Olympic Fencing action

Clawson middle school is launching a fencing program in the fall
Clawson middle school to launch fencing program this fall
Clawson middle school is launching a fencing program in the fall
Clawson middle school is launching a fencing program in the fall
Clawson middle school to launch fencing program this fall
Clawson middle school is launching a fencing program in the fall
Clawson middle school is launching a fencing program in the fall
Clawson middle school to launch fencing program this fall
Clawson middle school is launching a fencing program in the fall
Clawson middle school is launching a fencing program in the fall
Clawson middle school to launch fencing program this fall
Clawson middle school is launching a fencing program in the fall
So far, the 23 deaths believed to have been caused by Democratic Republic of Congo's latest Ebola outbreak had been detected in more isolated areas, giving authorities a better chance of ring-fencing the virus.
Congo Warns of 'New Phase' in Ebola Outbreak after First Urban Case
So far, the 23 deaths believed to have been caused by Democratic Republic of Congo's latest Ebola outbreak had been detected in more isolated areas, giving authorities a better chance of ring-fencing the virus.
Skip Bedell has tips to spruce-up your outdoor space.
Best fencing and storage options for your yard
Skip Bedell has tips to spruce-up your outdoor space.
Skip Bedell has tips to spruce-up your outdoor space.
Best fencing and storage options for your yard
Skip Bedell has tips to spruce-up your outdoor space.
Skip Bedell has tips to spruce-up your outdoor space.
Best fencing and storage options for your yard
Skip Bedell has tips to spruce-up your outdoor space.
In this Sunday, May 6, 2018, photograph, drummers play their instruments in the foreground as Rafael Knip, back, an elder from the Northern Ute tribe, offers prayers during a blessing of the land near Maybell, Colo. Individuals belonging to the group invest a great deal of time and money to assist the Bureau of Land Management. They are raising funds for fencing, improvements to water systems and other resources that will benefit all living things in the basin. (Sasha Nelson/Craig Daily Press via AP)
In this Sunday, May 6, 2018, photograph, drummers play their instruments in the foreground as Rafael Knip, back, an elder from the Northern Ute tribe, offers prayers during a blessing of the land near Maybell, Colo. Individuals belonging to the group invest a great deal of time and money to assist the Bureau of Land Management. They are raising funds for fencing, improvements to water systems and other resources that will benefit all living things in the basin. (Sasha Nelson/Craig Daily Press via AP)
In this Sunday, May 6, 2018, photograph, drummers play their instruments in the foreground as Rafael Knip, back, an elder from the Northern Ute tribe, offers prayers during a blessing of the land near Maybell, Colo. Individuals belonging to the group invest a great deal of time and money to assist the Bureau of Land Management. They are raising funds for fencing, improvements to water systems and other resources that will benefit all living things in the basin. (Sasha Nelson/Craig Daily Press via AP)
In this Sunday, May 6, 2018, photograph,visitors look on during a blessing of the land by members of the Northern Ute tribe and the Wild Horse Warriors for Sand Wash Basin near Maybell, Colo. Individuals belonging to the group invest a great deal of time and money to assist the Bureau of Land Management. They are raising funds for fencing, improvements to water systems and other resources that will benefit all living things in the basin. (Sasha Nelson/Craig Daily Press via AP)
In this Sunday, May 6, 2018, photograph,visitors look on during a blessing of the land by members of the Northern Ute tribe and the Wild Horse Warriors for Sand Wash Basin near Maybell, Colo. Individuals belonging to the group invest a great deal of time and money to assist the Bureau of Land Management. They are raising funds for fencing, improvements to water systems and other resources that will benefit all living things in the basin. (Sasha Nelson/Craig Daily Press via AP)
In this Sunday, May 6, 2018, photograph,visitors look on during a blessing of the land by members of the Northern Ute tribe and the Wild Horse Warriors for Sand Wash Basin near Maybell, Colo. Individuals belonging to the group invest a great deal of time and money to assist the Bureau of Land Management. They are raising funds for fencing, improvements to water systems and other resources that will benefit all living things in the basin. (Sasha Nelson/Craig Daily Press via AP)
Free Webinar Explains How GPS-Based Geo-fencing Drives Consumer Traffic
A view of the White House through fencing surrounding Lafayette Square Park on Wednesday, 9 November 2016 in Washington, DC. Americans today will choose between Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump and Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton as they go to the polls to vote for the next president of the United States. (Photo by Cheriss May/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
Democrats Watch the Trump Show From the Bleachers
A view of the White House through fencing surrounding Lafayette Square Park on Wednesday, 9 November 2016 in Washington, DC. Americans today will choose between Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump and Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton as they go to the polls to vote for the next president of the United States. (Photo by Cheriss May/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
Fence and Deck Connection is back with some great tips and trends on fencing!
Fence and Deck Connection
Fence and Deck Connection is back with some great tips and trends on fencing!
Fence and Deck Connection is back with some great tips and trends on fencing!
Fence and Deck Connection
Fence and Deck Connection is back with some great tips and trends on fencing!
Fence and Deck Connection is back with some great tips and trends on fencing!
Fence and Deck Connection
Fence and Deck Connection is back with some great tips and trends on fencing!
Fence and Deck Connection is back with some great tips and trends on fencing!
Fence and Deck Connection
Fence and Deck Connection is back with some great tips and trends on fencing!
The fencing at Camp 5 at the US military's prison on Guantanamo Bay
The fencing at Camp 5 at the US military's prison on Guantanamo Bay
The fencing at Camp 5 at the US military's prison on Guantanamo Bay
The University of North Carolina head fencing coach Ron Miller is retiring after 51 years.
UNC Fencing Head Coach Ron Miller retires after 51 years
The University of North Carolina head fencing coach Ron Miller is retiring after 51 years.
The University of North Carolina head fencing coach Ron Miller is retiring after 51 years.
UNC Fencing Head Coach Ron Miller retires after 51 years
The University of North Carolina head fencing coach Ron Miller is retiring after 51 years.
The University of North Carolina head fencing coach Ron Miller is retiring after 51 years.
UNC Fencing Head Coach Ron Miller retires after 51 years
The University of North Carolina head fencing coach Ron Miller is retiring after 51 years.
The fencing at Camp 5 at the US military's prison on Guantanamo Bay
The fencing at Camp 5 at the US military's prison on Guantanamo Bay
The fencing at Camp 5 at the US military's prison on Guantanamo Bay
The fencing at Camp 5 at the US military's prison on Guantanamo Bay (AFP Photo/Thomas WATKINS)
The fencing at Camp 5 at the US military's prison on Guantanamo Bay
The fencing at Camp 5 at the US military's prison on Guantanamo Bay (AFP Photo/Thomas WATKINS)
The fencing at Camp 5 at the US military's prison on Guantanamo Bay
The fencing at Camp 5 at the US military's prison on Guantanamo Bay
The fencing at Camp 5 at the US military's prison on Guantanamo Bay
Stepping out beyond the secure fencing of the base - currently a ramshackle of mattresses out in the open, workshops and supplies stacked on shelves, but a safe zone nonetheless - it’s not long before you notice the presence of zombies nearby, mostly docile and not shuffling anywhere, too far apart to be considered either a horde or a threat. But with my first character packing a shotgun, my curiosity gets the better of me. Blowing apart the first zombie is no problem, but the noise quickly catches the attention of far more undead than expected. Suddenly, the mini-map in the bottom corner highlights more ‘zeds’ (as they’re also nicknamed), and it’s terrifying how quickly things escalate. They’re not just climbing over fences in pursuit, some are even running. And it turns out my ammunition is also very limited. Dropped in about seven hours into the game past all initial tutorials, this hands-on introduction to State of Decay 2, proves to be a brutally harsh lesson on what separates Undead Labs’ creation from hordes of other games about the zombie apocalypse. Even for the less trigger-happy who prefer the heft of a melee weapon for smashing in a zombie’s skull, these actions are governed by your stamina, which will quickly deplete after a few swings, just when you’re getting overwhelmed and find yourself too out of breath to make a run for it. It’s a contrast to the action-oriented Dead Rising series, where you’re equipped to dismember armies of undead with reckless abandon. It’s clear after a couple more rash encounters that State of Decay 2 requires a more considered approach, either crouching towards a zombie for a stealth kill or avoiding confrontation altogether, although repeated actions like running or killing zombies can also increase your character’s experience to unlock new abilities and in the latter case, earn influence, the game’s currency. State of Decay 2 | At a glance Combat is however only one aspect of State of Decay 2, as your success of survival is also dependent on your community’s ever-changing morale and finite resources, from food, to medicine, to materials, that will need constant attention. The diverse procedurally-generated characters that form your community, which you can switch control over back at base, are also something of a finite resource. That is, if anyone dies, their death is permanent. This can be devastating especially if you’ve invested time developing their skills, or promoted them to become your community’s leader, the closest State of Decay 2 has to a protagonist, albeit liable to change based on circumstances. Perhaps in our age of watching Game of Thrones or indeed The Walking Dead, where key characters can meet a grisly demise when you least expect, this is less of a shock. With no determined story but one that emerges through the player’s own actions and choices, you may even find that your future leader is a less experienced member of the group you’ll be forced to train up, or perhaps a completely new survivor you’ve yet to recruit on your journey of survival. In another excursion, we encounter a hispanic woman called Socorro who’s been separated from her group and who we help get back to her base. The bad news is that we find everyone dead, or perhaps turned into the zombies that are now present, with a screamer - a freak-type zombie who makes a horrible high-pitched sound to attract even more zombies - inside the house. We manage to dispatch them, but with nothing left, Socorro at least trusts me enough to let me recruit her to my community instead. Every cloud, one might say. It’s a long way before anyone in the group will gain enough standing to become leader, so we attend to a more immediate concern - our dwindling supply of materials. Pressing up on the d-pad brings up a menu for radio assistance, which also includes a new option of calling for another player to drop-in to your game to help. In this case, we spend some of our influence to ask for help locating materials to scavenge. It’s a treacherous journey just getting to our destination but once you reach a building, you may need to clear out zombies before spending time rummaging through drawers, cupboards or boxes to find what you’re looking for. It’s at this point you realise the limit of what your rucksack and pockets can hold (i.e. not a lot at all). While searching can be sped up by holding the left bumper, the extra noise also risks attracting more zombies, proving an even more nightmarish scenario in tight interior spaces. Drop-in Dead | Introducing online co-op multiplayer to the series It’s a desperate scramble back to base, except I’m already in critical condition, having also been bitten by one of the new dangerous blood plague zombies (identified by their red eyes) while another more feral zombie is scurrying after me at alarming speed, swiping away at what little health remains. But the game shows leniency when you’re at death’s door by allowing you to mash a button to recover just a little more health, like your internal survival instincts and adrenaline kicking in for one last push. Even the base turns out not to be permanently safe, with zombies attempting to overrun it when you’ve caused too much of a ruckus, requiring the efforts of your other AI-controlled companions to help beat back the horde. Once the threat has died down, I finally stagger over to the supply point and replenish the base’s materials - a meagre supply, but it will do to carry us for another day, though now it turns out food is also running low. State of Decay 2 interview | How Undead Labs are shuffling away from the horde However, it turns out the attack from the plague zombie earlier has infected my character with the blood plague, which not only leads to death over time but can also spread to the rest of your community. Finding a cure requires destroying plague hearts located around the map and collecting plague samples, not an easy feat as those areas also draw in a lot of plague zombies. With no cure at hand and this preview session almost over, it’s with a heavy heart that I switch to another character who’s instructed to grant mercy to the infected, with a bullet to the head. It’s a grim way to end, but when State of Decay 2 launches later this month, I suspect many more players will find themselves making just as many tough decisions to survive this zombie apocalypse.
