH &quot;POY TRUMP&quot; FOR THIS STORY
Pictures of the Year: U.S. Politics
A combination of photos taken at the National Mall shows the crowds attending the inauguration ceremonies to swear in U.S. President Donald Trump at 12:01pm (L) on January 20, 2017 and President Barack Obama sometime between 12:07pm and 12:26pm on January 20, 2009, Washington, U.S. Lucas Jackson: "The assignment was simply to shoot the inauguration from the Washington Monument. To avoid confusion I made sure to transmit crowd pictures while Trump was onstage with the crowd at its peak. Twitter quickly erupted with claims that my images were taken early in the morning or photoshopped to remove attendees. At his first briefing, the President's new press secretary, Sean Spicer, said: "Photographs of the inaugural proceedings were intentionally framed in a way, in one particular tweet, to minimize the enormous support that had gathered on the National Mall. This was also the first time that fencing and magnetometers went as far back on the Mall, preventing hundreds of thousands of people from being able to access the Mall as quickly as they had in inaugurations past." This was not true. It was a new experience to have the validity of such a straightforward image questioned. After that press conference the picture was everywhere. Later, CNN released an image it took from the portico of the U.S. Capitol as Trump was sworn in. That vantage point is several hundred feet lower than the Washington Monument so the crowd looks bigger than in my picture. A second wave of 'liar' inundated me on Twitter. I ignored the noise but posted a copy of my image on Instagram with the caption: "Perspective; it matters." Later people noticed that the clock on the Smithsonian building in my picture shows the time at 1:15. Social media tried to claim my images were taken over an hour after the inauguration once the crowd had thinned. But the Smithsonian said its clock was broken and was stuck on that time." REUTERS/Lucas Jackson (L), Stelios Varias SEARCH "POY TRUMP" FOR THIS STORY
Thefts of the material have been happening in the South Chicago neighborhood.
Scrap Metal Thieves Target Chain Link Fencing
Thefts of the material have been happening in the South Chicago neighborhood.
Thefts of the material have been happening in the South Chicago neighborhood.
Scrap Metal Thieves Target Chain Link Fencing
Thefts of the material have been happening in the South Chicago neighborhood.
Thefts of the material have been happening in the South Chicago neighborhood.
Scrap Metal Thieves Target Chain Link Fencing
Thefts of the material have been happening in the South Chicago neighborhood.
Thefts of the material have been happening in the South Chicago neighborhood.
Scrap Metal Thieves Target Chain Link Fencing
Thefts of the material have been happening in the South Chicago neighborhood.
If there’s one thing more exciting than the prospect of watching England limp out of the group stages of next year’s World Cup, it’s the chance to learn more about the enigmatic nether regions of the host nation. We all know Moscow and St Petersburg, each soaking in its own charm and character, but what of Kazan or Yekaterinburg? Nizhny Novgorod, anyone? Of the 11 cities set to welcome thousands of football fans from around the world, we would wager the names of eight, maybe nine, have never crossed the lips of those poised to visit. With that in mind, here’s a crash course on the Russian host cities you’ve never heard of. Or follow these links for the lowdown on Moscow and St Petersburg. 1. Samara Where is it? To the south-west, not far from the Kazakhstan border. Population: 1.2million Of note: Known as Kuybyshev, in honour of the Bolshevik leader Valerian Kuybyshev, from 1935 to 1991. How to get there: Kurumoch International Airport, as well as rail links to Moscow and other major cities. Samara is proud of its space-race heritage Credit: Getty “Samara is a very diverse city,” says the official World Cup literature. “It is a merchant town and an important aerospace centre; it is athletic, musical and youthful. Back in 1916, Boris Pasternak, Russian poet, novelist and future Nobel Prize laureate, wrote: ‘Samara is the best, the most sinful, most elegant and most comfortable part of Moscow, cut out from the city and transplanted on the banks of the Volga.’” Samara is indeed home to Russia’s aerospace centre and is where the rocket that took Yuri Gagarin, the first man in space, was built. There is also a Football Museum, opened in 2007; Vladimir Lenin Memorial Home, where the Ulyanov family once rented a flat; and a subterranean stronghold made for Joseph Stalin but never used, today known as “Stalin’s Bunker”. The city on the banks of the Volga is twinned with Palermo, Italy, and St Louis, US, among others. 2. Yekaterinburg Where is it? East of the Urals. Population: 1.4million Of note: The Church on Blood in Honour of All Saints Resplendent in the Russian Land was built on the site of the 1918 executions of Tsar Nicholas II and his family. How to get there: Kolstsovo International Airport is one of the largest in the country. The church built on the site of the Romanov executions Credit: Getty In contrast to St Petersburg’s “window to Europe”, Yekaterinburg is Russia’s “window to Asia”. Capital of the Urals, the region is of great economic importance and full of natural treasures, such as oil, gas, gold mines and Europe’s largest emerald deposit. Why not swing by the Boris Yeltsin Museum? The former leader was born nearby. 3. Rostov-on-Don Where is it? Southern Russia, on the banks of the Black Sea. Population: 1.1million Of note: Home of the Don Cossacks. How to get there: Platov International is the city’s brand spanking new airport. “The story of the Don Cossacks, delectable fish, and all the traditions of a large trading port: Rostov-on-Don treats visitors to the flavours of the Russian south,” says Russia&#39;s World Cup information website. The city, twinned with Glasgow, boasts a number of tourist sites including Russian Orthodox churches, as well as the heritage of a raft of renowned authors, including Alexander Solzhenitsyn, Maxim Gorky and Alexander Pushkin. The Upside Down House - where, you guessed it, everything is upside down - sounds perfect for travellers with time to kill. 59 fascinating things you didn&#39;t know about Russia 4. Sochi Where is it? The Russian Riviera - on the Black Sea. Population: 370,000 Of note: Winter Olympics 2014 host city. How to get there: Adler-Sochi International Airport. The Russian Riviera Credit: Getty We all know about Sochi, don’t we? The unofficial summer capital of Russia, where past tsars and Joseph Stalin had dachas (the latter of which can be visited), Sochi boasts a subtropical climate that warms the Russian elite every summer. But it’s not all glitz and glamour, there’s the Nikolai Ostrovsky Literary Memorial Museum and Sochi’s Museum of Sporting Glory. The people behind the World Cup boast of its “impressive modern infrastructure”. 5. Saransk Where is it? Saransk is capital of the Mordovia region, about 400 miles east of Moscow. Population: 297,000 Of note: Gerard Depardieu, the French actor, has been a registered resident here since 2013. How to get there: There’s a daily direct train from Moscow, or a small airport. “Saransk is a town of myths and legends, with a chequered past and big plans for the future,” says the World Cup’s promotional literature. “Remembering his trip to Saransk, Leo Tolstoy wrote in 1906: ‘Old pines with long trunks and short crowns. The soil is black, and a little stony… Backwoods. The Sura River, and the best sturgeon ever.’ By 2018, when the FIFA World Cup arrives here, the myths of Saransk will have been transformed into architecture.” Intruguing. Do not miss the Museum of Mordovia Folk Culture, or a triumvirate of excellent squares - Millennium Square, Victory Square and Soviet Square. Inside the bizarre world of Soviet sanatoriums 6. Kaliningrad Where is it? Prepare to have your mind blown. Population: 437,456 Of note: Kaliningrad is Russia’s European enclave, wedged between Poland and Lithuania on the Baltic Sea coast. How to get there: Khrabrovo Airport, train from Moscow, or ferry from a number of European cities. During Soviet times Kaliningrad was a closed military zone, and after the fall of the USSR, it suffered a horrendous economic collapse. Today, however, it is popular with holidaying Russians, especially its half of the Unesco-protected Curonian Spit beach strip that it shares with Lithuania. Founded by Teutonic Knights in 1255, Kaliningrad was also home to the legendary Baron Munchhausen, philosopher Immanuel Kant and writer and compose Ernst Hoffman. England in Kaliningrad: The city will host England v Belgium on 28 June 2018. 7. Volgograd Where is it? On the banks of the Volga, south-west of Moscow. Population: 1million Of note: Volgograd was once known as Stalingrad. How to get there: Volgograd International Airport connects to other major Russian cities, or its connected to Moscow by rail. The imposing The Motherland Calls sculpture Credit: Getty It’s hard to detach the city from its past, a city made by famous by a devastating Second World War siege. The official literature notes: “Over the course of the last hundred years, Volgograd has often been a prominent figure on the Russian and global stage. Many events have left their mark on the city in monuments, places and traditions. “Over the last century the city has changed its name three times: at the beginning of the twentieth century it was called Tsaritsyn and it was a backwater place on the banks of the Volga River. Then it became Stalingrad - the fortress that played a pivotal role in World War II, and later was renamed Volgograd, having become in the process a sunny and hospitable city whose residents love fishing, football, boat rides and beaches.” The Motherland Calls, a monument to the Battle of Stalingrad and the tallest statue of a woman in the world, is well worth a visit. The imposing structure soars above the city, while beneath it is buried the famous Soviet sniper Vasily Zaytsev. England in Volgograd: The city will host England v Tunisia on 18 June 2018. 8. Nizhny Novgorod Where is it? 250 miles east of Moscow. Population: 1.3 million Of note: It was previously known as Gorky, in honour of the Soviet author. How to get there: Strigino International Airport. Colourful cathedral domes in Nizhny Novgorod Credit: GETTY The city was previously closed to foreigners during the Soviet era to protect the security of its military research centre and production factories. Even street maps were not available for sale until mid-1970s. “At the same time Nizhny Novgorod is an old Russian merchant town with timber planking and carved window frames that survived the onslaught of modern architecture,” says the official literature. The city boasts a Kremlin, “the cradle of Nizhny Novgorod”, built high above the Volga. The structure seen today was built in the 16th century. England in Nizhny Novgorod: The city will host England v Panama on 24 June 2018. 9. Kazan Where is it? Where the Volga meets the Kazanka. Population: 1.1million Of note: It is referred to the Sports Capital of Russia, having hosted the 2014 World Fencing Championships and 2015 World Aquatics Championships. How to get there: Kazan International Airport, or by rail from Moscow. Kazan, too, has a Kremlin, which in 2015 was visited by 1.5 million people. The World Cup organisers say Kazan is a “feast of a city”. “Cold winters and hot summers, Muslim minarets and Orthodox monasteries, the ancient archeological sites and the science city of Innopolis, forest steppes, taiga and the Great Silk Road all mix in the cauldron that is the Tatar capital,” they say. “The result of this melting pot is the self-sufficient and self-assured third capital of Russia that each year extends a warm welcome to a million guests who come here to experience all sorts of impressions and emotions.” The city has its own Millennium Bridge, too.
What can England fans expect in Nizhny Novgorod?
If there’s one thing more exciting than the prospect of watching England limp out of the group stages of next year’s World Cup, it’s the chance to learn more about the enigmatic nether regions of the host nation. We all know Moscow and St Petersburg, each soaking in its own charm and character, but what of Kazan or Yekaterinburg? Nizhny Novgorod, anyone? Of the 11 cities set to welcome thousands of football fans from around the world, we would wager the names of eight, maybe nine, have never crossed the lips of those poised to visit. With that in mind, here’s a crash course on the Russian host cities you’ve never heard of. Or follow these links for the lowdown on Moscow and St Petersburg. 1. Samara Where is it? To the south-west, not far from the Kazakhstan border. Population: 1.2million Of note: Known as Kuybyshev, in honour of the Bolshevik leader Valerian Kuybyshev, from 1935 to 1991. How to get there: Kurumoch International Airport, as well as rail links to Moscow and other major cities. Samara is proud of its space-race heritage Credit: Getty “Samara is a very diverse city,” says the official World Cup literature. “It is a merchant town and an important aerospace centre; it is athletic, musical and youthful. Back in 1916, Boris Pasternak, Russian poet, novelist and future Nobel Prize laureate, wrote: ‘Samara is the best, the most sinful, most elegant and most comfortable part of Moscow, cut out from the city and transplanted on the banks of the Volga.’” Samara is indeed home to Russia’s aerospace centre and is where the rocket that took Yuri Gagarin, the first man in space, was built. There is also a Football Museum, opened in 2007; Vladimir Lenin Memorial Home, where the Ulyanov family once rented a flat; and a subterranean stronghold made for Joseph Stalin but never used, today known as “Stalin’s Bunker”. The city on the banks of the Volga is twinned with Palermo, Italy, and St Louis, US, among others. 2. Yekaterinburg Where is it? East of the Urals. Population: 1.4million Of note: The Church on Blood in Honour of All Saints Resplendent in the Russian Land was built on the site of the 1918 executions of Tsar Nicholas II and his family. How to get there: Kolstsovo International Airport is one of the largest in the country. The church built on the site of the Romanov executions Credit: Getty In contrast to St Petersburg’s “window to Europe”, Yekaterinburg is Russia’s “window to Asia”. Capital of the Urals, the region is of great economic importance and full of natural treasures, such as oil, gas, gold mines and Europe’s largest emerald deposit. Why not swing by the Boris Yeltsin Museum? The former leader was born nearby. 3. Rostov-on-Don Where is it? Southern Russia, on the banks of the Black Sea. Population: 1.1million Of note: Home of the Don Cossacks. How to get there: Platov International is the city’s brand spanking new airport. “The story of the Don Cossacks, delectable fish, and all the traditions of a large trading port: Rostov-on-Don treats visitors to the flavours of the Russian south,” says Russia's World Cup information website. The city, twinned with Glasgow, boasts a number of tourist sites including Russian Orthodox churches, as well as the heritage of a raft of renowned authors, including Alexander Solzhenitsyn, Maxim Gorky and Alexander Pushkin. The Upside Down House - where, you guessed it, everything is upside down - sounds perfect for travellers with time to kill. 59 fascinating things you didn't know about Russia 4. Sochi Where is it? The Russian Riviera - on the Black Sea. Population: 370,000 Of note: Winter Olympics 2014 host city. How to get there: Adler-Sochi International Airport. The Russian Riviera Credit: Getty We all know about Sochi, don’t we? The unofficial summer capital of Russia, where past tsars and Joseph Stalin had dachas (the latter of which can be visited), Sochi boasts a subtropical climate that warms the Russian elite every summer. But it’s not all glitz and glamour, there’s the Nikolai Ostrovsky Literary Memorial Museum and Sochi’s Museum of Sporting Glory. The people behind the World Cup boast of its “impressive modern infrastructure”. 5. Saransk Where is it? Saransk is capital of the Mordovia region, about 400 miles east of Moscow. Population: 297,000 Of note: Gerard Depardieu, the French actor, has been a registered resident here since 2013. How to get there: There’s a daily direct train from Moscow, or a small airport. “Saransk is a town of myths and legends, with a chequered past and big plans for the future,” says the World Cup’s promotional literature. “Remembering his trip to Saransk, Leo Tolstoy wrote in 1906: ‘Old pines with long trunks and short crowns. The soil is black, and a little stony… Backwoods. The Sura River, and the best sturgeon ever.’ By 2018, when the FIFA World Cup arrives here, the myths of Saransk will have been transformed into architecture.” Intruguing. Do not miss the Museum of Mordovia Folk Culture, or a triumvirate of excellent squares - Millennium Square, Victory Square and Soviet Square. Inside the bizarre world of Soviet sanatoriums 6. Kaliningrad Where is it? Prepare to have your mind blown. Population: 437,456 Of note: Kaliningrad is Russia’s European enclave, wedged between Poland and Lithuania on the Baltic Sea coast. How to get there: Khrabrovo Airport, train from Moscow, or ferry from a number of European cities. During Soviet times Kaliningrad was a closed military zone, and after the fall of the USSR, it suffered a horrendous economic collapse. Today, however, it is popular with holidaying Russians, especially its half of the Unesco-protected Curonian Spit beach strip that it shares with Lithuania. Founded by Teutonic Knights in 1255, Kaliningrad was also home to the legendary Baron Munchhausen, philosopher Immanuel Kant and writer and compose Ernst Hoffman. England in Kaliningrad: The city will host England v Belgium on 28 June 2018. 7. Volgograd Where is it? On the banks of the Volga, south-west of Moscow. Population: 1million Of note: Volgograd was once known as Stalingrad. How to get there: Volgograd International Airport connects to other major Russian cities, or its connected to Moscow by rail. The imposing The Motherland Calls sculpture Credit: Getty It’s hard to detach the city from its past, a city made by famous by a devastating Second World War siege. The official literature notes: “Over the course of the last hundred years, Volgograd has often been a prominent figure on the Russian and global stage. Many events have left their mark on the city in monuments, places and traditions. “Over the last century the city has changed its name three times: at the beginning of the twentieth century it was called Tsaritsyn and it was a backwater place on the banks of the Volga River. Then it became Stalingrad - the fortress that played a pivotal role in World War II, and later was renamed Volgograd, having become in the process a sunny and hospitable city whose residents love fishing, football, boat rides and beaches.” The Motherland Calls, a monument to the Battle of Stalingrad and the tallest statue of a woman in the world, is well worth a visit. The imposing structure soars above the city, while beneath it is buried the famous Soviet sniper Vasily Zaytsev. England in Volgograd: The city will host England v Tunisia on 18 June 2018. 8. Nizhny Novgorod Where is it? 250 miles east of Moscow. Population: 1.3 million Of note: It was previously known as Gorky, in honour of the Soviet author. How to get there: Strigino International Airport. Colourful cathedral domes in Nizhny Novgorod Credit: GETTY The city was previously closed to foreigners during the Soviet era to protect the security of its military research centre and production factories. Even street maps were not available for sale until mid-1970s. “At the same time Nizhny Novgorod is an old Russian merchant town with timber planking and carved window frames that survived the onslaught of modern architecture,” says the official literature. The city boasts a Kremlin, “the cradle of Nizhny Novgorod”, built high above the Volga. The structure seen today was built in the 16th century. England in Nizhny Novgorod: The city will host England v Panama on 24 June 2018. 9. Kazan Where is it? Where the Volga meets the Kazanka. Population: 1.1million Of note: It is referred to the Sports Capital of Russia, having hosted the 2014 World Fencing Championships and 2015 World Aquatics Championships. How to get there: Kazan International Airport, or by rail from Moscow. Kazan, too, has a Kremlin, which in 2015 was visited by 1.5 million people. The World Cup organisers say Kazan is a “feast of a city”. “Cold winters and hot summers, Muslim minarets and Orthodox monasteries, the ancient archeological sites and the science city of Innopolis, forest steppes, taiga and the Great Silk Road all mix in the cauldron that is the Tatar capital,” they say. “The result of this melting pot is the self-sufficient and self-assured third capital of Russia that each year extends a warm welcome to a million guests who come here to experience all sorts of impressions and emotions.” The city has its own Millennium Bridge, too.
