Olympic Fencing action

Pakistani soldiers stand guard at newly erected fence between Pakistan and Afghanistan at Angore Adda, Pakistan, Wednesday, Oct. 18, 2017. Pakistan's military says new fencing and guard posts along the border with Afghanistan will help prevent militant attacks, but the stepped-up fortifications have angered Kabul, which does not recognize the frontier as an international border. (AP Photo/Mohammad Yousaf)

Pakistani soldiers stand guard at a newly erected fence between Pakistan and Afghanistan at Angore Adda, Pakistan, Wednesday, Oct. 18, 2017. Pakistan's military says new fencing and guard posts along the border with Afghanistan will help prevent militant attacks, but the stepped-up fortifications have angered Kabul, which does not recognize the frontier as an international border. (AP Photo/Mohammad Yousaf)

A Pakistani soldier stands guard at a newly erected fence between Pakistan and Afghanistan at Angore Adda, Pakistan, Wednesday, Oct. 18, 2017.Pakistan's military says new fencing and guard posts along the border with Afghanistan will help prevent militant attacks, but the stepped-up fortifications have angered Kabul, which does not recognize the frontier as an international border. (AP Photo/Mohammad Yousaf)

A Pakistani soldier stands guard at newly erected fence between Pakistan and Afghanistan at Angore Adda, Pakistan, Wednesday, Oct. 18, 2017. Pakistan's military says new fencing and guard posts along the border with Afghanistan will help prevent militant attacks, but the stepped-up fortifications have angered Kabul, which does not recognize the frontier as an international border. (AP Photo/Mohammad Yousaf)

Australia tries to solve its bike-sharing dumping problem

Singapore-based, dockless bike-sharing service oBike fished 42 bikes out of Melbourne's Yarra River in one day.

Suffice it to say, something has to be done about the high instances of bike-share dumping — and slowly but surely, local councils around the world are taking the lead.

Dockless bike-sharing services have become synonymous with large, unsightly piles of dumped bikes, or bikes left in unusual locations, up trees, in rivers, or just scattered haphazardly around city streets.

This is not where you return your #obike. #melbourne #victoria pic.twitter.com/C6V3V3BVB2

— Paul Wong (@___pw___) September 19, 2017

So, the City of Melbourne, City of Port Phillip and City of Yarra have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with oBike, which is an attempt to create guidelines for the bike-sharing service's public responsibility.

Before we jump into the MOU, it's important to know that before now, oBike has literally not enforced any type of fine on people who have dumped their bikes. Even though they have your details. 

"We do have an oBike Credits System in place but as bike-sharing is in its infancy stage now, we believe that it takes time to cultivate gracious cycling behaviour. Hence, [a fine] has not been strongly enforced previously," oBike spokesperson
Chethan Sagar Mysore Rangaswamy told Mashable

"However, with the MOU in place, we will now take a more serious stance towards indiscriminate parking and will be looking to penalise the last users who parked irresponsibly."

Now, the MOU

Under the terms outlined in the MOU, the company is responsible for ensuring that oBikes do not obstruct footpath access, are parked upright at all times, are not parked on steps, ramps or other areas that provide directional assistance to the vision impaired, are parked away from roadside curbs and are not parked on traffic islands or against trees, buildings, light poles or street furniture.

The MOU also stipulates that dangerously placed oBikes be relocated within two hours, any inappropriately placed oBikes be relocated within 48 hours, and any oBikes reported as faulty, damaged or unsafe are immediately removed from service.

Combatting the pile-up situation, excessive numbers of oBikes at a single location must be relocated within 24 hours, and that bike locations must be monitored regularly to avoid and manage potential breaches of the agreement.

Image: obike

If oBike fails to comply with the MOU, oBikes can be confiscated and impounded, only to be released for $50 per bike.

The three Melbourne councils will seek MOUs with any other bike-sharing company that wishes to launch in the city — and of course, there's a bunch looking, with China heavyweight Ofo launching in Adelaide already.

“The signing of the MOU is a step in the right direction for sustainable transport options like oBike and a safer, clutter-free environment for bike users and pedestrians," said City of Melbourne Transport Portfolio Chair Cr Nicolas Frances Gilley.

"It means oBike and the three municipal councils are on the same page when it comes to expectations, roles and responsibilities."

Singapore has recently enforced their own rules, making all dockless bike-sharing companies put geo-fencing technology in their bikes, to ensure that people park their bikes back at "designated parking zones" — basically, a virtual dock.

Hopefully, rivers won't see as many two-wheeled fish from now on.

 

Australia tries to solve its bike-sharing dumping problem

Singapore-based, dockless bike-sharing service oBike fished 42 bikes out of Melbourne's Yarra River in one day.

Suffice it to say, something has to be done about the high instances of bike-share dumping — and slowly but surely, local councils around the world are taking the lead.

Dockless bike-sharing services have become synonymous with large, unsightly piles of dumped bikes, or bikes left in unusual locations, up trees, in rivers, or just scattered haphazardly around city streets.

This is not where you return your #obike. #melbourne #victoria pic.twitter.com/C6V3V3BVB2

— Paul Wong (@___pw___) September 19, 2017

So, the City of Melbourne, City of Port Phillip and City of Yarra have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with oBike, which is an attempt to create guidelines for the bike-sharing service's public responsibility.

Before we jump into the MOU, it's important to know that before now, oBike has literally not enforced any type of fine on people who have dumped their bikes. Even though they have your details. 

"We do have an oBike Credits System in place but as bike-sharing is in its infancy stage now, we believe that it takes time to cultivate gracious cycling behaviour. Hence, [a fine] has not been strongly enforced previously," oBike spokesperson
Chethan Sagar Mysore Rangaswamy told Mashable

"However, with the MOU in place, we will now take a more serious stance towards indiscriminate parking and will be looking to penalise the last users who parked irresponsibly."

Now, the MOU

Under the terms outlined in the MOU, the company is responsible for ensuring that oBikes do not obstruct footpath access, are parked upright at all times, are not parked on steps, ramps or other areas that provide directional assistance to the vision impaired, are parked away from roadside curbs and are not parked on traffic islands or against trees, buildings, light poles or street furniture.

The MOU also stipulates that dangerously placed oBikes be relocated within two hours, any inappropriately placed oBikes be relocated within 48 hours, and any oBikes reported as faulty, damaged or unsafe are immediately removed from service.

Combatting the pile-up situation, excessive numbers of oBikes at a single location must be relocated within 24 hours, and that bike locations must be monitored regularly to avoid and manage potential breaches of the agreement.