State of Decay 2 hands-on | Struggling for survival in Undead Labs’ zombie sequel
Stepping out beyond the secure fencing of the base - currently a ramshackle of mattresses out in the open, workshops and supplies stacked on shelves, but a safe zone nonetheless - it’s not long before you notice the presence of zombies nearby, mostly docile and not shuffling anywhere, too far apart to be considered either a horde or a threat. But with my first character packing a shotgun, my curiosity gets the better of me. Blowing apart the first zombie is no problem, but the noise quickly catches the attention of far more undead than expected. Suddenly, the mini-map in the bottom corner highlights more ‘zeds’ (as they’re also nicknamed), and it’s terrifying how quickly things escalate. They’re not just climbing over fences in pursuit, some are even running. And it turns out my ammunition is also very limited. Dropped in about seven hours into the game past all initial tutorials, this hands-on introduction to State of Decay 2, proves to be a brutally harsh lesson on what separates Undead Labs’ creation from hordes of other games about the zombie apocalypse. Even for the less trigger-happy who prefer the heft of a melee weapon for smashing in a zombie’s skull, these actions are governed by your stamina, which will quickly deplete after a few swings, just when you’re getting overwhelmed and find yourself too out of breath to make a run for it. It’s a contrast to the action-oriented Dead Rising series, where you’re equipped to dismember armies of undead with reckless abandon. It’s clear after a couple more rash encounters that State of Decay 2 requires a more considered approach, either crouching towards a zombie for a stealth kill or avoiding confrontation altogether, although repeated actions like running or killing zombies can also increase your character’s experience to unlock new abilities and in the latter case, earn influence, the game’s currency. State of Decay 2 | At a glance Combat is however only one aspect of State of Decay 2, as your success of survival is also dependent on your community’s ever-changing morale and finite resources, from food, to medicine, to materials, that will need constant attention. The diverse procedurally-generated characters that form your community, which you can switch control over back at base, are also something of a finite resource. That is, if anyone dies, their death is permanent. This can be devastating especially if you’ve invested time developing their skills, or promoted them to become your community’s leader, the closest State of Decay 2 has to a protagonist, albeit liable to change based on circumstances. Perhaps in our age of watching Game of Thrones or indeed The Walking Dead, where key characters can meet a grisly demise when you least expect, this is less of a shock. With no determined story but one that emerges through the player’s own actions and choices, you may even find that your future leader is a less experienced member of the group you’ll be forced to train up, or perhaps a completely new survivor you’ve yet to recruit on your journey of survival. In another excursion, we encounter a hispanic woman called Socorro who’s been separated from her group and who we help get back to her base. The bad news is that we find everyone dead, or perhaps turned into the zombies that are now present, with a screamer - a freak-type zombie who makes a horrible high-pitched sound to attract even more zombies - inside the house. We manage to dispatch them, but with nothing left, Socorro at least trusts me enough to let me recruit her to my community instead. Every cloud, one might say. It’s a long way before anyone in the group will gain enough standing to become leader, so we attend to a more immediate concern - our dwindling supply of materials. Pressing up on the d-pad brings up a menu for radio assistance, which also includes a new option of calling for another player to drop-in to your game to help. In this case, we spend some of our influence to ask for help locating materials to scavenge. It’s a treacherous journey just getting to our destination but once you reach a building, you may need to clear out zombies before spending time rummaging through drawers, cupboards or boxes to find what you’re looking for. It’s at this point you realise the limit of what your rucksack and pockets can hold (i.e. not a lot at all). While searching can be sped up by holding the left bumper, the extra noise also risks attracting more zombies, proving an even more nightmarish scenario in tight interior spaces. Drop-in Dead | Introducing online co-op multiplayer to the series It’s a desperate scramble back to base, except I’m already in critical condition, having also been bitten by one of the new dangerous blood plague zombies (identified by their red eyes) while another more feral zombie is scurrying after me at alarming speed, swiping away at what little health remains. But the game shows leniency when you’re at death’s door by allowing you to mash a button to recover just a little more health, like your internal survival instincts and adrenaline kicking in for one last push. Even the base turns out not to be permanently safe, with zombies attempting to overrun it when you’ve caused too much of a ruckus, requiring the efforts of your other AI-controlled companions to help beat back the horde. Once the threat has died down, I finally stagger over to the supply point and replenish the base’s materials - a meagre supply, but it will do to carry us for another day, though now it turns out food is also running low. State of Decay 2 interview | How Undead Labs are shuffling away from the horde However, it turns out the attack from the plague zombie earlier has infected my character with the blood plague, which not only leads to death over time but can also spread to the rest of your community. Finding a cure requires destroying plague hearts located around the map and collecting plague samples, not an easy feat as those areas also draw in a lot of plague zombies. With no cure at hand and this preview session almost over, it’s with a heavy heart that I switch to another character who’s instructed to grant mercy to the infected, with a bullet to the head. It’s a grim way to end, but when State of Decay 2 launches later this month, I suspect many more players will find themselves making just as many tough decisions to survive this zombie apocalypse.