If there’s one thing more exciting than the prospect of watching England limp out of the group stages of next year’s World Cup, it’s the chance to learn more about the enigmatic nether regions of the host nation. We all know Moscow and St Petersburg, each soaking in its own charm and character, but what of Kazan or Yekaterinburg? Nizhny Novgorod, anyone? Of the 11 cities set to welcome thousands of football fans from around the world, we would wager the names of eight, maybe nine, have never crossed the lips of those poised to visit. With that in mind, here’s a crash course on the Russian host cities you’ve never heard of. Or follow these links for the lowdown on Moscow and St Petersburg. 1. Samara Where is it? To the south-west, not far from the Kazakhstan border. Population: 1.2million Of note: Known as Kuybyshev, in honour of the Bolshevik leader Valerian Kuybyshev, from 1935 to 1991. How to get there: Kurumoch International Airport, as well as rail links to Moscow and other major cities. Samara is proud of its space-race heritage Credit: Getty “Samara is a very diverse city,” says the official World Cup literature. “It is a merchant town and an important aerospace centre; it is athletic, musical and youthful. Back in 1916, Boris Pasternak, Russian poet, novelist and future Nobel Prize laureate, wrote: ‘Samara is the best, the most sinful, most elegant and most comfortable part of Moscow, cut out from the city and transplanted on the banks of the Volga.’” Samara is indeed home to Russia’s aerospace centre and is where the rocket that took Yuri Gagarin, the first man in space, was built. There is also a Football Museum, opened in 2007; Vladimir Lenin Memorial Home, where the Ulyanov family once rented a flat; and a subterranean stronghold made for Joseph Stalin but never used, today known as “Stalin’s Bunker”. The city on the banks of the Volga is twinned with Palermo, Italy, and St Louis, US, among others. 2. Yekaterinburg Where is it? East of the Urals. Population: 1.4million Of note: The Church on Blood in Honour of All Saints Resplendent in the Russian Land was built on the site of the 1918 executions of Tsar Nicholas II and his family. How to get there: Kolstsovo International Airport is one of the largest in the country. The church built on the site of the Romanov executions Credit: Getty In contrast to St Petersburg’s “window to Europe”, Yekaterinburg is Russia’s “window to Asia”. Capital of the Urals, the region is of great economic importance and full of natural treasures, such as oil, gas, gold mines and Europe’s largest emerald deposit. Why not swing by the Boris Yeltsin Museum? The former leader was born nearby. 3. Rostov-on-Don Where is it? Southern Russia, on the banks of the Black Sea. Population: 1.1million Of note: Home of the Don Cossacks. How to get there: Platov International is the city’s brand spanking new airport. “The story of the Don Cossacks, delectable fish, and all the traditions of a large trading port: Rostov-on-Don treats visitors to the flavours of the Russian south,” says Russia&#39;s World Cup information website. The city, twinned with Glasgow, boasts a number of tourist sites including Russian Orthodox churches, as well as the heritage of a raft of renowned authors, including Alexander Solzhenitsyn, Maxim Gorky and Alexander Pushkin. The Upside Down House - where, you guessed it, everything is upside down - sounds perfect for travellers with time to kill. 59 fascinating things you didn&#39;t know about Russia 4. Sochi Where is it? The Russian Riviera - on the Black Sea. Population: 370,000 Of note: Winter Olympics 2014 host city. How to get there: Adler-Sochi International Airport. The Russian Riviera Credit: Getty We all know about Sochi, don’t we? The unofficial summer capital of Russia, where past tsars and Joseph Stalin had dachas (the latter of which can be visited), Sochi boasts a subtropical climate that warms the Russian elite every summer. But it’s not all glitz and glamour, there’s the Nikolai Ostrovsky Literary Memorial Museum and Sochi’s Museum of Sporting Glory. The people behind the World Cup boast of its “impressive modern infrastructure”. 5. Saransk Where is it? Saransk is capital of the Mordovia region, about 400 miles east of Moscow. Population: 297,000 Of note: Gerard Depardieu, the French actor, has been a registered resident here since 2013. How to get there: There’s a daily direct train from Moscow, or a small airport. “Saransk is a town of myths and legends, with a chequered past and big plans for the future,” says the World Cup’s promotional literature. “Remembering his trip to Saransk, Leo Tolstoy wrote in 1906: ‘Old pines with long trunks and short crowns. The soil is black, and a little stony… Backwoods. The Sura River, and the best sturgeon ever.’ By 2018, when the FIFA World Cup arrives here, the myths of Saransk will have been transformed into architecture.” Intruguing. Do not miss the Museum of Mordovia Folk Culture, or a triumvirate of excellent squares - Millennium Square, Victory Square and Soviet Square. Inside the bizarre world of Soviet sanatoriums 6. Kaliningrad Where is it? Prepare to have your mind blown. Population: 437,456 Of note: Kaliningrad is Russia’s European enclave, wedged between Poland and Lithuania on the Baltic Sea coast. How to get there: Khrabrovo Airport, train from Moscow, or ferry from a number of European cities. During Soviet times Kaliningrad was a closed military zone, and after the fall of the USSR, it suffered a horrendous economic collapse. Today, however, it is popular with holidaying Russians, especially its half of the Unesco-protected Curonian Spit beach strip that it shares with Lithuania. Founded by Teutonic Knights in 1255, Kaliningrad was also home to the legendary Baron Munchhausen, philosopher Immanuel Kant and writer and compose Ernst Hoffman. England in Kaliningrad: The city will host England v Belgium on 28 June 2018. 7. Volgograd Where is it? On the banks of the Volga, south-west of Moscow. Population: 1million Of note: Volgograd was once known as Stalingrad. How to get there: Volgograd International Airport connects to other major Russian cities, or its connected to Moscow by rail. The imposing The Motherland Calls sculpture Credit: Getty It’s hard to detach the city from its past, a city made by famous by a devastating Second World War siege. The official literature notes: “Over the course of the last hundred years, Volgograd has often been a prominent figure on the Russian and global stage. Many events have left their mark on the city in monuments, places and traditions. “Over the last century the city has changed its name three times: at the beginning of the twentieth century it was called Tsaritsyn and it was a backwater place on the banks of the Volga River. Then it became Stalingrad - the fortress that played a pivotal role in World War II, and later was renamed Volgograd, having become in the process a sunny and hospitable city whose residents love fishing, football, boat rides and beaches.” The Motherland Calls, a monument to the Battle of Stalingrad and the tallest statue of a woman in the world, is well worth a visit. The imposing structure soars above the city, while beneath it is buried the famous Soviet sniper Vasily Zaytsev. England in Volgograd: The city will host England v Tunisia on 18 June 2018. 8. Nizhny Novgorod Where is it? 250 miles east of Moscow. Population: 1.3 million Of note: It was previously known as Gorky, in honour of the Soviet author. How to get there: Strigino International Airport. Colourful cathedral domes in Nizhny Novgorod Credit: GETTY The city was previously closed to foreigners during the Soviet era to protect the security of its military research centre and production factories. Even street maps were not available for sale until mid-1970s. “At the same time Nizhny Novgorod is an old Russian merchant town with timber planking and carved window frames that survived the onslaught of modern architecture,” says the official literature. The city boasts a Kremlin, “the cradle of Nizhny Novgorod”, built high above the Volga. The structure seen today was built in the 16th century. England in Nizhny Novgorod: The city will host England v Panama on 24 June 2018. 9. Kazan Where is it? Where the Volga meets the Kazanka. Population: 1.1million Of note: It is referred to the Sports Capital of Russia, having hosted the 2014 World Fencing Championships and 2015 World Aquatics Championships. How to get there: Kazan International Airport, or by rail from Moscow. Kazan, too, has a Kremlin, which in 2015 was visited by 1.5 million people. The World Cup organisers say Kazan is a “feast of a city”. “Cold winters and hot summers, Muslim minarets and Orthodox monasteries, the ancient archeological sites and the science city of Innopolis, forest steppes, taiga and the Great Silk Road all mix in the cauldron that is the Tatar capital,” they say. “The result of this melting pot is the self-sufficient and self-assured third capital of Russia that each year extends a warm welcome to a million guests who come here to experience all sorts of impressions and emotions.” The city has its own Millennium Bridge, too.
What can England fans expect in Nizhny Novgorod?