Image: obike

If oBike fails to comply with the MOU, oBikes can be confiscated and impounded, only to be released for $50 per bike.

The three Melbourne councils will seek MOUs with any other bike-sharing company that wishes to launch in the city — and of course, there's a bunch looking, with China heavyweight Ofo launching in Adelaide already.

“The signing of the MOU is a step in the right direction for sustainable transport options like oBike and a safer, clutter-free environment for bike users and pedestrians," said City of Melbourne Transport Portfolio Chair Cr Nicolas Frances Gilley.

"It means oBike and the three municipal councils are on the same page when it comes to expectations, roles and responsibilities."

Singapore has recently enforced their own rules, making all dockless bike-sharing companies put geo-fencing technology in their bikes, to ensure that people park their bikes back at "designated parking zones" — basically, a virtual dock.

Hopefully, rivers won't see as many two-wheeled fish from now on.

 

Australia tries to solve its bike-sharing dumping problem

Singapore-based, dockless bike-sharing service oBike fished 42 bikes out of Melbourne's Yarra River in one day.

Suffice it to say, something has to be done about the high instances of bike-share dumping — and slowly but surely, local councils around the world are taking the lead.

Dockless bike-sharing services have become synonymous with large, unsightly piles of dumped bikes, or bikes left in unusual locations, up trees, in rivers, or just scattered haphazardly around city streets.

This is not where you return your #obike. #melbourne #victoria pic.twitter.com/C6V3V3BVB2

— Paul Wong (@___pw___) September 19, 2017

So, the City of Melbourne, City of Port Phillip and City of Yarra have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with oBike, which is an attempt to create guidelines for the bike-sharing service's public responsibility.

Before we jump into the MOU, it's important to know that before now, oBike has literally not enforced any type of fine on people who have dumped their bikes. Even though they have your details. 

"We do have an oBike Credits System in place but as bike-sharing is in its infancy stage now, we believe that it takes time to cultivate gracious cycling behaviour. Hence, [a fine] has not been strongly enforced previously," oBike spokesperson
Chethan Sagar Mysore Rangaswamy told Mashable

"However, with the MOU in place, we will now take a more serious stance towards indiscriminate parking and will be looking to penalise the last users who parked irresponsibly."

Now, the MOU

Under the terms outlined in the MOU, the company is responsible for ensuring that oBikes do not obstruct footpath access, are parked upright at all times, are not parked on steps, ramps or other areas that provide directional assistance to the vision impaired, are parked away from roadside curbs and are not parked on traffic islands or against trees, buildings, light poles or street furniture.

The MOU also stipulates that dangerously placed oBikes be relocated within two hours, any inappropriately placed oBikes be relocated within 48 hours, and any oBikes reported as faulty, damaged or unsafe are immediately removed from service.

Combatting the pile-up situation, excessive numbers of oBikes at a single location must be relocated within 24 hours, and that bike locations must be monitored regularly to avoid and manage potential breaches of the agreement.

Image: obike

If oBike fails to comply with the MOU, oBikes can be confiscated and impounded, only to be released for $50 per bike.

The three Melbourne councils will seek MOUs with any other bike-sharing company that wishes to launch in the city — and of course, there's a bunch looking, with China heavyweight Ofo launching in Adelaide already.

“The signing of the MOU is a step in the right direction for sustainable transport options like oBike and a safer, clutter-free environment for bike users and pedestrians," said City of Melbourne Transport Portfolio Chair Cr Nicolas Frances Gilley.

"It means oBike and the three municipal councils are on the same page when it comes to expectations, roles and responsibilities."

Singapore has recently enforced their own rules, making all dockless bike-sharing companies put geo-fencing technology in their bikes, to ensure that people park their bikes back at "designated parking zones" — basically, a virtual dock.

Hopefully, rivers won't see as many two-wheeled fish from now on.

 

Australia tries to solve its bike-sharing dumping problem

Singapore-based, dockless bike-sharing service oBike fished 42 bikes out of Melbourne's Yarra River in one day.

Suffice it to say, something has to be done about the high instances of bike-share dumping — and slowly but surely, local councils around the world are taking the lead.

Dockless bike-sharing services have become synonymous with large, unsightly piles of dumped bikes, or bikes left in unusual locations, up trees, in rivers, or just scattered haphazardly around city streets.

This is not where you return your #obike. #melbourne #victoria pic.twitter.com/C6V3V3BVB2

— Paul Wong (@___pw___) September 19, 2017

So, the City of Melbourne, City of Port Phillip and City of Yarra have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with oBike, which is an attempt to create guidelines for the bike-sharing service's public responsibility.

Before we jump into the MOU, it's important to know that before now, oBike has literally not enforced any type of fine on people who have dumped their bikes. Even though they have your details. 

"We do have an oBike Credits System in place but as bike-sharing is in its infancy stage now, we believe that it takes time to cultivate gracious cycling behaviour. Hence, [a fine] has not been strongly enforced previously," oBike spokesperson
Chethan Sagar Mysore Rangaswamy told Mashable

"However, with the MOU in place, we will now take a more serious stance towards indiscriminate parking and will be looking to penalise the last users who parked irresponsibly."

Now, the MOU

Under the terms outlined in the MOU, the company is responsible for ensuring that oBikes do not obstruct footpath access, are parked upright at all times, are not parked on steps, ramps or other areas that provide directional assistance to the vision impaired, are parked away from roadside curbs and are not parked on traffic islands or against trees, buildings, light poles or street furniture.

The MOU also stipulates that dangerously placed oBikes be relocated within two hours, any inappropriately placed oBikes be relocated within 48 hours, and any oBikes reported as faulty, damaged or unsafe are immediately removed from service.

Combatting the pile-up situation, excessive numbers of oBikes at a single location must be relocated within 24 hours, and that bike locations must be monitored regularly to avoid and manage potential breaches of the agreement.

Image: obike

If oBike fails to comply with the MOU, oBikes can be confiscated and impounded, only to be released for $50 per bike.

The three Melbourne councils will seek MOUs with any other bike-sharing company that wishes to launch in the city — and of course, there's a bunch looking, with China heavyweight Ofo launching in Adelaide already.

“The signing of the MOU is a step in the right direction for sustainable transport options like oBike and a safer, clutter-free environment for bike users and pedestrians," said City of Melbourne Transport Portfolio Chair Cr Nicolas Frances Gilley.

"It means oBike and the three municipal councils are on the same page when it comes to expectations, roles and responsibilities."