Stepping out beyond the secure fencing of the base - currently a ramshackle of mattresses out in the open, workshops and supplies stacked on shelves, but a safe zone nonetheless - it’s not long before you notice the presence of zombies nearby, mostly docile and not shuffling anywhere, too far apart to be considered either a horde or a threat. But with my first character packing a shotgun, my curiosity gets the better of me. Blowing apart the first zombie is no problem, but the noise quickly catches the attention of far more undead than expected. Suddenly, the mini-map in the bottom corner highlights more ‘zeds’ (as they’re also nicknamed), and it’s terrifying how quickly things escalate. They’re not just climbing over fences in pursuit, some are even running. And it turns out my ammunition is also very limited. Dropped in about seven hours into the game past all initial tutorials, this hands-on introduction to State of Decay 2, proves to be a brutally harsh lesson on what separates Undead Labs’ creation from hordes of other games about the zombie apocalypse. Even for the less trigger-happy who prefer the heft of a melee weapon for smashing in a zombie’s skull, these actions are governed by your stamina, which will quickly deplete after a few swings, just when you’re getting overwhelmed and find yourself too out of breath to make a run for it. It’s a contrast to the action-oriented Dead Rising series, where you’re equipped to dismember armies of undead with reckless abandon. It’s clear after a couple more rash encounters that State of Decay 2 requires a more considered approach, either crouching towards a zombie for a stealth kill or avoiding confrontation altogether, although repeated actions like running or killing zombies can also increase your character’s experience to unlock new abilities and in the latter case, earn influence, the game’s currency. State of Decay 2 | At a glance Combat is however only one aspect of State of Decay 2, as your success of survival is also dependent on your community’s ever-changing morale and finite resources, from food, to medicine, to materials, that will need constant attention. The diverse procedurally-generated characters that form your community, which you can switch control over back at base, are also something of a finite resource. That is, if anyone dies, their death is permanent. This can be devastating especially if you’ve invested time developing their skills, or promoted them to become your community’s leader, the closest State of Decay 2 has to a protagonist, albeit liable to change based on circumstances. Perhaps in our age of watching Game of Thrones or indeed The Walking Dead, where key characters can meet a grisly demise when you least expect, this is less of a shock. With no determined story but one that emerges through the player’s own actions and choices, you may even find that your future leader is a less experienced member of the group you’ll be forced to train up, or perhaps a completely new survivor you’ve yet to recruit on your journey of survival. In another excursion, we encounter a hispanic woman called Socorro who’s been separated from her group and who we help get back to her base. The bad news is that we find everyone dead, or perhaps turned into the zombies that are now present, with a screamer - a freak-type zombie who makes a horrible high-pitched sound to attract even more zombies - inside the house. We manage to dispatch them, but with nothing left, Socorro at least trusts me enough to let me recruit her to my community instead. Every cloud, one might say. It’s a long way before anyone in the group will gain enough standing to become leader, so we attend to a more immediate concern - our dwindling supply of materials. Pressing up on the d-pad brings up a menu for radio assistance, which also includes a new option of calling for another player to drop-in to your game to help. In this case, we spend some of our influence to ask for help locating materials to scavenge. It’s a treacherous journey just getting to our destination but once you reach a building, you may need to clear out zombies before spending time rummaging through drawers, cupboards or boxes to find what you’re looking for. It’s at this point you realise the limit of what your rucksack and pockets can hold (i.e. not a lot at all). While searching can be sped up by holding the left bumper, the extra noise also risks attracting more zombies, proving an even more nightmarish scenario in tight interior spaces. Drop-in Dead | Introducing online co-op multiplayer to the series It’s a desperate scramble back to base, except I’m already in critical condition, having also been bitten by one of the new dangerous blood plague zombies (identified by their red eyes) while another more feral zombie is scurrying after me at alarming speed, swiping away at what little health remains. But the game shows leniency when you’re at death’s door by allowing you to mash a button to recover just a little more health, like your internal survival instincts and adrenaline kicking in for one last push. Even the base turns out not to be permanently safe, with zombies attempting to overrun it when you’ve caused too much of a ruckus, requiring the efforts of your other AI-controlled companions to help beat back the horde. Once the threat has died down, I finally stagger over to the supply point and replenish the base’s materials - a meagre supply, but it will do to carry us for another day, though now it turns out food is also running low. State of Decay 2 interview | How Undead Labs are shuffling away from the horde However, it turns out the attack from the plague zombie earlier has infected my character with the blood plague, which not only leads to death over time but can also spread to the rest of your community. Finding a cure requires destroying plague hearts located around the map and collecting plague samples, not an easy feat as those areas also draw in a lot of plague zombies. With no cure at hand and this preview session almost over, it’s with a heavy heart that I switch to another character who’s instructed to grant mercy to the infected, with a bullet to the head. It’s a grim way to end, but when State of Decay 2 launches later this month, I suspect many more players will find themselves making just as many tough decisions to survive this zombie apocalypse.
State of Decay 2 hands-on | Struggling for survival in Undead Labs’ zombie sequel
Stepping out beyond the secure fencing of the base - currently a ramshackle of mattresses out in the open, workshops and supplies stacked on shelves, but a safe zone nonetheless - it’s not long before you notice the presence of zombies nearby, mostly docile and not shuffling anywhere, too far apart to be considered either a horde or a threat. But with my first character packing a shotgun, my curiosity gets the better of me. Blowing apart the first zombie is no problem, but the noise quickly catches the attention of far more undead than expected. Suddenly, the mini-map in the bottom corner highlights more ‘zeds’ (as they’re also nicknamed), and it’s terrifying how quickly things escalate. They’re not just climbing over fences in pursuit, some are even running. And it turns out my ammunition is also very limited. Dropped in about seven hours into the game past all initial tutorials, this hands-on introduction to State of Decay 2, proves to be a brutally harsh lesson on what separates Undead Labs’ creation from hordes of other games about the zombie apocalypse. Even for the less trigger-happy who prefer the heft of a melee weapon for smashing in a zombie’s skull, these actions are governed by your stamina, which will quickly deplete after a few swings, just when you’re getting overwhelmed and find yourself too out of breath to make a run for it. It’s a contrast to the action-oriented Dead Rising series, where you’re equipped to dismember armies of undead with reckless abandon. It’s clear after a couple more rash encounters that State of Decay 2 requires a more considered approach, either crouching towards a zombie for a stealth kill or avoiding confrontation altogether, although repeated actions like running or killing zombies can also increase your character’s experience to unlock new abilities and in the latter case, earn influence, the game’s currency. State of Decay 2 | At a glance Combat is however only one aspect of State of Decay 2, as your success of survival is also dependent on your community’s ever-changing morale and finite resources, from food, to medicine, to materials, that will need constant attention. The diverse procedurally-generated characters that form your community, which you can switch control over back at base, are also something of a finite resource. That is, if anyone dies, their death is permanent. This can be devastating especially if you’ve invested time developing their skills, or promoted them to become your community’s leader, the closest State of Decay 2 has to a protagonist, albeit liable to change based on circumstances. Perhaps in our age of watching Game of Thrones or indeed The Walking Dead, where key characters can meet a grisly demise when you least expect, this is less of a shock. With no determined story but one that emerges through the player’s own actions and choices, you may even find that your future leader is a less experienced member of the group you’ll be forced to train up, or perhaps a completely new survivor you’ve yet to recruit on your journey of survival. In another excursion, we encounter a hispanic woman called Socorro who’s been separated from her group and who we help get back to her base. The bad news is that we find everyone dead, or perhaps turned into the zombies that are now present, with a screamer - a freak-type zombie who makes a horrible high-pitched sound to attract even more zombies - inside the house. We manage to dispatch them, but with nothing left, Socorro at least trusts me enough to let me recruit her to my community instead. Every cloud, one might say. It’s a long way before anyone in the group will gain enough standing to become leader, so we attend to a more immediate concern - our dwindling supply of materials. Pressing up on the d-pad brings up a menu for radio assistance, which also includes a new option of calling for another player to drop-in to your game to help. In this case, we spend some of our influence to ask for help locating materials to scavenge. It’s a treacherous journey just getting to our destination but once you reach a building, you may need to clear out zombies before spending time rummaging through drawers, cupboards or boxes to find what you’re looking for. It’s at this point you realise the limit of what your rucksack and pockets can hold (i.e. not a lot at all). While searching can be sped up by holding the left bumper, the extra noise also risks attracting more zombies, proving an even more nightmarish scenario in tight interior spaces. Drop-in Dead | Introducing online co-op multiplayer to the series It’s a desperate scramble back to base, except I’m already in critical condition, having also been bitten by one of the new dangerous blood plague zombies (identified by their red eyes) while another more feral zombie is scurrying after me at alarming speed, swiping away at what little health remains. But the game shows leniency when you’re at death’s door by allowing you to mash a button to recover just a little more health, like your internal survival instincts and adrenaline kicking in for one last push. Even the base turns out not to be permanently safe, with zombies attempting to overrun it when you’ve caused too much of a ruckus, requiring the efforts of your other AI-controlled companions to help beat back the horde. Once the threat has died down, I finally stagger over to the supply point and replenish the base’s materials - a meagre supply, but it will do to carry us for another day, though now it turns out food is also running low. State of Decay 2 interview | How Undead Labs are shuffling away from the horde However, it turns out the attack from the plague zombie earlier has infected my character with the blood plague, which not only leads to death over time but can also spread to the rest of your community. Finding a cure requires destroying plague hearts located around the map and collecting plague samples, not an easy feat as those areas also draw in a lot of plague zombies. With no cure at hand and this preview session almost over, it’s with a heavy heart that I switch to another character who’s instructed to grant mercy to the infected, with a bullet to the head. It’s a grim way to end, but when State of Decay 2 launches later this month, I suspect many more players will find themselves making just as many tough decisions to survive this zombie apocalypse.
Vikings, knights, maidens, fencing, music, smoked turkey legs; all of that and more are at the Nebraska Renaissance Fair this weekend.
Fun for everyone at the Nebraska Renaissance Fair
Vikings, knights, maidens, fencing, music, smoked turkey legs; all of that and more are at the Nebraska Renaissance Fair this weekend.
Vikings, knights, maidens, fencing, music, smoked turkey legs; all of that and more are at the Nebraska Renaissance Fair this weekend.
Fun for everyone at the Nebraska Renaissance Fair
Vikings, knights, maidens, fencing, music, smoked turkey legs; all of that and more are at the Nebraska Renaissance Fair this weekend.
Vikings, knights, maidens, fencing, music, smoked turkey legs; all of that and more are at the Nebraska Renaissance Fair this weekend.
