Olympic Fencing action

Nikolay V. Pukalov, head of the Counsular Division of the Embassy of the Russian Federation of Washington, D.C., peers through the iron fencing surrounding the former Russian consul general's residence Wednesday, April 25, 2018, in Seattle. Officials with the U.S. State Department have drilled out locks to access and inspect the home, a day after Russian staff vacated the site. President Donald Trump's administration announced last month that the diplomatic outpost would be closed and 60 Russian diplomats would be expelled nationwide to punish Moscow for its alleged role in poisoning an ex-spy in Britain. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
Nikolay V. Pukalov, head of the Counsular Division of the Embassy of the Russian Federation of Washington, D.C., peers through the iron fencing surrounding the former Russian consul general's residence Wednesday, April 25, 2018, in Seattle. Officials with the U.S. State Department have drilled out locks to access and inspect the home, a day after Russian staff vacated the site. President Donald Trump's administration announced last month that the diplomatic outpost would be closed and 60 Russian diplomats would be expelled nationwide to punish Moscow for its alleged role in poisoning an ex-spy in Britain. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
Nikolay V. Pukalov, head of the Counsular Division of the Embassy of the Russian Federation of Washington, D.C., peers through the iron fencing surrounding the former Russian consul general's residence Wednesday, April 25, 2018, in Seattle. Officials with the U.S. State Department have drilled out locks to access and inspect the home, a day after Russian staff vacated the site. President Donald Trump's administration announced last month that the diplomatic outpost would be closed and 60 Russian diplomats would be expelled nationwide to punish Moscow for its alleged role in poisoning an ex-spy in Britain. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
Nikolay V. Pukalov, head of the Counsular Division of the Embassy of the Russian Federation of Washington, D.C., walks past the brick and iron fencing surrounding the former Russian consul general's residence, where the Russian flag continue to fly, Wednesday, April 25, 2018, in Seattle. Officials with the U.S. State Department have drilled out locks to access and inspect the home, a day after Russian staff vacated the site. President Donald Trump's administration announced last month that the diplomatic outpost would be closed and 60 Russian diplomats would be expelled nationwide to punish Moscow for its alleged role in poisoning an ex-spy in Britain. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
Nikolay V. Pukalov, head of the Counsular Division of the Embassy of the Russian Federation of Washington, D.C., walks past the brick and iron fencing surrounding the former Russian consul general's residence, where the Russian flag continue to fly, Wednesday, April 25, 2018, in Seattle. Officials with the U.S. State Department have drilled out locks to access and inspect the home, a day after Russian staff vacated the site. President Donald Trump's administration announced last month that the diplomatic outpost would be closed and 60 Russian diplomats would be expelled nationwide to punish Moscow for its alleged role in poisoning an ex-spy in Britain. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
Nikolay V. Pukalov, head of the Counsular Division of the Embassy of the Russian Federation of Washington, D.C., walks past the brick and iron fencing surrounding the former Russian consul general's residence, where the Russian flag continue to fly, Wednesday, April 25, 2018, in Seattle. Officials with the U.S. State Department have drilled out locks to access and inspect the home, a day after Russian staff vacated the site. President Donald Trump's administration announced last month that the diplomatic outpost would be closed and 60 Russian diplomats would be expelled nationwide to punish Moscow for its alleged role in poisoning an ex-spy in Britain. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
Mississippi coach Mike Bianco, left, explains the nuances of the outfield fencing to Mississippi State interim coach Gary Henderson before the Governor's Cup, an NCAA college baseball game at Trustmark Park Stadium in Pearl, Miss., Tuesday, April 24, 2018. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)
Mississippi coach Mike Bianco, left, explains the nuances of the outfield fencing to Mississippi State interim coach Gary Henderson before the Governor's Cup, an NCAA college baseball game at Trustmark Park Stadium in Pearl, Miss., Tuesday, April 24, 2018. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)
Mississippi coach Mike Bianco, left, explains the nuances of the outfield fencing to Mississippi State interim coach Gary Henderson before the Governor's Cup, an NCAA college baseball game at Trustmark Park Stadium in Pearl, Miss., Tuesday, April 24, 2018. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)
City leaders plan to fencing around Rail Yards following fire
City leaders plan to fencing around Rail Yards following fire
City leaders plan to fencing around Rail Yards following fire
City leaders plan to fencing around Rail Yards following fire
City leaders plan to fencing around Rail Yards following fire
City leaders plan to fencing around Rail Yards following fire
City leaders plan to fencing around Rail Yards following fire
City leaders plan to fencing around Rail Yards following fire
City leaders plan to fencing around Rail Yards following fire
City leaders plan to fencing around Rail Yards following fire
City leaders plan to fencing around Rail Yards following fire
City leaders plan to fencing around Rail Yards following fire
Numbered markers are seen on bullet-riddled fencing at the scene Batsh was shot dead
