Olympic Fencing action

The fifth installment of Nigel Sylvester’s Go series takes viewers on a fun-filled adventure through London and Paris. The video represents a return to form for the pro BMX rider, with a renewed focus on the bike.
From fencing to fried chicken, Nigel Sylvester’s new ‘Go’ video has it all
The fifth installment of Nigel Sylvester’s Go series takes viewers on a fun-filled adventure through London and Paris. The video represents a return to form for the pro BMX rider, with a renewed focus on the bike.
The fifth installment of Nigel Sylvester’s Go series takes viewers on a fun-filled adventure through London and Paris. The video represents a return to form for the pro BMX rider, with a renewed focus on the bike.
From fencing to fried chicken, Nigel Sylvester’s new ‘Go’ video has it all
The fifth installment of Nigel Sylvester’s Go series takes viewers on a fun-filled adventure through London and Paris. The video represents a return to form for the pro BMX rider, with a renewed focus on the bike.
The fifth installment of Nigel Sylvester’s Go series takes viewers on a fun-filled adventure through London and Paris. The video represents a return to form for the pro BMX rider, with a renewed focus on the bike.
From fencing to fried chicken, Nigel Sylvester’s new ‘Go’ video has it all
The fifth installment of Nigel Sylvester’s Go series takes viewers on a fun-filled adventure through London and Paris. The video represents a return to form for the pro BMX rider, with a renewed focus on the bike.
The fifth installment of Nigel Sylvester’s Go series takes viewers on a fun-filled adventure through London and Paris. The video represents a return to form for the pro BMX rider, with a renewed focus on the bike.
From fencing to fried chicken, Nigel Sylvester’s new ‘Go’ video has it all
The fifth installment of Nigel Sylvester’s Go series takes viewers on a fun-filled adventure through London and Paris. The video represents a return to form for the pro BMX rider, with a renewed focus on the bike.
The fifth installment of Nigel Sylvester’s Go series takes viewers on a fun-filled adventure through London and Paris. The video represents a return to form for the pro BMX rider, with a renewed focus on the bike.
From fencing to fried chicken, Nigel Sylvester’s new ‘Go’ video has it all
The fifth installment of Nigel Sylvester’s Go series takes viewers on a fun-filled adventure through London and Paris. The video represents a return to form for the pro BMX rider, with a renewed focus on the bike.
The fifth installment of Nigel Sylvester’s Go series takes viewers on a fun-filled adventure through London and Paris. The video represents a return to form for the pro BMX rider, with a renewed focus on the bike.
From fencing to fried chicken, Nigel Sylvester’s new ‘Go’ video has it all
The fifth installment of Nigel Sylvester’s Go series takes viewers on a fun-filled adventure through London and Paris. The video represents a return to form for the pro BMX rider, with a renewed focus on the bike.
The fifth installment of Nigel Sylvester’s Go series takes viewers on a fun-filled adventure through London and Paris. The video represents a return to form for the pro BMX rider, with a renewed focus on the bike.
From fencing to fried chicken, Nigel Sylvester’s new ‘Go’ video has it all
The fifth installment of Nigel Sylvester’s Go series takes viewers on a fun-filled adventure through London and Paris. The video represents a return to form for the pro BMX rider, with a renewed focus on the bike.
France's Mallo Auriane (L) challenges Zamachowska Aleksandra from Poland during the women's final at the European Fencing Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia (AFP Photo/OLIVER BUNIC)
Slice
France's Mallo Auriane (L) challenges Zamachowska Aleksandra from Poland during the women's final at the European Fencing Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia (AFP Photo/OLIVER BUNIC)
FILE - This Oct. 2, 2012 file photo shows U.S. Border Patrol agents patrolling the border fence near Naco, Ariz. The United States has spent billions of dollars over the last decade fencing a third of its southwest border with Mexico in an attempt to stop the flood of illegal immigrants. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, File)
FILE - This Oct. 2, 2012 file photo shows U.S. Border Patrol agents patrolling the border fence near Naco, Ariz. The United States has spent billions of dollars over the last decade fencing a third of its southwest border with Mexico in an attempt to stop the flood of illegal immigrants. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, File)
FILE - This Oct. 2, 2012 file photo shows U.S. Border Patrol agents patrolling the border fence near Naco, Ariz. The United States has spent billions of dollars over the last decade fencing a third of its southwest border with Mexico in an attempt to stop the flood of illegal immigrants. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, File)
Amid rolling fields and woodland, 100 miles north of New York City, a team of archaeologists scoured the land for clues. Their search was not for Mayan mosaics or Roman ruins - rather, the team was looking for information about an epic period of American history: the Woodstock music festival. Next year marks the 50th anniversary of the legendary gathering, which brought Jimi Hendrix, The Who, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Janis Joplin and Joe Cocker together for one of the defining musical events of the 1960s. In advance of the celebrations, a team from Binghamton University's public archaeology facility was enlisted to help map out precisely where the festival unfolded. "The overall point of this investigation is to kind of define the stage space," said Josh Anderson, the project director, kneeling beside a hole that showed evidence of a fence that kept 400,000 fans from the stage area. "We can use this as a reference point," he said. "People can stand on that and look up at the hill and say, 'Oh, this is where the performers were. Jimi Hendrix stood here and played his guitar at 8:30 in the morning.'" Artifacts dug up from the Woodstock site Credit: AP The five-day excavation did unearth some artifacts: parts of old aluminium can pull tabs, bits of broken bottle glass. The artifacts will be analysed and mapped for depth and location - the pull tab parts are useful since they suggest where the surface level was at the time of the concert. The main point of the survey was to get a clear understanding of the layout of Max Yasgur's old farm - which is already on the National Register of Historic Places. The hillside has been preserved since the late 1990s by a charity that runs an adjacent '60s-themed museum, complete with a psychedelic bus. "This is a significant historic site in American culture, one of the few peaceful events that gets commemorated from the 1960s," said Wade Lawrence, director of The Museum at Bethel Woods. He told AP that the archaeologists' work will help the museum plan interpretive walking routes in time for the concert's 50th anniversary next year. “Bethel Woods would like to recreate the experience of the main concert stage from the 1969 festival,” the museum’s website states. “This includes the performer’s bridge over West Shore Road, the speaker towers, and fencing around the main stage in addition to footers or other evidence of the actual stage.” Mr Lawrence said aerial shots taken during the August weekend cannot be relied upon to show the exact location of the '69 stage and light and speaker towers. Paul Brown working on the Woodstock site Credit: AP On-site data helps, though the bottom of the hillside was re-graded in the late '90s to accommodate a temporary stage for anniversary performances. The spot of the original stage is under a layer of compacted soil, brought in for the concerts. However, archaeologists now think they have found the spot where a chain-link fence on the side of the stage area met the wooden "Peace Fence" that ran in front of the stage. Now they can match concert photos to a specific spot in the field. That could help them estimate where the corners of the stage were 49 years ago. During the dig, archaeologists rolled back square metres of the long green grass and carefully scraped away inches of dirt as they searched for clues about the old layout. "It's some science. It's some guesswork," said archaeologist Paul Brown as he worked a square. "You hope that you get lucky." Mr Lawrence said the archaeologists' report also will be used as museum officials consider restoring the grades in the area of the original stage. The museum is weighing any change to the site carefully, given its significance to so many.
Woodstock site investigated by archaeologists to unlock mysteries of musical venue
Amid rolling fields and woodland, 100 miles north of New York City, a team of archaeologists scoured the land for clues. Their search was not for Mayan mosaics or Roman ruins - rather, the team was looking for information about an epic period of American history: the Woodstock music festival. Next year marks the 50th anniversary of the legendary gathering, which brought Jimi Hendrix, The Who, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Janis Joplin and Joe Cocker together for one of the defining musical events of the 1960s. In advance of the celebrations, a team from Binghamton University's public archaeology facility was enlisted to help map out precisely where the festival unfolded. "The overall point of this investigation is to kind of define the stage space," said Josh Anderson, the project director, kneeling beside a hole that showed evidence of a fence that kept 400,000 fans from the stage area. "We can use this as a reference point," he said. "People can stand on that and look up at the hill and say, 'Oh, this is where the performers were. Jimi Hendrix stood here and played his guitar at 8:30 in the morning.'" Artifacts dug up from the Woodstock site Credit: AP The five-day excavation did unearth some artifacts: parts of old aluminium can pull tabs, bits of broken bottle glass. The artifacts will be analysed and mapped for depth and location - the pull tab parts are useful since they suggest where the surface level was at the time of the concert. The main point of the survey was to get a clear understanding of the layout of Max Yasgur's old farm - which is already on the National Register of Historic Places. The hillside has been preserved since the late 1990s by a charity that runs an adjacent '60s-themed museum, complete with a psychedelic bus. "This is a significant historic site in American culture, one of the few peaceful events that gets commemorated from the 1960s," said Wade Lawrence, director of The Museum at Bethel Woods. He told AP that the archaeologists' work will help the museum plan interpretive walking routes in time for the concert's 50th anniversary next year. “Bethel Woods would like to recreate the experience of the main concert stage from the 1969 festival,” the museum’s website states. “This includes the performer’s bridge over West Shore Road, the speaker towers, and fencing around the main stage in addition to footers or other evidence of the actual stage.” Mr Lawrence said aerial shots taken during the August weekend cannot be relied upon to show the exact location of the '69 stage and light and speaker towers. Paul Brown working on the Woodstock site Credit: AP On-site data helps, though the bottom of the hillside was re-graded in the late '90s to accommodate a temporary stage for anniversary performances. The spot of the original stage is under a layer of compacted soil, brought in for the concerts. However, archaeologists now think they have found the spot where a chain-link fence on the side of the stage area met the wooden "Peace Fence" that ran in front of the stage. Now they can match concert photos to a specific spot in the field. That could help them estimate where the corners of the stage were 49 years ago. During the dig, archaeologists rolled back square metres of the long green grass and carefully scraped away inches of dirt as they searched for clues about the old layout. "It's some science. It's some guesswork," said archaeologist Paul Brown as he worked a square. "You hope that you get lucky." Mr Lawrence said the archaeologists' report also will be used as museum officials consider restoring the grades in the area of the original stage. The museum is weighing any change to the site carefully, given its significance to so many.
Amid rolling fields and woodland, 100 miles north of New York City, a team of archaeologists scoured the land for clues. Their search was not for Mayan mosaics or Roman ruins - rather, the team was looking for information about an epic period of American history: the Woodstock music festival. Next year marks the 50th anniversary of the legendary gathering, which brought Jimi Hendrix, The Who, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Janis Joplin and Joe Cocker together for one of the defining musical events of the 1960s. In advance of the celebrations, a team from Binghamton University's public archaeology facility was enlisted to help map out precisely where the festival unfolded. "The overall point of this investigation is to kind of define the stage space," said Josh Anderson, the project director, kneeling beside a hole that showed evidence of a fence that kept 400,000 fans from the stage area. "We can use this as a reference point," he said. "People can stand on that and look up at the hill and say, 'Oh, this is where the performers were. Jimi Hendrix stood here and played his guitar at 8:30 in the morning.'" Artifacts dug up from the Woodstock site Credit: AP The five-day excavation did unearth some artifacts: parts of old aluminium can pull tabs, bits of broken bottle glass. The artifacts will be analysed and mapped for depth and location - the pull tab parts are useful since they suggest where the surface level was at the time of the concert. The main point of the survey was to get a clear understanding of the layout of Max Yasgur's old farm - which is already on the National Register of Historic Places. The hillside has been preserved since the late 1990s by a charity that runs an adjacent '60s-themed museum, complete with a psychedelic bus. "This is a significant historic site in American culture, one of the few peaceful events that gets commemorated from the 1960s," said Wade Lawrence, director of The Museum at Bethel Woods. He told AP that the archaeologists' work will help the museum plan interpretive walking routes in time for the concert's 50th anniversary next year. “Bethel Woods would like to recreate the experience of the main concert stage from the 1969 festival,” the museum’s website states. “This includes the performer’s bridge over West Shore Road, the speaker towers, and fencing around the main stage in addition to footers or other evidence of the actual stage.” Mr Lawrence said aerial shots taken during the August weekend cannot be relied upon to show the exact location of the '69 stage and light and speaker towers. Paul Brown working on the Woodstock site Credit: AP On-site data helps, though the bottom of the hillside was re-graded in the late '90s to accommodate a temporary stage for anniversary performances. The spot of the original stage is under a layer of compacted soil, brought in for the concerts. However, archaeologists now think they have found the spot where a chain-link fence on the side of the stage area met the wooden "Peace Fence" that ran in front of the stage. Now they can match concert photos to a specific spot in the field. That could help them estimate where the corners of the stage were 49 years ago. During the dig, archaeologists rolled back square metres of the long green grass and carefully scraped away inches of dirt as they searched for clues about the old layout. "It's some science. It's some guesswork," said archaeologist Paul Brown as he worked a square. "You hope that you get lucky." Mr Lawrence said the archaeologists' report also will be used as museum officials consider restoring the grades in the area of the original stage. The museum is weighing any change to the site carefully, given its significance to so many.
Woodstock site investigated by archaeologists to unlock mysteries of musical venue
Amid rolling fields and woodland, 100 miles north of New York City, a team of archaeologists scoured the land for clues. Their search was not for Mayan mosaics or Roman ruins - rather, the team was looking for information about an epic period of American history: the Woodstock music festival. Next year marks the 50th anniversary of the legendary gathering, which brought Jimi Hendrix, The Who, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Janis Joplin and Joe Cocker together for one of the defining musical events of the 1960s. In advance of the celebrations, a team from Binghamton University's public archaeology facility was enlisted to help map out precisely where the festival unfolded. "The overall point of this investigation is to kind of define the stage space," said Josh Anderson, the project director, kneeling beside a hole that showed evidence of a fence that kept 400,000 fans from the stage area. "We can use this as a reference point," he said. "People can stand on that and look up at the hill and say, 'Oh, this is where the performers were. Jimi Hendrix stood here and played his guitar at 8:30 in the morning.'" Artifacts dug up from the Woodstock site Credit: AP The five-day excavation did unearth some artifacts: parts of old aluminium can pull tabs, bits of broken bottle glass. The artifacts will be analysed and mapped for depth and location - the pull tab parts are useful since they suggest where the surface level was at the time of the concert. The main point of the survey was to get a clear understanding of the layout of Max Yasgur's old farm - which is already on the National Register of Historic Places. The hillside has been preserved since the late 1990s by a charity that runs an adjacent '60s-themed museum, complete with a psychedelic bus. "This is a significant historic site in American culture, one of the few peaceful events that gets commemorated from the 1960s," said Wade Lawrence, director of The Museum at Bethel Woods. He told AP that the archaeologists' work will help the museum plan interpretive walking routes in time for the concert's 50th anniversary next year. “Bethel Woods would like to recreate the experience of the main concert stage from the 1969 festival,” the museum’s website states. “This includes the performer’s bridge over West Shore Road, the speaker towers, and fencing around the main stage in addition to footers or other evidence of the actual stage.” Mr Lawrence said aerial shots taken during the August weekend cannot be relied upon to show the exact location of the '69 stage and light and speaker towers. Paul Brown working on the Woodstock site Credit: AP On-site data helps, though the bottom of the hillside was re-graded in the late '90s to accommodate a temporary stage for anniversary performances. The spot of the original stage is under a layer of compacted soil, brought in for the concerts. However, archaeologists now think they have found the spot where a chain-link fence on the side of the stage area met the wooden "Peace Fence" that ran in front of the stage. Now they can match concert photos to a specific spot in the field. That could help them estimate where the corners of the stage were 49 years ago. During the dig, archaeologists rolled back square metres of the long green grass and carefully scraped away inches of dirt as they searched for clues about the old layout. "It's some science. It's some guesswork," said archaeologist Paul Brown as he worked a square. "You hope that you get lucky." Mr Lawrence said the archaeologists' report also will be used as museum officials consider restoring the grades in the area of the original stage. The museum is weighing any change to the site carefully, given its significance to so many.
Amid rolling fields and woodland, 100 miles north of New York City, a team of archaeologists scoured the land for clues. Their search was not for Mayan mosaics or Roman ruins - rather, the team was looking for information about an epic period of American history: the Woodstock music festival. Next year marks the 50th anniversary of the legendary gathering, which brought Jimi Hendrix, The Who, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Janis Joplin and Joe Cocker together for one of the defining musical events of the 1960s. In advance of the celebrations, a team from Binghamton University's public archaeology facility was enlisted to help map out precisely where the festival unfolded. "The overall point of this investigation is to kind of define the stage space," said Josh Anderson, the project director, kneeling beside a hole that showed evidence of a fence that kept 400,000 fans from the stage area. "We can use this as a reference point," he said. "People can stand on that and look up at the hill and say, 'Oh, this is where the performers were. Jimi Hendrix stood here and played his guitar at 8:30 in the morning.'" Artifacts dug up from the Woodstock site Credit: AP The five-day excavation did unearth some artifacts: parts of old aluminium can pull tabs, bits of broken bottle glass. The artifacts will be analysed and mapped for depth and location - the pull tab parts are useful since they suggest where the surface level was at the time of the concert. The main point of the survey was to get a clear understanding of the layout of Max Yasgur's old farm - which is already on the National Register of Historic Places. The hillside has been preserved since the late 1990s by a charity that runs an adjacent '60s-themed museum, complete with a psychedelic bus. "This is a significant historic site in American culture, one of the few peaceful events that gets commemorated from the 1960s," said Wade Lawrence, director of The Museum at Bethel Woods. He told AP that the archaeologists' work will help the museum plan interpretive walking routes in time for the concert's 50th anniversary next year. “Bethel Woods would like to recreate the experience of the main concert stage from the 1969 festival,” the museum’s website states. “This includes the performer’s bridge over West Shore Road, the speaker towers, and fencing around the main stage in addition to footers or other evidence of the actual stage.” Mr Lawrence said aerial shots taken during the August weekend cannot be relied upon to show the exact location of the '69 stage and light and speaker towers. Paul Brown working on the Woodstock site Credit: AP On-site data helps, though the bottom of the hillside was re-graded in the late '90s to accommodate a temporary stage for anniversary performances. The spot of the original stage is under a layer of compacted soil, brought in for the concerts. However, archaeologists now think they have found the spot where a chain-link fence on the side of the stage area met the wooden "Peace Fence" that ran in front of the stage. Now they can match concert photos to a specific spot in the field. That could help them estimate where the corners of the stage were 49 years ago. During the dig, archaeologists rolled back square metres of the long green grass and carefully scraped away inches of dirt as they searched for clues about the old layout. "It's some science. It's some guesswork," said archaeologist Paul Brown as he worked a square. "You hope that you get lucky." Mr Lawrence said the archaeologists' report also will be used as museum officials consider restoring the grades in the area of the original stage. The museum is weighing any change to the site carefully, given its significance to so many.