Singapore has recently enforced their own rules, making all dockless bike-sharing companies put geo-fencing technology in their bikes, to ensure that people park their bikes back at "designated parking zones" — basically, a virtual dock.

Hopefully, rivers won't see as many two-wheeled fish from now on.

 

14 States Slam Trump’s Transgender-Soldier Ban in Court

Soldiers with the U.S. Army's Second Infantry Division stand behind wire fencing during an air assault training course at Camp Casey in Dongducheon, South Korea.

Delhi: For nearly 170 days, national fencing champion is fighting a lonely battle against alcohol addiction

A 28-year-old former national-level fencing champion T David Raj has taken this fight against alcoholism to another level.

Delhi: For nearly 170 days, national fencing champion is fighting a lonely battle against alcohol addiction

A 28-year-old former national-level fencing champion T David Raj has taken this fight against alcoholism to another level.

Delhi: For nearly 170 days, national fencing champion is fighting a lonely battle against alcohol addiction

A 28-year-old former national-level fencing champion T David Raj has taken this fight against alcoholism to another level.

Donald Trump takes a field trip to Secret Service training site

Touring the suburban facility where Secret Service agents sharpen their skills, President Donald Trump applauded on Friday as his press secretary rolled up in a Dodge Charger after taking a hair-raising spin around a driver training course. The smell of burnt rubber permeated the air as the car carrying a smiling Sarah Huckabee Sanders, White House social media director Dan Scavino and Ronnie Jackson, Trump’s doctor, returned to the starting point at the James J. Rowley Training Center in Maryland after its driver navigated an obstacle course of orange cones at high speeds, screeching on the turns. Big smiles were on everyone’s faces as they got out of the vehicle. Huckabee Sanders said by email that the experience was "amazing" and showed the "incredible skill" of the Secret Service. Trump, accompanied by first lady Melania Trump, was on his first visit to the facility, which belongs to the federal agency that is charged with providing around-the-clock protection for the president and his immediate family. President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump look at a 1983 Cadillac convertible as they tour the Moran Vehicle Training facility at the United States Secret Service James J. Rowley Training Center in Beltsville, Md., Friday, Oct. 13, 2017 Credit: AP Trump has described the Secret Service as "phenomenal." Critics have complained that Trump’s frequent weekend travel to his homes in Florida and New Jersey, along with business and other travel by some of his adult children, is taxing the agency’s budget. The president arrived by helicopter from the White House and was driven first to a canine training facility. The grassy area is bound by chain-link fencing, and suitcases of various shapes and sizes were laid out in a row on the ground. Trump and his wife met agency personnel. The White House did not allow journalists to see what the president saw after several barking dogs were brought out from a nearby facility. Huckabee Sanders said they saw several K-9 demonstrations. U.S. President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump tour the U.S. Secret Service James J. Rowley Training Center on October 13, 2017 in Beltsville, Maryland. In the foreground is the car that was used to evacuate then-U.S. President Ronald Reagan from a golf course in Augusta, Georgia on October 22, 1983 when an armed man crashed through the gate of the golf course and demanded to speak to the President Credit: Getty At the vehicle training course, reporters watched as Trump absorbed the details relayed to him by Secret Service training staffers about two former presidential vehicles the agency keeps there on display. One is a 1993 Cadillac limousine last used by President Bill Clinton. The other is a 1983 Cadillac convertible with the roof down. Before entering politics, Trump explored the idea of producing a line of Cadillac-body limousines bearing his name, according to his 1987 book, "Trump: The Art of the Deal." Then it was time for the driving demo. White House staffers took turns going out on the course with the drivers. Trump and the first lady watched from beneath a canopy. Trump also visited the firing range between stops, Huckabee Sanders said.

Donald Trump takes a field trip to Secret Service training site

Touring the suburban facility where Secret Service agents sharpen their skills, President Donald Trump applauded on Friday as his press secretary rolled up in a Dodge Charger after taking a hair-raising spin around a driver training course. The smell of burnt rubber permeated the air as the car carrying a smiling Sarah Huckabee Sanders, White House social media director Dan Scavino and Ronnie Jackson, Trump’s doctor, returned to the starting point at the James J. Rowley Training Center in Maryland after its driver navigated an obstacle course of orange cones at high speeds, screeching on the turns. Big smiles were on everyone’s faces as they got out of the vehicle. Huckabee Sanders said by email that the experience was "amazing" and showed the "incredible skill" of the Secret Service. Trump, accompanied by first lady Melania Trump, was on his first visit to the facility, which belongs to the federal agency that is charged with providing around-the-clock protection for the president and his immediate family. President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump look at a 1983 Cadillac convertible as they tour the Moran Vehicle Training facility at the United States Secret Service James J. Rowley Training Center in Beltsville, Md., Friday, Oct. 13, 2017 Credit: AP Trump has described the Secret Service as "phenomenal." Critics have complained that Trump’s frequent weekend travel to his homes in Florida and New Jersey, along with business and other travel by some of his adult children, is taxing the agency’s budget. The president arrived by helicopter from the White House and was driven first to a canine training facility. The grassy area is bound by chain-link fencing, and suitcases of various shapes and sizes were laid out in a row on the ground. Trump and his wife met agency personnel. The White House did not allow journalists to see what the president saw after several barking dogs were brought out from a nearby facility. Huckabee Sanders said they saw several K-9 demonstrations. U.S. President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump tour the U.S. Secret Service James J. Rowley Training Center on October 13, 2017 in Beltsville, Maryland. In the foreground is the car that was used to evacuate then-U.S. President Ronald Reagan from a golf course in Augusta, Georgia on October 22, 1983 when an armed man crashed through the gate of the golf course and demanded to speak to the President Credit: Getty At the vehicle training course, reporters watched as Trump absorbed the details relayed to him by Secret Service training staffers about two former presidential vehicles the agency keeps there on display. One is a 1993 Cadillac limousine last used by President Bill Clinton. The other is a 1983 Cadillac convertible with the roof down. Before entering politics, Trump explored the idea of producing a line of Cadillac-body limousines bearing his name, according to his 1987 book, "Trump: The Art of the Deal." Then it was time for the driving demo. White House staffers took turns going out on the course with the drivers. Trump and the first lady watched from beneath a canopy. Trump also visited the firing range between stops, Huckabee Sanders said.