If there’s one thing more exciting than the prospect of watching England limp out of the group stages of next year’s World Cup, it’s the chance to learn more about the enigmatic nether regions of the host nation. We all know Moscow and St Petersburg, each soaking in its own charm and character, but what of Kazan or Yekaterinburg? Nizhny Novgorod, anyone? Of the 11 cities set to welcome thousands of football fans from around the world, we would wager the names of eight, maybe nine, have never crossed the lips of those poised to visit. With that in mind, here’s a crash course on the Russian host cities you’ve never heard of. Or follow these links for the lowdown on Moscow and St Petersburg. 1. Samara Where is it? To the south-west, not far from the Kazakhstan border. Population: 1.2million Of note: Known as Kuybyshev, in honour of the Bolshevik leader Valerian Kuybyshev, from 1935 to 1991. How to get there: Kurumoch International Airport, as well as rail links to Moscow and other major cities. Samara is proud of its space-race heritage Credit: Getty “Samara is a very diverse city,” says the official World Cup literature. “It is a merchant town and an important aerospace centre; it is athletic, musical and youthful. Back in 1916, Boris Pasternak, Russian poet, novelist and future Nobel Prize laureate, wrote: ‘Samara is the best, the most sinful, most elegant and most comfortable part of Moscow, cut out from the city and transplanted on the banks of the Volga.’” Samara is indeed home to Russia’s aerospace centre and is where the rocket that took Yuri Gagarin, the first man in space, was built. There is also a Football Museum, opened in 2007; Vladimir Lenin Memorial Home, where the Ulyanov family once rented a flat; and a subterranean stronghold made for Joseph Stalin but never used, today known as “Stalin’s Bunker”. The city on the banks of the Volga is twinned with Palermo, Italy, and St Louis, US, among others. 2. Yekaterinburg Where is it? East of the Urals. Population: 1.4million Of note: The Church on Blood in Honour of All Saints Resplendent in the Russian Land was built on the site of the 1918 executions of Tsar Nicholas II and his family. How to get there: Kolstsovo International Airport is one of the largest in the country. The church built on the site of the Romanov executions Credit: Getty In contrast to St Petersburg’s “window to Europe”, Yekaterinburg is Russia’s “window to Asia”. Capital of the Urals, the region is of great economic importance and full of natural treasures, such as oil, gas, gold mines and Europe’s largest emerald deposit. Why not swing by the Boris Yeltsin Museum? The former leader was born nearby. 3. Rostov-on-Don Where is it? Southern Russia, on the banks of the Black Sea. Population: 1.1million Of note: Home of the Don Cossacks. How to get there: Platov International is the city’s brand spanking new airport. “The story of the Don Cossacks, delectable fish, and all the traditions of a large trading port: Rostov-on-Don treats visitors to the flavours of the Russian south,” says Russia's World Cup information website. The city, twinned with Glasgow, boasts a number of tourist sites including Russian Orthodox churches, as well as the heritage of a raft of renowned authors, including Alexander Solzhenitsyn, Maxim Gorky and Alexander Pushkin. The Upside Down House - where, you guessed it, everything is upside down - sounds perfect for travellers with time to kill. 59 fascinating things you didn't know about Russia 4. Sochi Where is it? The Russian Riviera - on the Black Sea. Population: 370,000 Of note: Winter Olympics 2014 host city. How to get there: Adler-Sochi International Airport. The Russian Riviera Credit: Getty We all know about Sochi, don’t we? The unofficial summer capital of Russia, where past tsars and Joseph Stalin had dachas (the latter of which can be visited), Sochi boasts a subtropical climate that warms the Russian elite every summer. But it’s not all glitz and glamour, there’s the Nikolai Ostrovsky Literary Memorial Museum and Sochi’s Museum of Sporting Glory. The people behind the World Cup boast of its “impressive modern infrastructure”. 5. Saransk Where is it? Saransk is capital of the Mordovia region, about 400 miles east of Moscow. Population: 297,000 Of note: Gerard Depardieu, the French actor, has been a registered resident here since 2013. How to get there: There’s a daily direct train from Moscow, or a small airport. “Saransk is a town of myths and legends, with a chequered past and big plans for the future,” says the World Cup’s promotional literature. “Remembering his trip to Saransk, Leo Tolstoy wrote in 1906: ‘Old pines with long trunks and short crowns. The soil is black, and a little stony… Backwoods. The Sura River, and the best sturgeon ever.’ By 2018, when the FIFA World Cup arrives here, the myths of Saransk will have been transformed into architecture.” Intruguing. Do not miss the Museum of Mordovia Folk Culture, or a triumvirate of excellent squares - Millennium Square, Victory Square and Soviet Square. Inside the bizarre world of Soviet sanatoriums 6. Kaliningrad Where is it? Prepare to have your mind blown. Population: 437,456 Of note: Kaliningrad is Russia’s European enclave, wedged between Poland and Lithuania on the Baltic Sea coast. How to get there: Khrabrovo Airport, train from Moscow, or ferry from a number of European cities. During Soviet times Kaliningrad was a closed military zone, and after the fall of the USSR, it suffered a horrendous economic collapse. Today, however, it is popular with holidaying Russians, especially its half of the Unesco-protected Curonian Spit beach strip that it shares with Lithuania. Founded by Teutonic Knights in 1255, Kaliningrad was also home to the legendary Baron Munchhausen, philosopher Immanuel Kant and writer and compose Ernst Hoffman. England in Kaliningrad: The city will host England v Belgium on 28 June 2018. 7. Volgograd Where is it? On the banks of the Volga, south-west of Moscow. Population: 1million Of note: Volgograd was once known as Stalingrad. How to get there: Volgograd International Airport connects to other major Russian cities, or its connected to Moscow by rail. The imposing The Motherland Calls sculpture Credit: Getty It’s hard to detach the city from its past, a city made by famous by a devastating Second World War siege. The official literature notes: “Over the course of the last hundred years, Volgograd has often been a prominent figure on the Russian and global stage. Many events have left their mark on the city in monuments, places and traditions. “Over the last century the city has changed its name three times: at the beginning of the twentieth century it was called Tsaritsyn and it was a backwater place on the banks of the Volga River. Then it became Stalingrad - the fortress that played a pivotal role in World War II, and later was renamed Volgograd, having become in the process a sunny and hospitable city whose residents love fishing, football, boat rides and beaches.” The Motherland Calls, a monument to the Battle of Stalingrad and the tallest statue of a woman in the world, is well worth a visit. The imposing structure soars above the city, while beneath it is buried the famous Soviet sniper Vasily Zaytsev. England in Volgograd: The city will host England v Tunisia on 18 June 2018. 8. Nizhny Novgorod Where is it? 250 miles east of Moscow. Population: 1.3 million Of note: It was previously known as Gorky, in honour of the Soviet author. How to get there: Strigino International Airport. Colourful cathedral domes in Nizhny Novgorod Credit: GETTY The city was previously closed to foreigners during the Soviet era to protect the security of its military research centre and production factories. Even street maps were not available for sale until mid-1970s. “At the same time Nizhny Novgorod is an old Russian merchant town with timber planking and carved window frames that survived the onslaught of modern architecture,” says the official literature. The city boasts a Kremlin, “the cradle of Nizhny Novgorod”, built high above the Volga. The structure seen today was built in the 16th century. England in Nizhny Novgorod: The city will host England v Panama on 24 June 2018. 9. Kazan Where is it? Where the Volga meets the Kazanka. Population: 1.1million Of note: It is referred to the Sports Capital of Russia, having hosted the 2014 World Fencing Championships and 2015 World Aquatics Championships. How to get there: Kazan International Airport, or by rail from Moscow. Kazan, too, has a Kremlin, which in 2015 was visited by 1.5 million people. The World Cup organisers say Kazan is a “feast of a city”. “Cold winters and hot summers, Muslim minarets and Orthodox monasteries, the ancient archeological sites and the science city of Innopolis, forest steppes, taiga and the Great Silk Road all mix in the cauldron that is the Tatar capital,” they say. “The result of this melting pot is the self-sufficient and self-assured third capital of Russia that each year extends a warm welcome to a million guests who come here to experience all sorts of impressions and emotions.” The city has its own Millennium Bridge, too.
If there’s one thing more exciting than the prospect of watching England limp out of the group stages of next year’s World Cup, it’s the chance to learn more about the enigmatic nether regions of the host nation. We all know Moscow and St Petersburg, each soaking in its own charm and character, but what of Kazan or Yekaterinburg? Nizhny Novgorod, anyone? Of the 11 cities set to welcome thousands of football fans from around the world, we would wager the names of eight, maybe nine, have never crossed the lips of those poised to visit. With that in mind, here’s a crash course on the Russian host cities you’ve never heard of. Or follow these links for the lowdown on Moscow and St Petersburg. 1. Samara Where is it? To the south-west, not far from the Kazakhstan border. Population: 1.2million Of note: Known as Kuybyshev, in honour of the Bolshevik leader Valerian Kuybyshev, from 1935 to 1991. How to get there: Kurumoch International Airport, as well as rail links to Moscow and other major cities. Samara is proud of its space-race heritage Credit: Getty “Samara is a very diverse city,” says the official World Cup literature. “It is a merchant town and an important aerospace centre; it is athletic, musical and youthful. Back in 1916, Boris Pasternak, Russian poet, novelist and future Nobel Prize laureate, wrote: ‘Samara is the best, the most sinful, most elegant and most comfortable part of Moscow, cut out from the city and transplanted on the banks of the Volga.’” Samara is indeed home to Russia’s aerospace centre and is where the rocket that took Yuri Gagarin, the first man in space, was built. There is also a Football Museum, opened in 2007; Vladimir Lenin Memorial Home, where the Ulyanov family once rented a flat; and a subterranean stronghold made for Joseph Stalin but never used, today known as “Stalin’s Bunker”. The city on the banks of the Volga is twinned with Palermo, Italy, and St Louis, US, among others. 2. Yekaterinburg Where is it? East of the Urals. Population: 1.4million Of note: The Church on Blood in Honour of All Saints Resplendent in the Russian Land was built on the site of the 1918 executions of Tsar Nicholas II and his family. How to get there: Kolstsovo International Airport is one of the largest in the country. The church built on the site of the Romanov executions Credit: Getty In contrast to St Petersburg’s “window to Europe”, Yekaterinburg is Russia’s “window to Asia”. Capital of the Urals, the region is of great economic importance and full of natural treasures, such as oil, gas, gold mines and Europe’s largest emerald deposit. Why not swing by the Boris Yeltsin Museum? The former leader was born nearby. 3. Rostov-on-Don Where is it? Southern Russia, on the banks of the Black Sea. Population: 1.1million Of note: Home of the Don Cossacks. How to get there: Platov International is the city’s brand spanking new airport. “The story of the Don Cossacks, delectable fish, and all the traditions of a large trading port: Rostov-on-Don treats visitors to the flavours of the Russian south,” says Russia&#39;s World Cup information website. The city, twinned with Glasgow, boasts a number of tourist sites including Russian Orthodox churches, as well as the heritage of a raft of renowned authors, including Alexander Solzhenitsyn, Maxim Gorky and Alexander Pushkin. The Upside Down House - where, you guessed it, everything is upside down - sounds perfect for travellers with time to kill. 59 fascinating things you didn&#39;t know about Russia 4. Sochi Where is it? The Russian Riviera - on the Black Sea. Population: 370,000 Of note: Winter Olympics 2014 host city. How to get there: Adler-Sochi International Airport. The Russian Riviera Credit: Getty We all know about Sochi, don’t we? The unofficial summer capital of Russia, where past tsars and Joseph Stalin had dachas (the latter of which can be visited), Sochi boasts a subtropical climate that warms the Russian elite every summer. But it’s not all glitz and glamour, there’s the Nikolai Ostrovsky Literary Memorial Museum and Sochi’s Museum of Sporting Glory. The people behind the World Cup boast of its “impressive modern infrastructure”. 5. Saransk Where is it? Saransk is capital of the Mordovia region, about 400 miles east of Moscow. Population: 297,000 Of note: Gerard Depardieu, the French actor, has been a registered resident here since 2013. How to get there: There’s a daily direct train from Moscow, or a small airport. “Saransk is a town of myths and legends, with a chequered past and big plans for the future,” says the World Cup’s promotional literature. “Remembering his trip to Saransk, Leo Tolstoy wrote in 1906: ‘Old pines with long trunks and short crowns. The soil is black, and a little stony… Backwoods. The Sura River, and the best sturgeon ever.’ By 2018, when the FIFA World Cup arrives here, the myths of Saransk will have been transformed into architecture.” Intruguing. Do not miss the Museum of Mordovia Folk Culture, or a triumvirate of excellent squares - Millennium Square, Victory Square and Soviet Square. Inside the bizarre world of Soviet sanatoriums 6. Kaliningrad Where is it? Prepare to have your mind blown. Population: 437,456 Of note: Kaliningrad is Russia’s European enclave, wedged between Poland and Lithuania on the Baltic Sea coast. How to get there: Khrabrovo Airport, train from Moscow, or ferry from a number of European cities. During Soviet times Kaliningrad was a closed military zone, and after the fall of the USSR, it suffered a horrendous economic collapse. Today, however, it is popular with holidaying Russians, especially its half of the Unesco-protected Curonian Spit beach strip that it shares with Lithuania. Founded by Teutonic Knights in 1255, Kaliningrad was also home to the legendary Baron Munchhausen, philosopher Immanuel Kant and writer and compose Ernst Hoffman. England in Kaliningrad: The city will host England v Belgium on 28 June 2018. 7. Volgograd Where is it? On the banks of the Volga, south-west of Moscow. Population: 1million Of note: Volgograd was once known as Stalingrad. How to get there: Volgograd International Airport connects to other major Russian cities, or its connected to Moscow by rail. The imposing The Motherland Calls sculpture Credit: Getty It’s hard to detach the city from its past, a city made by famous by a devastating Second World War siege. The official literature notes: “Over the course of the last hundred years, Volgograd has often been a prominent figure on the Russian and global stage. Many events have left their mark on the city in monuments, places and traditions. “Over the last century the city has changed its name three times: at the beginning of the twentieth century it was called Tsaritsyn and it was a backwater place on the banks of the Volga River. Then it became Stalingrad - the fortress that played a pivotal role in World War II, and later was renamed Volgograd, having become in the process a sunny and hospitable city whose residents love fishing, football, boat rides and beaches.” The Motherland Calls, a monument to the Battle of Stalingrad and the tallest statue of a woman in the world, is well worth a visit. The imposing structure soars above the city, while beneath it is buried the famous Soviet sniper Vasily Zaytsev. England in Volgograd: The city will host England v Tunisia on 18 June 2018. 8. Nizhny Novgorod Where is it? 250 miles east of Moscow. Population: 1.3 million Of note: It was previously known as Gorky, in honour of the Soviet author. How to get there: Strigino International Airport. Colourful cathedral domes in Nizhny Novgorod Credit: GETTY The city was previously closed to foreigners during the Soviet era to protect the security of its military research centre and production factories. Even street maps were not available for sale until mid-1970s. “At the same time Nizhny Novgorod is an old Russian merchant town with timber planking and carved window frames that survived the onslaught of modern architecture,” says the official literature. The city boasts a Kremlin, “the cradle of Nizhny Novgorod”, built high above the Volga. The structure seen today was built in the 16th century. England in Nizhny Novgorod: The city will host England v Panama on 24 June 2018. 9. Kazan Where is it? Where the Volga meets the Kazanka. Population: 1.1million Of note: It is referred to the Sports Capital of Russia, having hosted the 2014 World Fencing Championships and 2015 World Aquatics Championships. How to get there: Kazan International Airport, or by rail from Moscow. Kazan, too, has a Kremlin, which in 2015 was visited by 1.5 million people. The World Cup organisers say Kazan is a “feast of a city”. “Cold winters and hot summers, Muslim minarets and Orthodox monasteries, the ancient archeological sites and the science city of Innopolis, forest steppes, taiga and the Great Silk Road all mix in the cauldron that is the Tatar capital,” they say. “The result of this melting pot is the self-sufficient and self-assured third capital of Russia that each year extends a warm welcome to a million guests who come here to experience all sorts of impressions and emotions.” The city has its own Millennium Bridge, too.
What can England fans expect in Nizhny Novgorod?