Woodstock site investigated by archaeologists to unlock mysteries of musical venue
Amid rolling fields and woodland, 100 miles north of New York City, a team of archaeologists scoured the land for clues. Their search was not for Mayan mosaics or Roman ruins - rather, the team was looking for information about an epic period of American history: the Woodstock music festival. Next year marks the 50th anniversary of the legendary gathering, which brought Jimi Hendrix, The Who, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Janis Joplin and Joe Cocker together for one of the defining musical events of the 1960s. In advance of the celebrations, a team from Binghamton University's public archaeology facility was enlisted to help map out precisely where the festival unfolded. "The overall point of this investigation is to kind of define the stage space," said Josh Anderson, the project director, kneeling beside a hole that showed evidence of a fence that kept 400,000 fans from the stage area. "We can use this as a reference point," he said. "People can stand on that and look up at the hill and say, 'Oh, this is where the performers were. Jimi Hendrix stood here and played his guitar at 8:30 in the morning.'" Artifacts dug up from the Woodstock site Credit: AP The five-day excavation did unearth some artifacts: parts of old aluminium can pull tabs, bits of broken bottle glass. The artifacts will be analysed and mapped for depth and location - the pull tab parts are useful since they suggest where the surface level was at the time of the concert. The main point of the survey was to get a clear understanding of the layout of Max Yasgur's old farm - which is already on the National Register of Historic Places. The hillside has been preserved since the late 1990s by a charity that runs an adjacent '60s-themed museum, complete with a psychedelic bus. "This is a significant historic site in American culture, one of the few peaceful events that gets commemorated from the 1960s," said Wade Lawrence, director of The Museum at Bethel Woods. He told AP that the archaeologists' work will help the museum plan interpretive walking routes in time for the concert's 50th anniversary next year. “Bethel Woods would like to recreate the experience of the main concert stage from the 1969 festival,” the museum’s website states. “This includes the performer’s bridge over West Shore Road, the speaker towers, and fencing around the main stage in addition to footers or other evidence of the actual stage.” Mr Lawrence said aerial shots taken during the August weekend cannot be relied upon to show the exact location of the '69 stage and light and speaker towers. Paul Brown working on the Woodstock site Credit: AP On-site data helps, though the bottom of the hillside was re-graded in the late '90s to accommodate a temporary stage for anniversary performances. The spot of the original stage is under a layer of compacted soil, brought in for the concerts. However, archaeologists now think they have found the spot where a chain-link fence on the side of the stage area met the wooden "Peace Fence" that ran in front of the stage. Now they can match concert photos to a specific spot in the field. That could help them estimate where the corners of the stage were 49 years ago. During the dig, archaeologists rolled back square metres of the long green grass and carefully scraped away inches of dirt as they searched for clues about the old layout. "It's some science. It's some guesswork," said archaeologist Paul Brown as he worked a square. "You hope that you get lucky." Mr Lawrence said the archaeologists' report also will be used as museum officials consider restoring the grades in the area of the original stage. The museum is weighing any change to the site carefully, given its significance to so many.
Detained immigrants are separated by chain-linked fencing according to age and gender -- with young siblings split up -- for up to 72 hours (AFP Photo/Handout)
Detained immigrants are separated by chain-linked fencing according to age and gender -- with young siblings split up -- for up to 72 hours
Detained immigrants are separated by chain-linked fencing according to age and gender -- with young siblings split up -- for up to 72 hours (AFP Photo/Handout)
Detained immigrants are separated by chain-linked fencing according to age and gender -- with young siblings split up -- for up to 72 hours
Detained immigrants are separated by chain-linked fencing according to age and gender -- with young siblings split up -- for up to 72 hours
Detained immigrants are separated by chain-linked fencing according to age and gender -- with young siblings split up -- for up to 72 hours
Detained immigrants are separated by chain-linked fencing according to age and gender -- with young siblings split up -- for up to 72 hours
Detained immigrants are separated by chain-linked fencing according to age and gender -- with young siblings split up -- for up to 72 hours
Detained immigrants are separated by chain-linked fencing according to age and gender -- with young siblings split up -- for up to 72 hours
Vivian Kong is Hong Kong’s first female to win an Asian Fencing Championships gold medal
Vivian Kong is Hong Kong’s first female to win an Asian Fencing Championships gold medal
Vivian Kong is Hong Kong’s first female to win an Asian Fencing Championships gold medal
Vivian Kong is Hong Kong’s first female to win an Asian Fencing Championships gold medal
Vivian Kong is Hong Kong’s first female to win an Asian Fencing Championships gold medal
Vivian Kong is Hong Kong’s first female to win an Asian Fencing Championships gold medal
Melania Trump waded into a debate over children being separated from their families at the Mexico border, saying the United States should "govern with heart". In a rare intervention the first lady's spokeswoman said she wanted Republicans and Democrats to work together to achieve "successful immigration reform". Her comments were taken by some as an implicit criticism of her husband's recently introduced "zero tolerance" policy at the border. A two-year-old Honduran asylum seeker cries as her mother is searched and detained near the US-Mexico border on June 12, 2018 in McAllen, Texas Credit: Getty It was also possible she was backing the president's recent claim that Democrats in Congress were responsible for the situation. Her remarks were followed by a strong statement from former first lady Laura Bush, who called the policy "cruel" and "immoral" and said "it breaks my heart." Melania Trump said she wants an end to children being separated from their families at the Mexico border Credit: CARLOS BARRIA/Reuters More than 2,000 children have been removed from their parents over the last six weeks since Jeff Sessions, the US attorney general, introduced the new approach. Under the policy adults are being detained and prosecuted with their children taken away and sent to separate shelters. Previously, many illegal immigrants were allowed to remain at liberty while they awaited proceedings. Children who've been taken into custody related to cases of illegal entry into the United States, rest in one of the cages at a facility in McAllen, Texas Credit: AP A spokeswoman for the first lady said: "Mrs Trump hates to see children separated from their families and hopes both sides of the aisle can finally come together to achieve successful immigration reform. "She believes we need to be a country that follows all laws but also a country that governs with heart." A mural at a former Walmart where illegal immigrant boys are being held Credit: Reuters Mrs Trump, who immigrated to the United States legally from her native Slovenia, campaigns on behalf of children. The comments came amid a growing uproar over the detention of minors, including hundreds being held at a former Walmart superstore in Texas. On Monday night Hilary Clinton also condemned the situation, calling it a "humanitarian crisis". What’s happening to families at the border right now is a humanitarian crisis. Every parent who has ever held a child in their arms, every human being with a sense of compassion and decency, should be outraged.— Hillary Clinton (@HillaryClinton) 18 June 2018 Despite what this White House claims, separating families is not mandated by law. That is an outright lie, and it’s incumbent on all of us – journalists and citizens alike – to call it just that.— Hillary Clinton (@HillaryClinton) 18 June 2018 Laura Bush writing a guest column for The Washington Post on Sunday compared the policy to the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II. "I appreciate the need to enforce and protect our international boundaries, but this zero-tolerance policy is cruel," the wife of George W Bush wrote. She said "the US government "should not be in the business of warehousing children in converted box stores or making plans to place them in tent cities in the desert outside of El Paso." The US Border Patrol on Sunday allowed reporters to briefly visit the facility where it holds families arrested at the border. The cages in which people are held in cases of illegal entry into the United States Credit: AP Inside an old warehouse in South Texas, hundreds of children wait in a series of cages created by metal fencing. One cage had 20 children inside. Scattered about are bottles of water, bags of chips and large foil sheets intended to serve as blankets. One teenager told an advocate who visited that she was helping care for a young child she didn't know because the child's aunt was somewhere else in the facility. She said she had to show others in her cell how to change the girl's diaper. Behind the Shutter: US-Mexico border Mr Trump himself has also said he "hates to see separation of parents and children" and has accused Democrats of pursuing a "horrible and cruel legislative agenda". On Sunday Kellyanne Conway, his counsellor, tried to further distance the White House from responsibility. Mrs Conway said: "As a mother, as a Catholic, as somebody who’s got a conscience, I will tell you that nobody likes this policy. "Congress passed the law that it is a crime to enter this country illegally. So if they don’t like that law, they should change it." Democrats and some Republicans in Congress also criticised the policy, blaming the White House. Illegal immigrant boys are allowed two phone calls a week at a shelter Credit: Reuters Susan Collins, a Republican senator from Maine, accused the White House of trying to send a message "that if you cross the border with children, your children are going to be ripped away from you". She added: "That's traumatising to the children who are innocent victims and it is contrary to our values in this country." Democrats suggested Mr Trump was using the separation of families as a negotiating tool to secure funding for his proposed border wall in future immigration legislation. Adam Schiff, a Democrat congressman, said the administration was "using the grief, the tears, the pain of these kids as mortar to build the wall. It's an effort to extort a bill to their liking in the Congress". Mr Trump is due to meet with Republicans in Congress on Tuesday and there is expected to be a vote on an immigration bill next week. Steve Bannon, Mr Trump's former chief strategist, defended the separation of families at the border. He said: "We ran on a policy, very simply, stop mass illegal immigration and limit legal immigration, get our sovereignty back, and to help our workers. "And so he went to a zero tolerance policy. Zero tolerance, it's a crime to come across illegally, and children get separated."
Melania Trump and Laura Bush join debate over children separated from families at US-Mexico border
Melania Trump waded into a debate over children being separated from their families at the Mexico border, saying the United States should "govern with heart". In a rare intervention the first lady's spokeswoman said she wanted Republicans and Democrats to work together to achieve "successful immigration reform". Her comments were taken by some as an implicit criticism of her husband's recently introduced "zero tolerance" policy at the border. A two-year-old Honduran asylum seeker cries as her mother is searched and detained near the US-Mexico border on June 12, 2018 in McAllen, Texas Credit: Getty It was also possible she was backing the president's recent claim that Democrats in Congress were responsible for the situation. Her remarks were followed by a strong statement from former first lady Laura Bush, who called the policy "cruel" and "immoral" and said "it breaks my heart." Melania Trump said she wants an end to children being separated from their families at the Mexico border Credit: CARLOS BARRIA/Reuters More than 2,000 children have been removed from their parents over the last six weeks since Jeff Sessions, the US attorney general, introduced the new approach. Under the policy adults are being detained and prosecuted with their children taken away and sent to separate shelters. Previously, many illegal immigrants were allowed to remain at liberty while they awaited proceedings. Children who've been taken into custody related to cases of illegal entry into the United States, rest in one of the cages at a facility in McAllen, Texas Credit: AP A spokeswoman for the first lady said: "Mrs Trump hates to see children separated from their families and hopes both sides of the aisle can finally come together to achieve successful immigration reform. "She believes we need to be a country that follows all laws but also a country that governs with heart." A mural at a former Walmart where illegal immigrant boys are being held Credit: Reuters Mrs Trump, who immigrated to the United States legally from her native Slovenia, campaigns on behalf of children. The comments came amid a growing uproar over the detention of minors, including hundreds being held at a former Walmart superstore in Texas. On Monday night Hilary Clinton also condemned the situation, calling it a "humanitarian crisis". What’s happening to families at the border right now is a humanitarian crisis. Every parent who has ever held a child in their arms, every human being with a sense of compassion and decency, should be outraged.— Hillary Clinton (@HillaryClinton) 18 June 2018 Despite what this White House claims, separating families is not mandated by law. That is an outright lie, and it’s incumbent on all of us – journalists and citizens alike – to call it just that.— Hillary Clinton (@HillaryClinton) 18 June 2018 Laura Bush writing a guest column for The Washington Post on Sunday compared the policy to the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II. "I appreciate the need to enforce and protect our international boundaries, but this zero-tolerance policy is cruel," the wife of George W Bush wrote. She said "the US government "should not be in the business of warehousing children in converted box stores or making plans to place them in tent cities in the desert outside of El Paso." The US Border Patrol on Sunday allowed reporters to briefly visit the facility where it holds families arrested at the border. The cages in which people are held in cases of illegal entry into the United States Credit: AP Inside an old warehouse in South Texas, hundreds of children wait in a series of cages created by metal fencing. One cage had 20 children inside. Scattered about are bottles of water, bags of chips and large foil sheets intended to serve as blankets. One teenager told an advocate who visited that she was helping care for a young child she didn't know because the child's aunt was somewhere else in the facility. She said she had to show others in her cell how to change the girl's diaper. Behind the Shutter: US-Mexico border Mr Trump himself has also said he "hates to see separation of parents and children" and has accused Democrats of pursuing a "horrible and cruel legislative agenda". On Sunday Kellyanne Conway, his counsellor, tried to further distance the White House from responsibility. Mrs Conway said: "As a mother, as a Catholic, as somebody who’s got a conscience, I will tell you that nobody likes this policy. "Congress passed the law that it is a crime to enter this country illegally. So if they don’t like that law, they should change it." Democrats and some Republicans in Congress also criticised the policy, blaming the White House. Illegal immigrant boys are allowed two phone calls a week at a shelter Credit: Reuters Susan Collins, a Republican senator from Maine, accused the White House of trying to send a message "that if you cross the border with children, your children are going to be ripped away from you". She added: "That's traumatising to the children who are innocent victims and it is contrary to our values in this country." Democrats suggested Mr Trump was using the separation of families as a negotiating tool to secure funding for his proposed border wall in future immigration legislation. Adam Schiff, a Democrat congressman, said the administration was "using the grief, the tears, the pain of these kids as mortar to build the wall. It's an effort to extort a bill to their liking in the Congress". Mr Trump is due to meet with Republicans in Congress on Tuesday and there is expected to be a vote on an immigration bill next week. Steve Bannon, Mr Trump's former chief strategist, defended the separation of families at the border. He said: "We ran on a policy, very simply, stop mass illegal immigration and limit legal immigration, get our sovereignty back, and to help our workers. "And so he went to a zero tolerance policy. Zero tolerance, it's a crime to come across illegally, and children get separated."
Melania Trump waded into a debate over children being separated from their families at the Mexico border, saying the United States should "govern with heart". In a rare intervention the first lady's spokeswoman said she wanted Republicans and Democrats to work together to achieve "successful immigration reform". Her comments were taken by some as an implicit criticism of her husband's recently introduced "zero tolerance" policy at the border. A two-year-old Honduran asylum seeker cries as her mother is searched and detained near the US-Mexico border on June 12, 2018 in McAllen, Texas Credit: Getty It was also possible she was backing the president's recent claim that Democrats in Congress were responsible for the situation. Her remarks were followed by a strong statement from former first lady Laura Bush, who called the policy "cruel" and "immoral" and said "it breaks my heart." Melania Trump said she wants an end to children being separated from their families at the Mexico border Credit: CARLOS BARRIA/Reuters More than 2,000 children have been removed from their parents over the last six weeks since Jeff Sessions, the US attorney general, introduced the new approach. Under the policy adults are being detained and prosecuted with their children taken away and sent to separate shelters. Previously, many illegal immigrants were allowed to remain at liberty while they awaited proceedings. Children who've been taken into custody related to cases of illegal entry into the United States, rest in one of the cages at a facility in McAllen, Texas Credit: AP A spokeswoman for the first lady said: "Mrs Trump hates to see children separated from their families and hopes both sides of the aisle can finally come together to achieve successful immigration reform. "She believes we need to be a country that follows all laws but also a country that governs with heart." A mural at a former Walmart where illegal immigrant boys are being held Credit: Reuters Mrs Trump, who immigrated to the United States legally from her native Slovenia, campaigns on behalf of children. The comments came amid a growing uproar over the detention of minors, including hundreds being held at a former Walmart superstore in Texas. On Monday night Hilary Clinton also condemned the situation, calling it a "humanitarian crisis". What’s happening to families at the border right now is a humanitarian crisis. Every parent who has ever held a child in their arms, every human being with a sense of compassion and decency, should be outraged.— Hillary Clinton (@HillaryClinton) 18 June 2018 Despite what this White House claims, separating families is not mandated by law. That is an outright lie, and it’s incumbent on all of us – journalists and citizens alike – to call it just that.— Hillary Clinton (@HillaryClinton) 18 June 2018 Laura Bush writing a guest column for The Washington Post on Sunday compared the policy to the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II. "I appreciate the need to enforce and protect our international boundaries, but this zero-tolerance policy is cruel," the wife of George W Bush wrote. She said "the US government "should not be in the business of warehousing children in converted box stores or making plans to place them in tent cities in the desert outside of El Paso." The US Border Patrol on Sunday allowed reporters to briefly visit the facility where it holds families arrested at the border. The cages in which people are held in cases of illegal entry into the United States Credit: AP Inside an old warehouse in South Texas, hundreds of children wait in a series of cages created by metal fencing. One cage had 20 children inside. Scattered about are bottles of water, bags of chips and large foil sheets intended to serve as blankets. One teenager told an advocate who visited that she was helping care for a young child she didn't know because the child's aunt was somewhere else in the facility. She said she had to show others in her cell how to change the girl's diaper. Behind the Shutter: US-Mexico border Mr Trump himself has also said he "hates to see separation of parents and children" and has accused Democrats of pursuing a "horrible and cruel legislative agenda". On Sunday Kellyanne Conway, his counsellor, tried to further distance the White House from responsibility. Mrs Conway said: "As a mother, as a Catholic, as somebody who’s got a conscience, I will tell you that nobody likes this policy. "Congress passed the law that it is a crime to enter this country illegally. So if they don’t like that law, they should change it." Democrats and some Republicans in Congress also criticised the policy, blaming the White House. Illegal immigrant boys are allowed two phone calls a week at a shelter Credit: Reuters Susan Collins, a Republican senator from Maine, accused the White House of trying to send a message "that if you cross the border with children, your children are going to be ripped away from you". She added: "That's traumatising to the children who are innocent victims and it is contrary to our values in this country." Democrats suggested Mr Trump was using the separation of families as a negotiating tool to secure funding for his proposed border wall in future immigration legislation. Adam Schiff, a Democrat congressman, said the administration was "using the grief, the tears, the pain of these kids as mortar to build the wall. It's an effort to extort a bill to their liking in the Congress". Mr Trump is due to meet with Republicans in Congress on Tuesday and there is expected to be a vote on an immigration bill next week. Steve Bannon, Mr Trump's former chief strategist, defended the separation of families at the border. He said: "We ran on a policy, very simply, stop mass illegal immigration and limit legal immigration, get our sovereignty back, and to help our workers. "And so he went to a zero tolerance policy. Zero tolerance, it's a crime to come across illegally, and children get separated."