Numbered markers are seen on bullet-riddled fencing at the scene Batsh was shot dead
Numbered markers are seen on bullet-riddled fencing at the scene Batsh was shot dead
Numbered markers are seen on bullet-riddled fencing at the scene Batsh was shot dead (AFP Photo/Mohd RASFAN)
Numbered markers are seen on bullet-riddled fencing at the scene Batsh was shot dead
Numbered markers are seen on bullet-riddled fencing at the scene Batsh was shot dead (AFP Photo/Mohd RASFAN)
Numbered markers are seen on bullet-riddled fencing at the scene Batsh was shot dead
Numbered markers are seen on bullet-riddled fencing at the scene Batsh was shot dead
Numbered markers are seen on bullet-riddled fencing at the scene Batsh was shot dead
Numbered markers are seen on bullet-riddled fencing at the scene Batsh was shot dead
Numbered markers are seen on bullet-riddled fencing at the scene Batsh was shot dead
Numbered markers are seen on bullet-riddled fencing at the scene Batsh was shot dead
A former Credit Suisse banker has been hired to oversee the sale of taxpayers’ majority stake in Royal Bank of Scotland. Charles Donald becomes head of UK Government Investments’ Financial Institutions Group (FIG), the body that manages the Government’s 71pc holding in RBS, as well as its student loan book. The role is likely to attract more attention in the coming months, with the Treasury expected to start selling its RBS stake once the bank settles a long-awaited multi-billion dollar fine with the US Department of Justice for past mis-selling of toxic mortgage products. RBS is still 71pc owned by taxpayers, but the Treasury disclosed in last Autumn’s Budget that it intends to start selling off its stake by March next year. The bank has no information on the timing of the fine, but Barclays settled with the US authorities on a similar albeit smaller case for $2bn (£1.4bn) last month. Mr Donald will take over the role next month. He is currently vice chairman of UK advisory and corporate broking at Credit Suisse. His previous roles have included co-head of UK investment banking at Credit Suisse and heading up Nomura’s UK investment banking unit. He has also held positions at Lehman Brothers and UBS. Earlier this week RBS agreed to stump up £3.5bn to help plug its pension scheme deficit, prompted by restructuring required to comply with UK "ring-fencing" rules. The high street lender said it was making the payments to compensate pension scheme members for the loss of financial firepower resulting from hiving off the firm’s investment banking arm NatWest Markets.
Former Credit Suisse banker to oversee sale of taxpayers' stake in RBS
A former Credit Suisse banker has been hired to oversee the sale of taxpayers’ majority stake in Royal Bank of Scotland. Charles Donald becomes head of UK Government Investments’ Financial Institutions Group (FIG), the body that manages the Government’s 71pc holding in RBS, as well as its student loan book. The role is likely to attract more attention in the coming months, with the Treasury expected to start selling its RBS stake once the bank settles a long-awaited multi-billion dollar fine with the US Department of Justice for past mis-selling of toxic mortgage products. RBS is still 71pc owned by taxpayers, but the Treasury disclosed in last Autumn’s Budget that it intends to start selling off its stake by March next year. The bank has no information on the timing of the fine, but Barclays settled with the US authorities on a similar albeit smaller case for $2bn (£1.4bn) last month. Mr Donald will take over the role next month. He is currently vice chairman of UK advisory and corporate broking at Credit Suisse. His previous roles have included co-head of UK investment banking at Credit Suisse and heading up Nomura’s UK investment banking unit. He has also held positions at Lehman Brothers and UBS. Earlier this week RBS agreed to stump up £3.5bn to help plug its pension scheme deficit, prompted by restructuring required to comply with UK "ring-fencing" rules. The high street lender said it was making the payments to compensate pension scheme members for the loss of financial firepower resulting from hiving off the firm’s investment banking arm NatWest Markets.
While it's still illegal to smoke pot in public in California, there will be an exception made for people smoking weed inside the fencing at San Francisco's Hippie Hill. Jackie Ward reports. (4/18/18)
Smoking Weed In Public Remains Illegal In California, Even On 4/20
While it's still illegal to smoke pot in public in California, there will be an exception made for people smoking weed inside the fencing at San Francisco's Hippie Hill. Jackie Ward reports. (4/18/18)
While it's still illegal to smoke pot in public in California, there will be an exception made for people smoking weed inside the fencing at San Francisco's Hippie Hill. Jackie Ward reports. (4/18/18)
Smoking Weed In Public Remains Illegal In California, Even On 4/20
While it's still illegal to smoke pot in public in California, there will be an exception made for people smoking weed inside the fencing at San Francisco's Hippie Hill. Jackie Ward reports. (4/18/18)
While it's still illegal to smoke pot in public in California, there will be an exception made for people smoking weed inside the fencing at San Francisco's Hippie Hill. Jackie Ward reports. (4/18/18)
Smoking Weed In Public Remains Illegal In California, Even On 4/20
While it's still illegal to smoke pot in public in California, there will be an exception made for people smoking weed inside the fencing at San Francisco's Hippie Hill. Jackie Ward reports. (4/18/18)
We paid calls on the Facebook CEO's barber, high school fencing coach and others to find out what makes Zuckerberg tick. Also: We visited one of the more controversial stops on his recent nationwide tour.