Fun for everyone at the Nebraska Renaissance Fair
Vikings, knights, maidens, fencing, music, smoked turkey legs; all of that and more are at the Nebraska Renaissance Fair this weekend.
Vikings, knights, maidens, fencing, music, smoked turkey legs; all of that and more are at the Nebraska Renaissance Fair this weekend.
Fun for everyone at the Nebraska Renaissance Fair
Vikings, knights, maidens, fencing, music, smoked turkey legs; all of that and more are at the Nebraska Renaissance Fair this weekend.
A Portland, Oregon man was arrested for allegedly organizing a Lego theft ring and selling thousands of dollars in stolen toys online.
Man arrested for 'fencing' operation involving thousands of dollars in Lego sets
A Portland, Oregon man was arrested for allegedly organizing a Lego theft ring and selling thousands of dollars in stolen toys online.
A Portland, Oregon man was arrested for allegedly organizing a Lego theft ring and selling thousands of dollars in stolen toys online.
Man arrested for 'fencing' operation involving thousands of dollars in Lego sets
A Portland, Oregon man was arrested for allegedly organizing a Lego theft ring and selling thousands of dollars in stolen toys online.
A Portland, Oregon man was arrested for allegedly organizing a Lego theft ring and selling thousands of dollars in stolen toys online.
Man arrested for 'fencing' operation involving thousands of dollars in Lego sets
A Portland, Oregon man was arrested for allegedly organizing a Lego theft ring and selling thousands of dollars in stolen toys online.
A Portland, Oregon man was arrested for allegedly organizing a Lego theft ring and selling thousands of dollars in stolen toys online.
Man arrested for 'fencing' operation involving thousands of dollars in Lego sets
A Portland, Oregon man was arrested for allegedly organizing a Lego theft ring and selling thousands of dollars in stolen toys online.
Fencing and sidewalks are among the improvements planned for Brooklyn's largest park. CBS2's Dana Tyler reports.
$5.6 Million Improvement Underway For Prospect Park
Fencing and sidewalks are among the improvements planned for Brooklyn's largest park. CBS2's Dana Tyler reports.
Fencing and sidewalks are among the improvements planned for Brooklyn's largest park. CBS2's Dana Tyler reports.
$5.6 Million Improvement Underway For Prospect Park
Fencing and sidewalks are among the improvements planned for Brooklyn's largest park. CBS2's Dana Tyler reports.
Fencing and sidewalks are among the improvements planned for Brooklyn's largest park. CBS2's Dana Tyler reports.
$5.6 Million Improvement Underway For Prospect Park
Fencing and sidewalks are among the improvements planned for Brooklyn's largest park. CBS2's Dana Tyler reports.
Fencing and sidewalks are among the improvements planned for Brooklyn's largest park. CBS2's Dana Tyler reports.
$5.6 Million Improvement Underway For Prospect Park
Fencing and sidewalks are among the improvements planned for Brooklyn's largest park. CBS2's Dana Tyler reports.
<p>‘Peckham mothers can indulge in “keep fit” exercises, swimming, fencing, badminton, or any other of the various diversions afforded by the Centre. To join a family the cost is a mere shilling per week and it entitles every member of the family to the many facilities afforded.’ (Historic England) </p>
A group of women taking part in an exercise class at the Pioneer Health Centre, St Mary’s Road, London

‘Peckham mothers can indulge in “keep fit” exercises, swimming, fencing, badminton, or any other of the various diversions afforded by the Centre. To join a family the cost is a mere shilling per week and it entitles every member of the family to the many facilities afforded.’ (Historic England)

Nikolay V. Pukalov, head of the Counsular Division of the Embassy of the Russian Federation of Washington, D.C., peers through the iron fencing surrounding the former Russian consul general&#39;s residence Wednesday, April 25, 2018, in Seattle. Officials with the U.S. State Department have drilled out locks to access and inspect the home, a day after Russian staff vacated the site. President Donald Trump&#39;s administration announced last month that the diplomatic outpost would be closed and 60 Russian diplomats would be expelled nationwide to punish Moscow for its alleged role in poisoning an ex-spy in Britain. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
Nikolay V. Pukalov, head of the Counsular Division of the Embassy of the Russian Federation of Washington, D.C., peers through the iron fencing surrounding the former Russian consul general's residence Wednesday, April 25, 2018, in Seattle. Officials with the U.S. State Department have drilled out locks to access and inspect the home, a day after Russian staff vacated the site. President Donald Trump's administration announced last month that the diplomatic outpost would be closed and 60 Russian diplomats would be expelled nationwide to punish Moscow for its alleged role in poisoning an ex-spy in Britain. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
Nikolay V. Pukalov, head of the Counsular Division of the Embassy of the Russian Federation of Washington, D.C., peers through the iron fencing surrounding the former Russian consul general's residence Wednesday, April 25, 2018, in Seattle. Officials with the U.S. State Department have drilled out locks to access and inspect the home, a day after Russian staff vacated the site. President Donald Trump's administration announced last month that the diplomatic outpost would be closed and 60 Russian diplomats would be expelled nationwide to punish Moscow for its alleged role in poisoning an ex-spy in Britain. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
Nikolay V. Pukalov, head of the Counsular Division of the Embassy of the Russian Federation of Washington, D.C., walks past the brick and iron fencing surrounding the former Russian consul general&#39;s residence, where the Russian flag continue to fly, Wednesday, April 25, 2018, in Seattle. Officials with the U.S. State Department have drilled out locks to access and inspect the home, a day after Russian staff vacated the site. President Donald Trump&#39;s administration announced last month that the diplomatic outpost would be closed and 60 Russian diplomats would be expelled nationwide to punish Moscow for its alleged role in poisoning an ex-spy in Britain. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
Nikolay V. Pukalov, head of the Counsular Division of the Embassy of the Russian Federation of Washington, D.C., walks past the brick and iron fencing surrounding the former Russian consul general's residence, where the Russian flag continue to fly, Wednesday, April 25, 2018, in Seattle. Officials with the U.S. State Department have drilled out locks to access and inspect the home, a day after Russian staff vacated the site. President Donald Trump's administration announced last month that the diplomatic outpost would be closed and 60 Russian diplomats would be expelled nationwide to punish Moscow for its alleged role in poisoning an ex-spy in Britain. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
Nikolay V. Pukalov, head of the Counsular Division of the Embassy of the Russian Federation of Washington, D.C., walks past the brick and iron fencing surrounding the former Russian consul general's residence, where the Russian flag continue to fly, Wednesday, April 25, 2018, in Seattle. Officials with the U.S. State Department have drilled out locks to access and inspect the home, a day after Russian staff vacated the site. President Donald Trump's administration announced last month that the diplomatic outpost would be closed and 60 Russian diplomats would be expelled nationwide to punish Moscow for its alleged role in poisoning an ex-spy in Britain. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
City leaders plan to fencing around Rail Yards following fire
City leaders plan to fencing around Rail Yards following fire
City leaders plan to fencing around Rail Yards following fire
Villagers in a Sri Lankan town are calling for improvements to a rubbish dump after at least six wild elephants died from eating toxic plastic waste. Residents of Deegawapi in the Amparai region are also concerned the giant creatures are encroaching on their farmland and making families feel unsafe. Drone footage shows a heard of elephants eating the man-made mixture at the dump, which lacks fencing or walls. Video from the ground also shows elephants picking up food from the vast tip. It is believed six elephants have so far died from ingesting polyethylene – the main compound in disposable plastics – while searching for food scraps, according to Veterinary surgeon Dr. Nihal Pushpakumara from the Department of Wildlife Conservation in Amparai. The waste is brought from the nearby areas of Akkaraipattu, Sammanthurai and Kalmunai and is simply covered with soil once dumped. Residents of the surrounding areas have also said they feel unable to leave their homes in the late afternoon once the elephants arrive at the dump. The Pradeshiya Sabha municipality has now vowed to build a fence to keep the elephants away from the landfill after complaints from villagers. The footage was filmed on April 24.
Six elephants dead after eating plastic at Sri Lanka rubbish landfill
Villagers in a Sri Lankan town are calling for improvements to a rubbish dump after at least six wild elephants died from eating toxic plastic waste. Residents of Deegawapi in the Amparai region are also concerned the giant creatures are encroaching on their farmland and making families feel unsafe. Drone footage shows a heard of elephants eating the man-made mixture at the dump, which lacks fencing or walls. Video from the ground also shows elephants picking up food from the vast tip. It is believed six elephants have so far died from ingesting polyethylene – the main compound in disposable plastics – while searching for food scraps, according to Veterinary surgeon Dr. Nihal Pushpakumara from the Department of Wildlife Conservation in Amparai. The waste is brought from the nearby areas of Akkaraipattu, Sammanthurai and Kalmunai and is simply covered with soil once dumped. Residents of the surrounding areas have also said they feel unable to leave their homes in the late afternoon once the elephants arrive at the dump. The Pradeshiya Sabha municipality has now vowed to build a fence to keep the elephants away from the landfill after complaints from villagers. The footage was filmed on April 24.