Melania Trump and Laura Bush join debate over children separated from families at US-Mexico border
Melania Trump waded into a debate over children being separated from their families at the Mexico border, saying the United States should "govern with heart". In a rare intervention the first lady's spokeswoman said she wanted Republicans and Democrats to work together to achieve "successful immigration reform". Her comments were taken by some as an implicit criticism of her husband's recently introduced "zero tolerance" policy at the border. A two-year-old Honduran asylum seeker cries as her mother is searched and detained near the US-Mexico border on June 12, 2018 in McAllen, Texas Credit: Getty It was also possible she was backing the president's recent claim that Democrats in Congress were responsible for the situation. Her remarks were followed by a strong statement from former first lady Laura Bush, who called the policy "cruel" and "immoral" and said "it breaks my heart." Melania Trump said she wants an end to children being separated from their families at the Mexico border Credit: CARLOS BARRIA/Reuters More than 2,000 children have been removed from their parents over the last six weeks since Jeff Sessions, the US attorney general, introduced the new approach. Under the policy adults are being detained and prosecuted with their children taken away and sent to separate shelters. Previously, many illegal immigrants were allowed to remain at liberty while they awaited proceedings. Children who've been taken into custody related to cases of illegal entry into the United States, rest in one of the cages at a facility in McAllen, Texas Credit: AP A spokeswoman for the first lady said: "Mrs Trump hates to see children separated from their families and hopes both sides of the aisle can finally come together to achieve successful immigration reform. "She believes we need to be a country that follows all laws but also a country that governs with heart." A mural at a former Walmart where illegal immigrant boys are being held Credit: Reuters Mrs Trump, who immigrated to the United States legally from her native Slovenia, campaigns on behalf of children. The comments came amid a growing uproar over the detention of minors, including hundreds being held at a former Walmart superstore in Texas. On Monday night Hilary Clinton also condemned the situation, calling it a "humanitarian crisis". What’s happening to families at the border right now is a humanitarian crisis. Every parent who has ever held a child in their arms, every human being with a sense of compassion and decency, should be outraged.— Hillary Clinton (@HillaryClinton) 18 June 2018 Despite what this White House claims, separating families is not mandated by law. That is an outright lie, and it’s incumbent on all of us – journalists and citizens alike – to call it just that.— Hillary Clinton (@HillaryClinton) 18 June 2018 Laura Bush writing a guest column for The Washington Post on Sunday compared the policy to the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II. "I appreciate the need to enforce and protect our international boundaries, but this zero-tolerance policy is cruel," the wife of George W Bush wrote. She said "the US government "should not be in the business of warehousing children in converted box stores or making plans to place them in tent cities in the desert outside of El Paso." The US Border Patrol on Sunday allowed reporters to briefly visit the facility where it holds families arrested at the border. The cages in which people are held in cases of illegal entry into the United States Credit: AP Inside an old warehouse in South Texas, hundreds of children wait in a series of cages created by metal fencing. One cage had 20 children inside. Scattered about are bottles of water, bags of chips and large foil sheets intended to serve as blankets. One teenager told an advocate who visited that she was helping care for a young child she didn't know because the child's aunt was somewhere else in the facility. She said she had to show others in her cell how to change the girl's diaper. Behind the Shutter: US-Mexico border Mr Trump himself has also said he "hates to see separation of parents and children" and has accused Democrats of pursuing a "horrible and cruel legislative agenda". On Sunday Kellyanne Conway, his counsellor, tried to further distance the White House from responsibility. Mrs Conway said: "As a mother, as a Catholic, as somebody who’s got a conscience, I will tell you that nobody likes this policy. "Congress passed the law that it is a crime to enter this country illegally. So if they don’t like that law, they should change it." Democrats and some Republicans in Congress also criticised the policy, blaming the White House. Illegal immigrant boys are allowed two phone calls a week at a shelter Credit: Reuters Susan Collins, a Republican senator from Maine, accused the White House of trying to send a message "that if you cross the border with children, your children are going to be ripped away from you". She added: "That's traumatising to the children who are innocent victims and it is contrary to our values in this country." Democrats suggested Mr Trump was using the separation of families as a negotiating tool to secure funding for his proposed border wall in future immigration legislation. Adam Schiff, a Democrat congressman, said the administration was "using the grief, the tears, the pain of these kids as mortar to build the wall. It's an effort to extort a bill to their liking in the Congress". Mr Trump is due to meet with Republicans in Congress on Tuesday and there is expected to be a vote on an immigration bill next week. Steve Bannon, Mr Trump's former chief strategist, defended the separation of families at the border. He said: "We ran on a policy, very simply, stop mass illegal immigration and limit legal immigration, get our sovereignty back, and to help our workers. "And so he went to a zero tolerance policy. Zero tolerance, it's a crime to come across illegally, and children get separated."
Melania Trump waded into a debate over children being separated from their families at the Mexico border, saying the United States should "govern with heart". In a rare intervention the first lady's spokeswoman said she wanted Republicans and Democrats to work together to achieve "successful immigration reform". Her comments were taken by some as an implicit criticism of her husband's recently introduced "zero tolerance" policy at the border. A two-year-old Honduran asylum seeker cries as her mother is searched and detained near the US-Mexico border on June 12, 2018 in McAllen, Texas Credit: Getty It was also possible she was backing the president's recent claim that Democrats in Congress were responsible for the situation. Her remarks were followed by a strong statement from former first lady Laura Bush, who called the policy "cruel" and "immoral" and said "it breaks my heart." Melania Trump said she wants an end to children being separated from their families at the Mexico border Credit: CARLOS BARRIA/Reuters More than 2,000 children have been removed from their parents over the last six weeks since Jeff Sessions, the US attorney general, introduced the new approach. Under the policy adults are being detained and prosecuted with their children taken away and sent to separate shelters. Previously, many illegal immigrants were allowed to remain at liberty while they awaited proceedings. Children who've been taken into custody related to cases of illegal entry into the United States, rest in one of the cages at a facility in McAllen, Texas Credit: AP A spokeswoman for the first lady said: "Mrs Trump hates to see children separated from their families and hopes both sides of the aisle can finally come together to achieve successful immigration reform. "She believes we need to be a country that follows all laws but also a country that governs with heart." A mural at a former Walmart where illegal immigrant boys are being held Credit: Reuters Mrs Trump, who immigrated to the United States legally from her native Slovenia, campaigns on behalf of children. The comments came amid a growing uproar over the detention of minors, including hundreds being held at a former Walmart superstore in Texas. On Monday night Hilary Clinton also condemned the situation, calling it a "humanitarian crisis". What’s happening to families at the border right now is a humanitarian crisis. Every parent who has ever held a child in their arms, every human being with a sense of compassion and decency, should be outraged.— Hillary Clinton (@HillaryClinton) 18 June 2018 Despite what this White House claims, separating families is not mandated by law. That is an outright lie, and it’s incumbent on all of us – journalists and citizens alike – to call it just that.— Hillary Clinton (@HillaryClinton) 18 June 2018 Laura Bush writing a guest column for The Washington Post on Sunday compared the policy to the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II. "I appreciate the need to enforce and protect our international boundaries, but this zero-tolerance policy is cruel," the wife of George W Bush wrote. She said "the US government "should not be in the business of warehousing children in converted box stores or making plans to place them in tent cities in the desert outside of El Paso." The US Border Patrol on Sunday allowed reporters to briefly visit the facility where it holds families arrested at the border. The cages in which people are held in cases of illegal entry into the United States Credit: AP Inside an old warehouse in South Texas, hundreds of children wait in a series of cages created by metal fencing. One cage had 20 children inside. Scattered about are bottles of water, bags of chips and large foil sheets intended to serve as blankets. One teenager told an advocate who visited that she was helping care for a young child she didn't know because the child's aunt was somewhere else in the facility. She said she had to show others in her cell how to change the girl's diaper. Behind the Shutter: US-Mexico border Mr Trump himself has also said he "hates to see separation of parents and children" and has accused Democrats of pursuing a "horrible and cruel legislative agenda". On Sunday Kellyanne Conway, his counsellor, tried to further distance the White House from responsibility. Mrs Conway said: "As a mother, as a Catholic, as somebody who’s got a conscience, I will tell you that nobody likes this policy. "Congress passed the law that it is a crime to enter this country illegally. So if they don’t like that law, they should change it." Democrats and some Republicans in Congress also criticised the policy, blaming the White House. Illegal immigrant boys are allowed two phone calls a week at a shelter Credit: Reuters Susan Collins, a Republican senator from Maine, accused the White House of trying to send a message "that if you cross the border with children, your children are going to be ripped away from you". She added: "That's traumatising to the children who are innocent victims and it is contrary to our values in this country." Democrats suggested Mr Trump was using the separation of families as a negotiating tool to secure funding for his proposed border wall in future immigration legislation. Adam Schiff, a Democrat congressman, said the administration was "using the grief, the tears, the pain of these kids as mortar to build the wall. It's an effort to extort a bill to their liking in the Congress". Mr Trump is due to meet with Republicans in Congress on Tuesday and there is expected to be a vote on an immigration bill next week. Steve Bannon, Mr Trump's former chief strategist, defended the separation of families at the border. He said: "We ran on a policy, very simply, stop mass illegal immigration and limit legal immigration, get our sovereignty back, and to help our workers. "And so he went to a zero tolerance policy. Zero tolerance, it's a crime to come across illegally, and children get separated."
Melania Trump and Laura Bush join debate over children separated from families at US-Mexico border
Melania Trump waded into a debate over children being separated from their families at the Mexico border, saying the United States should "govern with heart". In a rare intervention the first lady's spokeswoman said she wanted Republicans and Democrats to work together to achieve "successful immigration reform". Her comments were taken by some as an implicit criticism of her husband's recently introduced "zero tolerance" policy at the border. A two-year-old Honduran asylum seeker cries as her mother is searched and detained near the US-Mexico border on June 12, 2018 in McAllen, Texas Credit: Getty It was also possible she was backing the president's recent claim that Democrats in Congress were responsible for the situation. Her remarks were followed by a strong statement from former first lady Laura Bush, who called the policy "cruel" and "immoral" and said "it breaks my heart." Melania Trump said she wants an end to children being separated from their families at the Mexico border Credit: CARLOS BARRIA/Reuters More than 2,000 children have been removed from their parents over the last six weeks since Jeff Sessions, the US attorney general, introduced the new approach. Under the policy adults are being detained and prosecuted with their children taken away and sent to separate shelters. Previously, many illegal immigrants were allowed to remain at liberty while they awaited proceedings. Children who've been taken into custody related to cases of illegal entry into the United States, rest in one of the cages at a facility in McAllen, Texas Credit: AP A spokeswoman for the first lady said: "Mrs Trump hates to see children separated from their families and hopes both sides of the aisle can finally come together to achieve successful immigration reform. "She believes we need to be a country that follows all laws but also a country that governs with heart." A mural at a former Walmart where illegal immigrant boys are being held Credit: Reuters Mrs Trump, who immigrated to the United States legally from her native Slovenia, campaigns on behalf of children. The comments came amid a growing uproar over the detention of minors, including hundreds being held at a former Walmart superstore in Texas. On Monday night Hilary Clinton also condemned the situation, calling it a "humanitarian crisis". What’s happening to families at the border right now is a humanitarian crisis. Every parent who has ever held a child in their arms, every human being with a sense of compassion and decency, should be outraged.— Hillary Clinton (@HillaryClinton) 18 June 2018 Despite what this White House claims, separating families is not mandated by law. That is an outright lie, and it’s incumbent on all of us – journalists and citizens alike – to call it just that.— Hillary Clinton (@HillaryClinton) 18 June 2018 Laura Bush writing a guest column for The Washington Post on Sunday compared the policy to the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II. "I appreciate the need to enforce and protect our international boundaries, but this zero-tolerance policy is cruel," the wife of George W Bush wrote. She said "the US government "should not be in the business of warehousing children in converted box stores or making plans to place them in tent cities in the desert outside of El Paso." The US Border Patrol on Sunday allowed reporters to briefly visit the facility where it holds families arrested at the border. The cages in which people are held in cases of illegal entry into the United States Credit: AP Inside an old warehouse in South Texas, hundreds of children wait in a series of cages created by metal fencing. One cage had 20 children inside. Scattered about are bottles of water, bags of chips and large foil sheets intended to serve as blankets. One teenager told an advocate who visited that she was helping care for a young child she didn't know because the child's aunt was somewhere else in the facility. She said she had to show others in her cell how to change the girl's diaper. Behind the Shutter: US-Mexico border Mr Trump himself has also said he "hates to see separation of parents and children" and has accused Democrats of pursuing a "horrible and cruel legislative agenda". On Sunday Kellyanne Conway, his counsellor, tried to further distance the White House from responsibility. Mrs Conway said: "As a mother, as a Catholic, as somebody who’s got a conscience, I will tell you that nobody likes this policy. "Congress passed the law that it is a crime to enter this country illegally. So if they don’t like that law, they should change it." Democrats and some Republicans in Congress also criticised the policy, blaming the White House. Illegal immigrant boys are allowed two phone calls a week at a shelter Credit: Reuters Susan Collins, a Republican senator from Maine, accused the White House of trying to send a message "that if you cross the border with children, your children are going to be ripped away from you". She added: "That's traumatising to the children who are innocent victims and it is contrary to our values in this country." Democrats suggested Mr Trump was using the separation of families as a negotiating tool to secure funding for his proposed border wall in future immigration legislation. Adam Schiff, a Democrat congressman, said the administration was "using the grief, the tears, the pain of these kids as mortar to build the wall. It's an effort to extort a bill to their liking in the Congress". Mr Trump is due to meet with Republicans in Congress on Tuesday and there is expected to be a vote on an immigration bill next week. Steve Bannon, Mr Trump's former chief strategist, defended the separation of families at the border. He said: "We ran on a policy, very simply, stop mass illegal immigration and limit legal immigration, get our sovereignty back, and to help our workers. "And so he went to a zero tolerance policy. Zero tolerance, it's a crime to come across illegally, and children get separated."
Melania Trump waded into a debate over children being separated from their families at the Mexico border, saying the United States should "govern with heart". In a rare intervention the first lady's spokeswoman said she wanted Republicans and Democrats to work together to achieve "successful immigration reform". Her comments were taken by some as an implicit criticism of her husband's recently introduced "zero tolerance" policy at the border. A two-year-old Honduran asylum seeker cries as her mother is searched and detained near the US-Mexico border on June 12, 2018 in McAllen, Texas Credit: Getty It was also possible she was backing the president's recent claim that Democrats in Congress were responsible for the situation. Her remarks were followed by a strong statement from former first lady Laura Bush, who called the policy "cruel" and "immoral" and said "it breaks my heart." Melania Trump said she wants an end to children being separated from their families at the Mexico border Credit: CARLOS BARRIA/Reuters More than 2,000 children have been removed from their parents over the last six weeks since Jeff Sessions, the US attorney general, introduced the new approach. Under the policy adults are being detained and prosecuted with their children taken away and sent to separate shelters. Previously, many illegal immigrants were allowed to remain at liberty while they awaited proceedings. Children who've been taken into custody related to cases of illegal entry into the United States, rest in one of the cages at a facility in McAllen, Texas Credit: AP A spokeswoman for the first lady said: "Mrs Trump hates to see children separated from their families and hopes both sides of the aisle can finally come together to achieve successful immigration reform. "She believes we need to be a country that follows all laws but also a country that governs with heart." A mural at a former Walmart where illegal immigrant boys are being held Credit: Reuters Mrs Trump, who immigrated to the United States legally from her native Slovenia, campaigns on behalf of children. The comments came amid a growing uproar over the detention of minors, including hundreds being held at a former Walmart superstore in Texas. On Monday night Hilary Clinton also condemned the situation, calling it a "humanitarian crisis". What’s happening to families at the border right now is a humanitarian crisis. Every parent who has ever held a child in their arms, every human being with a sense of compassion and decency, should be outraged.— Hillary Clinton (@HillaryClinton) 18 June 2018 Despite what this White House claims, separating families is not mandated by law. That is an outright lie, and it’s incumbent on all of us – journalists and citizens alike – to call it just that.— Hillary Clinton (@HillaryClinton) 18 June 2018 Laura Bush writing a guest column for The Washington Post on Sunday compared the policy to the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II. "I appreciate the need to enforce and protect our international boundaries, but this zero-tolerance policy is cruel," the wife of George W Bush wrote. She said "the US government "should not be in the business of warehousing children in converted box stores or making plans to place them in tent cities in the desert outside of El Paso." The US Border Patrol on Sunday allowed reporters to briefly visit the facility where it holds families arrested at the border. The cages in which people are held in cases of illegal entry into the United States Credit: AP Inside an old warehouse in South Texas, hundreds of children wait in a series of cages created by metal fencing. One cage had 20 children inside. Scattered about are bottles of water, bags of chips and large foil sheets intended to serve as blankets. One teenager told an advocate who visited that she was helping care for a young child she didn't know because the child's aunt was somewhere else in the facility. She said she had to show others in her cell how to change the girl's diaper. Behind the Shutter: US-Mexico border Mr Trump himself has also said he "hates to see separation of parents and children" and has accused Democrats of pursuing a "horrible and cruel legislative agenda". On Sunday Kellyanne Conway, his counsellor, tried to further distance the White House from responsibility. Mrs Conway said: "As a mother, as a Catholic, as somebody who’s got a conscience, I will tell you that nobody likes this policy. "Congress passed the law that it is a crime to enter this country illegally. So if they don’t like that law, they should change it." Democrats and some Republicans in Congress also criticised the policy, blaming the White House. Illegal immigrant boys are allowed two phone calls a week at a shelter Credit: Reuters Susan Collins, a Republican senator from Maine, accused the White House of trying to send a message "that if you cross the border with children, your children are going to be ripped away from you". She added: "That's traumatising to the children who are innocent victims and it is contrary to our values in this country." Democrats suggested Mr Trump was using the separation of families as a negotiating tool to secure funding for his proposed border wall in future immigration legislation. Adam Schiff, a Democrat congressman, said the administration was "using the grief, the tears, the pain of these kids as mortar to build the wall. It's an effort to extort a bill to their liking in the Congress". Mr Trump is due to meet with Republicans in Congress on Tuesday and there is expected to be a vote on an immigration bill next week. Steve Bannon, Mr Trump's former chief strategist, defended the separation of families at the border. He said: "We ran on a policy, very simply, stop mass illegal immigration and limit legal immigration, get our sovereignty back, and to help our workers. "And so he went to a zero tolerance policy. Zero tolerance, it's a crime to come across illegally, and children get separated."