Donald Trump takes a field trip to Secret Service training site

Touring the suburban facility where Secret Service agents sharpen their skills, President Donald Trump applauded on Friday as his press secretary rolled up in a Dodge Charger after taking a hair-raising spin around a driver training course. The smell of burnt rubber permeated the air as the car carrying a smiling Sarah Huckabee Sanders, White House social media director Dan Scavino and Ronnie Jackson, Trump’s doctor, returned to the starting point at the James J. Rowley Training Center in Maryland after its driver navigated an obstacle course of orange cones at high speeds, screeching on the turns. Big smiles were on everyone’s faces as they got out of the vehicle. Huckabee Sanders said by email that the experience was "amazing" and showed the "incredible skill" of the Secret Service. Trump, accompanied by first lady Melania Trump, was on his first visit to the facility, which belongs to the federal agency that is charged with providing around-the-clock protection for the president and his immediate family. President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump look at a 1983 Cadillac convertible as they tour the Moran Vehicle Training facility at the United States Secret Service James J. Rowley Training Center in Beltsville, Md., Friday, Oct. 13, 2017 Credit: AP Trump has described the Secret Service as "phenomenal." Critics have complained that Trump’s frequent weekend travel to his homes in Florida and New Jersey, along with business and other travel by some of his adult children, is taxing the agency’s budget. The president arrived by helicopter from the White House and was driven first to a canine training facility. The grassy area is bound by chain-link fencing, and suitcases of various shapes and sizes were laid out in a row on the ground. Trump and his wife met agency personnel. The White House did not allow journalists to see what the president saw after several barking dogs were brought out from a nearby facility. Huckabee Sanders said they saw several K-9 demonstrations. U.S. President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump tour the U.S. Secret Service James J. Rowley Training Center on October 13, 2017 in Beltsville, Maryland. In the foreground is the car that was used to evacuate then-U.S. President Ronald Reagan from a golf course in Augusta, Georgia on October 22, 1983 when an armed man crashed through the gate of the golf course and demanded to speak to the President Credit: Getty At the vehicle training course, reporters watched as Trump absorbed the details relayed to him by Secret Service training staffers about two former presidential vehicles the agency keeps there on display. One is a 1993 Cadillac limousine last used by President Bill Clinton. The other is a 1983 Cadillac convertible with the roof down. Before entering politics, Trump explored the idea of producing a line of Cadillac-body limousines bearing his name, according to his 1987 book, "Trump: The Art of the Deal." Then it was time for the driving demo. White House staffers took turns going out on the course with the drivers. Trump and the first lady watched from beneath a canopy. Trump also visited the firing range between stops, Huckabee Sanders said.

Great fun - but has the world moved on? Hair, The Vaults, review

In 1968, Hair arrived in London’s West End like a patchouli-scented, spliff-toking upstart. One of the first productions to be emancipated by the abolition of the Theatres Act (which ended the Lord Chamberlain’s powers of censorship), this hippy musical featured nudity and a song, Sodomy, which listed all manner of sexual acts. Want to howl with laughter? Walk this way-Young Frankenstein, Garrick, review This exuberant production from Jonathan O’Boyle embraces the spirit of Sixties permissiveness as the Tribe, a group of politically engaged Greenwich Village hippies fighting for free love and against conscription into the Vietnam War, effortlessly rattle their way through Galt MacDermot’s glorious score. Indeed, the hit ratio is incredibly high – Aquarius, of course, but also Good Morning Starshine, I Got Life (covered famously by Nina Simone) and the title track (“My hair like Jesus wore it, Hallelujah! I adore it.””). Credit: Hannah McKay   There were some terrific solo efforts from the cast (Shekinah McFarlane and Natalie Green especially), yet it was as an ensemble that they really caught fire. The finale of Let the Sunshine In, a song I’ve never cared for, was performed with a sense of asperity which was actually very moving. The slightly ragged book, by James Rado and Gerome Ragni is always rather at the mercy of the great tunes, but Robert Metson gives a strong sense of Claude’s fatal trajectory from activist to soldier. Meanwhile a skittish Andy Coxon is great fun as the school dropout, Berger, even if he never quite manages to elicit our sympathy. There has also been a considered effort to immerse the audience pre and post-show – a bar with wig-wam spaces in which to turn on and tune in, and a “Good Karma” food stall. For the exhibitionists among you, there is a performance in the coming weeks in which you can attend in the nude. All of this is gimmicky, of course, and that underlines the problem with Hair. Is it a museum piece or should you try and make it speak to the here and now? Credit: Hannah McKay Certainly, O’Boyle has attempted to make a plea for its relevance. Border fencing represents the boundary between North and South Korea, while the production opens with the announcement of Donald Trump’s inauguration. But really, this is paraphernalia. It is the show’s timeless concerns – how women remain subjugated to men despite seemingly liberated lifestyles, how men must ultimately be forced into traditionally masculine roles – that are the most powerful. A Seagull that never quite takes off - Lyric Hammersmith, review The evening ends with a groovy kind of love-in as the audience are invited to join in the closing number. It’s great fun (even if it slightly jars with the bleak conclusion) and only the squarest cat will fail to have a gas. But ultimately I couldn’t help feeling that the world – and indeed theatre – has moved on.   Until January 13. Tickets: 020 7401 9603; hair50.com

Great fun - but has the world moved on? Hair, The Vaults, review

In 1968, Hair arrived in London’s West End like a patchouli-scented, spliff-toking upstart. One of the first productions to be emancipated by the abolition of the Theatres Act (which ended the Lord Chamberlain’s powers of censorship), this hippy musical featured nudity and a song, Sodomy, which listed all manner of sexual acts. Want to howl with laughter? Walk this way-Young Frankenstein, Garrick, review This exuberant production from Jonathan O’Boyle embraces the spirit of Sixties permissiveness as the Tribe, a group of politically engaged Greenwich Village hippies fighting for free love and against conscription into the Vietnam War, effortlessly rattle their way through Galt MacDermot’s glorious score. Indeed, the hit ratio is incredibly high – Aquarius, of course, but also Good Morning Starshine, I Got Life (covered famously by Nina Simone) and the title track (“My hair like Jesus wore it, Hallelujah! I adore it.””). Credit: Hannah McKay   There were some terrific solo efforts from the cast (Shekinah McFarlane and Natalie Green especially), yet it was as an ensemble that they really caught fire. The finale of Let the Sunshine In, a song I’ve never cared for, was performed with a sense of asperity which was actually very moving. The slightly ragged book, by James Rado and Gerome Ragni is always rather at the mercy of the great tunes, but Robert Metson gives a strong sense of Claude’s fatal trajectory from activist to soldier. Meanwhile a skittish Andy Coxon is great fun as the school dropout, Berger, even if he never quite manages to elicit our sympathy. There has also been a considered effort to immerse the audience pre and post-show – a bar with wig-wam spaces in which to turn on and tune in, and a “Good Karma” food stall. For the exhibitionists among you, there is a performance in the coming weeks in which you can attend in the nude. All of this is gimmicky, of course, and that underlines the problem with Hair. Is it a museum piece or should you try and make it speak to the here and now? Credit: Hannah McKay Certainly, O’Boyle has attempted to make a plea for its relevance. Border fencing represents the boundary between North and South Korea, while the production opens with the announcement of Donald Trump’s inauguration. But really, this is paraphernalia. It is the show’s timeless concerns – how women remain subjugated to men despite seemingly liberated lifestyles, how men must ultimately be forced into traditionally masculine roles – that are the most powerful. A Seagull that never quite takes off - Lyric Hammersmith, review The evening ends with a groovy kind of love-in as the audience are invited to join in the closing number. It’s great fun (even if it slightly jars with the bleak conclusion) and only the squarest cat will fail to have a gas. But ultimately I couldn’t help feeling that the world – and indeed theatre – has moved on.   Until January 13. Tickets: 020 7401 9603; hair50.com