If there’s one thing more exciting than the prospect of watching England limp out of the group stages of next year’s World Cup, it’s the chance to learn more about the enigmatic nether regions of the host nation. We all know Moscow and St Petersburg, each soaking in its own charm and character, but what of Kazan or Yekaterinburg? Nizhny Novgorod, anyone? Of the 11 cities set to welcome thousands of football fans from around the world, we would wager the names of eight, maybe nine, have never crossed the lips of those poised to visit. With that in mind, here’s a crash course on the Russian host cities you’ve never heard of. Or follow these links for the lowdown on Moscow and St Petersburg. 1. Samara Where is it? To the south-west, not far from the Kazakhstan border. Population: 1.2million Of note: Known as Kuybyshev, in honour of the Bolshevik leader Valerian Kuybyshev, from 1935 to 1991. How to get there: Kurumoch International Airport, as well as rail links to Moscow and other major cities. Samara is proud of its space-race heritage Credit: Getty “Samara is a very diverse city,” says the official World Cup literature. “It is a merchant town and an important aerospace centre; it is athletic, musical and youthful. Back in 1916, Boris Pasternak, Russian poet, novelist and future Nobel Prize laureate, wrote: ‘Samara is the best, the most sinful, most elegant and most comfortable part of Moscow, cut out from the city and transplanted on the banks of the Volga.’” Samara is indeed home to Russia’s aerospace centre and is where the rocket that took Yuri Gagarin, the first man in space, was built. There is also a Football Museum, opened in 2007; Vladimir Lenin Memorial Home, where the Ulyanov family once rented a flat; and a subterranean stronghold made for Joseph Stalin but never used, today known as “Stalin’s Bunker”. The city on the banks of the Volga is twinned with Palermo, Italy, and St Louis, US, among others. 2. Yekaterinburg Where is it? East of the Urals. Population: 1.4million Of note: The Church on Blood in Honour of All Saints Resplendent in the Russian Land was built on the site of the 1918 executions of Tsar Nicholas II and his family. How to get there: Kolstsovo International Airport is one of the largest in the country. The church built on the site of the Romanov executions Credit: Getty In contrast to St Petersburg’s “window to Europe”, Yekaterinburg is Russia’s “window to Asia”. Capital of the Urals, the region is of great economic importance and full of natural treasures, such as oil, gas, gold mines and Europe’s largest emerald deposit. Why not swing by the Boris Yeltsin Museum? The former leader was born nearby. 3. Rostov-on-Don Where is it? Southern Russia, on the banks of the Black Sea. Population: 1.1million Of note: Home of the Don Cossacks. How to get there: Platov International is the city’s brand spanking new airport. “The story of the Don Cossacks, delectable fish, and all the traditions of a large trading port: Rostov-on-Don treats visitors to the flavours of the Russian south,” says Russia's World Cup information website. The city, twinned with Glasgow, boasts a number of tourist sites including Russian Orthodox churches, as well as the heritage of a raft of renowned authors, including Alexander Solzhenitsyn, Maxim Gorky and Alexander Pushkin. The Upside Down House - where, you guessed it, everything is upside down - sounds perfect for travellers with time to kill. 59 fascinating things you didn't know about Russia 4. Sochi Where is it? The Russian Riviera - on the Black Sea. Population: 370,000 Of note: Winter Olympics 2014 host city. How to get there: Adler-Sochi International Airport. The Russian Riviera Credit: Getty We all know about Sochi, don’t we? The unofficial summer capital of Russia, where past tsars and Joseph Stalin had dachas (the latter of which can be visited), Sochi boasts a subtropical climate that warms the Russian elite every summer. But it’s not all glitz and glamour, there’s the Nikolai Ostrovsky Literary Memorial Museum and Sochi’s Museum of Sporting Glory. The people behind the World Cup boast of its “impressive modern infrastructure”. 5. Saransk Where is it? Saransk is capital of the Mordovia region, about 400 miles east of Moscow. Population: 297,000 Of note: Gerard Depardieu, the French actor, has been a registered resident here since 2013. How to get there: There’s a daily direct train from Moscow, or a small airport. “Saransk is a town of myths and legends, with a chequered past and big plans for the future,” says the World Cup’s promotional literature. “Remembering his trip to Saransk, Leo Tolstoy wrote in 1906: ‘Old pines with long trunks and short crowns. The soil is black, and a little stony… Backwoods. The Sura River, and the best sturgeon ever.’ By 2018, when the FIFA World Cup arrives here, the myths of Saransk will have been transformed into architecture.” Intruguing. Do not miss the Museum of Mordovia Folk Culture, or a triumvirate of excellent squares - Millennium Square, Victory Square and Soviet Square. Inside the bizarre world of Soviet sanatoriums 6. Kaliningrad Where is it? Prepare to have your mind blown. Population: 437,456 Of note: Kaliningrad is Russia’s European enclave, wedged between Poland and Lithuania on the Baltic Sea coast. How to get there: Khrabrovo Airport, train from Moscow, or ferry from a number of European cities. During Soviet times Kaliningrad was a closed military zone, and after the fall of the USSR, it suffered a horrendous economic collapse. Today, however, it is popular with holidaying Russians, especially its half of the Unesco-protected Curonian Spit beach strip that it shares with Lithuania. Founded by Teutonic Knights in 1255, Kaliningrad was also home to the legendary Baron Munchhausen, philosopher Immanuel Kant and writer and compose Ernst Hoffman. England in Kaliningrad: The city will host England v Belgium on 28 June 2018. 7. Volgograd Where is it? On the banks of the Volga, south-west of Moscow. Population: 1million Of note: Volgograd was once known as Stalingrad. How to get there: Volgograd International Airport connects to other major Russian cities, or its connected to Moscow by rail. The imposing The Motherland Calls sculpture Credit: Getty It’s hard to detach the city from its past, a city made by famous by a devastating Second World War siege. The official literature notes: “Over the course of the last hundred years, Volgograd has often been a prominent figure on the Russian and global stage. Many events have left their mark on the city in monuments, places and traditions. “Over the last century the city has changed its name three times: at the beginning of the twentieth century it was called Tsaritsyn and it was a backwater place on the banks of the Volga River. Then it became Stalingrad - the fortress that played a pivotal role in World War II, and later was renamed Volgograd, having become in the process a sunny and hospitable city whose residents love fishing, football, boat rides and beaches.” The Motherland Calls, a monument to the Battle of Stalingrad and the tallest statue of a woman in the world, is well worth a visit. The imposing structure soars above the city, while beneath it is buried the famous Soviet sniper Vasily Zaytsev. England in Volgograd: The city will host England v Tunisia on 18 June 2018. 8. Nizhny Novgorod Where is it? 250 miles east of Moscow. Population: 1.3 million Of note: It was previously known as Gorky, in honour of the Soviet author. How to get there: Strigino International Airport. Colourful cathedral domes in Nizhny Novgorod Credit: GETTY The city was previously closed to foreigners during the Soviet era to protect the security of its military research centre and production factories. Even street maps were not available for sale until mid-1970s. “At the same time Nizhny Novgorod is an old Russian merchant town with timber planking and carved window frames that survived the onslaught of modern architecture,” says the official literature. The city boasts a Kremlin, “the cradle of Nizhny Novgorod”, built high above the Volga. The structure seen today was built in the 16th century. England in Nizhny Novgorod: The city will host England v Panama on 24 June 2018. 9. Kazan Where is it? Where the Volga meets the Kazanka. Population: 1.1million Of note: It is referred to the Sports Capital of Russia, having hosted the 2014 World Fencing Championships and 2015 World Aquatics Championships. How to get there: Kazan International Airport, or by rail from Moscow. Kazan, too, has a Kremlin, which in 2015 was visited by 1.5 million people. The World Cup organisers say Kazan is a “feast of a city”. “Cold winters and hot summers, Muslim minarets and Orthodox monasteries, the ancient archeological sites and the science city of Innopolis, forest steppes, taiga and the Great Silk Road all mix in the cauldron that is the Tatar capital,” they say. “The result of this melting pot is the self-sufficient and self-assured third capital of Russia that each year extends a warm welcome to a million guests who come here to experience all sorts of impressions and emotions.” The city has its own Millennium Bridge, too.
If there’s one thing more exciting than the prospect of watching England limp out of the group stages of next year’s World Cup, it’s the chance to learn more about the enigmatic nether regions of the host nation. We all know Moscow and St Petersburg, each soaking in its own charm and character, but what of Kazan or Yekaterinburg? Nizhny Novgorod, anyone? Of the 11 cities set to welcome thousands of football fans from around the world, we would wager the names of eight, maybe nine, have never crossed the lips of those poised to visit. With that in mind, here’s a crash course on the Russian host cities you’ve never heard of. Or follow these links for the lowdown on Moscow and St Petersburg. 1. Samara Where is it? To the south-west, not far from the Kazakhstan border. Population: 1.2million Of note: Known as Kuybyshev, in honour of the Bolshevik leader Valerian Kuybyshev, from 1935 to 1991. How to get there: Kurumoch International Airport, as well as rail links to Moscow and other major cities. Samara is proud of its space-race heritage Credit: Getty “Samara is a very diverse city,” says the official World Cup literature. “It is a merchant town and an important aerospace centre; it is athletic, musical and youthful. Back in 1916, Boris Pasternak, Russian poet, novelist and future Nobel Prize laureate, wrote: ‘Samara is the best, the most sinful, most elegant and most comfortable part of Moscow, cut out from the city and transplanted on the banks of the Volga.’” Samara is indeed home to Russia’s aerospace centre and is where the rocket that took Yuri Gagarin, the first man in space, was built. There is also a Football Museum, opened in 2007; Vladimir Lenin Memorial Home, where the Ulyanov family once rented a flat; and a subterranean stronghold made for Joseph Stalin but never used, today known as “Stalin’s Bunker”. The city on the banks of the Volga is twinned with Palermo, Italy, and St Louis, US, among others. 2. Yekaterinburg Where is it? East of the Urals. Population: 1.4million Of note: The Church on Blood in Honour of All Saints Resplendent in the Russian Land was built on the site of the 1918 executions of Tsar Nicholas II and his family. How to get there: Kolstsovo International Airport is one of the largest in the country. The church built on the site of the Romanov executions Credit: Getty In contrast to St Petersburg’s “window to Europe”, Yekaterinburg is Russia’s “window to Asia”. Capital of the Urals, the region is of great economic importance and full of natural treasures, such as oil, gas, gold mines and Europe’s largest emerald deposit. Why not swing by the Boris Yeltsin Museum? The former leader was born nearby. 3. Rostov-on-Don Where is it? Southern Russia, on the banks of the Black Sea. Population: 1.1million Of note: Home of the Don Cossacks. How to get there: Platov International is the city’s brand spanking new airport. “The story of the Don Cossacks, delectable fish, and all the traditions of a large trading port: Rostov-on-Don treats visitors to the flavours of the Russian south,” says Russia&#39;s World Cup information website. The city, twinned with Glasgow, boasts a number of tourist sites including Russian Orthodox churches, as well as the heritage of a raft of renowned authors, including Alexander Solzhenitsyn, Maxim Gorky and Alexander Pushkin. The Upside Down House - where, you guessed it, everything is upside down - sounds perfect for travellers with time to kill. 59 fascinating things you didn&#39;t know about Russia 4. Sochi Where is it? The Russian Riviera - on the Black Sea. Population: 370,000 Of note: Winter Olympics 2014 host city. How to get there: Adler-Sochi International Airport. The Russian Riviera Credit: Getty We all know about Sochi, don’t we? The unofficial summer capital of Russia, where past tsars and Joseph Stalin had dachas (the latter of which can be visited), Sochi boasts a subtropical climate that warms the Russian elite every summer. But it’s not all glitz and glamour, there’s the Nikolai Ostrovsky Literary Memorial Museum and Sochi’s Museum of Sporting Glory. The people behind the World Cup boast of its “impressive modern infrastructure”. 5. Saransk Where is it? Saransk is capital of the Mordovia region, about 400 miles east of Moscow. Population: 297,000 Of note: Gerard Depardieu, the French actor, has been a registered resident here since 2013. How to get there: There’s a daily direct train from Moscow, or a small airport. “Saransk is a town of myths and legends, with a chequered past and big plans for the future,” says the World Cup’s promotional literature. “Remembering his trip to Saransk, Leo Tolstoy wrote in 1906: ‘Old pines with long trunks and short crowns. The soil is black, and a little stony… Backwoods. The Sura River, and the best sturgeon ever.’ By 2018, when the FIFA World Cup arrives here, the myths of Saransk will have been transformed into architecture.” Intruguing. Do not miss the Museum of Mordovia Folk Culture, or a triumvirate of excellent squares - Millennium Square, Victory Square and Soviet Square. Inside the bizarre world of Soviet sanatoriums 6. Kaliningrad Where is it? Prepare to have your mind blown. Population: 437,456 Of note: Kaliningrad is Russia’s European enclave, wedged between Poland and Lithuania on the Baltic Sea coast. How to get there: Khrabrovo Airport, train from Moscow, or ferry from a number of European cities. During Soviet times Kaliningrad was a closed military zone, and after the fall of the USSR, it suffered a horrendous economic collapse. Today, however, it is popular with holidaying Russians, especially its half of the Unesco-protected Curonian Spit beach strip that it shares with Lithuania. Founded by Teutonic Knights in 1255, Kaliningrad was also home to the legendary Baron Munchhausen, philosopher Immanuel Kant and writer and compose Ernst Hoffman. England in Kaliningrad: The city will host England v Belgium on 28 June 2018. 7. Volgograd Where is it? On the banks of the Volga, south-west of Moscow. Population: 1million Of note: Volgograd was once known as Stalingrad. How to get there: Volgograd International Airport connects to other major Russian cities, or its connected to Moscow by rail. The imposing The Motherland Calls sculpture Credit: Getty It’s hard to detach the city from its past, a city made by famous by a devastating Second World War siege. The official literature notes: “Over the course of the last hundred years, Volgograd has often been a prominent figure on the Russian and global stage. Many events have left their mark on the city in monuments, places and traditions. “Over the last century the city has changed its name three times: at the beginning of the twentieth century it was called Tsaritsyn and it was a backwater place on the banks of the Volga River. Then it became Stalingrad - the fortress that played a pivotal role in World War II, and later was renamed Volgograd, having become in the process a sunny and hospitable city whose residents love fishing, football, boat rides and beaches.” The Motherland Calls, a monument to the Battle of Stalingrad and the tallest statue of a woman in the world, is well worth a visit. The imposing structure soars above the city, while beneath it is buried the famous Soviet sniper Vasily Zaytsev. England in Volgograd: The city will host England v Tunisia on 18 June 2018. 8. Nizhny Novgorod Where is it? 250 miles east of Moscow. Population: 1.3 million Of note: It was previously known as Gorky, in honour of the Soviet author. How to get there: Strigino International Airport. Colourful cathedral domes in Nizhny Novgorod Credit: GETTY The city was previously closed to foreigners during the Soviet era to protect the security of its military research centre and production factories. Even street maps were not available for sale until mid-1970s. “At the same time Nizhny Novgorod is an old Russian merchant town with timber planking and carved window frames that survived the onslaught of modern architecture,” says the official literature. The city boasts a Kremlin, “the cradle of Nizhny Novgorod”, built high above the Volga. The structure seen today was built in the 16th century. England in Nizhny Novgorod: The city will host England v Panama on 24 June 2018. 9. Kazan Where is it? Where the Volga meets the Kazanka. Population: 1.1million Of note: It is referred to the Sports Capital of Russia, having hosted the 2014 World Fencing Championships and 2015 World Aquatics Championships. How to get there: Kazan International Airport, or by rail from Moscow. Kazan, too, has a Kremlin, which in 2015 was visited by 1.5 million people. The World Cup organisers say Kazan is a “feast of a city”. “Cold winters and hot summers, Muslim minarets and Orthodox monasteries, the ancient archeological sites and the science city of Innopolis, forest steppes, taiga and the Great Silk Road all mix in the cauldron that is the Tatar capital,” they say. “The result of this melting pot is the self-sufficient and self-assured third capital of Russia that each year extends a warm welcome to a million guests who come here to experience all sorts of impressions and emotions.” The city has its own Millennium Bridge, too.
What can England fans expect in Nizhny Novgorod?