Melania Trump and Laura Bush join debate over children separated from families at US-Mexico border
Melania Trump waded into a debate over children being separated from their families at the Mexico border, saying the United States should "govern with heart". In a rare intervention the first lady's spokeswoman said she wanted Republicans and Democrats to work together to achieve "successful immigration reform". Her comments were taken by some as an implicit criticism of her husband's recently introduced "zero tolerance" policy at the border. A two-year-old Honduran asylum seeker cries as her mother is searched and detained near the US-Mexico border on June 12, 2018 in McAllen, Texas Credit: Getty It was also possible she was backing the president's recent claim that Democrats in Congress were responsible for the situation. Her remarks were followed by a strong statement from former first lady Laura Bush, who called the policy "cruel" and "immoral" and said "it breaks my heart." Melania Trump said she wants an end to children being separated from their families at the Mexico border Credit: CARLOS BARRIA/Reuters More than 2,000 children have been removed from their parents over the last six weeks since Jeff Sessions, the US attorney general, introduced the new approach. Under the policy adults are being detained and prosecuted with their children taken away and sent to separate shelters. Previously, many illegal immigrants were allowed to remain at liberty while they awaited proceedings. Children who've been taken into custody related to cases of illegal entry into the United States, rest in one of the cages at a facility in McAllen, Texas Credit: AP A spokeswoman for the first lady said: "Mrs Trump hates to see children separated from their families and hopes both sides of the aisle can finally come together to achieve successful immigration reform. "She believes we need to be a country that follows all laws but also a country that governs with heart." A mural at a former Walmart where illegal immigrant boys are being held Credit: Reuters Mrs Trump, who immigrated to the United States legally from her native Slovenia, campaigns on behalf of children. The comments came amid a growing uproar over the detention of minors, including hundreds being held at a former Walmart superstore in Texas. On Monday night Hilary Clinton also condemned the situation, calling it a "humanitarian crisis". What’s happening to families at the border right now is a humanitarian crisis. Every parent who has ever held a child in their arms, every human being with a sense of compassion and decency, should be outraged.— Hillary Clinton (@HillaryClinton) 18 June 2018 Despite what this White House claims, separating families is not mandated by law. That is an outright lie, and it’s incumbent on all of us – journalists and citizens alike – to call it just that.— Hillary Clinton (@HillaryClinton) 18 June 2018 Laura Bush writing a guest column for The Washington Post on Sunday compared the policy to the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II. "I appreciate the need to enforce and protect our international boundaries, but this zero-tolerance policy is cruel," the wife of George W Bush wrote. She said "the US government "should not be in the business of warehousing children in converted box stores or making plans to place them in tent cities in the desert outside of El Paso." The US Border Patrol on Sunday allowed reporters to briefly visit the facility where it holds families arrested at the border. The cages in which people are held in cases of illegal entry into the United States Credit: AP Inside an old warehouse in South Texas, hundreds of children wait in a series of cages created by metal fencing. One cage had 20 children inside. Scattered about are bottles of water, bags of chips and large foil sheets intended to serve as blankets. One teenager told an advocate who visited that she was helping care for a young child she didn't know because the child's aunt was somewhere else in the facility. She said she had to show others in her cell how to change the girl's diaper. Behind the Shutter: US-Mexico border Mr Trump himself has also said he "hates to see separation of parents and children" and has accused Democrats of pursuing a "horrible and cruel legislative agenda". On Sunday Kellyanne Conway, his counsellor, tried to further distance the White House from responsibility. Mrs Conway said: "As a mother, as a Catholic, as somebody who’s got a conscience, I will tell you that nobody likes this policy. "Congress passed the law that it is a crime to enter this country illegally. So if they don’t like that law, they should change it." Democrats and some Republicans in Congress also criticised the policy, blaming the White House. Illegal immigrant boys are allowed two phone calls a week at a shelter Credit: Reuters Susan Collins, a Republican senator from Maine, accused the White House of trying to send a message "that if you cross the border with children, your children are going to be ripped away from you". She added: "That's traumatising to the children who are innocent victims and it is contrary to our values in this country." Democrats suggested Mr Trump was using the separation of families as a negotiating tool to secure funding for his proposed border wall in future immigration legislation. Adam Schiff, a Democrat congressman, said the administration was "using the grief, the tears, the pain of these kids as mortar to build the wall. It's an effort to extort a bill to their liking in the Congress". Mr Trump is due to meet with Republicans in Congress on Tuesday and there is expected to be a vote on an immigration bill next week. Steve Bannon, Mr Trump's former chief strategist, defended the separation of families at the border. He said: "We ran on a policy, very simply, stop mass illegal immigration and limit legal immigration, get our sovereignty back, and to help our workers. "And so he went to a zero tolerance policy. Zero tolerance, it's a crime to come across illegally, and children get separated."
Melania Trump waded into a debate over children being separated from their families at the Mexico border, saying the United States should "govern with heart". In a rare intervention the first lady's spokeswoman said she wanted Republicans and Democrats to work together to achieve "successful immigration reform". Her comments were taken by some as an implicit criticism of her husband's recently introduced "zero tolerance" policy at the border. A two-year-old Honduran asylum seeker cries as her mother is searched and detained near the US-Mexico border on June 12, 2018 in McAllen, Texas Credit: Getty It was also possible she was backing the president's recent claim that Democrats in Congress were responsible for the situation. Her remarks were followed by a strong statement from former first lady Laura Bush, who called the policy "cruel" and "immoral" and said "it breaks my heart." Melania Trump said she wants an end to children being separated from their families at the Mexico border Credit: CARLOS BARRIA/Reuters More than 2,000 children have been removed from their parents over the last six weeks since Jeff Sessions, the US attorney general, introduced the new approach. Under the policy adults are being detained and prosecuted with their children taken away and sent to separate shelters. Previously, many illegal immigrants were allowed to remain at liberty while they awaited proceedings. Children who've been taken into custody related to cases of illegal entry into the United States, rest in one of the cages at a facility in McAllen, Texas Credit: AP A spokeswoman for the first lady said: "Mrs Trump hates to see children separated from their families and hopes both sides of the aisle can finally come together to achieve successful immigration reform. "She believes we need to be a country that follows all laws but also a country that governs with heart." A mural at a former Walmart where illegal immigrant boys are being held Credit: Reuters Mrs Trump, who immigrated to the United States legally from her native Slovenia, campaigns on behalf of children. The comments came amid a growing uproar over the detention of minors, including hundreds being held at a former Walmart superstore in Texas. On Monday night Hilary Clinton also condemned the situation, calling it a "humanitarian crisis". What’s happening to families at the border right now is a humanitarian crisis. Every parent who has ever held a child in their arms, every human being with a sense of compassion and decency, should be outraged.— Hillary Clinton (@HillaryClinton) 18 June 2018 Despite what this White House claims, separating families is not mandated by law. That is an outright lie, and it’s incumbent on all of us – journalists and citizens alike – to call it just that.— Hillary Clinton (@HillaryClinton) 18 June 2018 Laura Bush writing a guest column for The Washington Post on Sunday compared the policy to the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II. "I appreciate the need to enforce and protect our international boundaries, but this zero-tolerance policy is cruel," the wife of George W Bush wrote. She said "the US government "should not be in the business of warehousing children in converted box stores or making plans to place them in tent cities in the desert outside of El Paso." The US Border Patrol on Sunday allowed reporters to briefly visit the facility where it holds families arrested at the border. The cages in which people are held in cases of illegal entry into the United States Credit: AP Inside an old warehouse in South Texas, hundreds of children wait in a series of cages created by metal fencing. One cage had 20 children inside. Scattered about are bottles of water, bags of chips and large foil sheets intended to serve as blankets. One teenager told an advocate who visited that she was helping care for a young child she didn't know because the child's aunt was somewhere else in the facility. She said she had to show others in her cell how to change the girl's diaper. Behind the Shutter: US-Mexico border Mr Trump himself has also said he "hates to see separation of parents and children" and has accused Democrats of pursuing a "horrible and cruel legislative agenda". On Sunday Kellyanne Conway, his counsellor, tried to further distance the White House from responsibility. Mrs Conway said: "As a mother, as a Catholic, as somebody who’s got a conscience, I will tell you that nobody likes this policy. "Congress passed the law that it is a crime to enter this country illegally. So if they don’t like that law, they should change it." Democrats and some Republicans in Congress also criticised the policy, blaming the White House. Illegal immigrant boys are allowed two phone calls a week at a shelter Credit: Reuters Susan Collins, a Republican senator from Maine, accused the White House of trying to send a message "that if you cross the border with children, your children are going to be ripped away from you". She added: "That's traumatising to the children who are innocent victims and it is contrary to our values in this country." Democrats suggested Mr Trump was using the separation of families as a negotiating tool to secure funding for his proposed border wall in future immigration legislation. Adam Schiff, a Democrat congressman, said the administration was "using the grief, the tears, the pain of these kids as mortar to build the wall. It's an effort to extort a bill to their liking in the Congress". Mr Trump is due to meet with Republicans in Congress on Tuesday and there is expected to be a vote on an immigration bill next week. Steve Bannon, Mr Trump's former chief strategist, defended the separation of families at the border. He said: "We ran on a policy, very simply, stop mass illegal immigration and limit legal immigration, get our sovereignty back, and to help our workers. "And so he went to a zero tolerance policy. Zero tolerance, it's a crime to come across illegally, and children get separated."
Melania Trump and Laura Bush join debate over children separated from families at US-Mexico border
Melania Trump waded into a debate over children being separated from their families at the Mexico border, saying the United States should "govern with heart". In a rare intervention the first lady's spokeswoman said she wanted Republicans and Democrats to work together to achieve "successful immigration reform". Her comments were taken by some as an implicit criticism of her husband's recently introduced "zero tolerance" policy at the border. A two-year-old Honduran asylum seeker cries as her mother is searched and detained near the US-Mexico border on June 12, 2018 in McAllen, Texas Credit: Getty It was also possible she was backing the president's recent claim that Democrats in Congress were responsible for the situation. Her remarks were followed by a strong statement from former first lady Laura Bush, who called the policy "cruel" and "immoral" and said "it breaks my heart." Melania Trump said she wants an end to children being separated from their families at the Mexico border Credit: CARLOS BARRIA/Reuters More than 2,000 children have been removed from their parents over the last six weeks since Jeff Sessions, the US attorney general, introduced the new approach. Under the policy adults are being detained and prosecuted with their children taken away and sent to separate shelters. Previously, many illegal immigrants were allowed to remain at liberty while they awaited proceedings. Children who've been taken into custody related to cases of illegal entry into the United States, rest in one of the cages at a facility in McAllen, Texas Credit: AP A spokeswoman for the first lady said: "Mrs Trump hates to see children separated from their families and hopes both sides of the aisle can finally come together to achieve successful immigration reform. "She believes we need to be a country that follows all laws but also a country that governs with heart." A mural at a former Walmart where illegal immigrant boys are being held Credit: Reuters Mrs Trump, who immigrated to the United States legally from her native Slovenia, campaigns on behalf of children. The comments came amid a growing uproar over the detention of minors, including hundreds being held at a former Walmart superstore in Texas. On Monday night Hilary Clinton also condemned the situation, calling it a "humanitarian crisis". What’s happening to families at the border right now is a humanitarian crisis. Every parent who has ever held a child in their arms, every human being with a sense of compassion and decency, should be outraged.— Hillary Clinton (@HillaryClinton) 18 June 2018 Despite what this White House claims, separating families is not mandated by law. That is an outright lie, and it’s incumbent on all of us – journalists and citizens alike – to call it just that.— Hillary Clinton (@HillaryClinton) 18 June 2018 Laura Bush writing a guest column for The Washington Post on Sunday compared the policy to the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II. "I appreciate the need to enforce and protect our international boundaries, but this zero-tolerance policy is cruel," the wife of George W Bush wrote. She said "the US government "should not be in the business of warehousing children in converted box stores or making plans to place them in tent cities in the desert outside of El Paso." The US Border Patrol on Sunday allowed reporters to briefly visit the facility where it holds families arrested at the border. The cages in which people are held in cases of illegal entry into the United States Credit: AP Inside an old warehouse in South Texas, hundreds of children wait in a series of cages created by metal fencing. One cage had 20 children inside. Scattered about are bottles of water, bags of chips and large foil sheets intended to serve as blankets. One teenager told an advocate who visited that she was helping care for a young child she didn't know because the child's aunt was somewhere else in the facility. She said she had to show others in her cell how to change the girl's diaper. Behind the Shutter: US-Mexico border Mr Trump himself has also said he "hates to see separation of parents and children" and has accused Democrats of pursuing a "horrible and cruel legislative agenda". On Sunday Kellyanne Conway, his counsellor, tried to further distance the White House from responsibility. Mrs Conway said: "As a mother, as a Catholic, as somebody who’s got a conscience, I will tell you that nobody likes this policy. "Congress passed the law that it is a crime to enter this country illegally. So if they don’t like that law, they should change it." Democrats and some Republicans in Congress also criticised the policy, blaming the White House. Illegal immigrant boys are allowed two phone calls a week at a shelter Credit: Reuters Susan Collins, a Republican senator from Maine, accused the White House of trying to send a message "that if you cross the border with children, your children are going to be ripped away from you". She added: "That's traumatising to the children who are innocent victims and it is contrary to our values in this country." Democrats suggested Mr Trump was using the separation of families as a negotiating tool to secure funding for his proposed border wall in future immigration legislation. Adam Schiff, a Democrat congressman, said the administration was "using the grief, the tears, the pain of these kids as mortar to build the wall. It's an effort to extort a bill to their liking in the Congress". Mr Trump is due to meet with Republicans in Congress on Tuesday and there is expected to be a vote on an immigration bill next week. Steve Bannon, Mr Trump's former chief strategist, defended the separation of families at the border. He said: "We ran on a policy, very simply, stop mass illegal immigration and limit legal immigration, get our sovereignty back, and to help our workers. "And so he went to a zero tolerance policy. Zero tolerance, it's a crime to come across illegally, and children get separated."
Melania Trump waded into a debate over children being separated from their families at the Mexico border, saying the United States should "govern with heart". In a rare intervention the first lady's spokeswoman said she wanted Republicans and Democrats to work together to achieve "successful immigration reform". Her comments were taken by some as an implicit criticism of her husband's recently introduced "zero tolerance" policy at the border. A two-year-old Honduran asylum seeker cries as her mother is searched and detained near the US-Mexico border on June 12, 2018 in McAllen, Texas Credit: Getty It was also possible she was backing the president's recent claim that Democrats in Congress were responsible for the situation. Her remarks were followed by a strong statement from former first lady Laura Bush, who called the policy "cruel" and "immoral" and said "it breaks my heart." Melania Trump said she wants an end to children being separated from their families at the Mexico border Credit: CARLOS BARRIA/Reuters More than 2,000 children have been removed from their parents over the last six weeks since Jeff Sessions, the US attorney general, introduced the new approach. Under the policy adults are being detained and prosecuted with their children taken away and sent to separate shelters. Previously, many illegal immigrants were allowed to remain at liberty while they awaited proceedings. Children who've been taken into custody related to cases of illegal entry into the United States, rest in one of the cages at a facility in McAllen, Texas Credit: AP A spokeswoman for the first lady said: "Mrs Trump hates to see children separated from their families and hopes both sides of the aisle can finally come together to achieve successful immigration reform. "She believes we need to be a country that follows all laws but also a country that governs with heart." A mural at a former Walmart where illegal immigrant boys are being held Credit: Reuters Mrs Trump, who immigrated to the United States legally from her native Slovenia, campaigns on behalf of children. The comments came amid a growing uproar over the detention of minors, including hundreds being held at a former Walmart superstore in Texas. On Monday night Hilary Clinton also condemned the situation, calling it a "humanitarian crisis". What’s happening to families at the border right now is a humanitarian crisis. Every parent who has ever held a child in their arms, every human being with a sense of compassion and decency, should be outraged.— Hillary Clinton (@HillaryClinton) 18 June 2018 Despite what this White House claims, separating families is not mandated by law. That is an outright lie, and it’s incumbent on all of us – journalists and citizens alike – to call it just that.— Hillary Clinton (@HillaryClinton) 18 June 2018 Laura Bush writing a guest column for The Washington Post on Sunday compared the policy to the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II. "I appreciate the need to enforce and protect our international boundaries, but this zero-tolerance policy is cruel," the wife of George W Bush wrote. She said "the US government "should not be in the business of warehousing children in converted box stores or making plans to place them in tent cities in the desert outside of El Paso." The US Border Patrol on Sunday allowed reporters to briefly visit the facility where it holds families arrested at the border. The cages in which people are held in cases of illegal entry into the United States Credit: AP Inside an old warehouse in South Texas, hundreds of children wait in a series of cages created by metal fencing. One cage had 20 children inside. Scattered about are bottles of water, bags of chips and large foil sheets intended to serve as blankets. One teenager told an advocate who visited that she was helping care for a young child she didn't know because the child's aunt was somewhere else in the facility. She said she had to show others in her cell how to change the girl's diaper. Behind the Shutter: US-Mexico border Mr Trump himself has also said he "hates to see separation of parents and children" and has accused Democrats of pursuing a "horrible and cruel legislative agenda". On Sunday Kellyanne Conway, his counsellor, tried to further distance the White House from responsibility. Mrs Conway said: "As a mother, as a Catholic, as somebody who’s got a conscience, I will tell you that nobody likes this policy. "Congress passed the law that it is a crime to enter this country illegally. So if they don’t like that law, they should change it." Democrats and some Republicans in Congress also criticised the policy, blaming the White House. Illegal immigrant boys are allowed two phone calls a week at a shelter Credit: Reuters Susan Collins, a Republican senator from Maine, accused the White House of trying to send a message "that if you cross the border with children, your children are going to be ripped away from you". She added: "That's traumatising to the children who are innocent victims and it is contrary to our values in this country." Democrats suggested Mr Trump was using the separation of families as a negotiating tool to secure funding for his proposed border wall in future immigration legislation. Adam Schiff, a Democrat congressman, said the administration was "using the grief, the tears, the pain of these kids as mortar to build the wall. It's an effort to extort a bill to their liking in the Congress". Mr Trump is due to meet with Republicans in Congress on Tuesday and there is expected to be a vote on an immigration bill next week. Steve Bannon, Mr Trump's former chief strategist, defended the separation of families at the border. He said: "We ran on a policy, very simply, stop mass illegal immigration and limit legal immigration, get our sovereignty back, and to help our workers. "And so he went to a zero tolerance policy. Zero tolerance, it's a crime to come across illegally, and children get separated."