CNET goes to Mark Zuckerberg's hometown
We paid calls on the Facebook CEO's barber, high school fencing coach and others to find out what makes Zuckerberg tick. Also: We visited one of the more controversial stops on his recent nationwide tour.
We paid calls on the Facebook CEO's barber, high school fencing coach and others to find out what makes Zuckerberg tick. Also: We visited one of the more controversial stops on his recent nationwide tour.
CNET goes to Mark Zuckerberg's hometown
We paid calls on the Facebook CEO's barber, high school fencing coach and others to find out what makes Zuckerberg tick. Also: We visited one of the more controversial stops on his recent nationwide tour.
We paid calls on the Facebook CEO's barber, high school fencing coach and others to find out what makes Zuckerberg tick. Also: We visited one of the more controversial stops on his recent nationwide tour.
CNET goes to Mark Zuckerberg's hometown
We paid calls on the Facebook CEO's barber, high school fencing coach and others to find out what makes Zuckerberg tick. Also: We visited one of the more controversial stops on his recent nationwide tour.
We paid calls on the Facebook CEO's barber, high school fencing coach and others to find out what makes Zuckerberg tick. Also: We visited one of the more controversial stops on his recent nationwide tour.
CNET goes to Mark Zuckerberg's hometown
We paid calls on the Facebook CEO's barber, high school fencing coach and others to find out what makes Zuckerberg tick. Also: We visited one of the more controversial stops on his recent nationwide tour.
We paid calls on the Facebook CEO's barber, high school fencing coach and others to find out what makes Zuckerberg tick. Also: We visited one of the more controversial stops on his recent nationwide tour.
CNET goes to Mark Zuckerberg's hometown
We paid calls on the Facebook CEO's barber, high school fencing coach and others to find out what makes Zuckerberg tick. Also: We visited one of the more controversial stops on his recent nationwide tour.
We paid calls on the Facebook CEO's barber, high school fencing coach and others to find out what makes Zuckerberg tick. Also: We visited one of the more controversial stops on his recent nationwide tour.
CNET goes to Mark Zuckerberg's hometown
We paid calls on the Facebook CEO's barber, high school fencing coach and others to find out what makes Zuckerberg tick. Also: We visited one of the more controversial stops on his recent nationwide tour.
We paid calls on the Facebook CEO's barber, high school fencing coach and others to find out what makes Zuckerberg tick. Also: We visited one of the more controversial stops on his recent nationwide tour.
CNET goes to Mark Zuckerberg's hometown
We paid calls on the Facebook CEO's barber, high school fencing coach and others to find out what makes Zuckerberg tick. Also: We visited one of the more controversial stops on his recent nationwide tour.
We paid calls on the Facebook CEO's barber, high school fencing coach and others to find out what makes Zuckerberg tick. Also: We visited one of the more controversial stops on his recent nationwide tour.
CNET goes to Mark Zuckerberg's hometown
We paid calls on the Facebook CEO's barber, high school fencing coach and others to find out what makes Zuckerberg tick. Also: We visited one of the more controversial stops on his recent nationwide tour.
Taxpayer-controlled RBS is stumping up £3.5bn to help plug its pension scheme deficit, prompted by restructuring required to comply with UK "ring-fencing" rules. The high street lender said it was making the payments to compensate pension scheme members for the loss of financial firepower resulting from hiving off the firm’s investment banking arm NatWest Markets. RBS will contribute an initial £2bn by the end of this year, and then up to an additional £1.5bn from 2020. The further sums are dependent on the bank’s dividend restarting, with pension payments set to match any dividend paid, up to the £1.5bn threshold. RBS declined to disclose its pension scheme deficit, but said it did not expect to have to make any further deficit contributions following the payments. Ewen Stevenson, RBS chief financial officer, said that the pension agreement was an “important milestone” on the way to restarting a dividend – which has not been paid since the financial crisis and the bank's £45bn state bailout. Ring fencing rules are designed to protect high street customers from lenders' riskier investment banks Credit: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg Mr Stevenson added: “With these proposed payments ... we will have substantially addressed the historical funding weaknesses that existed in the fund and brought clarity to future funding arrangements.” The ring-fencing rules force UK banks to split their retail arms from their investment banks in changes designed to protect consumers and businesses from the fallout if there is another financial crisis. The rules come into force next January, but the big banks are all set to switch on their "ring fences" well ahead of the deadline. Barclays became the first to do so over the Easter weekend and RBS will do so at the end of this month. RBS said the initial £2bn pension payment would cost it 80 basis points of capital, which if incurred today would take its core capital ratio from 15.9pc to 15.1pc. The bank is currently well-capitalised relative to its peers, as it awaits a likely hefty fine for past misconduct in the US for mis-selling toxic mortgage-backed securities. Barclays settled a similar albeit smaller case for $2bn (£1.4bn) last month, a lower figure than the City had feared. As part of the pension scheme changes the pension pots of RBS investment bank staff will be transferred into a new scheme. RBS shares were up 1.7pc in mid-afternoon trading.