Villagers in a Sri Lankan town are calling for improvements to a rubbish dump after at least six wild elephants died from eating toxic plastic waste. Residents of Deegawapi in the Amparai region are also concerned the giant creatures are encroaching on their farmland and making families feel unsafe. Drone footage shows a heard of elephants eating the man-made mixture at the dump, which lacks fencing or walls. Video from the ground also shows elephants picking up food from the vast tip. It is believed six elephants have so far died from ingesting polyethylene – the main compound in disposable plastics – while searching for food scraps, according to Veterinary surgeon Dr. Nihal Pushpakumara from the Department of Wildlife Conservation in Amparai. The waste is brought from the nearby areas of Akkaraipattu, Sammanthurai and Kalmunai and is simply covered with soil once dumped. Residents of the surrounding areas have also said they feel unable to leave their homes in the late afternoon once the elephants arrive at the dump. The Pradeshiya Sabha municipality has now vowed to build a fence to keep the elephants away from the landfill after complaints from villagers. The footage was filmed on April 24.
Six elephants dead after eating plastic at Sri Lanka rubbish landfill
Villagers in a Sri Lankan town are calling for improvements to a rubbish dump after at least six wild elephants died from eating toxic plastic waste. Residents of Deegawapi in the Amparai region are also concerned the giant creatures are encroaching on their farmland and making families feel unsafe. Drone footage shows a heard of elephants eating the man-made mixture at the dump, which lacks fencing or walls. Video from the ground also shows elephants picking up food from the vast tip. It is believed six elephants have so far died from ingesting polyethylene – the main compound in disposable plastics – while searching for food scraps, according to Veterinary surgeon Dr. Nihal Pushpakumara from the Department of Wildlife Conservation in Amparai. The waste is brought from the nearby areas of Akkaraipattu, Sammanthurai and Kalmunai and is simply covered with soil once dumped. Residents of the surrounding areas have also said they feel unable to leave their homes in the late afternoon once the elephants arrive at the dump. The Pradeshiya Sabha municipality has now vowed to build a fence to keep the elephants away from the landfill after complaints from villagers. The footage was filmed on April 24.
Villagers in a Sri Lankan town are calling for improvements to a rubbish dump after at least six wild elephants died from eating toxic plastic waste. Residents of Deegawapi in the Amparai region are also concerned the giant creatures are encroaching on their farmland and making families feel unsafe. Drone footage shows a heard of elephants eating the man-made mixture at the dump, which lacks fencing or walls. Video from the ground also shows elephants picking up food from the vast tip. It is believed six elephants have so far died from ingesting polyethylene – the main compound in disposable plastics – while searching for food scraps, according to Veterinary surgeon Dr. Nihal Pushpakumara from the Department of Wildlife Conservation in Amparai. The waste is brought from the nearby areas of Akkaraipattu, Sammanthurai and Kalmunai and is simply covered with soil once dumped. Residents of the surrounding areas have also said they feel unable to leave their homes in the late afternoon once the elephants arrive at the dump. The Pradeshiya Sabha municipality has now vowed to build a fence to keep the elephants away from the landfill after complaints from villagers. The footage was filmed on April 24.
Six elephants dead after eating plastic at Sri Lanka rubbish landfill
Villagers in a Sri Lankan town are calling for improvements to a rubbish dump after at least six wild elephants died from eating toxic plastic waste. Residents of Deegawapi in the Amparai region are also concerned the giant creatures are encroaching on their farmland and making families feel unsafe. Drone footage shows a heard of elephants eating the man-made mixture at the dump, which lacks fencing or walls. Video from the ground also shows elephants picking up food from the vast tip. It is believed six elephants have so far died from ingesting polyethylene – the main compound in disposable plastics – while searching for food scraps, according to Veterinary surgeon Dr. Nihal Pushpakumara from the Department of Wildlife Conservation in Amparai. The waste is brought from the nearby areas of Akkaraipattu, Sammanthurai and Kalmunai and is simply covered with soil once dumped. Residents of the surrounding areas have also said they feel unable to leave their homes in the late afternoon once the elephants arrive at the dump. The Pradeshiya Sabha municipality has now vowed to build a fence to keep the elephants away from the landfill after complaints from villagers. The footage was filmed on April 24.
Villagers in a Sri Lankan town are calling for improvements to a rubbish dump after at least six wild elephants died from eating toxic plastic waste. Residents of Deegawapi in the Amparai region are also concerned the giant creatures are encroaching on their farmland and making families feel unsafe. Drone footage shows a heard of elephants eating the man-made mixture at the dump, which lacks fencing or walls. Video from the ground also shows elephants picking up food from the vast tip. It is believed six elephants have so far died from ingesting polyethylene – the main compound in disposable plastics – while searching for food scraps, according to Veterinary surgeon Dr. Nihal Pushpakumara from the Department of Wildlife Conservation in Amparai. The waste is brought from the nearby areas of Akkaraipattu, Sammanthurai and Kalmunai and is simply covered with soil once dumped. Residents of the surrounding areas have also said they feel unable to leave their homes in the late afternoon once the elephants arrive at the dump. The Pradeshiya Sabha municipality has now vowed to build a fence to keep the elephants away from the landfill after complaints from villagers. The footage was filmed on April 24.
Six elephants dead after eating plastic at Sri Lanka rubbish landfill
Villagers in a Sri Lankan town are calling for improvements to a rubbish dump after at least six wild elephants died from eating toxic plastic waste. Residents of Deegawapi in the Amparai region are also concerned the giant creatures are encroaching on their farmland and making families feel unsafe. Drone footage shows a heard of elephants eating the man-made mixture at the dump, which lacks fencing or walls. Video from the ground also shows elephants picking up food from the vast tip. It is believed six elephants have so far died from ingesting polyethylene – the main compound in disposable plastics – while searching for food scraps, according to Veterinary surgeon Dr. Nihal Pushpakumara from the Department of Wildlife Conservation in Amparai. The waste is brought from the nearby areas of Akkaraipattu, Sammanthurai and Kalmunai and is simply covered with soil once dumped. Residents of the surrounding areas have also said they feel unable to leave their homes in the late afternoon once the elephants arrive at the dump. The Pradeshiya Sabha municipality has now vowed to build a fence to keep the elephants away from the landfill after complaints from villagers. The footage was filmed on April 24.
Numbered markers are seen on bullet-riddled fencing at the scene Batsh was shot dead
Numbered markers are seen on bullet-riddled fencing at the scene Batsh was shot dead
Numbered markers are seen on bullet-riddled fencing at the scene Batsh was shot dead
Numbered markers are seen on bullet-riddled fencing at the scene Batsh was shot dead (AFP Photo/Mohd RASFAN)
Numbered markers are seen on bullet-riddled fencing at the scene Batsh was shot dead
Numbered markers are seen on bullet-riddled fencing at the scene Batsh was shot dead (AFP Photo/Mohd RASFAN)
Numbered markers are seen on bullet-riddled fencing at the scene Batsh was shot dead
Numbered markers are seen on bullet-riddled fencing at the scene Batsh was shot dead
Numbered markers are seen on bullet-riddled fencing at the scene Batsh was shot dead
Numbered markers are seen on bullet-riddled fencing at the scene Batsh was shot dead
Numbered markers are seen on bullet-riddled fencing at the scene Batsh was shot dead
Numbered markers are seen on bullet-riddled fencing at the scene Batsh was shot dead
We paid calls on the Facebook CEO's barber, high school fencing coach and others to find out what makes Zuckerberg tick. Also: We visited one of the more controversial stops on his recent nationwide tour.
CNET goes to Mark Zuckerberg's hometown
We paid calls on the Facebook CEO's barber, high school fencing coach and others to find out what makes Zuckerberg tick. Also: We visited one of the more controversial stops on his recent nationwide tour.
We paid calls on the Facebook CEO's barber, high school fencing coach and others to find out what makes Zuckerberg tick. Also: We visited one of the more controversial stops on his recent nationwide tour.
CNET goes to Mark Zuckerberg's hometown
We paid calls on the Facebook CEO's barber, high school fencing coach and others to find out what makes Zuckerberg tick. Also: We visited one of the more controversial stops on his recent nationwide tour.
We paid calls on the Facebook CEO&#39;s barber, high school fencing coach and others to find out what makes Zuckerberg tick. Also: We visited one of the more controversial stops on his recent nationwide tour.
CNET goes to Mark Zuckerberg's hometown
We paid calls on the Facebook CEO's barber, high school fencing coach and others to find out what makes Zuckerberg tick. Also: We visited one of the more controversial stops on his recent nationwide tour.
We paid calls on the Facebook CEO's barber, high school fencing coach and others to find out what makes Zuckerberg tick. Also: We visited one of the more controversial stops on his recent nationwide tour.
CNET goes to Mark Zuckerberg's hometown
We paid calls on the Facebook CEO's barber, high school fencing coach and others to find out what makes Zuckerberg tick. Also: We visited one of the more controversial stops on his recent nationwide tour.
We paid calls on the Facebook CEO's barber, high school fencing coach and others to find out what makes Zuckerberg tick. Also: We visited one of the more controversial stops on his recent nationwide tour.