Melania Trump and Laura Bush join debate over children separated from families at US-Mexico border
Melania Trump waded into a debate over children being separated from their families at the Mexico border, saying the United States should "govern with heart". In a rare intervention the first lady's spokeswoman said she wanted Republicans and Democrats to work together to achieve "successful immigration reform". Her comments were taken by some as an implicit criticism of her husband's recently introduced "zero tolerance" policy at the border. A two-year-old Honduran asylum seeker cries as her mother is searched and detained near the US-Mexico border on June 12, 2018 in McAllen, Texas Credit: Getty It was also possible she was backing the president's recent claim that Democrats in Congress were responsible for the situation. Her remarks were followed by a strong statement from former first lady Laura Bush, who called the policy "cruel" and "immoral" and said "it breaks my heart." Melania Trump said she wants an end to children being separated from their families at the Mexico border Credit: CARLOS BARRIA/Reuters More than 2,000 children have been removed from their parents over the last six weeks since Jeff Sessions, the US attorney general, introduced the new approach. Under the policy adults are being detained and prosecuted with their children taken away and sent to separate shelters. Previously, many illegal immigrants were allowed to remain at liberty while they awaited proceedings. Children who've been taken into custody related to cases of illegal entry into the United States, rest in one of the cages at a facility in McAllen, Texas Credit: AP A spokeswoman for the first lady said: "Mrs Trump hates to see children separated from their families and hopes both sides of the aisle can finally come together to achieve successful immigration reform. "She believes we need to be a country that follows all laws but also a country that governs with heart." A mural at a former Walmart where illegal immigrant boys are being held Credit: Reuters Mrs Trump, who immigrated to the United States legally from her native Slovenia, campaigns on behalf of children. The comments came amid a growing uproar over the detention of minors, including hundreds being held at a former Walmart superstore in Texas. On Monday night Hilary Clinton also condemned the situation, calling it a "humanitarian crisis". What’s happening to families at the border right now is a humanitarian crisis. Every parent who has ever held a child in their arms, every human being with a sense of compassion and decency, should be outraged.— Hillary Clinton (@HillaryClinton) 18 June 2018 Despite what this White House claims, separating families is not mandated by law. That is an outright lie, and it’s incumbent on all of us – journalists and citizens alike – to call it just that.— Hillary Clinton (@HillaryClinton) 18 June 2018 Laura Bush writing a guest column for The Washington Post on Sunday compared the policy to the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II. "I appreciate the need to enforce and protect our international boundaries, but this zero-tolerance policy is cruel," the wife of George W Bush wrote. She said "the US government "should not be in the business of warehousing children in converted box stores or making plans to place them in tent cities in the desert outside of El Paso." The US Border Patrol on Sunday allowed reporters to briefly visit the facility where it holds families arrested at the border. The cages in which people are held in cases of illegal entry into the United States Credit: AP Inside an old warehouse in South Texas, hundreds of children wait in a series of cages created by metal fencing. One cage had 20 children inside. Scattered about are bottles of water, bags of chips and large foil sheets intended to serve as blankets. One teenager told an advocate who visited that she was helping care for a young child she didn't know because the child's aunt was somewhere else in the facility. She said she had to show others in her cell how to change the girl's diaper. Behind the Shutter: US-Mexico border Mr Trump himself has also said he "hates to see separation of parents and children" and has accused Democrats of pursuing a "horrible and cruel legislative agenda". On Sunday Kellyanne Conway, his counsellor, tried to further distance the White House from responsibility. Mrs Conway said: "As a mother, as a Catholic, as somebody who’s got a conscience, I will tell you that nobody likes this policy. "Congress passed the law that it is a crime to enter this country illegally. So if they don’t like that law, they should change it." Democrats and some Republicans in Congress also criticised the policy, blaming the White House. Illegal immigrant boys are allowed two phone calls a week at a shelter Credit: Reuters Susan Collins, a Republican senator from Maine, accused the White House of trying to send a message "that if you cross the border with children, your children are going to be ripped away from you". She added: "That's traumatising to the children who are innocent victims and it is contrary to our values in this country." Democrats suggested Mr Trump was using the separation of families as a negotiating tool to secure funding for his proposed border wall in future immigration legislation. Adam Schiff, a Democrat congressman, said the administration was "using the grief, the tears, the pain of these kids as mortar to build the wall. It's an effort to extort a bill to their liking in the Congress". Mr Trump is due to meet with Republicans in Congress on Tuesday and there is expected to be a vote on an immigration bill next week. Steve Bannon, Mr Trump's former chief strategist, defended the separation of families at the border. He said: "We ran on a policy, very simply, stop mass illegal immigration and limit legal immigration, get our sovereignty back, and to help our workers. "And so he went to a zero tolerance policy. Zero tolerance, it's a crime to come across illegally, and children get separated."
Melania Trump waded into a debate over children being separated from their families at the Mexico border, saying the United States should "govern with heart". In a rare intervention the first lady's spokeswoman said she wanted Republicans and Democrats to work together to achieve "successful immigration reform". Her comments were taken by some as an implicit criticism of her husband's recently introduced "zero tolerance" policy at the border. A two-year-old Honduran asylum seeker cries as her mother is searched and detained near the US-Mexico border on June 12, 2018 in McAllen, Texas Credit: Getty It was also possible she was backing the president's recent claim that Democrats in Congress were responsible for the situation. Her remarks were followed by a strong statement from former first lady Laura Bush, who called the policy "cruel" and "immoral" and said "it breaks my heart." Melania Trump said she wants an end to children being separated from their families at the Mexico border Credit: CARLOS BARRIA/Reuters More than 2,000 children have been removed from their parents over the last six weeks since Jeff Sessions, the US attorney general, introduced the new approach. Under the policy adults are being detained and prosecuted with their children taken away and sent to separate shelters. Previously, many illegal immigrants were allowed to remain at liberty while they awaited proceedings. Children who've been taken into custody related to cases of illegal entry into the United States, rest in one of the cages at a facility in McAllen, Texas Credit: AP A spokeswoman for the first lady said: "Mrs Trump hates to see children separated from their families and hopes both sides of the aisle can finally come together to achieve successful immigration reform. "She believes we need to be a country that follows all laws but also a country that governs with heart." A mural at a former Walmart where illegal immigrant boys are being held Credit: Reuters Mrs Trump, who immigrated to the United States legally from her native Slovenia, campaigns on behalf of children. The comments came amid a growing uproar over the detention of minors, including hundreds being held at a former Walmart superstore in Texas. On Monday night Hilary Clinton also condemned the situation, calling it a "humanitarian crisis". What’s happening to families at the border right now is a humanitarian crisis. Every parent who has ever held a child in their arms, every human being with a sense of compassion and decency, should be outraged.— Hillary Clinton (@HillaryClinton) 18 June 2018 Despite what this White House claims, separating families is not mandated by law. That is an outright lie, and it’s incumbent on all of us – journalists and citizens alike – to call it just that.— Hillary Clinton (@HillaryClinton) 18 June 2018 Laura Bush writing a guest column for The Washington Post on Sunday compared the policy to the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II. "I appreciate the need to enforce and protect our international boundaries, but this zero-tolerance policy is cruel," the wife of George W Bush wrote. She said "the US government "should not be in the business of warehousing children in converted box stores or making plans to place them in tent cities in the desert outside of El Paso." The US Border Patrol on Sunday allowed reporters to briefly visit the facility where it holds families arrested at the border. The cages in which people are held in cases of illegal entry into the United States Credit: AP Inside an old warehouse in South Texas, hundreds of children wait in a series of cages created by metal fencing. One cage had 20 children inside. Scattered about are bottles of water, bags of chips and large foil sheets intended to serve as blankets. One teenager told an advocate who visited that she was helping care for a young child she didn't know because the child's aunt was somewhere else in the facility. She said she had to show others in her cell how to change the girl's diaper. Behind the Shutter: US-Mexico border Mr Trump himself has also said he "hates to see separation of parents and children" and has accused Democrats of pursuing a "horrible and cruel legislative agenda". On Sunday Kellyanne Conway, his counsellor, tried to further distance the White House from responsibility. Mrs Conway said: "As a mother, as a Catholic, as somebody who’s got a conscience, I will tell you that nobody likes this policy. "Congress passed the law that it is a crime to enter this country illegally. So if they don’t like that law, they should change it." Democrats and some Republicans in Congress also criticised the policy, blaming the White House. Illegal immigrant boys are allowed two phone calls a week at a shelter Credit: Reuters Susan Collins, a Republican senator from Maine, accused the White House of trying to send a message "that if you cross the border with children, your children are going to be ripped away from you". She added: "That's traumatising to the children who are innocent victims and it is contrary to our values in this country." Democrats suggested Mr Trump was using the separation of families as a negotiating tool to secure funding for his proposed border wall in future immigration legislation. Adam Schiff, a Democrat congressman, said the administration was "using the grief, the tears, the pain of these kids as mortar to build the wall. It's an effort to extort a bill to their liking in the Congress". Mr Trump is due to meet with Republicans in Congress on Tuesday and there is expected to be a vote on an immigration bill next week. Steve Bannon, Mr Trump's former chief strategist, defended the separation of families at the border. He said: "We ran on a policy, very simply, stop mass illegal immigration and limit legal immigration, get our sovereignty back, and to help our workers. "And so he went to a zero tolerance policy. Zero tolerance, it's a crime to come across illegally, and children get separated."
Melania Trump and Laura Bush join debate over children separated from families at US-Mexico border
Melania Trump waded into a debate over children being separated from their families at the Mexico border, saying the United States should "govern with heart". In a rare intervention the first lady's spokeswoman said she wanted Republicans and Democrats to work together to achieve "successful immigration reform". Her comments were taken by some as an implicit criticism of her husband's recently introduced "zero tolerance" policy at the border. A two-year-old Honduran asylum seeker cries as her mother is searched and detained near the US-Mexico border on June 12, 2018 in McAllen, Texas Credit: Getty It was also possible she was backing the president's recent claim that Democrats in Congress were responsible for the situation. Her remarks were followed by a strong statement from former first lady Laura Bush, who called the policy "cruel" and "immoral" and said "it breaks my heart." Melania Trump said she wants an end to children being separated from their families at the Mexico border Credit: CARLOS BARRIA/Reuters More than 2,000 children have been removed from their parents over the last six weeks since Jeff Sessions, the US attorney general, introduced the new approach. Under the policy adults are being detained and prosecuted with their children taken away and sent to separate shelters. Previously, many illegal immigrants were allowed to remain at liberty while they awaited proceedings. Children who've been taken into custody related to cases of illegal entry into the United States, rest in one of the cages at a facility in McAllen, Texas Credit: AP A spokeswoman for the first lady said: "Mrs Trump hates to see children separated from their families and hopes both sides of the aisle can finally come together to achieve successful immigration reform. "She believes we need to be a country that follows all laws but also a country that governs with heart." A mural at a former Walmart where illegal immigrant boys are being held Credit: Reuters Mrs Trump, who immigrated to the United States legally from her native Slovenia, campaigns on behalf of children. The comments came amid a growing uproar over the detention of minors, including hundreds being held at a former Walmart superstore in Texas. On Monday night Hilary Clinton also condemned the situation, calling it a "humanitarian crisis". What’s happening to families at the border right now is a humanitarian crisis. Every parent who has ever held a child in their arms, every human being with a sense of compassion and decency, should be outraged.— Hillary Clinton (@HillaryClinton) 18 June 2018 Despite what this White House claims, separating families is not mandated by law. That is an outright lie, and it’s incumbent on all of us – journalists and citizens alike – to call it just that.— Hillary Clinton (@HillaryClinton) 18 June 2018 Laura Bush writing a guest column for The Washington Post on Sunday compared the policy to the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II. "I appreciate the need to enforce and protect our international boundaries, but this zero-tolerance policy is cruel," the wife of George W Bush wrote. She said "the US government "should not be in the business of warehousing children in converted box stores or making plans to place them in tent cities in the desert outside of El Paso." The US Border Patrol on Sunday allowed reporters to briefly visit the facility where it holds families arrested at the border. The cages in which people are held in cases of illegal entry into the United States Credit: AP Inside an old warehouse in South Texas, hundreds of children wait in a series of cages created by metal fencing. One cage had 20 children inside. Scattered about are bottles of water, bags of chips and large foil sheets intended to serve as blankets. One teenager told an advocate who visited that she was helping care for a young child she didn't know because the child's aunt was somewhere else in the facility. She said she had to show others in her cell how to change the girl's diaper. Behind the Shutter: US-Mexico border Mr Trump himself has also said he "hates to see separation of parents and children" and has accused Democrats of pursuing a "horrible and cruel legislative agenda". On Sunday Kellyanne Conway, his counsellor, tried to further distance the White House from responsibility. Mrs Conway said: "As a mother, as a Catholic, as somebody who’s got a conscience, I will tell you that nobody likes this policy. "Congress passed the law that it is a crime to enter this country illegally. So if they don’t like that law, they should change it." Democrats and some Republicans in Congress also criticised the policy, blaming the White House. Illegal immigrant boys are allowed two phone calls a week at a shelter Credit: Reuters Susan Collins, a Republican senator from Maine, accused the White House of trying to send a message "that if you cross the border with children, your children are going to be ripped away from you". She added: "That's traumatising to the children who are innocent victims and it is contrary to our values in this country." Democrats suggested Mr Trump was using the separation of families as a negotiating tool to secure funding for his proposed border wall in future immigration legislation. Adam Schiff, a Democrat congressman, said the administration was "using the grief, the tears, the pain of these kids as mortar to build the wall. It's an effort to extort a bill to their liking in the Congress". Mr Trump is due to meet with Republicans in Congress on Tuesday and there is expected to be a vote on an immigration bill next week. Steve Bannon, Mr Trump's former chief strategist, defended the separation of families at the border. He said: "We ran on a policy, very simply, stop mass illegal immigration and limit legal immigration, get our sovereignty back, and to help our workers. "And so he went to a zero tolerance policy. Zero tolerance, it's a crime to come across illegally, and children get separated."
Hundreds of immigrant children are waiting in a series of cages created by metal fencing inside a processing center in Texas.
Hundreds of children wait in Border Patrol facility in Texas
Hundreds of immigrant children are waiting in a series of cages created by metal fencing inside a processing center in Texas.
Hundreds of immigrant children are waiting in a series of cages created by metal fencing inside a processing center in Texas.
Hundreds of children wait in Border Patrol facility in Texas
Hundreds of immigrant children are waiting in a series of cages created by metal fencing inside a processing center in Texas.
Hundreds of immigrant children are waiting in a series of cages created by metal fencing inside a processing center in Texas.
Hundreds of children wait in Border Patrol facility in Texas
Hundreds of immigrant children are waiting in a series of cages created by metal fencing inside a processing center in Texas.
Hundreds of immigrant children are waiting in a series of cages created by metal fencing inside a processing center in Texas.
Hundreds of children wait in Border Patrol facility in Texas
Hundreds of immigrant children are waiting in a series of cages created by metal fencing inside a processing center in Texas.
The AP toured a holding facility in South Texas that's holding hundreds of immigrant children. While reporters were not allowed to record the tour, video released by border patrol shows them waiting in a series of cages created by metal fencing. (June 18)
Hundreds of Immigrant Children Wait in Cages
The AP toured a holding facility in South Texas that's holding hundreds of immigrant children. While reporters were not allowed to record the tour, video released by border patrol shows them waiting in a series of cages created by metal fencing. (June 18)
The AP toured a holding facility in South Texas that's holding hundreds of immigrant children. While reporters were not allowed to record the tour, video released by border patrol shows them waiting in a series of cages created by metal fencing. (June 18)
Hundreds of Immigrant Children Wait in Cages
The AP toured a holding facility in South Texas that's holding hundreds of immigrant children. While reporters were not allowed to record the tour, video released by border patrol shows them waiting in a series of cages created by metal fencing. (June 18)
The AP toured a holding facility in South Texas that's holding hundreds of immigrant children. While reporters were not allowed to record the tour, video released by border patrol shows them waiting in a series of cages created by metal fencing. (June 18)
Hundreds of Immigrant Children Wait in Cages
The AP toured a holding facility in South Texas that's holding hundreds of immigrant children. While reporters were not allowed to record the tour, video released by border patrol shows them waiting in a series of cages created by metal fencing. (June 18)
The AP toured a holding facility in South Texas that's holding hundreds of immigrant children. While reporters were not allowed to record the tour, video released by border patrol shows them waiting in a series of cages created by metal fencing. (June 18)
Hundreds of Immigrant Children Wait in Cages
The AP toured a holding facility in South Texas that's holding hundreds of immigrant children. While reporters were not allowed to record the tour, video released by border patrol shows them waiting in a series of cages created by metal fencing. (June 18)
Hundreds of immigrant children are waiting in a series of cages created by metal fencing inside a McAllen processing center.