RBS to pay up to £3.5bn into pension scheme ahead of switching on 'ring fence'
Taxpayer-controlled RBS is stumping up £3.5bn to help plug its pension scheme deficit, prompted by restructuring required to comply with UK "ring-fencing" rules. The high street lender said it was making the payments to compensate pension scheme members for the loss of financial firepower resulting from hiving off the firm’s investment banking arm NatWest Markets. RBS will contribute an initial £2bn by the end of this year, and then up to an additional £1.5bn from 2020. The further sums are dependent on the bank’s dividend restarting, with pension payments set to match any dividend paid, up to the £1.5bn threshold. RBS declined to disclose its pension scheme deficit, but said it did not expect to have to make any further deficit contributions following the payments. Ewen Stevenson, RBS chief financial officer, said that the pension agreement was an “important milestone” on the way to restarting a dividend – which has not been paid since the financial crisis and the bank's £45bn state bailout. Ring fencing rules are designed to protect high street customers from lenders' riskier investment banks Credit: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg Mr Stevenson added: “With these proposed payments ... we will have substantially addressed the historical funding weaknesses that existed in the fund and brought clarity to future funding arrangements.” The ring-fencing rules force UK banks to split their retail arms from their investment banks in changes designed to protect consumers and businesses from the fallout if there is another financial crisis. The rules come into force next January, but the big banks are all set to switch on their "ring fences" well ahead of the deadline. Barclays became the first to do so over the Easter weekend and RBS will do so at the end of this month. RBS said the initial £2bn pension payment would cost it 80 basis points of capital, which if incurred today would take its core capital ratio from 15.9pc to 15.1pc. The bank is currently well-capitalised relative to its peers, as it awaits a likely hefty fine for past misconduct in the US for mis-selling toxic mortgage-backed securities. Barclays settled a similar albeit smaller case for $2bn (£1.4bn) last month, a lower figure than the City had feared. As part of the pension scheme changes the pension pots of RBS investment bank staff will be transferred into a new scheme. RBS shares were up 1.7pc in mid-afternoon trading.
Taxpayer-controlled RBS is stumping up £3.5bn to help plug its pension scheme deficit, prompted by restructuring required to comply with UK "ring-fencing" rules. The high street lender said it was making the payments to compensate pension scheme members for the loss of financial firepower resulting from hiving off the firm’s investment banking arm NatWest Markets. RBS will contribute an initial £2bn by the end of this year, and then up to an additional £1.5bn from 2020. The further sums are dependent on the bank’s dividend restarting, with pension payments set to match any dividend paid, up to the £1.5bn threshold. RBS declined to disclose its pension scheme deficit, but said it did not expect to have to make any further deficit contributions following the payments. Ewen Stevenson, RBS chief financial officer, said that the pension agreement was an “important milestone” on the way to restarting a dividend – which has not been paid since the financial crisis and the bank's £45bn state bailout. Ring fencing rules are designed to protect high street customers from lenders' riskier investment banks Credit: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg Mr Stevenson added: “With these proposed payments ... we will have substantially addressed the historical funding weaknesses that existed in the fund and brought clarity to future funding arrangements.” The ring-fencing rules force UK banks to split their retail arms from their investment banks in changes designed to protect consumers and businesses from the fallout if there is another financial crisis. The rules come into force next January, but the big banks are all set to switch on their "ring fences" well ahead of the deadline. Barclays became the first to do so over the Easter weekend and RBS will do so at the end of this month. RBS said the initial £2bn pension payment would cost it 80 basis points of capital, which if incurred today would take its core capital ratio from 15.9pc to 15.1pc. The bank is currently well-capitalised relative to its peers, as it awaits a likely hefty fine for past misconduct in the US for mis-selling toxic mortgage-backed securities. Barclays settled a similar albeit smaller case for $2bn (£1.4bn) last month, a lower figure than the City had feared. As part of the pension scheme changes the pension pots of RBS investment bank staff will be transferred into a new scheme. RBS shares were up 1.7pc in mid-afternoon trading.