241 Toll Road In Irvine Closed Due To Canyon Fire 2

Caltrans says it will be closed for days while it makes repairs to things like fencing, guardrails and signs.

241 Toll Road In Irvine Closed Due To Canyon Fire 2

Caltrans says it will be closed for days while it makes repairs to things like fencing, guardrails and signs.

241 Toll Road In Irvine Closed Due To Canyon Fire 2

Caltrans says it will be closed for days while it makes repairs to things like fencing, guardrails and signs.

241 Toll Road In Irvine Closed Due To Canyon Fire 2

Caltrans says it will be closed for days while it makes repairs to things like fencing, guardrails and signs.

In this Aug. 29, 2017 photo, North Korean soldiers prepare fencing on the North Korea side of the border with China near the Chinese city of Jian in northeastern China's Jilin province. Securing North Korea's missile launchers and nuclear, chemical and biological weapons sites would likely be a chief priority for China in the event of a major crisis involving its communist neighbor, analysts say, although Beijing so far is keeping mum on any plans. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)

Humans ruined bike-sharing in Singapore so now bikes need parking zones

Ah, the freedom of a dockless bike. So much more convenient than something like Citi Bike, where you have to park your rental bike back at a set location.

See, the whole point of bike rentals from the likes Ofo, Mobike, oBike (and so on) is that you can pick a bike, ride it, leave it by the side of the road when you're done, and walk away.

Too bad humans had to ruin it. 

The city of Singapore has decided that enough is enough with all the bike dumping and irresponsible behaviour that's come along with the recent trend in dockless bike services.

By the end of the year, all the five rental services here will have to put in geo-fencing technology in their bikes, to ensure that people park their bikes back at "designated parking zones" — basically, a virtual dock.

Additionally, the five operators will have to remove faulty bicycles within a day, and ensure that users are covered by public liability insurance.

In the past, finding those faulty bikes would've proven challenging, since people were leaving them under bridges, up in trees, rivers, and even concealing them down dark stairwells in buildings. The new parking rules will help operators find more bikes.

Hopefully, having to put your bike back in a public place will also put an end to the rampant vandalism that has plagued these services. In nearly every country that these bikes have launched in, we've seen bikes stripped for parts, painted to be concealed (and therefore stolen for an individual's own use), and so on.

Mobike's country manager in Singapore, Sharon Meng, said in a statement after the new rules were signed on Thursday, that the company has already drawn out parking zones in several neighbourhoods in Singapore.

The new geo-fence will kick in in November for its bikes, which are already GPS-enabled, she added.

An Ofo spokesperson said the Ofo app will notify users 

For users who are making use of the ofo app, they would have to park and end their trips within the designated parking zones as reflected within their app. If they fail to do so, the app will notify them to remind them to park in a responsible manner. Exact details on penalties will be provided nearer to the end of the year.

While the new rules mean we'll continue to see these rental bikes on the roads for now, the virtual dock is a far cry from the initial sales pitch of having a "smarter" and freer bike system. For which we can only blame ourselves.

UPDATE: Oct. 5, 2017, 6:09 p.m. UTC Updated with a response from Ofo.

Humans ruined bike-sharing in Singapore so now bikes need parking zones

Ah, the freedom of a dockless bike. So much more convenient than something like Citi Bike, where you have to park your rental bike back at a set location.

See, the whole point of bike rentals from the likes Ofo, Mobike, oBike (and so on) is that you can pick a bike, ride it, leave it by the side of the road when you're done, and walk away.

Too bad humans had to ruin it. 

The city of Singapore has decided that enough is enough with all the bike dumping and irresponsible behaviour that's come along with the recent trend in dockless bike services.

By the end of the year, all the five rental services here will have to put in geo-fencing technology in their bikes, to ensure that people park their bikes back at "designated parking zones" — basically, a virtual dock.

Additionally, the five operators will have to remove faulty bicycles within a day, and ensure that users are covered by public liability insurance.

In the past, finding those faulty bikes would've proven challenging, since people were leaving them under bridges, up in trees, rivers, and even concealing them down dark stairwells in buildings. The new parking rules will help operators find more bikes.

Hopefully, having to put your bike back in a public place will also put an end to the rampant vandalism that has plagued these services. In nearly every country that these bikes have launched in, we've seen bikes stripped for parts, painted to be concealed (and therefore stolen for an individual's own use), and so on.

Mobike's country manager in Singapore, Sharon Meng, said in a statement after the new rules were signed on Thursday, that the company has already drawn out parking zones in several neighbourhoods in Singapore.

The new geo-fence will kick in in November for its bikes, which are already GPS-enabled, she added.

An Ofo spokesperson said the Ofo app will notify users 

For users who are making use of the ofo app, they would have to park and end their trips within the designated parking zones as reflected within their app. If they fail to do so, the app will notify them to remind them to park in a responsible manner. Exact details on penalties will be provided nearer to the end of the year.

While the new rules mean we'll continue to see these rental bikes on the roads for now, the virtual dock is a far cry from the initial sales pitch of having a "smarter" and freer bike system. For which we can only blame ourselves.

UPDATE: Oct. 5, 2017, 6:09 p.m. UTC Updated with a response from Ofo.

Humans ruined bike-sharing in Singapore so now bikes need parking zones

Ah, the freedom of a dockless bike. So much more convenient than something like Citi Bike, where you have to park your rental bike back at a set location.