If there’s one thing more exciting than the prospect of watching England limp out of the group stages of next year’s World Cup, it’s the chance to learn more about the enigmatic nether regions of the host nation. We all know Moscow and St Petersburg, each soaking in its own charm and character, but what of Kazan or Yekaterinburg? Nizhny Novgorod, anyone? Of the 11 cities set to welcome thousands of football fans from around the world, we would wager the names of eight, maybe nine, have never crossed the lips of those poised to visit. With that in mind, here’s a crash course on the Russian host cities you’ve never heard of. Or follow these links for the lowdown on Moscow and St Petersburg. 1. Samara Where is it? To the south-west, not far from the Kazakhstan border. Population: 1.2million Of note: Known as Kuybyshev, in honour of the Bolshevik leader Valerian Kuybyshev, from 1935 to 1991. How to get there: Kurumoch International Airport, as well as rail links to Moscow and other major cities. Samara is proud of its space-race heritage Credit: Getty “Samara is a very diverse city,” says the official World Cup literature. “It is a merchant town and an important aerospace centre; it is athletic, musical and youthful. Back in 1916, Boris Pasternak, Russian poet, novelist and future Nobel Prize laureate, wrote: ‘Samara is the best, the most sinful, most elegant and most comfortable part of Moscow, cut out from the city and transplanted on the banks of the Volga.’” Samara is indeed home to Russia’s aerospace centre and is where the rocket that took Yuri Gagarin, the first man in space, was built. There is also a Football Museum, opened in 2007; Vladimir Lenin Memorial Home, where the Ulyanov family once rented a flat; and a subterranean stronghold made for Joseph Stalin but never used, today known as “Stalin’s Bunker”. The city on the banks of the Volga is twinned with Palermo, Italy, and St Louis, US, among others. 2. Yekaterinburg Where is it? East of the Urals. Population: 1.4million Of note: The Church on Blood in Honour of All Saints Resplendent in the Russian Land was built on the site of the 1918 executions of Tsar Nicholas II and his family. How to get there: Kolstsovo International Airport is one of the largest in the country. The church built on the site of the Romanov executions Credit: Getty In contrast to St Petersburg’s “window to Europe”, Yekaterinburg is Russia’s “window to Asia”. Capital of the Urals, the region is of great economic importance and full of natural treasures, such as oil, gas, gold mines and Europe’s largest emerald deposit. Why not swing by the Boris Yeltsin Museum? The former leader was born nearby. 3. Rostov-on-Don Where is it? Southern Russia, on the banks of the Black Sea. Population: 1.1million Of note: Home of the Don Cossacks. How to get there: Platov International is the city’s brand spanking new airport. “The story of the Don Cossacks, delectable fish, and all the traditions of a large trading port: Rostov-on-Don treats visitors to the flavours of the Russian south,” says Russia's World Cup information website. The city, twinned with Glasgow, boasts a number of tourist sites including Russian Orthodox churches, as well as the heritage of a raft of renowned authors, including Alexander Solzhenitsyn, Maxim Gorky and Alexander Pushkin. The Upside Down House - where, you guessed it, everything is upside down - sounds perfect for travellers with time to kill. 59 fascinating things you didn't know about Russia 4. Sochi Where is it? The Russian Riviera - on the Black Sea. Population: 370,000 Of note: Winter Olympics 2014 host city. How to get there: Adler-Sochi International Airport. The Russian Riviera Credit: Getty We all know about Sochi, don’t we? The unofficial summer capital of Russia, where past tsars and Joseph Stalin had dachas (the latter of which can be visited), Sochi boasts a subtropical climate that warms the Russian elite every summer. But it’s not all glitz and glamour, there’s the Nikolai Ostrovsky Literary Memorial Museum and Sochi’s Museum of Sporting Glory. The people behind the World Cup boast of its “impressive modern infrastructure”. 5. Saransk Where is it? Saransk is capital of the Mordovia region, about 400 miles east of Moscow. Population: 297,000 Of note: Gerard Depardieu, the French actor, has been a registered resident here since 2013. How to get there: There’s a daily direct train from Moscow, or a small airport. “Saransk is a town of myths and legends, with a chequered past and big plans for the future,” says the World Cup’s promotional literature. “Remembering his trip to Saransk, Leo Tolstoy wrote in 1906: ‘Old pines with long trunks and short crowns. The soil is black, and a little stony… Backwoods. The Sura River, and the best sturgeon ever.’ By 2018, when the FIFA World Cup arrives here, the myths of Saransk will have been transformed into architecture.” Intruguing. Do not miss the Museum of Mordovia Folk Culture, or a triumvirate of excellent squares - Millennium Square, Victory Square and Soviet Square. Inside the bizarre world of Soviet sanatoriums 6. Kaliningrad Where is it? Prepare to have your mind blown. Population: 437,456 Of note: Kaliningrad is Russia’s European enclave, wedged between Poland and Lithuania on the Baltic Sea coast. How to get there: Khrabrovo Airport, train from Moscow, or ferry from a number of European cities. During Soviet times Kaliningrad was a closed military zone, and after the fall of the USSR, it suffered a horrendous economic collapse. Today, however, it is popular with holidaying Russians, especially its half of the Unesco-protected Curonian Spit beach strip that it shares with Lithuania. Founded by Teutonic Knights in 1255, Kaliningrad was also home to the legendary Baron Munchhausen, philosopher Immanuel Kant and writer and compose Ernst Hoffman. England in Kaliningrad: The city will host England v Belgium on 28 June 2018. 7. Volgograd Where is it? On the banks of the Volga, south-west of Moscow. Population: 1million Of note: Volgograd was once known as Stalingrad. How to get there: Volgograd International Airport connects to other major Russian cities, or its connected to Moscow by rail. The imposing The Motherland Calls sculpture Credit: Getty It’s hard to detach the city from its past, a city made by famous by a devastating Second World War siege. The official literature notes: “Over the course of the last hundred years, Volgograd has often been a prominent figure on the Russian and global stage. Many events have left their mark on the city in monuments, places and traditions. “Over the last century the city has changed its name three times: at the beginning of the twentieth century it was called Tsaritsyn and it was a backwater place on the banks of the Volga River. Then it became Stalingrad - the fortress that played a pivotal role in World War II, and later was renamed Volgograd, having become in the process a sunny and hospitable city whose residents love fishing, football, boat rides and beaches.” The Motherland Calls, a monument to the Battle of Stalingrad and the tallest statue of a woman in the world, is well worth a visit. The imposing structure soars above the city, while beneath it is buried the famous Soviet sniper Vasily Zaytsev. England in Volgograd: The city will host England v Tunisia on 18 June 2018. 8. Nizhny Novgorod Where is it? 250 miles east of Moscow. Population: 1.3 million Of note: It was previously known as Gorky, in honour of the Soviet author. How to get there: Strigino International Airport. Colourful cathedral domes in Nizhny Novgorod Credit: GETTY The city was previously closed to foreigners during the Soviet era to protect the security of its military research centre and production factories. Even street maps were not available for sale until mid-1970s. “At the same time Nizhny Novgorod is an old Russian merchant town with timber planking and carved window frames that survived the onslaught of modern architecture,” says the official literature. The city boasts a Kremlin, “the cradle of Nizhny Novgorod”, built high above the Volga. The structure seen today was built in the 16th century. England in Nizhny Novgorod: The city will host England v Panama on 24 June 2018. 9. Kazan Where is it? Where the Volga meets the Kazanka. Population: 1.1million Of note: It is referred to the Sports Capital of Russia, having hosted the 2014 World Fencing Championships and 2015 World Aquatics Championships. How to get there: Kazan International Airport, or by rail from Moscow. Kazan, too, has a Kremlin, which in 2015 was visited by 1.5 million people. The World Cup organisers say Kazan is a “feast of a city”. “Cold winters and hot summers, Muslim minarets and Orthodox monasteries, the ancient archeological sites and the science city of Innopolis, forest steppes, taiga and the Great Silk Road all mix in the cauldron that is the Tatar capital,” they say. “The result of this melting pot is the self-sufficient and self-assured third capital of Russia that each year extends a warm welcome to a million guests who come here to experience all sorts of impressions and emotions.” The city has its own Millennium Bridge, too.
If there’s one thing more exciting than the prospect of watching England limp out of the group stages of next year’s World Cup, it’s the chance to learn more about the enigmatic nether regions of the host nation. We all know Moscow and St Petersburg, each soaking in its own charm and character, but what of Kazan or Yekaterinburg? Nizhny Novgorod, anyone? Of the 11 cities set to welcome thousands of football fans from around the world, we would wager the names of eight, maybe nine, have never crossed the lips of those poised to visit. With that in mind, here’s a crash course on the Russian host cities you’ve never heard of. Or follow these links for the lowdown on Moscow and St Petersburg. 1. Samara Where is it? To the south-west, not far from the Kazakhstan border. Population: 1.2million Of note: Known as Kuybyshev, in honour of the Bolshevik leader Valerian Kuybyshev, from 1935 to 1991. How to get there: Kurumoch International Airport, as well as rail links to Moscow and other major cities. Samara is proud of its space-race heritage Credit: Getty “Samara is a very diverse city,” says the official World Cup literature. “It is a merchant town and an important aerospace centre; it is athletic, musical and youthful. Back in 1916, Boris Pasternak, Russian poet, novelist and future Nobel Prize laureate, wrote: ‘Samara is the best, the most sinful, most elegant and most comfortable part of Moscow, cut out from the city and transplanted on the banks of the Volga.’” Samara is indeed home to Russia’s aerospace centre and is where the rocket that took Yuri Gagarin, the first man in space, was built. There is also a Football Museum, opened in 2007; Vladimir Lenin Memorial Home, where the Ulyanov family once rented a flat; and a subterranean stronghold made for Joseph Stalin but never used, today known as “Stalin’s Bunker”. The city on the banks of the Volga is twinned with Palermo, Italy, and St Louis, US, among others. 2. Yekaterinburg Where is it? East of the Urals. Population: 1.4million Of note: The Church on Blood in Honour of All Saints Resplendent in the Russian Land was built on the site of the 1918 executions of Tsar Nicholas II and his family. How to get there: Kolstsovo International Airport is one of the largest in the country. The church built on the site of the Romanov executions Credit: Getty In contrast to St Petersburg’s “window to Europe”, Yekaterinburg is Russia’s “window to Asia”. Capital of the Urals, the region is of great economic importance and full of natural treasures, such as oil, gas, gold mines and Europe’s largest emerald deposit. Why not swing by the Boris Yeltsin Museum? The former leader was born nearby. 3. Rostov-on-Don Where is it? Southern Russia, on the banks of the Black Sea. Population: 1.1million Of note: Home of the Don Cossacks. How to get there: Platov International is the city’s brand spanking new airport. “The story of the Don Cossacks, delectable fish, and all the traditions of a large trading port: Rostov-on-Don treats visitors to the flavours of the Russian south,” says Russia&#39;s World Cup information website. The city, twinned with Glasgow, boasts a number of tourist sites including Russian Orthodox churches, as well as the heritage of a raft of renowned authors, including Alexander Solzhenitsyn, Maxim Gorky and Alexander Pushkin. The Upside Down House - where, you guessed it, everything is upside down - sounds perfect for travellers with time to kill. 59 fascinating things you didn&#39;t know about Russia 4. Sochi Where is it? The Russian Riviera - on the Black Sea. Population: 370,000 Of note: Winter Olympics 2014 host city. How to get there: Adler-Sochi International Airport. The Russian Riviera Credit: Getty We all know about Sochi, don’t we? The unofficial summer capital of Russia, where past tsars and Joseph Stalin had dachas (the latter of which can be visited), Sochi boasts a subtropical climate that warms the Russian elite every summer. But it’s not all glitz and glamour, there’s the Nikolai Ostrovsky Literary Memorial Museum and Sochi’s Museum of Sporting Glory. The people behind the World Cup boast of its “impressive modern infrastructure”. 5. Saransk Where is it? Saransk is capital of the Mordovia region, about 400 miles east of Moscow. Population: 297,000 Of note: Gerard Depardieu, the French actor, has been a registered resident here since 2013. How to get there: There’s a daily direct train from Moscow, or a small airport. “Saransk is a town of myths and legends, with a chequered past and big plans for the future,” says the World Cup’s promotional literature. “Remembering his trip to Saransk, Leo Tolstoy wrote in 1906: ‘Old pines with long trunks and short crowns. The soil is black, and a little stony… Backwoods. The Sura River, and the best sturgeon ever.’ By 2018, when the FIFA World Cup arrives here, the myths of Saransk will have been transformed into architecture.” Intruguing. Do not miss the Museum of Mordovia Folk Culture, or a triumvirate of excellent squares - Millennium Square, Victory Square and Soviet Square. Inside the bizarre world of Soviet sanatoriums 6. Kaliningrad Where is it? Prepare to have your mind blown. Population: 437,456 Of note: Kaliningrad is Russia’s European enclave, wedged between Poland and Lithuania on the Baltic Sea coast. How to get there: Khrabrovo Airport, train from Moscow, or ferry from a number of European cities. During Soviet times Kaliningrad was a closed military zone, and after the fall of the USSR, it suffered a horrendous economic collapse. Today, however, it is popular with holidaying Russians, especially its half of the Unesco-protected Curonian Spit beach strip that it shares with Lithuania. Founded by Teutonic Knights in 1255, Kaliningrad was also home to the legendary Baron Munchhausen, philosopher Immanuel Kant and writer and compose Ernst Hoffman. England in Kaliningrad: The city will host England v Belgium on 28 June 2018. 7. Volgograd Where is it? On the banks of the Volga, south-west of Moscow. Population: 1million Of note: Volgograd was once known as Stalingrad. How to get there: Volgograd International Airport connects to other major Russian cities, or its connected to Moscow by rail. The imposing The Motherland Calls sculpture Credit: Getty It’s hard to detach the city from its past, a city made by famous by a devastating Second World War siege. The official literature notes: “Over the course of the last hundred years, Volgograd has often been a prominent figure on the Russian and global stage. Many events have left their mark on the city in monuments, places and traditions. “Over the last century the city has changed its name three times: at the beginning of the twentieth century it was called Tsaritsyn and it was a backwater place on the banks of the Volga River. Then it became Stalingrad - the fortress that played a pivotal role in World War II, and later was renamed Volgograd, having become in the process a sunny and hospitable city whose residents love fishing, football, boat rides and beaches.” The Motherland Calls, a monument to the Battle of Stalingrad and the tallest statue of a woman in the world, is well worth a visit. The imposing structure soars above the city, while beneath it is buried the famous Soviet sniper Vasily Zaytsev. England in Volgograd: The city will host England v Tunisia on 18 June 2018. 8. Nizhny Novgorod Where is it? 250 miles east of Moscow. Population: 1.3 million Of note: It was previously known as Gorky, in honour of the Soviet author. How to get there: Strigino International Airport. Colourful cathedral domes in Nizhny Novgorod Credit: GETTY The city was previously closed to foreigners during the Soviet era to protect the security of its military research centre and production factories. Even street maps were not available for sale until mid-1970s. “At the same time Nizhny Novgorod is an old Russian merchant town with timber planking and carved window frames that survived the onslaught of modern architecture,” says the official literature. The city boasts a Kremlin, “the cradle of Nizhny Novgorod”, built high above the Volga. The structure seen today was built in the 16th century. England in Nizhny Novgorod: The city will host England v Panama on 24 June 2018. 9. Kazan Where is it? Where the Volga meets the Kazanka. Population: 1.1million Of note: It is referred to the Sports Capital of Russia, having hosted the 2014 World Fencing Championships and 2015 World Aquatics Championships. How to get there: Kazan International Airport, or by rail from Moscow. Kazan, too, has a Kremlin, which in 2015 was visited by 1.5 million people. The World Cup organisers say Kazan is a “feast of a city”. “Cold winters and hot summers, Muslim minarets and Orthodox monasteries, the ancient archeological sites and the science city of Innopolis, forest steppes, taiga and the Great Silk Road all mix in the cauldron that is the Tatar capital,” they say. “The result of this melting pot is the self-sufficient and self-assured third capital of Russia that each year extends a warm welcome to a million guests who come here to experience all sorts of impressions and emotions.” The city has its own Millennium Bridge, too.
What can England fans expect in Nizhny Novgorod?