Hundreds of children wait in Border Patrol facility in Texas
Hundreds of immigrant children are waiting in a series of cages created by metal fencing inside a McAllen processing center.
The UN human rights chief on Monday urged Washington to stop separating migrant children from their parents at the US border, describing the policy as "unconscionable". "The thought that any state would seek to deter parents by inflicting such abuse on children is unconscionable," Zeid Ra'ad Al Hussein said as he opened a session of the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva. The "zero-tolerance" border security policy implemented by President Donald Trump's administration has sparked global outrage. Images released on Monday morning showed segregated children detained in cages inside a warehouse in Texas, after journalists were given access for the first time. It came as senior Republicans continued to call into question the hardline policy. Melania Trump, the first lady, also appeared to question the treatment of migrants. In a statement last night she said she "hates to see children separated from their families", while the former first lady Laura Bush said the policy "breaks my heart". A two-year-old Honduran asylum seeker cries as her mother is searched and detained near the US-Mexico border on June 12 Credit: John Moore/Getty The government has said that during one recent six-week period nearly 2,000 minors were separated from their parents or adult guardians. The number of separations has jumped since early May, when Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced that all migrants illegally crossing the US border with Mexico would be arrested, regardless of whether the adults were seeking asylum. Since children cannot be sent to the facilities where their parents are held, they are separated. Zeid quoted the American Association of Pediatrics as describing the practice as "government-sanctioned child abuse" which may cause "irreparable harm," with "lifelong consequences". "I call on the United States to immediately end the practice of forcible separation of these children," he said, urging Washington to ratify the Convention of the Rights of the Child. The UN said that segregating children amounted to 'abuse' The US is the only country that has not ratified the convention. Ratification, Zeid said, would "ensure that the fundamental rights of all children, whatever their administrative status, will be at the centre of all domestic laws and policies." Zeid's address at the start of the 38th session of the UN Human Rights Council marks his last address to the body before he is due to step down at the end of August. The session kicked off under a cloud of growing US criticism of the council. Diplomatic sources said there was a risk that Washington may withdraw from the council altogether. The US Border Patrol on Sunday allowed reporters to briefly visit the facility where it holds families arrested at the border. Inside an old warehouse in South Texas, hundreds of children wait in a series of cages created by metal fencing. One cage had 20 children inside. Scattered about are bottles of water, bags of chips and large foil sheets intended to serve as blankets. Migrants caught trying to enter the US illegally are being separated from their children Credit: LOREN ELLIOTT/AFP One teenager told an advocate who visited that she was helping care for a young child she didn't know because the child's aunt was somewhere else in the facility. She said she had to show others in her cell how to change the girl's diaper. Mr Trump himself has also said he "hates to see separation of parents and children" and has accused Democrats of pursuing a "horrible and cruel legislative agenda". The Border Patrol said close to 200 people inside the facility were minors unaccompanied by a parent. Another 500 were "family units," parents and children. Many adults who crossed the border without legal permission could be charged with illegal entry and placed in jail, away from their children. Reporters were not allowed by agents to interview any of the detainees or take photos. Stories have spread of children being torn from their parents' arms, and parents not being able to find where their kids have gone. A group of congressional lawmakers visited the same facility on Sunday and were set to visit a longer-term shelter holding around 1,500 children - many of whom were separated from their parents. "Those kids inside who have been separated from their parents are already being traumatised," said Democratic Sen. Jeff Merkley of Oregon, who was denied entry earlier this month to children's shelter. "It doesn't matter whether the floor is swept and the bedsheets tucked in tight." Children in custody are forced to sleep on mattresses with foil covers In Texas' Rio Grande Valley, the busiest corridor for people trying to enter the US, Border Patrol officials argue that they have to crack down on migrants and separate adults from children as a deterrent to others. "When you exempt a group of people from the law ... that creates a draw," said Manuel Padilla, the Border Patrol's chief agent here. "That creates the trends right here." Agents running the holding facility - generally known as "Ursula" for the name of the street it's on - said everyone detained is given adequate food, access to showers and laundered clothes, and medical care. People are supposed to move through the facility quickly. Under US law, children are required to be turned over within three days to shelters funded by the Department of Health and Human Services. Padilla said agents in the Rio Grande Valley have allowed families with children under the age of 5 to stay together in most cases. An advocate who spent several hours in the facility on Friday said she was deeply troubled by what she found. Michelle Brane, director of migrant rights at the Women's Refugee Commission, met with a 16-year-old girl who had been taking care of a young girl for three days. The teen and others in their cage thought the girl was two years old. "She had to teach other kids in the cell to change her diaper," Brane said.
UN attacks 'unconscionable' US-Mexico border policy as Republicans join calls to end family segregation
The UN human rights chief on Monday urged Washington to stop separating migrant children from their parents at the US border, describing the policy as "unconscionable". "The thought that any state would seek to deter parents by inflicting such abuse on children is unconscionable," Zeid Ra'ad Al Hussein said as he opened a session of the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva. The "zero-tolerance" border security policy implemented by President Donald Trump's administration has sparked global outrage. Images released on Monday morning showed segregated children detained in cages inside a warehouse in Texas, after journalists were given access for the first time. It came as senior Republicans continued to call into question the hardline policy. Melania Trump, the first lady, also appeared to question the treatment of migrants. In a statement last night she said she "hates to see children separated from their families", while the former first lady Laura Bush said the policy "breaks my heart". A two-year-old Honduran asylum seeker cries as her mother is searched and detained near the US-Mexico border on June 12 Credit: John Moore/Getty The government has said that during one recent six-week period nearly 2,000 minors were separated from their parents or adult guardians. The number of separations has jumped since early May, when Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced that all migrants illegally crossing the US border with Mexico would be arrested, regardless of whether the adults were seeking asylum. Since children cannot be sent to the facilities where their parents are held, they are separated. Zeid quoted the American Association of Pediatrics as describing the practice as "government-sanctioned child abuse" which may cause "irreparable harm," with "lifelong consequences". "I call on the United States to immediately end the practice of forcible separation of these children," he said, urging Washington to ratify the Convention of the Rights of the Child. The UN said that segregating children amounted to 'abuse' The US is the only country that has not ratified the convention. Ratification, Zeid said, would "ensure that the fundamental rights of all children, whatever their administrative status, will be at the centre of all domestic laws and policies." Zeid's address at the start of the 38th session of the UN Human Rights Council marks his last address to the body before he is due to step down at the end of August. The session kicked off under a cloud of growing US criticism of the council. Diplomatic sources said there was a risk that Washington may withdraw from the council altogether. The US Border Patrol on Sunday allowed reporters to briefly visit the facility where it holds families arrested at the border. Inside an old warehouse in South Texas, hundreds of children wait in a series of cages created by metal fencing. One cage had 20 children inside. Scattered about are bottles of water, bags of chips and large foil sheets intended to serve as blankets. Migrants caught trying to enter the US illegally are being separated from their children Credit: LOREN ELLIOTT/AFP One teenager told an advocate who visited that she was helping care for a young child she didn't know because the child's aunt was somewhere else in the facility. She said she had to show others in her cell how to change the girl's diaper. Mr Trump himself has also said he "hates to see separation of parents and children" and has accused Democrats of pursuing a "horrible and cruel legislative agenda". The Border Patrol said close to 200 people inside the facility were minors unaccompanied by a parent. Another 500 were "family units," parents and children. Many adults who crossed the border without legal permission could be charged with illegal entry and placed in jail, away from their children. Reporters were not allowed by agents to interview any of the detainees or take photos. Stories have spread of children being torn from their parents' arms, and parents not being able to find where their kids have gone. A group of congressional lawmakers visited the same facility on Sunday and were set to visit a longer-term shelter holding around 1,500 children - many of whom were separated from their parents. "Those kids inside who have been separated from their parents are already being traumatised," said Democratic Sen. Jeff Merkley of Oregon, who was denied entry earlier this month to children's shelter. "It doesn't matter whether the floor is swept and the bedsheets tucked in tight." Children in custody are forced to sleep on mattresses with foil covers In Texas' Rio Grande Valley, the busiest corridor for people trying to enter the US, Border Patrol officials argue that they have to crack down on migrants and separate adults from children as a deterrent to others. "When you exempt a group of people from the law ... that creates a draw," said Manuel Padilla, the Border Patrol's chief agent here. "That creates the trends right here." Agents running the holding facility - generally known as "Ursula" for the name of the street it's on - said everyone detained is given adequate food, access to showers and laundered clothes, and medical care. People are supposed to move through the facility quickly. Under US law, children are required to be turned over within three days to shelters funded by the Department of Health and Human Services. Padilla said agents in the Rio Grande Valley have allowed families with children under the age of 5 to stay together in most cases. An advocate who spent several hours in the facility on Friday said she was deeply troubled by what she found. Michelle Brane, director of migrant rights at the Women's Refugee Commission, met with a 16-year-old girl who had been taking care of a young girl for three days. The teen and others in their cage thought the girl was two years old. "She had to teach other kids in the cell to change her diaper," Brane said.
The UN human rights chief on Monday urged Washington to stop separating migrant children from their parents at the US border, describing the policy as "unconscionable". "The thought that any state would seek to deter parents by inflicting such abuse on children is unconscionable," Zeid Ra'ad Al Hussein said as he opened a session of the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva. The "zero-tolerance" border security policy implemented by President Donald Trump's administration has sparked global outrage. Images released on Monday morning showed segregated children detained in cages inside a warehouse in Texas, after journalists were given access for the first time. It came as senior Republicans continued to call into question the hardline policy. Melania Trump, the first lady, also appeared to question the treatment of migrants. In a statement last night she said she "hates to see children separated from their families", while the former first lady Laura Bush said the policy "breaks my heart". A two-year-old Honduran asylum seeker cries as her mother is searched and detained near the US-Mexico border on June 12 Credit: John Moore/Getty The government has said that during one recent six-week period nearly 2,000 minors were separated from their parents or adult guardians. The number of separations has jumped since early May, when Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced that all migrants illegally crossing the US border with Mexico would be arrested, regardless of whether the adults were seeking asylum. Since children cannot be sent to the facilities where their parents are held, they are separated. Zeid quoted the American Association of Pediatrics as describing the practice as "government-sanctioned child abuse" which may cause "irreparable harm," with "lifelong consequences". "I call on the United States to immediately end the practice of forcible separation of these children," he said, urging Washington to ratify the Convention of the Rights of the Child. The UN said that segregating children amounted to 'abuse' The US is the only country that has not ratified the convention. Ratification, Zeid said, would "ensure that the fundamental rights of all children, whatever their administrative status, will be at the centre of all domestic laws and policies." Zeid's address at the start of the 38th session of the UN Human Rights Council marks his last address to the body before he is due to step down at the end of August. The session kicked off under a cloud of growing US criticism of the council. Diplomatic sources said there was a risk that Washington may withdraw from the council altogether. The US Border Patrol on Sunday allowed reporters to briefly visit the facility where it holds families arrested at the border. Inside an old warehouse in South Texas, hundreds of children wait in a series of cages created by metal fencing. One cage had 20 children inside. Scattered about are bottles of water, bags of chips and large foil sheets intended to serve as blankets. Migrants caught trying to enter the US illegally are being separated from their children Credit: LOREN ELLIOTT/AFP One teenager told an advocate who visited that she was helping care for a young child she didn't know because the child's aunt was somewhere else in the facility. She said she had to show others in her cell how to change the girl's diaper. Mr Trump himself has also said he "hates to see separation of parents and children" and has accused Democrats of pursuing a "horrible and cruel legislative agenda". The Border Patrol said close to 200 people inside the facility were minors unaccompanied by a parent. Another 500 were "family units," parents and children. Many adults who crossed the border without legal permission could be charged with illegal entry and placed in jail, away from their children. Reporters were not allowed by agents to interview any of the detainees or take photos. Stories have spread of children being torn from their parents' arms, and parents not being able to find where their kids have gone. A group of congressional lawmakers visited the same facility on Sunday and were set to visit a longer-term shelter holding around 1,500 children - many of whom were separated from their parents. "Those kids inside who have been separated from their parents are already being traumatised," said Democratic Sen. Jeff Merkley of Oregon, who was denied entry earlier this month to children's shelter. "It doesn't matter whether the floor is swept and the bedsheets tucked in tight." Children in custody are forced to sleep on mattresses with foil covers In Texas' Rio Grande Valley, the busiest corridor for people trying to enter the US, Border Patrol officials argue that they have to crack down on migrants and separate adults from children as a deterrent to others. "When you exempt a group of people from the law ... that creates a draw," said Manuel Padilla, the Border Patrol's chief agent here. "That creates the trends right here." Agents running the holding facility - generally known as "Ursula" for the name of the street it's on - said everyone detained is given adequate food, access to showers and laundered clothes, and medical care. People are supposed to move through the facility quickly. Under US law, children are required to be turned over within three days to shelters funded by the Department of Health and Human Services. Padilla said agents in the Rio Grande Valley have allowed families with children under the age of 5 to stay together in most cases. An advocate who spent several hours in the facility on Friday said she was deeply troubled by what she found. Michelle Brane, director of migrant rights at the Women's Refugee Commission, met with a 16-year-old girl who had been taking care of a young girl for three days. The teen and others in their cage thought the girl was two years old. "She had to teach other kids in the cell to change her diaper," Brane said.
UN attacks 'unconscionable' US-Mexico border policy as Republicans join calls to end family segregation
The UN human rights chief on Monday urged Washington to stop separating migrant children from their parents at the US border, describing the policy as "unconscionable". "The thought that any state would seek to deter parents by inflicting such abuse on children is unconscionable," Zeid Ra'ad Al Hussein said as he opened a session of the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva. The "zero-tolerance" border security policy implemented by President Donald Trump's administration has sparked global outrage. Images released on Monday morning showed segregated children detained in cages inside a warehouse in Texas, after journalists were given access for the first time. It came as senior Republicans continued to call into question the hardline policy. Melania Trump, the first lady, also appeared to question the treatment of migrants. In a statement last night she said she "hates to see children separated from their families", while the former first lady Laura Bush said the policy "breaks my heart". A two-year-old Honduran asylum seeker cries as her mother is searched and detained near the US-Mexico border on June 12 Credit: John Moore/Getty The government has said that during one recent six-week period nearly 2,000 minors were separated from their parents or adult guardians. The number of separations has jumped since early May, when Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced that all migrants illegally crossing the US border with Mexico would be arrested, regardless of whether the adults were seeking asylum. Since children cannot be sent to the facilities where their parents are held, they are separated. Zeid quoted the American Association of Pediatrics as describing the practice as "government-sanctioned child abuse" which may cause "irreparable harm," with "lifelong consequences". "I call on the United States to immediately end the practice of forcible separation of these children," he said, urging Washington to ratify the Convention of the Rights of the Child. The UN said that segregating children amounted to 'abuse' The US is the only country that has not ratified the convention. Ratification, Zeid said, would "ensure that the fundamental rights of all children, whatever their administrative status, will be at the centre of all domestic laws and policies." Zeid's address at the start of the 38th session of the UN Human Rights Council marks his last address to the body before he is due to step down at the end of August. The session kicked off under a cloud of growing US criticism of the council. Diplomatic sources said there was a risk that Washington may withdraw from the council altogether. The US Border Patrol on Sunday allowed reporters to briefly visit the facility where it holds families arrested at the border. Inside an old warehouse in South Texas, hundreds of children wait in a series of cages created by metal fencing. One cage had 20 children inside. Scattered about are bottles of water, bags of chips and large foil sheets intended to serve as blankets. Migrants caught trying to enter the US illegally are being separated from their children Credit: LOREN ELLIOTT/AFP One teenager told an advocate who visited that she was helping care for a young child she didn't know because the child's aunt was somewhere else in the facility. She said she had to show others in her cell how to change the girl's diaper. Mr Trump himself has also said he "hates to see separation of parents and children" and has accused Democrats of pursuing a "horrible and cruel legislative agenda". The Border Patrol said close to 200 people inside the facility were minors unaccompanied by a parent. Another 500 were "family units," parents and children. Many adults who crossed the border without legal permission could be charged with illegal entry and placed in jail, away from their children. Reporters were not allowed by agents to interview any of the detainees or take photos. Stories have spread of children being torn from their parents' arms, and parents not being able to find where their kids have gone. A group of congressional lawmakers visited the same facility on Sunday and were set to visit a longer-term shelter holding around 1,500 children - many of whom were separated from their parents. "Those kids inside who have been separated from their parents are already being traumatised," said Democratic Sen. Jeff Merkley of Oregon, who was denied entry earlier this month to children's shelter. "It doesn't matter whether the floor is swept and the bedsheets tucked in tight." Children in custody are forced to sleep on mattresses with foil covers In Texas' Rio Grande Valley, the busiest corridor for people trying to enter the US, Border Patrol officials argue that they have to crack down on migrants and separate adults from children as a deterrent to others. "When you exempt a group of people from the law ... that creates a draw," said Manuel Padilla, the Border Patrol's chief agent here. "That creates the trends right here." Agents running the holding facility - generally known as "Ursula" for the name of the street it's on - said everyone detained is given adequate food, access to showers and laundered clothes, and medical care. People are supposed to move through the facility quickly. Under US law, children are required to be turned over within three days to shelters funded by the Department of Health and Human Services. Padilla said agents in the Rio Grande Valley have allowed families with children under the age of 5 to stay together in most cases. An advocate who spent several hours in the facility on Friday said she was deeply troubled by what she found. Michelle Brane, director of migrant rights at the Women's Refugee Commission, met with a 16-year-old girl who had been taking care of a young girl for three days. The teen and others in their cage thought the girl was two years old. "She had to teach other kids in the cell to change her diaper," Brane said.