See, the whole point of bike rentals from the likes Ofo, Mobike, oBike (and so on) is that you can pick a bike, ride it, leave it by the side of the road when you're done, and walk away.

Too bad humans had to ruin it. 

The city of Singapore has decided that enough is enough with all the bike dumping and irresponsible behaviour that's come along with the recent trend in dockless bike services.

By the end of the year, all the five rental services here will have to put in geo-fencing technology in their bikes, to ensure that people park their bikes back at "designated parking zones" — basically, a virtual dock.

Additionally, the five operators will have to remove faulty bicycles within a day, and ensure that users are covered by public liability insurance.

In the past, finding those faulty bikes would've proven challenging, since people were leaving them under bridges, up in trees, rivers, and even concealing them down dark stairwells in buildings. The new parking rules will help operators find more bikes.

Hopefully, having to put your bike back in a public place will also put an end to the rampant vandalism that has plagued these services. In nearly every country that these bikes have launched in, we've seen bikes stripped for parts, painted to be concealed (and therefore stolen for an individual's own use), and so on.

Mobike's country manager in Singapore, Sharon Meng, said in a statement after the new rules were signed on Thursday, that the company has already drawn out parking zones in several neighbourhoods in Singapore.

The new geo-fence will kick in in November for its bikes, which are already GPS-enabled, she added.

An Ofo spokesperson said the Ofo app will notify users 

For users who are making use of the ofo app, they would have to park and end their trips within the designated parking zones as reflected within their app. If they fail to do so, the app will notify them to remind them to park in a responsible manner. Exact details on penalties will be provided nearer to the end of the year.

While the new rules mean we'll continue to see these rental bikes on the roads for now, the virtual dock is a far cry from the initial sales pitch of having a "smarter" and freer bike system. For which we can only blame ourselves.

UPDATE: Oct. 5, 2017, 6:09 p.m. UTC Updated with a response from Ofo.

The Caribbean's most spectacular airport has reopened

St Martin’s Princess Juliana International Airport, famous for its proximity to the beach, which sees aircraft swoop within spitting distance of sunseekers and planespotters, will reopen to this month after being damaged in recent hurricanes. Dutch carrier KLM will restart its twice weekly services from Amsterdam Schiphol Airport to the Caribbean hub, with a stopover in Curacao, on October 29. Winair, based in St Maarten (the Dutch half of St Martin), is expected to resume its regular services to Saba, St Eustatius, St Barts, and St Kitts from October 6, with the potential for other destinations to be added. The carrier will also operate special commercial and repatriation flights between Curacao and St Maarten on October 5, 7 and 10. St Maarten suffered severe damage in recent hurricanes Credit: Dutch Defense Ministry/GERBEN VAN ES St Maarten suffered severe damage during recent hurricanes, with buildings flattened and infrastructure decimated. On September 30 it was estimated the airport would not be restored to “all its glory” for another 35 weeks, but would be functioning optimally sooner than that, according to the country’s Minister of Tourism, Melissa Arrindell-Doncher. “The entire airport perimeter fencing was destroyed and all four jet bridges sustained substantial structural damage,” explains the official Caribbean tourism website. “The swing cabs were blown off all four bridges and all metal entrance doors attached between the bridges and the terminal building were blown in. Rescue workers in St Maarten following Hurricane Irma Credit: Dutch Defense Ministry/Gerben Van Es “All runway and taxiway lights and precision approach path indicators were destroyed. The shoulders and a section of the runway were under water. “The majority of the roof was destroyed in the terminal building, exposing the terminal to outdoor elements with water found on all four levels,” the website added. Tourists at Maho Beach are sometimes swept off their feet and injured by passing planes Credit: Adam Mukamal/Adam Mukamal#150420 Princess Juliana has been rated as one of the world’s scariest and scenic airport landings. With its flight approach being over water, pilots must make regular instrument checks to ensure the correct altitude is maintained. Take-off involves a U-turn to avoid the mountains that loom large at the end of the runway. Maho Beach has become a popular spot from which to observe approaching aircraft, and tourists are sometimes swept off their feet and injured by passing planes.  The world's most scenic airport approaches

The Caribbean's most spectacular airport has reopened

St Martin’s Princess Juliana International Airport, famous for its proximity to the beach, which sees aircraft swoop within spitting distance of sunseekers and planespotters, will reopen to this month after being damaged in recent hurricanes. Dutch carrier KLM will restart its twice weekly services from Amsterdam Schiphol Airport to the Caribbean hub, with a stopover in Curacao, on October 29. Winair, based in St Maarten (the Dutch half of St Martin), is expected to resume its regular services to Saba, St Eustatius, St Barts, and St Kitts from October 6, with the potential for other destinations to be added. The carrier will also operate special commercial and repatriation flights between Curacao and St Maarten on October 5, 7 and 10. St Maarten suffered severe damage in recent hurricanes Credit: Dutch Defense Ministry/GERBEN VAN ES St Maarten suffered severe damage during recent hurricanes, with buildings flattened and infrastructure decimated. On September 30 it was estimated the airport would not be restored to “all its glory” for another 35 weeks, but would be functioning optimally sooner than that, according to the country’s Minister of Tourism, Melissa Arrindell-Doncher. “The entire airport perimeter fencing was destroyed and all four jet bridges sustained substantial structural damage,” explains the official Caribbean tourism website. “The swing cabs were blown off all four bridges and all metal entrance doors attached between the bridges and the terminal building were blown in. Rescue workers in St Maarten following Hurricane Irma Credit: Dutch Defense Ministry/Gerben Van Es “All runway and taxiway lights and precision approach path indicators were destroyed. The shoulders and a section of the runway were under water. “The majority of the roof was destroyed in the terminal building, exposing the terminal to outdoor elements with water found on all four levels,” the website added. Tourists at Maho Beach are sometimes swept off their feet and injured by passing planes Credit: Adam Mukamal/Adam Mukamal#150420 Princess Juliana has been rated as one of the world’s scariest and scenic airport landings. With its flight approach being over water, pilots must make regular instrument checks to ensure the correct altitude is maintained. Take-off involves a U-turn to avoid the mountains that loom large at the end of the runway. Maho Beach has become a popular spot from which to observe approaching aircraft, and tourists are sometimes swept off their feet and injured by passing planes.  The world's most scenic airport approaches