If there’s one thing more exciting than the prospect of watching England limp out of the group stages of next year’s World Cup, it’s the chance to learn more about the enigmatic nether regions of the host nation. We all know Moscow and St Petersburg, each soaking in its own charm and character, but what of Kazan or Yekaterinburg? Nizhny Novgorod, anyone? Of the 11 cities set to welcome thousands of football fans from around the world, we would wager the names of eight, maybe nine, have never crossed the lips of those poised to visit. With that in mind, here’s a crash course on the Russian host cities you’ve never heard of. Or follow these links for the lowdown on Moscow and St Petersburg. 1. Samara Where is it? To the south-west, not far from the Kazakhstan border. Population: 1.2million Of note: Known as Kuybyshev, in honour of the Bolshevik leader Valerian Kuybyshev, from 1935 to 1991. How to get there: Kurumoch International Airport, as well as rail links to Moscow and other major cities. Samara is proud of its space-race heritage Credit: Getty “Samara is a very diverse city,” says the official World Cup literature. “It is a merchant town and an important aerospace centre; it is athletic, musical and youthful. Back in 1916, Boris Pasternak, Russian poet, novelist and future Nobel Prize laureate, wrote: ‘Samara is the best, the most sinful, most elegant and most comfortable part of Moscow, cut out from the city and transplanted on the banks of the Volga.’” Samara is indeed home to Russia’s aerospace centre and is where the rocket that took Yuri Gagarin, the first man in space, was built. There is also a Football Museum, opened in 2007; Vladimir Lenin Memorial Home, where the Ulyanov family once rented a flat; and a subterranean stronghold made for Joseph Stalin but never used, today known as “Stalin’s Bunker”. The city on the banks of the Volga is twinned with Palermo, Italy, and St Louis, US, among others. 2. Yekaterinburg Where is it? East of the Urals. Population: 1.4million Of note: The Church on Blood in Honour of All Saints Resplendent in the Russian Land was built on the site of the 1918 executions of Tsar Nicholas II and his family. How to get there: Kolstsovo International Airport is one of the largest in the country. The church built on the site of the Romanov executions Credit: Getty In contrast to St Petersburg’s “window to Europe”, Yekaterinburg is Russia’s “window to Asia”. Capital of the Urals, the region is of great economic importance and full of natural treasures, such as oil, gas, gold mines and Europe’s largest emerald deposit. Why not swing by the Boris Yeltsin Museum? The former leader was born nearby. 3. Rostov-on-Don Where is it? Southern Russia, on the banks of the Black Sea. Population: 1.1million Of note: Home of the Don Cossacks. How to get there: Platov International is the city’s brand spanking new airport. “The story of the Don Cossacks, delectable fish, and all the traditions of a large trading port: Rostov-on-Don treats visitors to the flavours of the Russian south,” says Russia's World Cup information website. The city, twinned with Glasgow, boasts a number of tourist sites including Russian Orthodox churches, as well as the heritage of a raft of renowned authors, including Alexander Solzhenitsyn, Maxim Gorky and Alexander Pushkin. The Upside Down House - where, you guessed it, everything is upside down - sounds perfect for travellers with time to kill. 59 fascinating things you didn't know about Russia 4. Sochi Where is it? The Russian Riviera - on the Black Sea. Population: 370,000 Of note: Winter Olympics 2014 host city. How to get there: Adler-Sochi International Airport. The Russian Riviera Credit: Getty We all know about Sochi, don’t we? The unofficial summer capital of Russia, where past tsars and Joseph Stalin had dachas (the latter of which can be visited), Sochi boasts a subtropical climate that warms the Russian elite every summer. But it’s not all glitz and glamour, there’s the Nikolai Ostrovsky Literary Memorial Museum and Sochi’s Museum of Sporting Glory. The people behind the World Cup boast of its “impressive modern infrastructure”. 5. Saransk Where is it? Saransk is capital of the Mordovia region, about 400 miles east of Moscow. Population: 297,000 Of note: Gerard Depardieu, the French actor, has been a registered resident here since 2013. How to get there: There’s a daily direct train from Moscow, or a small airport. “Saransk is a town of myths and legends, with a chequered past and big plans for the future,” says the World Cup’s promotional literature. “Remembering his trip to Saransk, Leo Tolstoy wrote in 1906: ‘Old pines with long trunks and short crowns. The soil is black, and a little stony… Backwoods. The Sura River, and the best sturgeon ever.’ By 2018, when the FIFA World Cup arrives here, the myths of Saransk will have been transformed into architecture.” Intruguing. Do not miss the Museum of Mordovia Folk Culture, or a triumvirate of excellent squares - Millennium Square, Victory Square and Soviet Square. Inside the bizarre world of Soviet sanatoriums 6. Kaliningrad Where is it? Prepare to have your mind blown. Population: 437,456 Of note: Kaliningrad is Russia’s European enclave, wedged between Poland and Lithuania on the Baltic Sea coast. How to get there: Khrabrovo Airport, train from Moscow, or ferry from a number of European cities. During Soviet times Kaliningrad was a closed military zone, and after the fall of the USSR, it suffered a horrendous economic collapse. Today, however, it is popular with holidaying Russians, especially its half of the Unesco-protected Curonian Spit beach strip that it shares with Lithuania. Founded by Teutonic Knights in 1255, Kaliningrad was also home to the legendary Baron Munchhausen, philosopher Immanuel Kant and writer and compose Ernst Hoffman. England in Kaliningrad: The city will host England v Belgium on 28 June 2018. 7. Volgograd Where is it? On the banks of the Volga, south-west of Moscow. Population: 1million Of note: Volgograd was once known as Stalingrad. How to get there: Volgograd International Airport connects to other major Russian cities, or its connected to Moscow by rail. The imposing The Motherland Calls sculpture Credit: Getty It’s hard to detach the city from its past, a city made by famous by a devastating Second World War siege. The official literature notes: “Over the course of the last hundred years, Volgograd has often been a prominent figure on the Russian and global stage. Many events have left their mark on the city in monuments, places and traditions. “Over the last century the city has changed its name three times: at the beginning of the twentieth century it was called Tsaritsyn and it was a backwater place on the banks of the Volga River. Then it became Stalingrad - the fortress that played a pivotal role in World War II, and later was renamed Volgograd, having become in the process a sunny and hospitable city whose residents love fishing, football, boat rides and beaches.” The Motherland Calls, a monument to the Battle of Stalingrad and the tallest statue of a woman in the world, is well worth a visit. The imposing structure soars above the city, while beneath it is buried the famous Soviet sniper Vasily Zaytsev. England in Volgograd: The city will host England v Tunisia on 18 June 2018. 8. Nizhny Novgorod Where is it? 250 miles east of Moscow. Population: 1.3 million Of note: It was previously known as Gorky, in honour of the Soviet author. How to get there: Strigino International Airport. Colourful cathedral domes in Nizhny Novgorod Credit: GETTY The city was previously closed to foreigners during the Soviet era to protect the security of its military research centre and production factories. Even street maps were not available for sale until mid-1970s. “At the same time Nizhny Novgorod is an old Russian merchant town with timber planking and carved window frames that survived the onslaught of modern architecture,” says the official literature. The city boasts a Kremlin, “the cradle of Nizhny Novgorod”, built high above the Volga. The structure seen today was built in the 16th century. England in Nizhny Novgorod: The city will host England v Panama on 24 June 2018. 9. Kazan Where is it? Where the Volga meets the Kazanka. Population: 1.1million Of note: It is referred to the Sports Capital of Russia, having hosted the 2014 World Fencing Championships and 2015 World Aquatics Championships. How to get there: Kazan International Airport, or by rail from Moscow. Kazan, too, has a Kremlin, which in 2015 was visited by 1.5 million people. The World Cup organisers say Kazan is a “feast of a city”. “Cold winters and hot summers, Muslim minarets and Orthodox monasteries, the ancient archeological sites and the science city of Innopolis, forest steppes, taiga and the Great Silk Road all mix in the cauldron that is the Tatar capital,” they say. “The result of this melting pot is the self-sufficient and self-assured third capital of Russia that each year extends a warm welcome to a million guests who come here to experience all sorts of impressions and emotions.” The city has its own Millennium Bridge, too.
If there’s one thing more exciting than the prospect of watching England limp out of the group stages of next year’s World Cup, it’s the chance to learn more about the enigmatic nether regions of the host nation. We all know Moscow and St Petersburg, each soaking in its own charm and character, but what of Kazan or Yekaterinburg? Nizhny Novgorod, anyone? Of the 11 cities set to welcome thousands of football fans from around the world, we would wager the names of eight, maybe nine, have never crossed the lips of those poised to visit. With that in mind, here’s a crash course on the Russian host cities you’ve never heard of. Or follow these links for the lowdown on Moscow and St Petersburg. 1. Samara Where is it? To the south-west, not far from the Kazakhstan border. Population: 1.2million Of note: Known as Kuybyshev, in honour of the Bolshevik leader Valerian Kuybyshev, from 1935 to 1991. How to get there: Kurumoch International Airport, as well as rail links to Moscow and other major cities. Samara is proud of its space-race heritage Credit: Getty “Samara is a very diverse city,” says the official World Cup literature. “It is a merchant town and an important aerospace centre; it is athletic, musical and youthful. Back in 1916, Boris Pasternak, Russian poet, novelist and future Nobel Prize laureate, wrote: ‘Samara is the best, the most sinful, most elegant and most comfortable part of Moscow, cut out from the city and transplanted on the banks of the Volga.’” Samara is indeed home to Russia’s aerospace centre and is where the rocket that took Yuri Gagarin, the first man in space, was built. There is also a Football Museum, opened in 2007; Vladimir Lenin Memorial Home, where the Ulyanov family once rented a flat; and a subterranean stronghold made for Joseph Stalin but never used, today known as “Stalin’s Bunker”. The city on the banks of the Volga is twinned with Palermo, Italy, and St Louis, US, among others. 2. Yekaterinburg Where is it? East of the Urals. Population: 1.4million Of note: The Church on Blood in Honour of All Saints Resplendent in the Russian Land was built on the site of the 1918 executions of Tsar Nicholas II and his family. How to get there: Kolstsovo International Airport is one of the largest in the country. The church built on the site of the Romanov executions Credit: Getty In contrast to St Petersburg’s “window to Europe”, Yekaterinburg is Russia’s “window to Asia”. Capital of the Urals, the region is of great economic importance and full of natural treasures, such as oil, gas, gold mines and Europe’s largest emerald deposit. Why not swing by the Boris Yeltsin Museum? The former leader was born nearby. 3. Rostov-on-Don Where is it? Southern Russia, on the banks of the Black Sea. Population: 1.1million Of note: Home of the Don Cossacks. How to get there: Platov International is the city’s brand spanking new airport. “The story of the Don Cossacks, delectable fish, and all the traditions of a large trading port: Rostov-on-Don treats visitors to the flavours of the Russian south,” says Russia&#39;s World Cup information website. The city, twinned with Glasgow, boasts a number of tourist sites including Russian Orthodox churches, as well as the heritage of a raft of renowned authors, including Alexander Solzhenitsyn, Maxim Gorky and Alexander Pushkin. The Upside Down House - where, you guessed it, everything is upside down - sounds perfect for travellers with time to kill. 59 fascinating things you didn&#39;t know about Russia 4. Sochi Where is it? The Russian Riviera - on the Black Sea. Population: 370,000 Of note: Winter Olympics 2014 host city. How to get there: Adler-Sochi International Airport. The Russian Riviera Credit: Getty We all know about Sochi, don’t we? The unofficial summer capital of Russia, where past tsars and Joseph Stalin had dachas (the latter of which can be visited), Sochi boasts a subtropical climate that warms the Russian elite every summer. But it’s not all glitz and glamour, there’s the Nikolai Ostrovsky Literary Memorial Museum and Sochi’s Museum of Sporting Glory. The people behind the World Cup boast of its “impressive modern infrastructure”. 5. Saransk Where is it? Saransk is capital of the Mordovia region, about 400 miles east of Moscow. Population: 297,000 Of note: Gerard Depardieu, the French actor, has been a registered resident here since 2013. How to get there: There’s a daily direct train from Moscow, or a small airport. “Saransk is a town of myths and legends, with a chequered past and big plans for the future,” says the World Cup’s promotional literature. “Remembering his trip to Saransk, Leo Tolstoy wrote in 1906: ‘Old pines with long trunks and short crowns. The soil is black, and a little stony… Backwoods. The Sura River, and the best sturgeon ever.’ By 2018, when the FIFA World Cup arrives here, the myths of Saransk will have been transformed into architecture.” Intruguing. Do not miss the Museum of Mordovia Folk Culture, or a triumvirate of excellent squares - Millennium Square, Victory Square and Soviet Square. Inside the bizarre world of Soviet sanatoriums 6. Kaliningrad Where is it? Prepare to have your mind blown. Population: 437,456 Of note: Kaliningrad is Russia’s European enclave, wedged between Poland and Lithuania on the Baltic Sea coast. How to get there: Khrabrovo Airport, train from Moscow, or ferry from a number of European cities. During Soviet times Kaliningrad was a closed military zone, and after the fall of the USSR, it suffered a horrendous economic collapse. Today, however, it is popular with holidaying Russians, especially its half of the Unesco-protected Curonian Spit beach strip that it shares with Lithuania. Founded by Teutonic Knights in 1255, Kaliningrad was also home to the legendary Baron Munchhausen, philosopher Immanuel Kant and writer and compose Ernst Hoffman. England in Kaliningrad: The city will host England v Belgium on 28 June 2018. 7. Volgograd Where is it? On the banks of the Volga, south-west of Moscow. Population: 1million Of note: Volgograd was once known as Stalingrad. How to get there: Volgograd International Airport connects to other major Russian cities, or its connected to Moscow by rail. The imposing The Motherland Calls sculpture Credit: Getty It’s hard to detach the city from its past, a city made by famous by a devastating Second World War siege. The official literature notes: “Over the course of the last hundred years, Volgograd has often been a prominent figure on the Russian and global stage. Many events have left their mark on the city in monuments, places and traditions. “Over the last century the city has changed its name three times: at the beginning of the twentieth century it was called Tsaritsyn and it was a backwater place on the banks of the Volga River. Then it became Stalingrad - the fortress that played a pivotal role in World War II, and later was renamed Volgograd, having become in the process a sunny and hospitable city whose residents love fishing, football, boat rides and beaches.” The Motherland Calls, a monument to the Battle of Stalingrad and the tallest statue of a woman in the world, is well worth a visit. The imposing structure soars above the city, while beneath it is buried the famous Soviet sniper Vasily Zaytsev. England in Volgograd: The city will host England v Tunisia on 18 June 2018. 8. Nizhny Novgorod Where is it? 250 miles east of Moscow. Population: 1.3 million Of note: It was previously known as Gorky, in honour of the Soviet author. How to get there: Strigino International Airport. Colourful cathedral domes in Nizhny Novgorod Credit: GETTY The city was previously closed to foreigners during the Soviet era to protect the security of its military research centre and production factories. Even street maps were not available for sale until mid-1970s. “At the same time Nizhny Novgorod is an old Russian merchant town with timber planking and carved window frames that survived the onslaught of modern architecture,” says the official literature. The city boasts a Kremlin, “the cradle of Nizhny Novgorod”, built high above the Volga. The structure seen today was built in the 16th century. England in Nizhny Novgorod: The city will host England v Panama on 24 June 2018. 9. Kazan Where is it? Where the Volga meets the Kazanka. Population: 1.1million Of note: It is referred to the Sports Capital of Russia, having hosted the 2014 World Fencing Championships and 2015 World Aquatics Championships. How to get there: Kazan International Airport, or by rail from Moscow. Kazan, too, has a Kremlin, which in 2015 was visited by 1.5 million people. The World Cup organisers say Kazan is a “feast of a city”. “Cold winters and hot summers, Muslim minarets and Orthodox monasteries, the ancient archeological sites and the science city of Innopolis, forest steppes, taiga and the Great Silk Road all mix in the cauldron that is the Tatar capital,” they say. “The result of this melting pot is the self-sufficient and self-assured third capital of Russia that each year extends a warm welcome to a million guests who come here to experience all sorts of impressions and emotions.” The city has its own Millennium Bridge, too.