RBS to pay up to £3.5bn into pension scheme ahead of switching on 'ring fence'
Taxpayer-controlled RBS is stumping up £3.5bn to help plug its pension scheme deficit, prompted by restructuring required to comply with UK "ring-fencing" rules. The high street lender said it was making the payments to compensate pension scheme members for the loss of financial firepower resulting from hiving off the firm’s investment banking arm NatWest Markets. RBS will contribute an initial £2bn by the end of this year, and then up to an additional £1.5bn from 2020. The further sums are dependent on the bank’s dividend restarting, with pension payments set to match any dividend paid, up to the £1.5bn threshold. RBS declined to disclose its pension scheme deficit, but said it did not expect to have to make any further deficit contributions following the payments. Ewen Stevenson, RBS chief financial officer, said that the pension agreement was an “important milestone” on the way to restarting a dividend – which has not been paid since the financial crisis and the bank's £45bn state bailout. Ring fencing rules are designed to protect high street customers from lenders' riskier investment banks Credit: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg Mr Stevenson added: “With these proposed payments ... we will have substantially addressed the historical funding weaknesses that existed in the fund and brought clarity to future funding arrangements.” The ring-fencing rules force UK banks to split their retail arms from their investment banks in changes designed to protect consumers and businesses from the fallout if there is another financial crisis. The rules come into force next January, but the big banks are all set to switch on their "ring fences" well ahead of the deadline. Barclays became the first to do so over the Easter weekend and RBS will do so at the end of this month. RBS said the initial £2bn pension payment would cost it 80 basis points of capital, which if incurred today would take its core capital ratio from 15.9pc to 15.1pc. The bank is currently well-capitalised relative to its peers, as it awaits a likely hefty fine for past misconduct in the US for mis-selling toxic mortgage-backed securities. Barclays settled a similar albeit smaller case for $2bn (£1.4bn) last month, a lower figure than the City had feared. As part of the pension scheme changes the pension pots of RBS investment bank staff will be transferred into a new scheme. RBS shares were up 1.7pc in mid-afternoon trading.
The Novichok nerve agent used in the Salisbury spy attack was delivered in “liquid form”, the Government has revealed. Officials from the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) said that only a “very small amount” of the substance was used to poison the former double agent Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia. The details emerged at a press briefing in Salisbury, where reporters were told the highest concentration of the deadly material was found at Mr Skripal's house. The Government also announced that the cleaning up of a handful of sites across Salisbury which were potentially contaminated as a result of the nerve agent attack will “take a number of months”. Specialist military personnel will be deployed to ensure nine sites in the Wiltshire cathedral city are safe with police cordons in key areas to be replaced with secure fencing. Officials maintain that the risk to the public remains low after Mr Skripal and Yulia were poisoned on March 4. Russian spy poisoning | Read more Chemical weapons experts identified the deadly nerve agent which was used in the attack as belonging to the Novichok family - a type of weapon created by the Soviet Union. The UK has formally blamed Russia for the attack but Moscow has denied all accusations of wrongdoing. Both nations have engaged in tit for tat retaliation in the wake of the incident as they expelled each other’s diplomats with relations between the Kremlin and Downing Street rapidly deteriorating. The Salisbury sites earmarked for decontamination include The Maltings shopping area near to where the pair were found, the city cemetery, the Zizzi restaurant where the pair dined and the Ashley Wood compound where Mr Skripal's BMW was taken after the attack. Three of the nine sites are in the city centre. A small cordoned area of London Road cemetery was the first area to be reopened to the public after extensive investigations and testing established that it was not contaminated. All of the remaining sites will remain secured. Mapped: Russian diplomats expelled from West The Government has stressed that the current scientific assessment is that the remainder of Salisbury is safe for residents and visitors while Public Health England has reaffirmed that the risk to the general public is low. Work to clean each site, which will be supported by approximately 190 specialist military personnel from the Army and RAF, will involve a process of testing, removal of items which may have been contaminated, chemical cleaning and retesting. Sites will not be reopened to the public until test results show they are free of contamination. The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, which is leading the work, said it is “expected to take a number of months”. Doctors caring for Mr Skripal and Yulia have said the pair are recovering from the attack with both no longer in a critical condition. Front Bench promotion - end of article
Salisbury spy attack: Novichok nerve agent was delivered in 'liquid form', Government reveals
The Novichok nerve agent used in the Salisbury spy attack was delivered in “liquid form”, the Government has revealed. Officials from the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) said that only a “very small amount” of the substance was used to poison the former double agent Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia. The details emerged at a press briefing in Salisbury, where reporters were told the highest concentration of the deadly material was found at Mr Skripal's house. The Government also announced that the cleaning up of a handful of sites across Salisbury which were potentially contaminated as a result of the nerve agent attack will “take a number of months”. Specialist military personnel will be deployed to ensure nine sites in the Wiltshire cathedral city are safe with police cordons in key areas to be replaced with secure fencing. Officials maintain that the risk to the public remains low after Mr Skripal and Yulia were poisoned on March 4. Russian spy poisoning | Read more Chemical weapons experts identified the deadly nerve agent which was used in the attack as belonging to the Novichok family - a type of weapon created by the Soviet Union. The UK has formally blamed Russia for the attack but Moscow has denied all accusations of wrongdoing. Both nations have engaged in tit for tat retaliation in the wake of the incident as they expelled each other’s diplomats with relations between the Kremlin and Downing Street rapidly deteriorating. The Salisbury sites earmarked for decontamination include The Maltings shopping area near to where the pair were found, the city cemetery, the Zizzi restaurant where the pair dined and the Ashley Wood compound where Mr Skripal's BMW was taken after the attack. Three of the nine sites are in the city centre. A small cordoned area of London Road cemetery was the first area to be reopened to the public after extensive investigations and testing established that it was not contaminated. All of the remaining sites will remain secured. Mapped: Russian diplomats expelled from West The Government has stressed that the current scientific assessment is that the remainder of Salisbury is safe for residents and visitors while Public Health England has reaffirmed that the risk to the general public is low. Work to clean each site, which will be supported by approximately 190 specialist military personnel from the Army and RAF, will involve a process of testing, removal of items which may have been contaminated, chemical cleaning and retesting. Sites will not be reopened to the public until test results show they are free of contamination. The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, which is leading the work, said it is “expected to take a number of months”. Doctors caring for Mr Skripal and Yulia have said the pair are recovering from the attack with both no longer in a critical condition. Front Bench promotion - end of article
Barbed wire fencing stands at the Kinder Morgan Inc. Trans Mountain pipeline expansion site in Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada, on Wednesday, April 11, 2018. Alberta, the landlocked Canadian province that's home to the oil sands, would be willing to buy out Kinder Morgan's Trans Mountain pipeline if that's the only way to salvage the critical export route, Premier Rachel Notley said.