The UN human rights chief on Monday urged Washington to stop separating migrant children from their parents at the US border, describing the policy as "unconscionable". "The thought that any state would seek to deter parents by inflicting such abuse on children is unconscionable," Zeid Ra'ad Al Hussein said as he opened a session of the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva. The "zero-tolerance" border security policy implemented by President Donald Trump's administration has sparked global outrage. Images released on Monday morning showed segregated children detained in cages inside a warehouse in Texas, after journalists were given access for the first time. It came as senior Republicans continued to call into question the hardline policy. Melania Trump, the first lady, also appeared to question the treatment of migrants. In a statement last night she said she "hates to see children separated from their families", while the former first lady Laura Bush said the policy "breaks my heart". Migrants caught trying to enter the US illegally are being separated from their children Credit: LOREN ELLIOTT/AFP The government has said that during one recent six-week period nearly 2,000 minors were separated from their parents or adult guardians. The number of separations has jumped since early May, when Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced that all migrants illegally crossing the US border with Mexico would be arrested, regardless of whether the adults were seeking asylum. Since children cannot be sent to the facilities where their parents are held, they are separated. Zeid quoted the American Association of Pediatrics as describing the practice as "government-sanctioned child abuse" which may cause "irreparable harm," with "lifelong consequences". "I call on the United States to immediately end the practice of forcible separation of these children," he said, urging Washington to ratify the Convention of the Rights of the Child. The UN said that segregating children amounted to 'abuse' The US is the only country that has not ratified the convention. Ratification, Zeid said, would "ensure that the fundamental rights of all children, whatever their administrative status, will be at the centre of all domestic laws and policies." Zeid's address at the start of the 38th session of the UN Human Rights Council marks his last address to the body before he is due to step down at the end of August. The session kicked off under a cloud of growing US criticism of the council. Diplomatic sources said there was a risk that Washington may withdraw from the council altogether. The US Border Patrol on Sunday allowed reporters to briefly visit the facility where it holds families arrested at the border. Inside an old warehouse in South Texas, hundreds of children wait in a series of cages created by metal fencing. One cage had 20 children inside. Scattered about are bottles of water, bags of chips and large foil sheets intended to serve as blankets. Immigrants wait to head to a nearby Catholic Charities relief center after being dropped off at a bus station shortly after release from detention Credit: LOREN ELLIOTT/ AFP One teenager told an advocate who visited that she was helping care for a young child she didn't know because the child's aunt was somewhere else in the facility. She said she had to show others in her cell how to change the girl's diaper. Mr Trump himself has also said he "hates to see separation of parents and children" and has accused Democrats of pursuing a "horrible and cruel legislative agenda". The Border Patrol said close to 200 people inside the facility were minors unaccompanied by a parent. Another 500 were "family units," parents and children. Many adults who crossed the border without legal permission could be charged with illegal entry and placed in jail, away from their children. Reporters were not allowed by agents to interview any of the detainees or take photos. Stories have spread of children being torn from their parents' arms, and parents not being able to find where their kids have gone. A group of congressional lawmakers visited the same facility on Sunday and were set to visit a longer-term shelter holding around 1,500 children - many of whom were separated from their parents. "Those kids inside who have been separated from their parents are already being traumatised," said Democratic Sen. Jeff Merkley of Oregon, who was denied entry earlier this month to children's shelter. "It doesn't matter whether the floor is swept and the bedsheets tucked in tight." Children in custody are forced to sleep on mattresses with foil covers In Texas' Rio Grande Valley, the busiest corridor for people trying to enter the US, Border Patrol officials argue that they have to crack down on migrants and separate adults from children as a deterrent to others. "When you exempt a group of people from the law ... that creates a draw," said Manuel Padilla, the Border Patrol's chief agent here. "That creates the trends right here." Agents running the holding facility - generally known as "Ursula" for the name of the street it's on - said everyone detained is given adequate food, access to showers and laundered clothes, and medical care. People are supposed to move through the facility quickly. Under US law, children are required to be turned over within three days to shelters funded by the Department of Health and Human Services. Padilla said agents in the Rio Grande Valley have allowed families with children under the age of 5 to stay together in most cases. An advocate who spent several hours in the facility on Friday said she was deeply troubled by what she found. Michelle Brane, director of migrant rights at the Women's Refugee Commission, met with a 16-year-old girl who had been taking care of a young girl for three days. The teen and others in their cage thought the girl was two years old. "She had to teach other kids in the cell to change her diaper," Brane said.
UN attacks 'unconscionable' US-Mexico border policy as Republicans join calls to end family segregation
The UN human rights chief on Monday urged Washington to stop separating migrant children from their parents at the US border, describing the policy as "unconscionable". "The thought that any state would seek to deter parents by inflicting such abuse on children is unconscionable," Zeid Ra'ad Al Hussein said as he opened a session of the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva. The "zero-tolerance" border security policy implemented by President Donald Trump's administration has sparked global outrage. Images released on Monday morning showed segregated children detained in cages inside a warehouse in Texas, after journalists were given access for the first time. It came as senior Republicans continued to call into question the hardline policy. Melania Trump, the first lady, also appeared to question the treatment of migrants. In a statement last night she said she "hates to see children separated from their families", while the former first lady Laura Bush said the policy "breaks my heart". Migrants caught trying to enter the US illegally are being separated from their children Credit: LOREN ELLIOTT/AFP The government has said that during one recent six-week period nearly 2,000 minors were separated from their parents or adult guardians. The number of separations has jumped since early May, when Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced that all migrants illegally crossing the US border with Mexico would be arrested, regardless of whether the adults were seeking asylum. Since children cannot be sent to the facilities where their parents are held, they are separated. Zeid quoted the American Association of Pediatrics as describing the practice as "government-sanctioned child abuse" which may cause "irreparable harm," with "lifelong consequences". "I call on the United States to immediately end the practice of forcible separation of these children," he said, urging Washington to ratify the Convention of the Rights of the Child. The UN said that segregating children amounted to 'abuse' The US is the only country that has not ratified the convention. Ratification, Zeid said, would "ensure that the fundamental rights of all children, whatever their administrative status, will be at the centre of all domestic laws and policies." Zeid's address at the start of the 38th session of the UN Human Rights Council marks his last address to the body before he is due to step down at the end of August. The session kicked off under a cloud of growing US criticism of the council. Diplomatic sources said there was a risk that Washington may withdraw from the council altogether. The US Border Patrol on Sunday allowed reporters to briefly visit the facility where it holds families arrested at the border. Inside an old warehouse in South Texas, hundreds of children wait in a series of cages created by metal fencing. One cage had 20 children inside. Scattered about are bottles of water, bags of chips and large foil sheets intended to serve as blankets. Immigrants wait to head to a nearby Catholic Charities relief center after being dropped off at a bus station shortly after release from detention Credit: LOREN ELLIOTT/ AFP One teenager told an advocate who visited that she was helping care for a young child she didn't know because the child's aunt was somewhere else in the facility. She said she had to show others in her cell how to change the girl's diaper. Mr Trump himself has also said he "hates to see separation of parents and children" and has accused Democrats of pursuing a "horrible and cruel legislative agenda". The Border Patrol said close to 200 people inside the facility were minors unaccompanied by a parent. Another 500 were "family units," parents and children. Many adults who crossed the border without legal permission could be charged with illegal entry and placed in jail, away from their children. Reporters were not allowed by agents to interview any of the detainees or take photos. Stories have spread of children being torn from their parents' arms, and parents not being able to find where their kids have gone. A group of congressional lawmakers visited the same facility on Sunday and were set to visit a longer-term shelter holding around 1,500 children - many of whom were separated from their parents. "Those kids inside who have been separated from their parents are already being traumatised," said Democratic Sen. Jeff Merkley of Oregon, who was denied entry earlier this month to children's shelter. "It doesn't matter whether the floor is swept and the bedsheets tucked in tight." Children in custody are forced to sleep on mattresses with foil covers In Texas' Rio Grande Valley, the busiest corridor for people trying to enter the US, Border Patrol officials argue that they have to crack down on migrants and separate adults from children as a deterrent to others. "When you exempt a group of people from the law ... that creates a draw," said Manuel Padilla, the Border Patrol's chief agent here. "That creates the trends right here." Agents running the holding facility - generally known as "Ursula" for the name of the street it's on - said everyone detained is given adequate food, access to showers and laundered clothes, and medical care. People are supposed to move through the facility quickly. Under US law, children are required to be turned over within three days to shelters funded by the Department of Health and Human Services. Padilla said agents in the Rio Grande Valley have allowed families with children under the age of 5 to stay together in most cases. An advocate who spent several hours in the facility on Friday said she was deeply troubled by what she found. Michelle Brane, director of migrant rights at the Women's Refugee Commission, met with a 16-year-old girl who had been taking care of a young girl for three days. The teen and others in their cage thought the girl was two years old. "She had to teach other kids in the cell to change her diaper," Brane said.
The UN human rights chief on Monday urged Washington to stop separating migrant children from their parents at the US border, describing the policy as "unconscionable". "The thought that any state would seek to deter parents by inflicting such abuse on children is unconscionable," Zeid Ra'ad Al Hussein said as he opened a session of the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva. The "zero-tolerance" border security policy implemented by President Donald Trump's administration has sparked global outrage. Images released on Monday morning showed segregated children detained in cages inside a warehouse in Texas, after journalists were given access for the first time. It came as senior Republicans continued to call into question the hardline policy. Melania Trump, the first lady, also appeared to question the treatment of migrants. In a statement last night she said she "hates to see children separated from their families", while the former first lady Laura Bush said the policy "breaks my heart". A two-year-old Honduran asylum seeker cries as her mother is searched and detained near the US-Mexico border on June 12 Credit: John Moore/Getty The government has said that during one recent six-week period nearly 2,000 minors were separated from their parents or adult guardians. The number of separations has jumped since early May, when Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced that all migrants illegally crossing the US border with Mexico would be arrested, regardless of whether the adults were seeking asylum. Since children cannot be sent to the facilities where their parents are held, they are separated. Zeid quoted the American Association of Pediatrics as describing the practice as "government-sanctioned child abuse" which may cause "irreparable harm," with "lifelong consequences". "I call on the United States to immediately end the practice of forcible separation of these children," he said, urging Washington to ratify the Convention of the Rights of the Child. The UN said that segregating children amounted to 'abuse' The US is the only country that has not ratified the convention. Ratification, Zeid said, would "ensure that the fundamental rights of all children, whatever their administrative status, will be at the centre of all domestic laws and policies." Zeid's address at the start of the 38th session of the UN Human Rights Council marks his last address to the body before he is due to step down at the end of August. The session kicked off under a cloud of growing US criticism of the council. Diplomatic sources said there was a risk that Washington may withdraw from the council altogether. The US Border Patrol on Sunday allowed reporters to briefly visit the facility where it holds families arrested at the border. Inside an old warehouse in South Texas, hundreds of children wait in a series of cages created by metal fencing. One cage had 20 children inside. Scattered about are bottles of water, bags of chips and large foil sheets intended to serve as blankets. Migrants caught trying to enter the US illegally are being separated from their children Credit: LOREN ELLIOTT/AFP One teenager told an advocate who visited that she was helping care for a young child she didn't know because the child's aunt was somewhere else in the facility. She said she had to show others in her cell how to change the girl's diaper. Mr Trump himself has also said he "hates to see separation of parents and children" and has accused Democrats of pursuing a "horrible and cruel legislative agenda". The Border Patrol said close to 200 people inside the facility were minors unaccompanied by a parent. Another 500 were "family units," parents and children. Many adults who crossed the border without legal permission could be charged with illegal entry and placed in jail, away from their children. Reporters were not allowed by agents to interview any of the detainees or take photos. Stories have spread of children being torn from their parents' arms, and parents not being able to find where their kids have gone. A group of congressional lawmakers visited the same facility on Sunday and were set to visit a longer-term shelter holding around 1,500 children - many of whom were separated from their parents. "Those kids inside who have been separated from their parents are already being traumatised," said Democratic Sen. Jeff Merkley of Oregon, who was denied entry earlier this month to children's shelter. "It doesn't matter whether the floor is swept and the bedsheets tucked in tight." Children in custody are forced to sleep on mattresses with foil covers In Texas' Rio Grande Valley, the busiest corridor for people trying to enter the US, Border Patrol officials argue that they have to crack down on migrants and separate adults from children as a deterrent to others. "When you exempt a group of people from the law ... that creates a draw," said Manuel Padilla, the Border Patrol's chief agent here. "That creates the trends right here." Agents running the holding facility - generally known as "Ursula" for the name of the street it's on - said everyone detained is given adequate food, access to showers and laundered clothes, and medical care. People are supposed to move through the facility quickly. Under US law, children are required to be turned over within three days to shelters funded by the Department of Health and Human Services. Padilla said agents in the Rio Grande Valley have allowed families with children under the age of 5 to stay together in most cases. An advocate who spent several hours in the facility on Friday said she was deeply troubled by what she found. Michelle Brane, director of migrant rights at the Women's Refugee Commission, met with a 16-year-old girl who had been taking care of a young girl for three days. The teen and others in their cage thought the girl was two years old. "She had to teach other kids in the cell to change her diaper," Brane said.
UN attacks 'unconscionable' US-Mexico border policy as Republicans join calls to end family segregation
The UN human rights chief on Monday urged Washington to stop separating migrant children from their parents at the US border, describing the policy as "unconscionable". "The thought that any state would seek to deter parents by inflicting such abuse on children is unconscionable," Zeid Ra'ad Al Hussein said as he opened a session of the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva. The "zero-tolerance" border security policy implemented by President Donald Trump's administration has sparked global outrage. Images released on Monday morning showed segregated children detained in cages inside a warehouse in Texas, after journalists were given access for the first time. It came as senior Republicans continued to call into question the hardline policy. Melania Trump, the first lady, also appeared to question the treatment of migrants. In a statement last night she said she "hates to see children separated from their families", while the former first lady Laura Bush said the policy "breaks my heart". A two-year-old Honduran asylum seeker cries as her mother is searched and detained near the US-Mexico border on June 12 Credit: John Moore/Getty The government has said that during one recent six-week period nearly 2,000 minors were separated from their parents or adult guardians. The number of separations has jumped since early May, when Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced that all migrants illegally crossing the US border with Mexico would be arrested, regardless of whether the adults were seeking asylum. Since children cannot be sent to the facilities where their parents are held, they are separated. Zeid quoted the American Association of Pediatrics as describing the practice as "government-sanctioned child abuse" which may cause "irreparable harm," with "lifelong consequences". "I call on the United States to immediately end the practice of forcible separation of these children," he said, urging Washington to ratify the Convention of the Rights of the Child. The UN said that segregating children amounted to 'abuse' The US is the only country that has not ratified the convention. Ratification, Zeid said, would "ensure that the fundamental rights of all children, whatever their administrative status, will be at the centre of all domestic laws and policies." Zeid's address at the start of the 38th session of the UN Human Rights Council marks his last address to the body before he is due to step down at the end of August. The session kicked off under a cloud of growing US criticism of the council. Diplomatic sources said there was a risk that Washington may withdraw from the council altogether. The US Border Patrol on Sunday allowed reporters to briefly visit the facility where it holds families arrested at the border. Inside an old warehouse in South Texas, hundreds of children wait in a series of cages created by metal fencing. One cage had 20 children inside. Scattered about are bottles of water, bags of chips and large foil sheets intended to serve as blankets. Migrants caught trying to enter the US illegally are being separated from their children Credit: LOREN ELLIOTT/AFP One teenager told an advocate who visited that she was helping care for a young child she didn't know because the child's aunt was somewhere else in the facility. She said she had to show others in her cell how to change the girl's diaper. Mr Trump himself has also said he "hates to see separation of parents and children" and has accused Democrats of pursuing a "horrible and cruel legislative agenda". The Border Patrol said close to 200 people inside the facility were minors unaccompanied by a parent. Another 500 were "family units," parents and children. Many adults who crossed the border without legal permission could be charged with illegal entry and placed in jail, away from their children. Reporters were not allowed by agents to interview any of the detainees or take photos. Stories have spread of children being torn from their parents' arms, and parents not being able to find where their kids have gone. A group of congressional lawmakers visited the same facility on Sunday and were set to visit a longer-term shelter holding around 1,500 children - many of whom were separated from their parents. "Those kids inside who have been separated from their parents are already being traumatised," said Democratic Sen. Jeff Merkley of Oregon, who was denied entry earlier this month to children's shelter. "It doesn't matter whether the floor is swept and the bedsheets tucked in tight." Children in custody are forced to sleep on mattresses with foil covers In Texas' Rio Grande Valley, the busiest corridor for people trying to enter the US, Border Patrol officials argue that they have to crack down on migrants and separate adults from children as a deterrent to others. "When you exempt a group of people from the law ... that creates a draw," said Manuel Padilla, the Border Patrol's chief agent here. "That creates the trends right here." Agents running the holding facility - generally known as "Ursula" for the name of the street it's on - said everyone detained is given adequate food, access to showers and laundered clothes, and medical care. People are supposed to move through the facility quickly. Under US law, children are required to be turned over within three days to shelters funded by the Department of Health and Human Services. Padilla said agents in the Rio Grande Valley have allowed families with children under the age of 5 to stay together in most cases. An advocate who spent several hours in the facility on Friday said she was deeply troubled by what she found. Michelle Brane, director of migrant rights at the Women's Refugee Commission, met with a 16-year-old girl who had been taking care of a young girl for three days. The teen and others in their cage thought the girl was two years old. "She had to teach other kids in the cell to change her diaper," Brane said.