The Caribbean's most spectacular airport has reopened

St Martin’s Princess Juliana International Airport, famous for its proximity to the beach, which sees aircraft swoop within spitting distance of sunseekers and planespotters, will reopen to this month after being damaged in recent hurricanes. Dutch carrier KLM will restart its twice weekly services from Amsterdam Schiphol Airport to the Caribbean hub, with a stopover in Curacao, on October 29. Winair, based in St Maarten (the Dutch half of St Martin), is expected to resume its regular services to Saba, St Eustatius, St Barts, and St Kitts from October 6, with the potential for other destinations to be added. The carrier will also operate special commercial and repatriation flights between Curacao and St Maarten on October 5, 7 and 10. St Maarten suffered severe damage in recent hurricanes Credit: Dutch Defense Ministry/GERBEN VAN ES St Maarten suffered severe damage during recent hurricanes, with buildings flattened and infrastructure decimated. On September 30 it was estimated the airport would not be restored to “all its glory” for another 35 weeks, but would be functioning optimally sooner than that, according to the country’s Minister of Tourism, Melissa Arrindell-Doncher. “The entire airport perimeter fencing was destroyed and all four jet bridges sustained substantial structural damage,” explains the official Caribbean tourism website. “The swing cabs were blown off all four bridges and all metal entrance doors attached between the bridges and the terminal building were blown in. Rescue workers in St Maarten following Hurricane Irma Credit: Dutch Defense Ministry/Gerben Van Es “All runway and taxiway lights and precision approach path indicators were destroyed. The shoulders and a section of the runway were under water. “The majority of the roof was destroyed in the terminal building, exposing the terminal to outdoor elements with water found on all four levels,” the website added. Tourists at Maho Beach are sometimes swept off their feet and injured by passing planes Credit: Adam Mukamal/Adam Mukamal#150420 Princess Juliana has been rated as one of the world’s scariest and scenic airport landings. With its flight approach being over water, pilots must make regular instrument checks to ensure the correct altitude is maintained. Take-off involves a U-turn to avoid the mountains that loom large at the end of the runway. Maho Beach has become a popular spot from which to observe approaching aircraft, and tourists are sometimes swept off their feet and injured by passing planes.  The world's most scenic airport approaches

The Caribbean's most spectacular airport has reopened

St Martin’s Princess Juliana International Airport, famous for its proximity to the beach, which sees aircraft swoop within spitting distance of sunseekers and planespotters, will reopen to this month after being damaged in recent hurricanes. Dutch carrier KLM will restart its twice weekly services from Amsterdam Schiphol Airport to the Caribbean hub, with a stopover in Curacao, on October 29. Winair, based in St Maarten (the Dutch half of St Martin), is expected to resume its regular services to Saba, St Eustatius, St Barts, and St Kitts from October 6, with the potential for other destinations to be added. The carrier will also operate special commercial and repatriation flights between Curacao and St Maarten on October 5, 7 and 10. St Maarten suffered severe damage in recent hurricanes Credit: Dutch Defense Ministry/GERBEN VAN ES St Maarten suffered severe damage during recent hurricanes, with buildings flattened and infrastructure decimated. On September 30 it was estimated the airport would not be restored to “all its glory” for another 35 weeks, but would be functioning optimally sooner than that, according to the country’s Minister of Tourism, Melissa Arrindell-Doncher. “The entire airport perimeter fencing was destroyed and all four jet bridges sustained substantial structural damage,” explains the official Caribbean tourism website. “The swing cabs were blown off all four bridges and all metal entrance doors attached between the bridges and the terminal building were blown in. Rescue workers in St Maarten following Hurricane Irma Credit: Dutch Defense Ministry/Gerben Van Es “All runway and taxiway lights and precision approach path indicators were destroyed. The shoulders and a section of the runway were under water. “The majority of the roof was destroyed in the terminal building, exposing the terminal to outdoor elements with water found on all four levels,” the website added. Tourists at Maho Beach are sometimes swept off their feet and injured by passing planes Credit: Adam Mukamal/Adam Mukamal#150420 Princess Juliana has been rated as one of the world’s scariest and scenic airport landings. With its flight approach being over water, pilots must make regular instrument checks to ensure the correct altitude is maintained. Take-off involves a U-turn to avoid the mountains that loom large at the end of the runway. Maho Beach has become a popular spot from which to observe approaching aircraft, and tourists are sometimes swept off their feet and injured by passing planes.  The world's most scenic airport approaches

Armed robbers are 'stupid' because they could commit cyber crime without risk of being shot, Security Minister claims

Criminals who take part in armed robberies are “stupid” because they could use the internet to commit crime without the risk of getting shot, the Security Minister has said. Ben Wallace said anyone who tried to rob a bank was likely to be killed or caught - either by the police or a “local gangster”. He said they could instead buy software on the “dark web” to “try and defraud hundreds of thousands of people” from the comfort of their own home. His comments risked accusations of giving career advice to criminals. Mr Wallace also warned that cyber crime was a “growing threat” as he urged people to remain vigilant online and to be alert to con artists who try to fool people into handing over their bank details. Ben Wallace, the Security Minister  Credit: John Stillwell/PA Speaking at a fringe event at Conservative Party conference in Manchester, Mr Wallace said: “Cyber crime is growing, it is the new crime in that sense and we must learn to change with it. “You would be pretty stupid nowadays to be an armed robber. You are likely, if you are an armed robber, to be caught. "You are likely to be shot. You are likely to be caught fencing the money should you actually make it out of the bank and you are likely to probably be shot by the local gangster who doesn’t like you doing it in his patch. “Whereas you can sit at home, go on the dark web, buy an off the shelf malware kit for £10, a mailing list on the internet for another £10 and you can sit in your bedroom and happily try and defraud hundreds of thousands of people. “That is a real, growing threat and we have to encourage our police to invest in that part of policing, but work together.” Mr Wallace said changing passwords and maintaining anti-virus software were two ways in which people could stay safe online as he also stressed the importance of remaining vigilant to offline threats. He said everyone should learn the “tell-tale signs” of terrorism to help the security services and the police foil plots. Cyber crime | Most common UK online offences He said: “In the physical space with the terrorism threat and the organised crime threat, if you see something suspicious, act on it. “Take time to be aware of your surroundings and in the current threat of what we call sudden violent extremists, a suicide attack or a person coming in with a knife, think about, as crude as this, your exits. “Think about how you could get out of a building if something happens and you are in a crowded space.” He said that all terrorists “leave signs”. “When I look at the incidents that we have had and I look through the post-incident evidence, they all leave signs and some of those signs could have been spotted by the public and that is important for us to all learn the tell tale signs that give people away,” he said.