What can England fans expect in Nizhny Novgorod?
If there’s one thing more exciting than the prospect of watching England limp out of the group stages of next year’s World Cup, it’s the chance to learn more about the enigmatic nether regions of the host nation. We all know Moscow and St Petersburg, each soaking in its own charm and character, but what of Kazan or Yekaterinburg? Nizhny Novgorod, anyone? Of the 11 cities set to welcome thousands of football fans from around the world, we would wager the names of eight, maybe nine, have never crossed the lips of those poised to visit. With that in mind, here’s a crash course on the Russian host cities you’ve never heard of. Or follow these links for the lowdown on Moscow and St Petersburg. 1. Samara Where is it? To the south-west, not far from the Kazakhstan border. Population: 1.2million Of note: Known as Kuybyshev, in honour of the Bolshevik leader Valerian Kuybyshev, from 1935 to 1991. How to get there: Kurumoch International Airport, as well as rail links to Moscow and other major cities. Samara is proud of its space-race heritage Credit: Getty “Samara is a very diverse city,” says the official World Cup literature. “It is a merchant town and an important aerospace centre; it is athletic, musical and youthful. Back in 1916, Boris Pasternak, Russian poet, novelist and future Nobel Prize laureate, wrote: ‘Samara is the best, the most sinful, most elegant and most comfortable part of Moscow, cut out from the city and transplanted on the banks of the Volga.’” Samara is indeed home to Russia’s aerospace centre and is where the rocket that took Yuri Gagarin, the first man in space, was built. There is also a Football Museum, opened in 2007; Vladimir Lenin Memorial Home, where the Ulyanov family once rented a flat; and a subterranean stronghold made for Joseph Stalin but never used, today known as “Stalin’s Bunker”. The city on the banks of the Volga is twinned with Palermo, Italy, and St Louis, US, among others. 2. Yekaterinburg Where is it? East of the Urals. Population: 1.4million Of note: The Church on Blood in Honour of All Saints Resplendent in the Russian Land was built on the site of the 1918 executions of Tsar Nicholas II and his family. How to get there: Kolstsovo International Airport is one of the largest in the country. The church built on the site of the Romanov executions Credit: Getty In contrast to St Petersburg’s “window to Europe”, Yekaterinburg is Russia’s “window to Asia”. Capital of the Urals, the region is of great economic importance and full of natural treasures, such as oil, gas, gold mines and Europe’s largest emerald deposit. Why not swing by the Boris Yeltsin Museum? The former leader was born nearby. 3. Rostov-on-Don Where is it? Southern Russia, on the banks of the Black Sea. Population: 1.1million Of note: Home of the Don Cossacks. How to get there: Platov International is the city’s brand spanking new airport. “The story of the Don Cossacks, delectable fish, and all the traditions of a large trading port: Rostov-on-Don treats visitors to the flavours of the Russian south,” says Russia's World Cup information website. The city, twinned with Glasgow, boasts a number of tourist sites including Russian Orthodox churches, as well as the heritage of a raft of renowned authors, including Alexander Solzhenitsyn, Maxim Gorky and Alexander Pushkin. The Upside Down House - where, you guessed it, everything is upside down - sounds perfect for travellers with time to kill. 59 fascinating things you didn't know about Russia 4. Sochi Where is it? The Russian Riviera - on the Black Sea. Population: 370,000 Of note: Winter Olympics 2014 host city. How to get there: Adler-Sochi International Airport. The Russian Riviera Credit: Getty We all know about Sochi, don’t we? The unofficial summer capital of Russia, where past tsars and Joseph Stalin had dachas (the latter of which can be visited), Sochi boasts a subtropical climate that warms the Russian elite every summer. But it’s not all glitz and glamour, there’s the Nikolai Ostrovsky Literary Memorial Museum and Sochi’s Museum of Sporting Glory. The people behind the World Cup boast of its “impressive modern infrastructure”. 5. Saransk Where is it? Saransk is capital of the Mordovia region, about 400 miles east of Moscow. Population: 297,000 Of note: Gerard Depardieu, the French actor, has been a registered resident here since 2013. How to get there: There’s a daily direct train from Moscow, or a small airport. “Saransk is a town of myths and legends, with a chequered past and big plans for the future,” says the World Cup’s promotional literature. “Remembering his trip to Saransk, Leo Tolstoy wrote in 1906: ‘Old pines with long trunks and short crowns. The soil is black, and a little stony… Backwoods. The Sura River, and the best sturgeon ever.’ By 2018, when the FIFA World Cup arrives here, the myths of Saransk will have been transformed into architecture.” Intruguing. Do not miss the Museum of Mordovia Folk Culture, or a triumvirate of excellent squares - Millennium Square, Victory Square and Soviet Square. Inside the bizarre world of Soviet sanatoriums 6. Kaliningrad Where is it? Prepare to have your mind blown. Population: 437,456 Of note: Kaliningrad is Russia’s European enclave, wedged between Poland and Lithuania on the Baltic Sea coast. How to get there: Khrabrovo Airport, train from Moscow, or ferry from a number of European cities. During Soviet times Kaliningrad was a closed military zone, and after the fall of the USSR, it suffered a horrendous economic collapse. Today, however, it is popular with holidaying Russians, especially its half of the Unesco-protected Curonian Spit beach strip that it shares with Lithuania. Founded by Teutonic Knights in 1255, Kaliningrad was also home to the legendary Baron Munchhausen, philosopher Immanuel Kant and writer and compose Ernst Hoffman. England in Kaliningrad: The city will host England v Belgium on 28 June 2018. 7. Volgograd Where is it? On the banks of the Volga, south-west of Moscow. Population: 1million Of note: Volgograd was once known as Stalingrad. How to get there: Volgograd International Airport connects to other major Russian cities, or its connected to Moscow by rail. The imposing The Motherland Calls sculpture Credit: Getty It’s hard to detach the city from its past, a city made by famous by a devastating Second World War siege. The official literature notes: “Over the course of the last hundred years, Volgograd has often been a prominent figure on the Russian and global stage. Many events have left their mark on the city in monuments, places and traditions. “Over the last century the city has changed its name three times: at the beginning of the twentieth century it was called Tsaritsyn and it was a backwater place on the banks of the Volga River. Then it became Stalingrad - the fortress that played a pivotal role in World War II, and later was renamed Volgograd, having become in the process a sunny and hospitable city whose residents love fishing, football, boat rides and beaches.” The Motherland Calls, a monument to the Battle of Stalingrad and the tallest statue of a woman in the world, is well worth a visit. The imposing structure soars above the city, while beneath it is buried the famous Soviet sniper Vasily Zaytsev. England in Volgograd: The city will host England v Tunisia on 18 June 2018. 8. Nizhny Novgorod Where is it? 250 miles east of Moscow. Population: 1.3 million Of note: It was previously known as Gorky, in honour of the Soviet author. How to get there: Strigino International Airport. Colourful cathedral domes in Nizhny Novgorod Credit: GETTY The city was previously closed to foreigners during the Soviet era to protect the security of its military research centre and production factories. Even street maps were not available for sale until mid-1970s. “At the same time Nizhny Novgorod is an old Russian merchant town with timber planking and carved window frames that survived the onslaught of modern architecture,” says the official literature. The city boasts a Kremlin, “the cradle of Nizhny Novgorod”, built high above the Volga. The structure seen today was built in the 16th century. England in Nizhny Novgorod: The city will host England v Panama on 24 June 2018. 9. Kazan Where is it? Where the Volga meets the Kazanka. Population: 1.1million Of note: It is referred to the Sports Capital of Russia, having hosted the 2014 World Fencing Championships and 2015 World Aquatics Championships. How to get there: Kazan International Airport, or by rail from Moscow. Kazan, too, has a Kremlin, which in 2015 was visited by 1.5 million people. The World Cup organisers say Kazan is a “feast of a city”. “Cold winters and hot summers, Muslim minarets and Orthodox monasteries, the ancient archeological sites and the science city of Innopolis, forest steppes, taiga and the Great Silk Road all mix in the cauldron that is the Tatar capital,” they say. “The result of this melting pot is the self-sufficient and self-assured third capital of Russia that each year extends a warm welcome to a million guests who come here to experience all sorts of impressions and emotions.” The city has its own Millennium Bridge, too.
Killjoy council chiefs have erected a security fence and imposed an "exclusion zone" around a Christmas TREE - over health and safety fears. Shoppers have expressed outrage after a 6ft-high fence was put up around a festive fir in Derby's Market Place. Steel barriers have also been placed around the fencing meaning visitors must view the tree from a distance of more than 30ft.
Council erect steel barriers around Christmas tree
Killjoy council chiefs have erected a security fence and imposed an "exclusion zone" around a Christmas TREE - over health and safety fears. Shoppers have expressed outrage after a 6ft-high fence was put up around a festive fir in Derby's Market Place. Steel barriers have also been placed around the fencing meaning visitors must view the tree from a distance of more than 30ft.
Killjoy council chiefs have erected a security fence and imposed an "exclusion zone" around a Christmas TREE - over health and safety fears. Shoppers have expressed outrage after a 6ft-high fence was put up around a festive fir in Derby's Market Place. Steel barriers have also been placed around the fencing meaning visitors must view the tree from a distance of more than 30ft.
Council erect steel barriers around Christmas tree
Killjoy council chiefs have erected a security fence and imposed an "exclusion zone" around a Christmas TREE - over health and safety fears. Shoppers have expressed outrage after a 6ft-high fence was put up around a festive fir in Derby's Market Place. Steel barriers have also been placed around the fencing meaning visitors must view the tree from a distance of more than 30ft.
Killjoy council chiefs have erected a security fence and imposed an &quot;exclusion zone&quot; around a Christmas TREE - over health and safety fears. Shoppers have expressed outrage after a 6ft-high fence was put up around a festive fir in Derby&#39;s Market Place. Steel barriers have also been placed around the fencing meaning visitors must view the tree from a distance of more than 30ft.
Council erect steel barriers around Christmas tree
Killjoy council chiefs have erected a security fence and imposed an "exclusion zone" around a Christmas TREE - over health and safety fears. Shoppers have expressed outrage after a 6ft-high fence was put up around a festive fir in Derby's Market Place. Steel barriers have also been placed around the fencing meaning visitors must view the tree from a distance of more than 30ft.
Killjoy council chiefs have erected a security fence and imposed an &quot;exclusion zone&quot; around a Christmas TREE - over health and safety fears. Shoppers have expressed outrage after a 6ft-high fence was put up around a festive fir in Derby&#39;s Market Place. Steel barriers have also been placed around the fencing meaning visitors must view the tree from a distance of more than 30ft.
Council erect steel barriers around Christmas tree
Killjoy council chiefs have erected a security fence and imposed an "exclusion zone" around a Christmas TREE - over health and safety fears. Shoppers have expressed outrage after a 6ft-high fence was put up around a festive fir in Derby's Market Place. Steel barriers have also been placed around the fencing meaning visitors must view the tree from a distance of more than 30ft.
Killjoy council chiefs have erected a security fence and imposed an "exclusion zone" around a Christmas TREE - over health and safety fears. Shoppers have expressed outrage after a 6ft-high fence was put up around a festive fir in Derby's Market Place. Steel barriers have also been placed around the fencing meaning visitors must view the tree from a distance of more than 30ft.
Council erect steel barriers around Christmas tree
Killjoy council chiefs have erected a security fence and imposed an "exclusion zone" around a Christmas TREE - over health and safety fears. Shoppers have expressed outrage after a 6ft-high fence was put up around a festive fir in Derby's Market Place. Steel barriers have also been placed around the fencing meaning visitors must view the tree from a distance of more than 30ft.
Killjoy council chiefs have erected a security fence and imposed an &quot;exclusion zone&quot; around a Christmas TREE - over health and safety fears. Shoppers have expressed outrage after a 6ft-high fence was put up around a festive fir in Derby&#39;s Market Place. Steel barriers have also been placed around the fencing meaning visitors must view the tree from a distance of more than 30ft.
Council erect steel barriers around Christmas tree
Killjoy council chiefs have erected a security fence and imposed an "exclusion zone" around a Christmas TREE - over health and safety fears. Shoppers have expressed outrage after a 6ft-high fence was put up around a festive fir in Derby's Market Place. Steel barriers have also been placed around the fencing meaning visitors must view the tree from a distance of more than 30ft.
Killjoy council chiefs have erected a security fence and imposed an "exclusion zone" around a Christmas TREE - over health and safety fears. Shoppers have expressed outrage after a 6ft-high fence was put up around a festive fir in Derby's Market Place. Steel barriers have also been placed around the fencing meaning visitors must view the tree from a distance of more than 30ft.
Council erect steel barriers around Christmas tree
Killjoy council chiefs have erected a security fence and imposed an "exclusion zone" around a Christmas TREE - over health and safety fears. Shoppers have expressed outrage after a 6ft-high fence was put up around a festive fir in Derby's Market Place. Steel barriers have also been placed around the fencing meaning visitors must view the tree from a distance of more than 30ft.