CNET goes to Mark Zuckerberg's hometown
We paid calls on the Facebook CEO's barber, high school fencing coach and others to find out what makes Zuckerberg tick. Also: We visited one of the more controversial stops on his recent nationwide tour.
We paid calls on the Facebook CEO&#39;s barber, high school fencing coach and others to find out what makes Zuckerberg tick. Also: We visited one of the more controversial stops on his recent nationwide tour.
CNET goes to Mark Zuckerberg's hometown
We paid calls on the Facebook CEO's barber, high school fencing coach and others to find out what makes Zuckerberg tick. Also: We visited one of the more controversial stops on his recent nationwide tour.
We paid calls on the Facebook CEO&#39;s barber, high school fencing coach and others to find out what makes Zuckerberg tick. Also: We visited one of the more controversial stops on his recent nationwide tour.
CNET goes to Mark Zuckerberg's hometown
We paid calls on the Facebook CEO's barber, high school fencing coach and others to find out what makes Zuckerberg tick. Also: We visited one of the more controversial stops on his recent nationwide tour.
We paid calls on the Facebook CEO's barber, high school fencing coach and others to find out what makes Zuckerberg tick. Also: We visited one of the more controversial stops on his recent nationwide tour.
CNET goes to Mark Zuckerberg's hometown
We paid calls on the Facebook CEO's barber, high school fencing coach and others to find out what makes Zuckerberg tick. Also: We visited one of the more controversial stops on his recent nationwide tour.
Taxpayer-controlled RBS is stumping up £3.5bn to help plug its pension scheme deficit, prompted by restructuring required to comply with UK &quot;ring-fencing&quot; rules. The high street lender said it was making the payments to compensate pension scheme members for the loss of financial firepower resulting from hiving off the firm’s investment banking arm NatWest Markets. RBS will contribute an initial £2bn by the end of this year, and then up to an additional £1.5bn from 2020. The further sums are dependent on the bank’s dividend restarting, with pension payments set to match any dividend paid, up to the £1.5bn threshold. RBS declined to disclose its pension scheme deficit, but said it did not expect to have to make any further deficit contributions following the payments. Ewen Stevenson, RBS chief financial officer, said that the pension agreement was an “important milestone” on the way to restarting a dividend – which has not been paid since the financial crisis and the bank&#39;s £45bn state bailout. Ring fencing rules are designed to protect high street customers from lenders&#39; riskier investment banks Credit: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg Mr Stevenson added: “With these proposed payments ... we will have substantially addressed the historical funding weaknesses that existed in the fund and brought clarity to future funding arrangements.” The ring-fencing rules force UK banks to split their retail arms from their investment banks in changes designed to protect consumers and businesses from the fallout if there is another financial crisis. The rules come into force next January, but the big banks are all set to switch on their &quot;ring fences&quot; well ahead of the deadline. Barclays became the first to do so over the Easter weekend and RBS will do so at the end of this month. RBS said the initial £2bn pension payment would cost it 80 basis points of capital, which if incurred today would take its core capital ratio from 15.9pc to 15.1pc. The bank is currently well-capitalised relative to its peers, as it awaits a likely hefty fine for past misconduct in the US for mis-selling toxic mortgage-backed securities. Barclays settled a similar albeit smaller case for $2bn (£1.4bn) last month, a lower figure than the City had feared. As part of the pension scheme changes the pension pots of RBS investment bank staff will be transferred into a new scheme. RBS shares were up 1.7pc in mid-afternoon trading.
RBS to pay up to £3.5bn into pension scheme ahead of switching on 'ring fence'
Taxpayer-controlled RBS is stumping up £3.5bn to help plug its pension scheme deficit, prompted by restructuring required to comply with UK "ring-fencing" rules. The high street lender said it was making the payments to compensate pension scheme members for the loss of financial firepower resulting from hiving off the firm’s investment banking arm NatWest Markets. RBS will contribute an initial £2bn by the end of this year, and then up to an additional £1.5bn from 2020. The further sums are dependent on the bank’s dividend restarting, with pension payments set to match any dividend paid, up to the £1.5bn threshold. RBS declined to disclose its pension scheme deficit, but said it did not expect to have to make any further deficit contributions following the payments. Ewen Stevenson, RBS chief financial officer, said that the pension agreement was an “important milestone” on the way to restarting a dividend – which has not been paid since the financial crisis and the bank's £45bn state bailout. Ring fencing rules are designed to protect high street customers from lenders' riskier investment banks Credit: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg Mr Stevenson added: “With these proposed payments ... we will have substantially addressed the historical funding weaknesses that existed in the fund and brought clarity to future funding arrangements.” The ring-fencing rules force UK banks to split their retail arms from their investment banks in changes designed to protect consumers and businesses from the fallout if there is another financial crisis. The rules come into force next January, but the big banks are all set to switch on their "ring fences" well ahead of the deadline. Barclays became the first to do so over the Easter weekend and RBS will do so at the end of this month. RBS said the initial £2bn pension payment would cost it 80 basis points of capital, which if incurred today would take its core capital ratio from 15.9pc to 15.1pc. The bank is currently well-capitalised relative to its peers, as it awaits a likely hefty fine for past misconduct in the US for mis-selling toxic mortgage-backed securities. Barclays settled a similar albeit smaller case for $2bn (£1.4bn) last month, a lower figure than the City had feared. As part of the pension scheme changes the pension pots of RBS investment bank staff will be transferred into a new scheme. RBS shares were up 1.7pc in mid-afternoon trading.
Taxpayer-controlled RBS is stumping up £3.5bn to help plug its pension scheme deficit, prompted by restructuring required to comply with UK &quot;ring-fencing&quot; rules. The high street lender said it was making the payments to compensate pension scheme members for the loss of financial firepower resulting from hiving off the firm’s investment banking arm NatWest Markets. RBS will contribute an initial £2bn by the end of this year, and then up to an additional £1.5bn from 2020. The further sums are dependent on the bank’s dividend restarting, with pension payments set to match any dividend paid, up to the £1.5bn threshold. RBS declined to disclose its pension scheme deficit, but said it did not expect to have to make any further deficit contributions following the payments. Ewen Stevenson, RBS chief financial officer, said that the pension agreement was an “important milestone” on the way to restarting a dividend – which has not been paid since the financial crisis and the bank&#39;s £45bn state bailout. Ring fencing rules are designed to protect high street customers from lenders&#39; riskier investment banks Credit: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg Mr Stevenson added: “With these proposed payments ... we will have substantially addressed the historical funding weaknesses that existed in the fund and brought clarity to future funding arrangements.” The ring-fencing rules force UK banks to split their retail arms from their investment banks in changes designed to protect consumers and businesses from the fallout if there is another financial crisis. The rules come into force next January, but the big banks are all set to switch on their &quot;ring fences&quot; well ahead of the deadline. Barclays became the first to do so over the Easter weekend and RBS will do so at the end of this month. RBS said the initial £2bn pension payment would cost it 80 basis points of capital, which if incurred today would take its core capital ratio from 15.9pc to 15.1pc. The bank is currently well-capitalised relative to its peers, as it awaits a likely hefty fine for past misconduct in the US for mis-selling toxic mortgage-backed securities. Barclays settled a similar albeit smaller case for $2bn (£1.4bn) last month, a lower figure than the City had feared. As part of the pension scheme changes the pension pots of RBS investment bank staff will be transferred into a new scheme. RBS shares were up 1.7pc in mid-afternoon trading.
RBS to pay up to £3.5bn into pension scheme ahead of switching on 'ring fence'
Taxpayer-controlled RBS is stumping up £3.5bn to help plug its pension scheme deficit, prompted by restructuring required to comply with UK "ring-fencing" rules. The high street lender said it was making the payments to compensate pension scheme members for the loss of financial firepower resulting from hiving off the firm’s investment banking arm NatWest Markets. RBS will contribute an initial £2bn by the end of this year, and then up to an additional £1.5bn from 2020. The further sums are dependent on the bank’s dividend restarting, with pension payments set to match any dividend paid, up to the £1.5bn threshold. RBS declined to disclose its pension scheme deficit, but said it did not expect to have to make any further deficit contributions following the payments. Ewen Stevenson, RBS chief financial officer, said that the pension agreement was an “important milestone” on the way to restarting a dividend – which has not been paid since the financial crisis and the bank's £45bn state bailout. Ring fencing rules are designed to protect high street customers from lenders' riskier investment banks Credit: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg Mr Stevenson added: “With these proposed payments ... we will have substantially addressed the historical funding weaknesses that existed in the fund and brought clarity to future funding arrangements.” The ring-fencing rules force UK banks to split their retail arms from their investment banks in changes designed to protect consumers and businesses from the fallout if there is another financial crisis. The rules come into force next January, but the big banks are all set to switch on their "ring fences" well ahead of the deadline. Barclays became the first to do so over the Easter weekend and RBS will do so at the end of this month. RBS said the initial £2bn pension payment would cost it 80 basis points of capital, which if incurred today would take its core capital ratio from 15.9pc to 15.1pc. The bank is currently well-capitalised relative to its peers, as it awaits a likely hefty fine for past misconduct in the US for mis-selling toxic mortgage-backed securities. Barclays settled a similar albeit smaller case for $2bn (£1.4bn) last month, a lower figure than the City had feared. As part of the pension scheme changes the pension pots of RBS investment bank staff will be transferred into a new scheme. RBS shares were up 1.7pc in mid-afternoon trading.