Alberta Readies Oil Embargo in Kinder Pipeline Battle
Barbed wire fencing stands at the Kinder Morgan Inc. Trans Mountain pipeline expansion site in Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada, on Wednesday, April 11, 2018. Alberta, the landlocked Canadian province that's home to the oil sands, would be willing to buy out Kinder Morgan's Trans Mountain pipeline if that's the only way to salvage the critical export route, Premier Rachel Notley said.
When we think about pets, the only things that come to mind are the small animals that we get to keep in our houses. Dogs and cats are the usual suspects, but the list can be expanded to include rodents, birds, lizards, serpents, insects and other things that might not come naturally to you as a companion. We think we can also add cows on the list of animals and creatures that might not strike you as pet material. If you do not believe us, you should definitely take a look at this here clip and see for yourself. It's impossible to deny how happy this <a href="https://rumble.com/v3z0cl-adorable-cow-is-delighted-with-her-brush.html" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:cow" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">cow</a> is when he is called from across a field. Watch him run and jump right up to the fence to greet his human best friend! What a priceless moment. We have no idea how good a cow’s vision is, but one thing is for sure. He may have taken a few good looks over by the fence, before he actually came running to the human like a tiny puppy. Only this is a <a href="https://rumble.com/v3odjh-adorable-cow-thinks-hes-a-dog-and-lives-in-house.html" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:big puppy" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">big puppy</a> with hooves for feet and can’t sleep in the house. Still, the love and respect these two feel for each other is inspiring! He even makes a few bounces before reaching the fence, because yay, it is his favorite human! For a moment there we thought that he wouldn’t stop and just ram himself into the chain-link fence. But the gentle animal slowed down in the nick of time and aligned himself with the fencing, expecting a few sweet scratches. Who wouldn’t love a pet like that?
Cow Runs Over Like A Puppy After Being Called By Owner
When we think about pets, the only things that come to mind are the small animals that we get to keep in our houses. Dogs and cats are the usual suspects, but the list can be expanded to include rodents, birds, lizards, serpents, insects and other things that might not come naturally to you as a companion. We think we can also add cows on the list of animals and creatures that might not strike you as pet material. If you do not believe us, you should definitely take a look at this here clip and see for yourself. It's impossible to deny how happy this cow is when he is called from across a field. Watch him run and jump right up to the fence to greet his human best friend! What a priceless moment. We have no idea how good a cow’s vision is, but one thing is for sure. He may have taken a few good looks over by the fence, before he actually came running to the human like a tiny puppy. Only this is a big puppy with hooves for feet and can’t sleep in the house. Still, the love and respect these two feel for each other is inspiring! He even makes a few bounces before reaching the fence, because yay, it is his favorite human! For a moment there we thought that he wouldn’t stop and just ram himself into the chain-link fence. But the gentle animal slowed down in the nick of time and aligned himself with the fencing, expecting a few sweet scratches. Who wouldn’t love a pet like that?