England are in the World Cup final then. Which one? Rugby of course. The Rugby World Cup. They are, I assure you. Yes, you’re quite right to think that you should have heard about it by now. No, no, not the Rugby Union World Cup, that’s in Japan in 2019. This is the original Rugby World Cup, the Rugby League World Cup. England are playing Australia at the Suncorp Stadium in Brisbane this Saturday and are hoping to get their hands on a trophy they have not won since 1972 (as Great Britain). It’s OK, nobody blames you for not knowing. It is not like there has been an explosion in all forms of media and communication in the interceding 45 years, or a vast commercialisation of all forms of sport and a concomitant redevelopment as a multibillion pound industry that touches the lives of people all round the globe. If that had been the case, there would surely be no reason for being ignorant of the fact that England are in a World Cup final on Saturday. Similarly, there would be no reason for Andy Burnham, the Mayor of Greater Manchester and former Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, to tweet after England’s nail-biting semi-final 20-18 win over Tonga last Saturday, ‘England are in a World Cup final on Saturday. I live in hope that, at some point this week, our media will inform the nation about this.’ It almost goes without saying that Rugby League is a much inferior sport to Rugby Union (an oxymoron right up there with Manchester United, Military Intelligence and, appropriately enough, ‘deafening silence’), or it would receive more attention – that’s how these things work isn’t it? Everything judged according to its merits with the due application of that most self-regarding of myths, the English sense of ‘fair play.’ Thought so. There’s only one thing for it – League has to become more like Union. Here are ten ways it can do that… i. First, and most importantly, improve the catering and corporate facilities. We’ll get to the changes in the actual game presently but this is absolutely vital. If there has to be some kind of sporting event going on the very least one can expect is smoked salmon blinis and quails’ eggs, wine that does not come out of a box and a comfortable seat, facing the pitch if necessary. ii. Once that is sorted we can move onto innovation. It’s got to go. What is the point of staging the first Rugby World Cup in 1954 when someone can simply come along thirty-three years later, after all the heavy-lifting has been done, and appropriate the name? See also, the introduction of floodlit matches on the BBC (1965) and video technology (1996 – five years before Union). iii. Clive Sullivan MBE may well have been the first black captain of any British sporting team – and a World Cup winner – but if we can’t even recognise these achievements with a knighthood what chances have we got? Somebody needs to have a word with the Palace. If squash and fencing can have a Dame each, surely they can spare a couple of Sirs for our league-playing boys. iv. This quick, open play nonsense has to be stopped. It’s all very well putting on a spectacle of athleticism and handling technique for the paying public and the audiences at home, but at school level when are the fat kids going to get a chance for a breather? v. Which brings us nicely on to lineouts. These need to be introduced to break up play as soon as possible. There is no finer sight in world sport than seeing a very tall man being thrust into the air by way of upward momentum on his buttocks provided by his teammates as he attempts to make contact with an oval ball. Lineouts would also provide ample time to check text messages and answer important work emails. vi. Scrums, of course, will have to be done properly from now on. Who needs an instantaneous attacking platform when valuable minutes, hours even, can be wasted watching scrums collapse and reset? We should actually go further here and, at international level, institute a five scrum rule that means if a minor infringement is worth punishing in the first place, it’s almost certainly worth punishing five times. Referees could be spared the task of guessing what has just gone on by the introduction of a tombola. This could obviously be sponsored, elegantly but extravagantly, to generate yet further revenue. vii. If that is not enough to slow the game down, let’s open it up to ponderous carbohydrate junkies at the schoolboy and amateur levels and build upon the almost sexual stop-start frisson that is the hallmark of Union. We can do this by throwing another four players on the pitch just to generally get in the way and over-complicate matters. viii. The current points system is obviously not fit for purpose. The kicking game is being woefully neglected; reverting to the old pre-1948 Union levels of four points for a drop goal might not even be sufficient. It will have to be 10 points from now on and renamed a ‘Jonny’. A working party can look at the possibility of introducing a life-size Subbuteo corner-taker figure to replace specialist players as this will free up training time to practise lineouts and scrums. ix. With the corporate hospitality and rules of the game sorted, we can now think about those who pay to watch the game. The obvious thing to do here is to leave the passionate, knowledgeable and loyal sporting heartland of Northern England and focus attention on thriving metropolitan areas like Leicester and Northampton or, more obviously, wherever there is a Range Rover dealership and a fondness for novelty socks. x. Finally, forget all ideas about naming the World Cup trophy after Paul Barrière, a World War II French resistance hero who came up with the idea of a rugby world cup in the first place and, instead, name it after an acknowledged cheat who couldn’t play football properly. And if all that lot doesn’t get us some media exposure, I don’t know what will. It already has? Oh.
England are in a World Cup final... and no one has noticed
England are in the World Cup final then. Which one? Rugby of course. The Rugby World Cup. They are, I assure you. Yes, you’re quite right to think that you should have heard about it by now. No, no, not the Rugby Union World Cup, that’s in Japan in 2019. This is the original Rugby World Cup, the Rugby League World Cup. England are playing Australia at the Suncorp Stadium in Brisbane this Saturday and are hoping to get their hands on a trophy they have not won since 1972 (as Great Britain). It’s OK, nobody blames you for not knowing. It is not like there has been an explosion in all forms of media and communication in the interceding 45 years, or a vast commercialisation of all forms of sport and a concomitant redevelopment as a multibillion pound industry that touches the lives of people all round the globe. If that had been the case, there would surely be no reason for being ignorant of the fact that England are in a World Cup final on Saturday. Similarly, there would be no reason for Andy Burnham, the Mayor of Greater Manchester and former Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, to tweet after England’s nail-biting semi-final 20-18 win over Tonga last Saturday, ‘England are in a World Cup final on Saturday. I live in hope that, at some point this week, our media will inform the nation about this.’ It almost goes without saying that Rugby League is a much inferior sport to Rugby Union (an oxymoron right up there with Manchester United, Military Intelligence and, appropriately enough, ‘deafening silence’), or it would receive more attention – that’s how these things work isn’t it? Everything judged according to its merits with the due application of that most self-regarding of myths, the English sense of ‘fair play.’ Thought so. There’s only one thing for it – League has to become more like Union. Here are ten ways it can do that… i. First, and most importantly, improve the catering and corporate facilities. We’ll get to the changes in the actual game presently but this is absolutely vital. If there has to be some kind of sporting event going on the very least one can expect is smoked salmon blinis and quails’ eggs, wine that does not come out of a box and a comfortable seat, facing the pitch if necessary. ii. Once that is sorted we can move onto innovation. It’s got to go. What is the point of staging the first Rugby World Cup in 1954 when someone can simply come along thirty-three years later, after all the heavy-lifting has been done, and appropriate the name? See also, the introduction of floodlit matches on the BBC (1965) and video technology (1996 – five years before Union). iii. Clive Sullivan MBE may well have been the first black captain of any British sporting team – and a World Cup winner – but if we can’t even recognise these achievements with a knighthood what chances have we got? Somebody needs to have a word with the Palace. If squash and fencing can have a Dame each, surely they can spare a couple of Sirs for our league-playing boys. iv. This quick, open play nonsense has to be stopped. It’s all very well putting on a spectacle of athleticism and handling technique for the paying public and the audiences at home, but at school level when are the fat kids going to get a chance for a breather? v. Which brings us nicely on to lineouts. These need to be introduced to break up play as soon as possible. There is no finer sight in world sport than seeing a very tall man being thrust into the air by way of upward momentum on his buttocks provided by his teammates as he attempts to make contact with an oval ball. Lineouts would also provide ample time to check text messages and answer important work emails. vi. Scrums, of course, will have to be done properly from now on. Who needs an instantaneous attacking platform when valuable minutes, hours even, can be wasted watching scrums collapse and reset? We should actually go further here and, at international level, institute a five scrum rule that means if a minor infringement is worth punishing in the first place, it’s almost certainly worth punishing five times. Referees could be spared the task of guessing what has just gone on by the introduction of a tombola. This could obviously be sponsored, elegantly but extravagantly, to generate yet further revenue. vii. If that is not enough to slow the game down, let’s open it up to ponderous carbohydrate junkies at the schoolboy and amateur levels and build upon the almost sexual stop-start frisson that is the hallmark of Union. We can do this by throwing another four players on the pitch just to generally get in the way and over-complicate matters. viii. The current points system is obviously not fit for purpose. The kicking game is being woefully neglected; reverting to the old pre-1948 Union levels of four points for a drop goal might not even be sufficient. It will have to be 10 points from now on and renamed a ‘Jonny’. A working party can look at the possibility of introducing a life-size Subbuteo corner-taker figure to replace specialist players as this will free up training time to practise lineouts and scrums. ix. With the corporate hospitality and rules of the game sorted, we can now think about those who pay to watch the game. The obvious thing to do here is to leave the passionate, knowledgeable and loyal sporting heartland of Northern England and focus attention on thriving metropolitan areas like Leicester and Northampton or, more obviously, wherever there is a Range Rover dealership and a fondness for novelty socks. x. Finally, forget all ideas about naming the World Cup trophy after Paul Barrière, a World War II French resistance hero who came up with the idea of a rugby world cup in the first place and, instead, name it after an acknowledged cheat who couldn’t play football properly. And if all that lot doesn’t get us some media exposure, I don’t know what will. It already has? Oh.
Young offenders in a Senegalese prison are being taught how to use swords to learn respect. The teenagers are being given fencing lessons in Thies Prison. The Charity &quot;Pour le sourire d&#39;un enfant&quot; started the initiative five years ago. It says it is helping to reduce re-offending rates and the prisoners have become calmer.
Teaching teenage prisoners how to use swords
Young offenders in a Senegalese prison are being taught how to use swords to learn respect. The teenagers are being given fencing lessons in Thies Prison. The Charity "Pour le sourire d'un enfant" started the initiative five years ago. It says it is helping to reduce re-offending rates and the prisoners have become calmer.
Young offenders in a Senegalese prison are being taught how to use swords to learn respect. The teenagers are being given fencing lessons in Thies Prison. The Charity &quot;Pour le sourire d&#39;un enfant&quot; started the initiative five years ago. It says it is helping to reduce re-offending rates and the prisoners have become calmer.
Teaching teenage prisoners how to use swords
Young offenders in a Senegalese prison are being taught how to use swords to learn respect. The teenagers are being given fencing lessons in Thies Prison. The Charity "Pour le sourire d'un enfant" started the initiative five years ago. It says it is helping to reduce re-offending rates and the prisoners have become calmer.
Young offenders in a Senegalese prison are being taught how to use swords to learn respect. The teenagers are being given fencing lessons in Thies Prison. The Charity "Pour le sourire d'un enfant" started the initiative five years ago. It says it is helping to reduce re-offending rates and the prisoners have become calmer.
Teaching teenage prisoners how to use swords
Young offenders in a Senegalese prison are being taught how to use swords to learn respect. The teenagers are being given fencing lessons in Thies Prison. The Charity "Pour le sourire d'un enfant" started the initiative five years ago. It says it is helping to reduce re-offending rates and the prisoners have become calmer.
Young offenders in a Senegalese prison are being taught how to use swords to learn respect. The teenagers are being given fencing lessons in Thies Prison. The Charity &quot;Pour le sourire d&#39;un enfant&quot; started the initiative five years ago. It says it is helping to reduce re-offending rates and the prisoners have become calmer.
Teaching teenage prisoners how to use swords
Young offenders in a Senegalese prison are being taught how to use swords to learn respect. The teenagers are being given fencing lessons in Thies Prison. The Charity "Pour le sourire d'un enfant" started the initiative five years ago. It says it is helping to reduce re-offending rates and the prisoners have become calmer.
Young offenders in a Senegalese prison are being taught how to use swords to learn respect. The teenagers are being given fencing lessons in Thies Prison. The Charity &quot;Pour le sourire d&#39;un enfant&quot; started the initiative five years ago. It says it is helping to reduce re-offending rates and the prisoners have become calmer.
Teaching teenage prisoners how to use swords
Young offenders in a Senegalese prison are being taught how to use swords to learn respect. The teenagers are being given fencing lessons in Thies Prison. The Charity "Pour le sourire d'un enfant" started the initiative five years ago. It says it is helping to reduce re-offending rates and the prisoners have become calmer.
Young offenders in a Senegalese prison are being taught how to use swords to learn respect. The teenagers are being given fencing lessons in Thies Prison. The Charity &quot;Pour le sourire d&#39;un enfant&quot; started the initiative five years ago. It says it is helping to reduce re-offending rates and the prisoners have become calmer.
Teaching teenage prisoners how to use swords
Young offenders in a Senegalese prison are being taught how to use swords to learn respect. The teenagers are being given fencing lessons in Thies Prison. The Charity "Pour le sourire d'un enfant" started the initiative five years ago. It says it is helping to reduce re-offending rates and the prisoners have become calmer.
Young offenders in a Senegalese prison are being taught how to use swords to learn respect. The teenagers are being given fencing lessons in Thies Prison. The Charity "Pour le sourire d'un enfant" started the initiative five years ago. It says it is helping to reduce re-offending rates and the prisoners have become calmer.
Teaching teenage prisoners how to use swords
Young offenders in a Senegalese prison are being taught how to use swords to learn respect. The teenagers are being given fencing lessons in Thies Prison. The Charity "Pour le sourire d'un enfant" started the initiative five years ago. It says it is helping to reduce re-offending rates and the prisoners have become calmer.
Young offenders in a Senegalese prison are being taught how to use swords to learn respect. The teenagers are being given fencing lessons in Thies Prison. The Charity &quot;Pour le sourire d&#39;un enfant&quot; started the initiative five years ago. It says it is helping to reduce re-offending rates and the prisoners have become calmer.
Teaching teenage prisoners how to use swords
Young offenders in a Senegalese prison are being taught how to use swords to learn respect. The teenagers are being given fencing lessons in Thies Prison. The Charity "Pour le sourire d'un enfant" started the initiative five years ago. It says it is helping to reduce re-offending rates and the prisoners have become calmer.
Families have been left cold by this tiny festive attraction dubbed &quot;Britain’s worst ice rink&quot; after it was erected in a car park surrounded by metal fencing. The square rink is opposite a branch of Sports Direct at the back of a shopping centre and just five people can use it at one time due to health and safety concerns.The attraction, which is the size of an average driveway, features two model penguins and two life-size toy soldiers. Customers are charged £3 for a 20-minute session on the tiny rink which is behind the Three Spires shopping centre in Lichfield, Staffs.
Britain's 'worst ice rink'
Families have been left cold by this tiny festive attraction dubbed "Britain’s worst ice rink" after it was erected in a car park surrounded by metal fencing. The square rink is opposite a branch of Sports Direct at the back of a shopping centre and just five people can use it at one time due to health and safety concerns.The attraction, which is the size of an average driveway, features two model penguins and two life-size toy soldiers. Customers are charged £3 for a 20-minute session on the tiny rink which is behind the Three Spires shopping centre in Lichfield, Staffs.
Families have been left cold by this tiny festive attraction dubbed &quot;Britain’s worst ice rink&quot; after it was erected in a car park surrounded by metal fencing. The square rink is opposite a branch of Sports Direct at the back of a shopping centre and just five people can use it at one time due to health and safety concerns.The attraction, which is the size of an average driveway, features two model penguins and two life-size toy soldiers. Customers are charged £3 for a 20-minute session on the tiny rink which is behind the Three Spires shopping centre in Lichfield, Staffs.
Britain's 'worst ice rink'
Families have been left cold by this tiny festive attraction dubbed "Britain’s worst ice rink" after it was erected in a car park surrounded by metal fencing. The square rink is opposite a branch of Sports Direct at the back of a shopping centre and just five people can use it at one time due to health and safety concerns.The attraction, which is the size of an average driveway, features two model penguins and two life-size toy soldiers. Customers are charged £3 for a 20-minute session on the tiny rink which is behind the Three Spires shopping centre in Lichfield, Staffs.
Families have been left cold by this tiny festive attraction dubbed &quot;Britain’s worst ice rink&quot; after it was erected in a car park surrounded by metal fencing. The square rink is opposite a branch of Sports Direct at the back of a shopping centre and just five people can use it at one time due to health and safety concerns.The attraction, which is the size of an average driveway, features two model penguins and two life-size toy soldiers. Customers are charged £3 for a 20-minute session on the tiny rink which is behind the Three Spires shopping centre in Lichfield, Staffs.
Britain's 'worst ice rink'
Families have been left cold by this tiny festive attraction dubbed "Britain’s worst ice rink" after it was erected in a car park surrounded by metal fencing. The square rink is opposite a branch of Sports Direct at the back of a shopping centre and just five people can use it at one time due to health and safety concerns.The attraction, which is the size of an average driveway, features two model penguins and two life-size toy soldiers. Customers are charged £3 for a 20-minute session on the tiny rink which is behind the Three Spires shopping centre in Lichfield, Staffs.

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