The Novichok nerve agent used in the Salisbury spy attack was delivered in “liquid form”, the Government has revealed. Officials from the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) said that only a “very small amount” of the substance was used to poison the former double agent Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia. The details emerged at a press briefing in Salisbury, where reporters were told the highest concentration of the deadly material was found at Mr Skripal&#39;s house. The Government also announced that the cleaning up of a handful of sites across Salisbury which were potentially contaminated as a result of the nerve agent attack will “take a number of months”. Specialist military personnel will be deployed to ensure nine sites in the Wiltshire cathedral city are safe with police cordons in key areas to be replaced with secure fencing. Officials maintain that the risk to the public remains low after Mr Skripal and Yulia were poisoned on March 4. Russian spy poisoning | Read more Chemical weapons experts identified the deadly nerve agent which was used in the attack as belonging to the Novichok family - a type of weapon created by the Soviet Union. The UK has formally blamed Russia for the attack but Moscow has denied all accusations of wrongdoing. Both nations have engaged in tit for tat retaliation in the wake of the incident as they expelled each other’s diplomats with relations between the Kremlin and Downing Street rapidly deteriorating. The Salisbury sites earmarked for decontamination include The Maltings shopping area near to where the pair were found, the city cemetery, the Zizzi restaurant where the pair dined and the Ashley Wood compound where Mr Skripal&#39;s BMW was taken after the attack. Three of the nine sites are in the city centre. A small cordoned area of London Road cemetery was the first area to be reopened to the public after extensive investigations and testing established that it was not contaminated. All of the remaining sites will remain secured. Mapped: Russian diplomats expelled from West The Government has stressed that the current scientific assessment is that the remainder of Salisbury is safe for residents and visitors while Public Health England has reaffirmed that the risk to the general public is low. Work to clean each site, which will be supported by approximately 190 specialist military personnel from the Army and RAF, will involve a process of testing, removal of items which may have been contaminated, chemical cleaning and retesting. Sites will not be reopened to the public until test results show they are free of contamination. The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, which is leading the work, said it is “expected to take a number of months”. Doctors caring for Mr Skripal and Yulia have said the pair are recovering from the attack with both no longer in a critical condition. Front Bench promotion - end of article
Salisbury spy attack: Novichok nerve agent was delivered in 'liquid form', Government reveals
The Novichok nerve agent used in the Salisbury spy attack was delivered in “liquid form”, the Government has revealed. Officials from the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) said that only a “very small amount” of the substance was used to poison the former double agent Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia. The details emerged at a press briefing in Salisbury, where reporters were told the highest concentration of the deadly material was found at Mr Skripal's house. The Government also announced that the cleaning up of a handful of sites across Salisbury which were potentially contaminated as a result of the nerve agent attack will “take a number of months”. Specialist military personnel will be deployed to ensure nine sites in the Wiltshire cathedral city are safe with police cordons in key areas to be replaced with secure fencing. Officials maintain that the risk to the public remains low after Mr Skripal and Yulia were poisoned on March 4. Russian spy poisoning | Read more Chemical weapons experts identified the deadly nerve agent which was used in the attack as belonging to the Novichok family - a type of weapon created by the Soviet Union. The UK has formally blamed Russia for the attack but Moscow has denied all accusations of wrongdoing. Both nations have engaged in tit for tat retaliation in the wake of the incident as they expelled each other’s diplomats with relations between the Kremlin and Downing Street rapidly deteriorating. The Salisbury sites earmarked for decontamination include The Maltings shopping area near to where the pair were found, the city cemetery, the Zizzi restaurant where the pair dined and the Ashley Wood compound where Mr Skripal's BMW was taken after the attack. Three of the nine sites are in the city centre. A small cordoned area of London Road cemetery was the first area to be reopened to the public after extensive investigations and testing established that it was not contaminated. All of the remaining sites will remain secured. Mapped: Russian diplomats expelled from West The Government has stressed that the current scientific assessment is that the remainder of Salisbury is safe for residents and visitors while Public Health England has reaffirmed that the risk to the general public is low. Work to clean each site, which will be supported by approximately 190 specialist military personnel from the Army and RAF, will involve a process of testing, removal of items which may have been contaminated, chemical cleaning and retesting. Sites will not be reopened to the public until test results show they are free of contamination. The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, which is leading the work, said it is “expected to take a number of months”. Doctors caring for Mr Skripal and Yulia have said the pair are recovering from the attack with both no longer in a critical condition. Front Bench promotion - end of article
Barbed wire fencing stands at the Kinder Morgan Inc. Trans Mountain pipeline expansion site in Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada, on Wednesday, April 11, 2018. Alberta, the landlocked Canadian province that's home to the oil sands, would be willing to buy out Kinder Morgan's Trans Mountain pipeline if that's the only way to salvage the critical export route, Premier Rachel Notley said.
Alberta Readies Oil Embargo in Kinder Pipeline Battle
Barbed wire fencing stands at the Kinder Morgan Inc. Trans Mountain pipeline expansion site in Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada, on Wednesday, April 11, 2018. Alberta, the landlocked Canadian province that's home to the oil sands, would be willing to buy out Kinder Morgan's Trans Mountain pipeline if that's the only way to salvage the critical export route, Premier Rachel Notley said.
When we think about pets, the only things that come to mind are the small animals that we get to keep in our houses. Dogs and cats are the usual suspects, but the list can be expanded to include rodents, birds, lizards, serpents, insects and other things that might not come naturally to you as a companion. We think we can also add cows on the list of animals and creatures that might not strike you as pet material. If you do not believe us, you should definitely take a look at this here clip and see for yourself. It's impossible to deny how happy this <a href="https://rumble.com/v3z0cl-adorable-cow-is-delighted-with-her-brush.html" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:cow" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">cow</a> is when he is called from across a field. Watch him run and jump right up to the fence to greet his human best friend! What a priceless moment. We have no idea how good a cow’s vision is, but one thing is for sure. He may have taken a few good looks over by the fence, before he actually came running to the human like a tiny puppy. Only this is a <a href="https://rumble.com/v3odjh-adorable-cow-thinks-hes-a-dog-and-lives-in-house.html" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:big puppy" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">big puppy</a> with hooves for feet and can’t sleep in the house. Still, the love and respect these two feel for each other is inspiring! He even makes a few bounces before reaching the fence, because yay, it is his favorite human! For a moment there we thought that he wouldn’t stop and just ram himself into the chain-link fence. But the gentle animal slowed down in the nick of time and aligned himself with the fencing, expecting a few sweet scratches. Who wouldn’t love a pet like that?
Cow Runs Over Like A Puppy After Being Called By Owner
When we think about pets, the only things that come to mind are the small animals that we get to keep in our houses. Dogs and cats are the usual suspects, but the list can be expanded to include rodents, birds, lizards, serpents, insects and other things that might not come naturally to you as a companion. We think we can also add cows on the list of animals and creatures that might not strike you as pet material. If you do not believe us, you should definitely take a look at this here clip and see for yourself. It's impossible to deny how happy this cow is when he is called from across a field. Watch him run and jump right up to the fence to greet his human best friend! What a priceless moment. We have no idea how good a cow’s vision is, but one thing is for sure. He may have taken a few good looks over by the fence, before he actually came running to the human like a tiny puppy. Only this is a big puppy with hooves for feet and can’t sleep in the house. Still, the love and respect these two feel for each other is inspiring! He even makes a few bounces before reaching the fence, because yay, it is his favorite human! For a moment there we thought that he wouldn’t stop and just ram himself into the chain-link fence. But the gentle animal slowed down in the nick of time and aligned himself with the fencing, expecting a few sweet scratches. Who wouldn’t love a pet like that?
When we think about pets, the only things that come to mind are the small animals that we get to keep in our houses. Dogs and cats are the usual suspects, but the list can be expanded to include rodents, birds, lizards, serpents, insects and other things that might not come naturally to you as a companion. We think we can also add cows on the list of animals and creatures that might not strike you as pet material. If you do not believe us, you should definitely take a look at this here clip and see for yourself. It's impossible to deny how happy this <a href="https://rumble.com/v3z0cl-adorable-cow-is-delighted-with-her-brush.html" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:cow" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">cow</a> is when he is called from across a field. Watch him run and jump right up to the fence to greet his human best friend! What a priceless moment. We have no idea how good a cow’s vision is, but one thing is for sure. He may have taken a few good looks over by the fence, before he actually came running to the human like a tiny puppy. Only this is a <a href="https://rumble.com/v3odjh-adorable-cow-thinks-hes-a-dog-and-lives-in-house.html" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:big puppy" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">big puppy</a> with hooves for feet and can’t sleep in the house. Still, the love and respect these two feel for each other is inspiring! He even makes a few bounces before reaching the fence, because yay, it is his favorite human! For a moment there we thought that he wouldn’t stop and just ram himself into the chain-link fence. But the gentle animal slowed down in the nick of time and aligned himself with the fencing, expecting a few sweet scratches. Who wouldn’t love a pet like that?