Armed robbers are 'stupid' because they could commit cyber crime without risk of being shot, Security Minister claims

Criminals who take part in armed robberies are “stupid” because they could use the internet to commit crime without the risk of getting shot, the Security Minister has said. Ben Wallace said anyone who tried to rob a bank was likely to be killed or caught - either by the police or a “local gangster”. He said they could instead buy software on the “dark web” to “try and defraud hundreds of thousands of people” from the comfort of their own home. His comments risked accusations of giving career advice to criminals. Mr Wallace also warned that cyber crime was a “growing threat” as he urged people to remain vigilant online and to be alert to con artists who try to fool people into handing over their bank details. Ben Wallace, the Security Minister  Credit: John Stillwell/PA Speaking at a fringe event at Conservative Party conference in Manchester, Mr Wallace said: “Cyber crime is growing, it is the new crime in that sense and we must learn to change with it. “You would be pretty stupid nowadays to be an armed robber. You are likely, if you are an armed robber, to be caught. "You are likely to be shot. You are likely to be caught fencing the money should you actually make it out of the bank and you are likely to probably be shot by the local gangster who doesn’t like you doing it in his patch. “Whereas you can sit at home, go on the dark web, buy an off the shelf malware kit for £10, a mailing list on the internet for another £10 and you can sit in your bedroom and happily try and defraud hundreds of thousands of people. “That is a real, growing threat and we have to encourage our police to invest in that part of policing, but work together.” Mr Wallace said changing passwords and maintaining anti-virus software were two ways in which people could stay safe online as he also stressed the importance of remaining vigilant to offline threats. He said everyone should learn the “tell-tale signs” of terrorism to help the security services and the police foil plots. Cyber crime | Most common UK online offences He said: “In the physical space with the terrorism threat and the organised crime threat, if you see something suspicious, act on it. “Take time to be aware of your surroundings and in the current threat of what we call sudden violent extremists, a suicide attack or a person coming in with a knife, think about, as crude as this, your exits. “Think about how you could get out of a building if something happens and you are in a crowded space.” He said that all terrorists “leave signs”. “When I look at the incidents that we have had and I look through the post-incident evidence, they all leave signs and some of those signs could have been spotted by the public and that is important for us to all learn the tell tale signs that give people away,” he said.

DJI builds new feature that makes drone flying non-traceable

Hobbyists, governments, and enterprise drone operators can now be assured that their usage is fully private as DJI has launched a new feature for its Pilot app that restricts outflow or inflow of any data by restricting data usage. The new Local Data Mode stops internet traffic on the app, assuring data of sensitive flights is secured from prying eyes. The Local Data Mode, once enabled, stops the sending or receiving of data over the internet. The caveat here is that by disabling data exchange, the app will not be able to detect user’s location, show the map and geo-fencing information including No Fly Zones and temporary flight restrictions. It further also stop notifying the drone operator of firmware updates.

DJI builds new feature that makes drone flying non-traceable

Hobbyists, governments, and enterprise drone operators can now be assured that their usage is fully private as DJI has launched a new feature for its Pilot app that restricts outflow or inflow of any data by restricting data usage. The new Local Data Mode stops internet traffic on the app, assuring data of sensitive flights is secured from prying eyes. The Local Data Mode, once enabled, stops the sending or receiving of data over the internet. The caveat here is that by disabling data exchange, the app will not be able to detect user’s location, show the map and geo-fencing information including No Fly Zones and temporary flight restrictions. It further also stop notifying the drone operator of firmware updates.

DJI builds new feature that makes drone flying non-traceable

Hobbyists, governments, and enterprise drone operators can now be assured that their usage is fully private as DJI has launched a new feature for its Pilot app that restricts outflow or inflow of any data by restricting data usage. The new Local Data Mode stops internet traffic on the app, assuring data of sensitive flights is secured from prying eyes. The Local Data Mode, once enabled, stops the sending or receiving of data over the internet. The caveat here is that by disabling data exchange, the app will not be able to detect user’s location, show the map and geo-fencing information including No Fly Zones and temporary flight restrictions. It further also stop notifying the drone operator of firmware updates.

DJI builds new feature that makes drone flying non-traceable

Hobbyists, governments, and enterprise drone operators can now be assured that their usage is fully private as DJI has launched a new feature for its Pilot app that restricts outflow or inflow of any data by restricting data usage. The new Local Data Mode stops internet traffic on the app, assuring data of sensitive flights is secured from prying eyes. The Local Data Mode, once enabled, stops the sending or receiving of data over the internet. The caveat here is that by disabling data exchange, the app will not be able to detect user’s location, show the map and geo-fencing information including No Fly Zones and temporary flight restrictions. It further also stop notifying the drone operator of firmware updates.

DJI builds new feature that makes drone flying non-traceable

Hobbyists, governments, and enterprise drone operators can now be assured that their usage is fully private as DJI has launched a new feature for its Pilot app that restricts outflow or inflow of any data by restricting data usage. The new Local Data Mode stops internet traffic on the app, assuring data of sensitive flights is secured from prying eyes. The Local Data Mode, once enabled, stops the sending or receiving of data over the internet. The caveat here is that by disabling data exchange, the app will not be able to detect user’s location, show the map and geo-fencing information including No Fly Zones and temporary flight restrictions. It further also stop notifying the drone operator of firmware updates.

FILE - This March 28, 2017 file photo shows the Pexton Building, surrounded by barbed wire fencing, at the Minnesota Sex Offender Program in St. Peter, Minn. The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday, Oct. 2, 2017, that it won't hear a challenge to Minnesota's sex offender civil commitment system, which allows people who have been deemed sexually dangerous to be committed to a treatment facility for an indefinite period of time. (AP Photo/Jim Mone File)

Supreme Court won't hear Minnesota sex offender case

FILE - This March 28, 2017 file photo shows the Pexton Building, surrounded by barbed wire fencing, at the Minnesota Sex Offender Program in St. Peter, Minn. The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday, Oct. 2, 2017, that it won't hear a challenge to Minnesota's sex offender civil commitment system, which allows people who have been deemed sexually dangerous to be committed to a treatment facility for an indefinite period of time. (AP Photo/Jim Mone File)

Trump asks small business owner to build White House fence

Custom Wood Fencing & Decks owner John Gannon discusses how President Trump’s tax reform plan can help his small business.

Trump asks small business owner to build White House fence

Custom Wood Fencing & Decks owner John Gannon discusses how President Trump’s tax reform plan can help his small business.