When we think about pets, the only things that come to mind are the small animals that we get to keep in our houses. Dogs and cats are the usual suspects, but the list can be expanded to include rodents, birds, lizards, serpents, insects and other things that might not come naturally to you as a companion. We think we can also add cows on the list of animals and creatures that might not strike you as pet material. If you do not believe us, you should definitely take a look at this here clip and see for yourself. It's impossible to deny how happy this <a href="https://rumble.com/v3z0cl-adorable-cow-is-delighted-with-her-brush.html" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:cow" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">cow</a> is when he is called from across a field. Watch him run and jump right up to the fence to greet his human best friend! What a priceless moment. We have no idea how good a cow’s vision is, but one thing is for sure. He may have taken a few good looks over by the fence, before he actually came running to the human like a tiny puppy. Only this is a <a href="https://rumble.com/v3odjh-adorable-cow-thinks-hes-a-dog-and-lives-in-house.html" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:big puppy" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">big puppy</a> with hooves for feet and can’t sleep in the house. Still, the love and respect these two feel for each other is inspiring! He even makes a few bounces before reaching the fence, because yay, it is his favorite human! For a moment there we thought that he wouldn’t stop and just ram himself into the chain-link fence. But the gentle animal slowed down in the nick of time and aligned himself with the fencing, expecting a few sweet scratches. Who wouldn’t love a pet like that?
Cow Runs Over Like A Puppy After Being Called By Owner
When we think about pets, the only things that come to mind are the small animals that we get to keep in our houses. Dogs and cats are the usual suspects, but the list can be expanded to include rodents, birds, lizards, serpents, insects and other things that might not come naturally to you as a companion. We think we can also add cows on the list of animals and creatures that might not strike you as pet material. If you do not believe us, you should definitely take a look at this here clip and see for yourself. It's impossible to deny how happy this cow is when he is called from across a field. Watch him run and jump right up to the fence to greet his human best friend! What a priceless moment. We have no idea how good a cow’s vision is, but one thing is for sure. He may have taken a few good looks over by the fence, before he actually came running to the human like a tiny puppy. Only this is a big puppy with hooves for feet and can’t sleep in the house. Still, the love and respect these two feel for each other is inspiring! He even makes a few bounces before reaching the fence, because yay, it is his favorite human! For a moment there we thought that he wouldn’t stop and just ram himself into the chain-link fence. But the gentle animal slowed down in the nick of time and aligned himself with the fencing, expecting a few sweet scratches. Who wouldn’t love a pet like that?
When we think about pets, the only things that come to mind are the small animals that we get to keep in our houses. Dogs and cats are the usual suspects, but the list can be expanded to include rodents, birds, lizards, serpents, insects and other things that might not come naturally to you as a companion. We think we can also add cows on the list of animals and creatures that might not strike you as pet material. If you do not believe us, you should definitely take a look at this here clip and see for yourself. It's impossible to deny how happy this <a href="https://rumble.com/v3z0cl-adorable-cow-is-delighted-with-her-brush.html" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:cow" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">cow</a> is when he is called from across a field. Watch him run and jump right up to the fence to greet his human best friend! What a priceless moment. We have no idea how good a cow’s vision is, but one thing is for sure. He may have taken a few good looks over by the fence, before he actually came running to the human like a tiny puppy. Only this is a <a href="https://rumble.com/v3odjh-adorable-cow-thinks-hes-a-dog-and-lives-in-house.html" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:big puppy" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">big puppy</a> with hooves for feet and can’t sleep in the house. Still, the love and respect these two feel for each other is inspiring! He even makes a few bounces before reaching the fence, because yay, it is his favorite human! For a moment there we thought that he wouldn’t stop and just ram himself into the chain-link fence. But the gentle animal slowed down in the nick of time and aligned himself with the fencing, expecting a few sweet scratches. Who wouldn’t love a pet like that?
Cow Runs Over Like A Puppy After Being Called By Owner
When we think about pets, the only things that come to mind are the small animals that we get to keep in our houses. Dogs and cats are the usual suspects, but the list can be expanded to include rodents, birds, lizards, serpents, insects and other things that might not come naturally to you as a companion. We think we can also add cows on the list of animals and creatures that might not strike you as pet material. If you do not believe us, you should definitely take a look at this here clip and see for yourself. It's impossible to deny how happy this cow is when he is called from across a field. Watch him run and jump right up to the fence to greet his human best friend! What a priceless moment. We have no idea how good a cow’s vision is, but one thing is for sure. He may have taken a few good looks over by the fence, before he actually came running to the human like a tiny puppy. Only this is a big puppy with hooves for feet and can’t sleep in the house. Still, the love and respect these two feel for each other is inspiring! He even makes a few bounces before reaching the fence, because yay, it is his favorite human! For a moment there we thought that he wouldn’t stop and just ram himself into the chain-link fence. But the gentle animal slowed down in the nick of time and aligned himself with the fencing, expecting a few sweet scratches. Who wouldn’t love a pet like that?