Cow Runs Over Like A Puppy After Being Called By Owner
When we think about pets, the only things that come to mind are the small animals that we get to keep in our houses. Dogs and cats are the usual suspects, but the list can be expanded to include rodents, birds, lizards, serpents, insects and other things that might not come naturally to you as a companion. We think we can also add cows on the list of animals and creatures that might not strike you as pet material. If you do not believe us, you should definitely take a look at this here clip and see for yourself. It's impossible to deny how happy this cow is when he is called from across a field. Watch him run and jump right up to the fence to greet his human best friend! What a priceless moment. We have no idea how good a cow’s vision is, but one thing is for sure. He may have taken a few good looks over by the fence, before he actually came running to the human like a tiny puppy. Only this is a big puppy with hooves for feet and can’t sleep in the house. Still, the love and respect these two feel for each other is inspiring! He even makes a few bounces before reaching the fence, because yay, it is his favorite human! For a moment there we thought that he wouldn’t stop and just ram himself into the chain-link fence. But the gentle animal slowed down in the nick of time and aligned himself with the fencing, expecting a few sweet scratches. Who wouldn’t love a pet like that?
When we think about pets, the only things that come to mind are the small animals that we get to keep in our houses. Dogs and cats are the usual suspects, but the list can be expanded to include rodents, birds, lizards, serpents, insects and other things that might not come naturally to you as a companion. We think we can also add cows on the list of animals and creatures that might not strike you as pet material. If you do not believe us, you should definitely take a look at this here clip and see for yourself. It's impossible to deny how happy this <a href="https://rumble.com/v3z0cl-adorable-cow-is-delighted-with-her-brush.html" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:cow" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">cow</a> is when he is called from across a field. Watch him run and jump right up to the fence to greet his human best friend! What a priceless moment. We have no idea how good a cow’s vision is, but one thing is for sure. He may have taken a few good looks over by the fence, before he actually came running to the human like a tiny puppy. Only this is a <a href="https://rumble.com/v3odjh-adorable-cow-thinks-hes-a-dog-and-lives-in-house.html" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:big puppy" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">big puppy</a> with hooves for feet and can’t sleep in the house. Still, the love and respect these two feel for each other is inspiring! He even makes a few bounces before reaching the fence, because yay, it is his favorite human! For a moment there we thought that he wouldn’t stop and just ram himself into the chain-link fence. But the gentle animal slowed down in the nick of time and aligned himself with the fencing, expecting a few sweet scratches. Who wouldn’t love a pet like that?
Cow Runs Over Like A Puppy After Being Called By Owner
When we think about pets, the only things that come to mind are the small animals that we get to keep in our houses. Dogs and cats are the usual suspects, but the list can be expanded to include rodents, birds, lizards, serpents, insects and other things that might not come naturally to you as a companion. We think we can also add cows on the list of animals and creatures that might not strike you as pet material. If you do not believe us, you should definitely take a look at this here clip and see for yourself. It's impossible to deny how happy this cow is when he is called from across a field. Watch him run and jump right up to the fence to greet his human best friend! What a priceless moment. We have no idea how good a cow’s vision is, but one thing is for sure. He may have taken a few good looks over by the fence, before he actually came running to the human like a tiny puppy. Only this is a big puppy with hooves for feet and can’t sleep in the house. Still, the love and respect these two feel for each other is inspiring! He even makes a few bounces before reaching the fence, because yay, it is his favorite human! For a moment there we thought that he wouldn’t stop and just ram himself into the chain-link fence. But the gentle animal slowed down in the nick of time and aligned himself with the fencing, expecting a few sweet scratches. Who wouldn’t love a pet like that?
When we think about pets, the only things that come to mind are the small animals that we get to keep in our houses. Dogs and cats are the usual suspects, but the list can be expanded to include rodents, birds, lizards, serpents, insects and other things that might not come naturally to you as a companion. We think we can also add cows on the list of animals and creatures that might not strike you as pet material. If you do not believe us, you should definitely take a look at this here clip and see for yourself. It's impossible to deny how happy this <a href="https://rumble.com/v3z0cl-adorable-cow-is-delighted-with-her-brush.html" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:cow" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">cow</a> is when he is called from across a field. Watch him run and jump right up to the fence to greet his human best friend! What a priceless moment. We have no idea how good a cow’s vision is, but one thing is for sure. He may have taken a few good looks over by the fence, before he actually came running to the human like a tiny puppy. Only this is a <a href="https://rumble.com/v3odjh-adorable-cow-thinks-hes-a-dog-and-lives-in-house.html" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:big puppy" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">big puppy</a> with hooves for feet and can’t sleep in the house. Still, the love and respect these two feel for each other is inspiring! He even makes a few bounces before reaching the fence, because yay, it is his favorite human! For a moment there we thought that he wouldn’t stop and just ram himself into the chain-link fence. But the gentle animal slowed down in the nick of time and aligned himself with the fencing, expecting a few sweet scratches. Who wouldn’t love a pet like that?
Cow Runs Over Like A Puppy After Being Called By Owner
When we think about pets, the only things that come to mind are the small animals that we get to keep in our houses. Dogs and cats are the usual suspects, but the list can be expanded to include rodents, birds, lizards, serpents, insects and other things that might not come naturally to you as a companion. We think we can also add cows on the list of animals and creatures that might not strike you as pet material. If you do not believe us, you should definitely take a look at this here clip and see for yourself. It's impossible to deny how happy this cow is when he is called from across a field. Watch him run and jump right up to the fence to greet his human best friend! What a priceless moment. We have no idea how good a cow’s vision is, but one thing is for sure. He may have taken a few good looks over by the fence, before he actually came running to the human like a tiny puppy. Only this is a big puppy with hooves for feet and can’t sleep in the house. Still, the love and respect these two feel for each other is inspiring! He even makes a few bounces before reaching the fence, because yay, it is his favorite human! For a moment there we thought that he wouldn’t stop and just ram himself into the chain-link fence. But the gentle animal slowed down in the nick of time and aligned himself with the fencing, expecting a few sweet scratches. Who wouldn’t love a pet like that?
<p>SBI was not willing to exit one of its biggest overseas markets, despite new ring-fencing rules. </p>
State Bank of India looks to broaden UK customer base beyond Indian diaspora

SBI was not willing to exit one of its biggest overseas markets, despite new ring-fencing rules.

<p>SBI was not willing to exit one of its biggest overseas markets, despite new ring-fencing rules. </p>
State Bank of India looks to broaden UK customer base beyond Indian diaspora

SBI was not willing to exit one of its biggest overseas markets, despite new ring-fencing rules.

<p>SBI was not willing to exit one of its biggest overseas markets, despite new ring-fencing rules. </p>
State Bank of India looks to broaden UK customer base beyond Indian diaspora

SBI was not willing to exit one of its biggest overseas markets, despite new ring-fencing rules.

NORWICH, UNITED KINGDOM - AUGUST 25: (EDITORS NOTE: IMAGES EMBARGOED FOR PUBLICATION UNTIL 0001GMT AUGUST 26, 2005; NATURAL LENS FLARE VISIBLE IN IMAGE) The sun shines through high security fencing surrounding Norwich Prison on August 25, 2005 in Norwich, England. A Chief Inspector of Prisons report on Norwich Prison says healthcare accommodation was among the worst seen, as prisoners suffered from unscreened toilets, little natural light, poor suicide prevention, inadequate education and training for long-term prisoners. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images) Photographer: Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images Europe
Puerto Rico to Offload Inmates to U.S. From ‘Archaic’ Prisons
NORWICH, UNITED KINGDOM - AUGUST 25: (EDITORS NOTE: IMAGES EMBARGOED FOR PUBLICATION UNTIL 0001GMT AUGUST 26, 2005; NATURAL LENS FLARE VISIBLE IN IMAGE) The sun shines through high security fencing surrounding Norwich Prison on August 25, 2005 in Norwich, England. A Chief Inspector of Prisons report on Norwich Prison says healthcare accommodation was among the worst seen, as prisoners suffered from unscreened toilets, little natural light, poor suicide prevention, inadequate education and training for long-term prisoners. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images) Photographer: Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images Europe
Austin Taylor, left, and Chase Morris, right, of Lee&#39;s Decking and Fencing, check the level of a fence post as they build a 350-foot-long privacy fence on Monday, April 9, 2018 in Owensboro, Ky. (Alan Warren/The Messenger-Inquirer via AP)
Austin Taylor, left, and Chase Morris, right, of Lee's Decking and Fencing, check the level of a fence post as they build a 350-foot-long privacy fence on Monday, April 9, 2018 in Owensboro, Ky. (Alan Warren/The Messenger-Inquirer via AP)
Austin Taylor, left, and Chase Morris, right, of Lee's Decking and Fencing, check the level of a fence post as they build a 350-foot-long privacy fence on Monday, April 9, 2018 in Owensboro, Ky. (Alan Warren/The Messenger-Inquirer via AP)

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