When we think about pets, the only things that come to mind are the small animals that we get to keep in our houses. Dogs and cats are the usual suspects, but the list can be expanded to include rodents, birds, lizards, serpents, insects and other things that might not come naturally to you as a companion. We think we can also add cows on the list of animals and creatures that might not strike you as pet material. If you do not believe us, you should definitely take a look at this here clip and see for yourself. It's impossible to deny how happy this <a href="https://rumble.com/v3z0cl-adorable-cow-is-delighted-with-her-brush.html" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:cow" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">cow</a> is when he is called from across a field. Watch him run and jump right up to the fence to greet his human best friend! What a priceless moment. We have no idea how good a cow’s vision is, but one thing is for sure. He may have taken a few good looks over by the fence, before he actually came running to the human like a tiny puppy. Only this is a <a href="https://rumble.com/v3odjh-adorable-cow-thinks-hes-a-dog-and-lives-in-house.html" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:big puppy" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">big puppy</a> with hooves for feet and can’t sleep in the house. Still, the love and respect these two feel for each other is inspiring! He even makes a few bounces before reaching the fence, because yay, it is his favorite human! For a moment there we thought that he wouldn’t stop and just ram himself into the chain-link fence. But the gentle animal slowed down in the nick of time and aligned himself with the fencing, expecting a few sweet scratches. Who wouldn’t love a pet like that?
Cow Runs Over Like A Puppy After Being Called By Owner
When we think about pets, the only things that come to mind are the small animals that we get to keep in our houses. Dogs and cats are the usual suspects, but the list can be expanded to include rodents, birds, lizards, serpents, insects and other things that might not come naturally to you as a companion. We think we can also add cows on the list of animals and creatures that might not strike you as pet material. If you do not believe us, you should definitely take a look at this here clip and see for yourself. It's impossible to deny how happy this cow is when he is called from across a field. Watch him run and jump right up to the fence to greet his human best friend! What a priceless moment. We have no idea how good a cow’s vision is, but one thing is for sure. He may have taken a few good looks over by the fence, before he actually came running to the human like a tiny puppy. Only this is a big puppy with hooves for feet and can’t sleep in the house. Still, the love and respect these two feel for each other is inspiring! He even makes a few bounces before reaching the fence, because yay, it is his favorite human! For a moment there we thought that he wouldn’t stop and just ram himself into the chain-link fence. But the gentle animal slowed down in the nick of time and aligned himself with the fencing, expecting a few sweet scratches. Who wouldn’t love a pet like that?
<p>SBI was not willing to exit one of its biggest overseas markets, despite new ring-fencing rules. </p>
State Bank of India looks to broaden UK customer base beyond Indian diaspora

SBI was not willing to exit one of its biggest overseas markets, despite new ring-fencing rules.

<p>SBI was not willing to exit one of its biggest overseas markets, despite new ring-fencing rules. </p>
State Bank of India looks to broaden UK customer base beyond Indian diaspora

SBI was not willing to exit one of its biggest overseas markets, despite new ring-fencing rules.

<p>SBI was not willing to exit one of its biggest overseas markets, despite new ring-fencing rules. </p>
State Bank of India looks to broaden UK customer base beyond Indian diaspora

SBI was not willing to exit one of its biggest overseas markets, despite new ring-fencing rules.

NORWICH, UNITED KINGDOM - AUGUST 25: (EDITORS NOTE: IMAGES EMBARGOED FOR PUBLICATION UNTIL 0001GMT AUGUST 26, 2005; NATURAL LENS FLARE VISIBLE IN IMAGE) The sun shines through high security fencing surrounding Norwich Prison on August 25, 2005 in Norwich, England. A Chief Inspector of Prisons report on Norwich Prison says healthcare accommodation was among the worst seen, as prisoners suffered from unscreened toilets, little natural light, poor suicide prevention, inadequate education and training for long-term prisoners. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images) Photographer: Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images Europe
Puerto Rico to Offload Inmates to U.S. From ‘Archaic’ Prisons
NORWICH, UNITED KINGDOM - AUGUST 25: (EDITORS NOTE: IMAGES EMBARGOED FOR PUBLICATION UNTIL 0001GMT AUGUST 26, 2005; NATURAL LENS FLARE VISIBLE IN IMAGE) The sun shines through high security fencing surrounding Norwich Prison on August 25, 2005 in Norwich, England. A Chief Inspector of Prisons report on Norwich Prison says healthcare accommodation was among the worst seen, as prisoners suffered from unscreened toilets, little natural light, poor suicide prevention, inadequate education and training for long-term prisoners. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images) Photographer: Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images Europe
Next Up on ESPN: Harvard Lacrosse, Fencing for Only $5 a Month
The $3 million project should be completed at all seven substations in July.
Dallas Police Officers, City Leaders Pleased With Perimeter Fencing At Substations
The $3 million project should be completed at all seven substations in July.
The $3 million project should be completed at all seven substations in July.
Dallas Police Officers, City Leaders Pleased With Perimeter Fencing At Substations
The $3 million project should be completed at all seven substations in July.
The $3 million project should be completed at all seven substations in July.
Dallas Police Officers, City Leaders Pleased With Perimeter Fencing At Substations
The $3 million project should be completed at all seven substations in July.
The $3 million project should be completed at all seven substations in July.
Dallas Police Officers, City Leaders Pleased With Perimeter Fencing At Substations
The $3 million project should be completed at all seven substations in July.

What to Read Next