The UN human rights chief on Monday urged Washington to stop separating migrant children from their parents at the US border, describing the policy as "unconscionable". "The thought that any state would seek to deter parents by inflicting such abuse on children is unconscionable," Zeid Ra'ad Al Hussein said as he opened a session of the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva. The "zero-tolerance" border security policy implemented by President Donald Trump's administration has sparked global outrage. Images released on Monday morning showed segregated children detained in cages inside a warehouse in Texas, after journalists were given access for the first time. It came as senior Republicans continued to call into question the hardline policy. Melania Trump, the first lady, also appeared to question the treatment of migrants. In a statement last night she said she "hates to see children separated from their families", while the former first lady Laura Bush said the policy "breaks my heart". A two-year-old Honduran asylum seeker cries as her mother is searched and detained near the US-Mexico border on June 12 Credit: John Moore/Getty The government has said that during one recent six-week period nearly 2,000 minors were separated from their parents or adult guardians. The number of separations has jumped since early May, when Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced that all migrants illegally crossing the US border with Mexico would be arrested, regardless of whether the adults were seeking asylum. Since children cannot be sent to the facilities where their parents are held, they are separated. Zeid quoted the American Association of Pediatrics as describing the practice as "government-sanctioned child abuse" which may cause "irreparable harm," with "lifelong consequences". "I call on the United States to immediately end the practice of forcible separation of these children," he said, urging Washington to ratify the Convention of the Rights of the Child. The UN said that segregating children amounted to 'abuse' The US is the only country that has not ratified the convention. Ratification, Zeid said, would "ensure that the fundamental rights of all children, whatever their administrative status, will be at the centre of all domestic laws and policies." Zeid's address at the start of the 38th session of the UN Human Rights Council marks his last address to the body before he is due to step down at the end of August. The session kicked off under a cloud of growing US criticism of the council. Diplomatic sources said there was a risk that Washington may withdraw from the council altogether. The US Border Patrol on Sunday allowed reporters to briefly visit the facility where it holds families arrested at the border. Inside an old warehouse in South Texas, hundreds of children wait in a series of cages created by metal fencing. One cage had 20 children inside. Scattered about are bottles of water, bags of chips and large foil sheets intended to serve as blankets. Migrants caught trying to enter the US illegally are being separated from their children Credit: LOREN ELLIOTT/AFP One teenager told an advocate who visited that she was helping care for a young child she didn't know because the child's aunt was somewhere else in the facility. She said she had to show others in her cell how to change the girl's diaper. Mr Trump himself has also said he "hates to see separation of parents and children" and has accused Democrats of pursuing a "horrible and cruel legislative agenda". The Border Patrol said close to 200 people inside the facility were minors unaccompanied by a parent. Another 500 were "family units," parents and children. Many adults who crossed the border without legal permission could be charged with illegal entry and placed in jail, away from their children. Reporters were not allowed by agents to interview any of the detainees or take photos. Stories have spread of children being torn from their parents' arms, and parents not being able to find where their kids have gone. A group of congressional lawmakers visited the same facility on Sunday and were set to visit a longer-term shelter holding around 1,500 children - many of whom were separated from their parents. "Those kids inside who have been separated from their parents are already being traumatised," said Democratic Sen. Jeff Merkley of Oregon, who was denied entry earlier this month to children's shelter. "It doesn't matter whether the floor is swept and the bedsheets tucked in tight." Children in custody are forced to sleep on mattresses with foil covers In Texas' Rio Grande Valley, the busiest corridor for people trying to enter the US, Border Patrol officials argue that they have to crack down on migrants and separate adults from children as a deterrent to others. "When you exempt a group of people from the law ... that creates a draw," said Manuel Padilla, the Border Patrol's chief agent here. "That creates the trends right here." Agents running the holding facility - generally known as "Ursula" for the name of the street it's on - said everyone detained is given adequate food, access to showers and laundered clothes, and medical care. People are supposed to move through the facility quickly. Under US law, children are required to be turned over within three days to shelters funded by the Department of Health and Human Services. Padilla said agents in the Rio Grande Valley have allowed families with children under the age of 5 to stay together in most cases. An advocate who spent several hours in the facility on Friday said she was deeply troubled by what she found. Michelle Brane, director of migrant rights at the Women's Refugee Commission, met with a 16-year-old girl who had been taking care of a young girl for three days. The teen and others in their cage thought the girl was two years old. "She had to teach other kids in the cell to change her diaper," Brane said.
UN attacks 'unconscionable' US-Mexico border policy as Republicans join calls to end family segregation
The UN human rights chief on Monday urged Washington to stop separating migrant children from their parents at the US border, describing the policy as "unconscionable". "The thought that any state would seek to deter parents by inflicting such abuse on children is unconscionable," Zeid Ra'ad Al Hussein said as he opened a session of the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva. The "zero-tolerance" border security policy implemented by President Donald Trump's administration has sparked global outrage. Images released on Monday morning showed segregated children detained in cages inside a warehouse in Texas, after journalists were given access for the first time. It came as senior Republicans continued to call into question the hardline policy. Melania Trump, the first lady, also appeared to question the treatment of migrants. In a statement last night she said she "hates to see children separated from their families", while the former first lady Laura Bush said the policy "breaks my heart". A two-year-old Honduran asylum seeker cries as her mother is searched and detained near the US-Mexico border on June 12 Credit: John Moore/Getty The government has said that during one recent six-week period nearly 2,000 minors were separated from their parents or adult guardians. The number of separations has jumped since early May, when Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced that all migrants illegally crossing the US border with Mexico would be arrested, regardless of whether the adults were seeking asylum. Since children cannot be sent to the facilities where their parents are held, they are separated. Zeid quoted the American Association of Pediatrics as describing the practice as "government-sanctioned child abuse" which may cause "irreparable harm," with "lifelong consequences". "I call on the United States to immediately end the practice of forcible separation of these children," he said, urging Washington to ratify the Convention of the Rights of the Child. The UN said that segregating children amounted to 'abuse' The US is the only country that has not ratified the convention. Ratification, Zeid said, would "ensure that the fundamental rights of all children, whatever their administrative status, will be at the centre of all domestic laws and policies." Zeid's address at the start of the 38th session of the UN Human Rights Council marks his last address to the body before he is due to step down at the end of August. The session kicked off under a cloud of growing US criticism of the council. Diplomatic sources said there was a risk that Washington may withdraw from the council altogether. The US Border Patrol on Sunday allowed reporters to briefly visit the facility where it holds families arrested at the border. Inside an old warehouse in South Texas, hundreds of children wait in a series of cages created by metal fencing. One cage had 20 children inside. Scattered about are bottles of water, bags of chips and large foil sheets intended to serve as blankets. Migrants caught trying to enter the US illegally are being separated from their children Credit: LOREN ELLIOTT/AFP One teenager told an advocate who visited that she was helping care for a young child she didn't know because the child's aunt was somewhere else in the facility. She said she had to show others in her cell how to change the girl's diaper. Mr Trump himself has also said he "hates to see separation of parents and children" and has accused Democrats of pursuing a "horrible and cruel legislative agenda". The Border Patrol said close to 200 people inside the facility were minors unaccompanied by a parent. Another 500 were "family units," parents and children. Many adults who crossed the border without legal permission could be charged with illegal entry and placed in jail, away from their children. Reporters were not allowed by agents to interview any of the detainees or take photos. Stories have spread of children being torn from their parents' arms, and parents not being able to find where their kids have gone. A group of congressional lawmakers visited the same facility on Sunday and were set to visit a longer-term shelter holding around 1,500 children - many of whom were separated from their parents. "Those kids inside who have been separated from their parents are already being traumatised," said Democratic Sen. Jeff Merkley of Oregon, who was denied entry earlier this month to children's shelter. "It doesn't matter whether the floor is swept and the bedsheets tucked in tight." Children in custody are forced to sleep on mattresses with foil covers In Texas' Rio Grande Valley, the busiest corridor for people trying to enter the US, Border Patrol officials argue that they have to crack down on migrants and separate adults from children as a deterrent to others. "When you exempt a group of people from the law ... that creates a draw," said Manuel Padilla, the Border Patrol's chief agent here. "That creates the trends right here." Agents running the holding facility - generally known as "Ursula" for the name of the street it's on - said everyone detained is given adequate food, access to showers and laundered clothes, and medical care. People are supposed to move through the facility quickly. Under US law, children are required to be turned over within three days to shelters funded by the Department of Health and Human Services. Padilla said agents in the Rio Grande Valley have allowed families with children under the age of 5 to stay together in most cases. An advocate who spent several hours in the facility on Friday said she was deeply troubled by what she found. Michelle Brane, director of migrant rights at the Women's Refugee Commission, met with a 16-year-old girl who had been taking care of a young girl for three days. The teen and others in their cage thought the girl was two years old. "She had to teach other kids in the cell to change her diaper," Brane said.
The UN human rights chief on Monday urged Washington to stop separating migrant children from their parents at the US border, describing the policy as "unconscionable". "The thought that any state would seek to deter parents by inflicting such abuse on children is unconscionable," Zeid Ra'ad Al Hussein said as he opened a session of the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva. The "zero-tolerance" border security policy implemented by President Donald Trump's administration has sparked global outrage. Images released on Monday morning showed segregated children detained in cages inside a warehouse in Texas, after journalists were given access for the first time. It came as senior Republicans continued to call into question the hardline policy. Melania Trump, the first lady, also appeared to question the treatment of migrants. In a statement last night she said she "hates to see children separated from their families", while the former first lady Laura Bush said the policy "breaks my heart". A two-year-old Honduran asylum seeker cries as her mother is searched and detained near the US-Mexico border on June 12 Credit: John Moore/Getty The government has said that during one recent six-week period nearly 2,000 minors were separated from their parents or adult guardians. The number of separations has jumped since early May, when Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced that all migrants illegally crossing the US border with Mexico would be arrested, regardless of whether the adults were seeking asylum. Since children cannot be sent to the facilities where their parents are held, they are separated. Zeid quoted the American Association of Pediatrics as describing the practice as "government-sanctioned child abuse" which may cause "irreparable harm," with "lifelong consequences". "I call on the United States to immediately end the practice of forcible separation of these children," he said, urging Washington to ratify the Convention of the Rights of the Child. The UN said that segregating children amounted to 'abuse' The US is the only country that has not ratified the convention. Ratification, Zeid said, would "ensure that the fundamental rights of all children, whatever their administrative status, will be at the centre of all domestic laws and policies." Zeid's address at the start of the 38th session of the UN Human Rights Council marks his last address to the body before he is due to step down at the end of August. The session kicked off under a cloud of growing US criticism of the council. Diplomatic sources said there was a risk that Washington may withdraw from the council altogether. The US Border Patrol on Sunday allowed reporters to briefly visit the facility where it holds families arrested at the border. Inside an old warehouse in South Texas, hundreds of children wait in a series of cages created by metal fencing. One cage had 20 children inside. Scattered about are bottles of water, bags of chips and large foil sheets intended to serve as blankets. Migrants caught trying to enter the US illegally are being separated from their children Credit: LOREN ELLIOTT/AFP One teenager told an advocate who visited that she was helping care for a young child she didn't know because the child's aunt was somewhere else in the facility. She said she had to show others in her cell how to change the girl's diaper. Mr Trump himself has also said he "hates to see separation of parents and children" and has accused Democrats of pursuing a "horrible and cruel legislative agenda". The Border Patrol said close to 200 people inside the facility were minors unaccompanied by a parent. Another 500 were "family units," parents and children. Many adults who crossed the border without legal permission could be charged with illegal entry and placed in jail, away from their children. Reporters were not allowed by agents to interview any of the detainees or take photos. Stories have spread of children being torn from their parents' arms, and parents not being able to find where their kids have gone. A group of congressional lawmakers visited the same facility on Sunday and were set to visit a longer-term shelter holding around 1,500 children - many of whom were separated from their parents. "Those kids inside who have been separated from their parents are already being traumatised," said Democratic Sen. Jeff Merkley of Oregon, who was denied entry earlier this month to children's shelter. "It doesn't matter whether the floor is swept and the bedsheets tucked in tight." Children in custody are forced to sleep on mattresses with foil covers In Texas' Rio Grande Valley, the busiest corridor for people trying to enter the US, Border Patrol officials argue that they have to crack down on migrants and separate adults from children as a deterrent to others. "When you exempt a group of people from the law ... that creates a draw," said Manuel Padilla, the Border Patrol's chief agent here. "That creates the trends right here." Agents running the holding facility - generally known as "Ursula" for the name of the street it's on - said everyone detained is given adequate food, access to showers and laundered clothes, and medical care. People are supposed to move through the facility quickly. Under US law, children are required to be turned over within three days to shelters funded by the Department of Health and Human Services. Padilla said agents in the Rio Grande Valley have allowed families with children under the age of 5 to stay together in most cases. An advocate who spent several hours in the facility on Friday said she was deeply troubled by what she found. Michelle Brane, director of migrant rights at the Women's Refugee Commission, met with a 16-year-old girl who had been taking care of a young girl for three days. The teen and others in their cage thought the girl was two years old. "She had to teach other kids in the cell to change her diaper," Brane said.
UN attacks 'unconscionable' US-Mexico border policy as Republicans join calls to end family segregation
The UN human rights chief on Monday urged Washington to stop separating migrant children from their parents at the US border, describing the policy as "unconscionable". "The thought that any state would seek to deter parents by inflicting such abuse on children is unconscionable," Zeid Ra'ad Al Hussein said as he opened a session of the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva. The "zero-tolerance" border security policy implemented by President Donald Trump's administration has sparked global outrage. Images released on Monday morning showed segregated children detained in cages inside a warehouse in Texas, after journalists were given access for the first time. It came as senior Republicans continued to call into question the hardline policy. Melania Trump, the first lady, also appeared to question the treatment of migrants. In a statement last night she said she "hates to see children separated from their families", while the former first lady Laura Bush said the policy "breaks my heart". A two-year-old Honduran asylum seeker cries as her mother is searched and detained near the US-Mexico border on June 12 Credit: John Moore/Getty The government has said that during one recent six-week period nearly 2,000 minors were separated from their parents or adult guardians. The number of separations has jumped since early May, when Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced that all migrants illegally crossing the US border with Mexico would be arrested, regardless of whether the adults were seeking asylum. Since children cannot be sent to the facilities where their parents are held, they are separated. Zeid quoted the American Association of Pediatrics as describing the practice as "government-sanctioned child abuse" which may cause "irreparable harm," with "lifelong consequences". "I call on the United States to immediately end the practice of forcible separation of these children," he said, urging Washington to ratify the Convention of the Rights of the Child. The UN said that segregating children amounted to 'abuse' The US is the only country that has not ratified the convention. Ratification, Zeid said, would "ensure that the fundamental rights of all children, whatever their administrative status, will be at the centre of all domestic laws and policies." Zeid's address at the start of the 38th session of the UN Human Rights Council marks his last address to the body before he is due to step down at the end of August. The session kicked off under a cloud of growing US criticism of the council. Diplomatic sources said there was a risk that Washington may withdraw from the council altogether. The US Border Patrol on Sunday allowed reporters to briefly visit the facility where it holds families arrested at the border. Inside an old warehouse in South Texas, hundreds of children wait in a series of cages created by metal fencing. One cage had 20 children inside. Scattered about are bottles of water, bags of chips and large foil sheets intended to serve as blankets. Migrants caught trying to enter the US illegally are being separated from their children Credit: LOREN ELLIOTT/AFP One teenager told an advocate who visited that she was helping care for a young child she didn't know because the child's aunt was somewhere else in the facility. She said she had to show others in her cell how to change the girl's diaper. Mr Trump himself has also said he "hates to see separation of parents and children" and has accused Democrats of pursuing a "horrible and cruel legislative agenda". The Border Patrol said close to 200 people inside the facility were minors unaccompanied by a parent. Another 500 were "family units," parents and children. Many adults who crossed the border without legal permission could be charged with illegal entry and placed in jail, away from their children. Reporters were not allowed by agents to interview any of the detainees or take photos. Stories have spread of children being torn from their parents' arms, and parents not being able to find where their kids have gone. A group of congressional lawmakers visited the same facility on Sunday and were set to visit a longer-term shelter holding around 1,500 children - many of whom were separated from their parents. "Those kids inside who have been separated from their parents are already being traumatised," said Democratic Sen. Jeff Merkley of Oregon, who was denied entry earlier this month to children's shelter. "It doesn't matter whether the floor is swept and the bedsheets tucked in tight." Children in custody are forced to sleep on mattresses with foil covers In Texas' Rio Grande Valley, the busiest corridor for people trying to enter the US, Border Patrol officials argue that they have to crack down on migrants and separate adults from children as a deterrent to others. "When you exempt a group of people from the law ... that creates a draw," said Manuel Padilla, the Border Patrol's chief agent here. "That creates the trends right here." Agents running the holding facility - generally known as "Ursula" for the name of the street it's on - said everyone detained is given adequate food, access to showers and laundered clothes, and medical care. People are supposed to move through the facility quickly. Under US law, children are required to be turned over within three days to shelters funded by the Department of Health and Human Services. Padilla said agents in the Rio Grande Valley have allowed families with children under the age of 5 to stay together in most cases. An advocate who spent several hours in the facility on Friday said she was deeply troubled by what she found. Michelle Brane, director of migrant rights at the Women's Refugee Commission, met with a 16-year-old girl who had been taking care of a young girl for three days. The teen and others in their cage thought the girl was two years old. "She had to teach other kids in the cell to change her diaper," Brane said.
Melania Trump waded into a debate over children being separated from their families at the Mexico border, saying the United States should "govern with heart". In a rare intervention the first lady's spokeswoman said she wanted Republicans and Democrats to work together to achieve "successful immigration reform". Her comments were taken by some as an implicit criticism of her husband's recently introduced "zero tolerance" policy at the border. It was also possible she was backing the president's recent claim that Democrats in Congress were responsible for the situation. Her remarks were followed by a strong statement from former first lady Laura Bush, who called the policy "cruel" and "immoral" and said "it breaks my heart." Melania Trump said she wants an end to children being separated from their families at the Mexico border Credit: CARLOS BARRIA/Reuters More than 2,000 children have been removed from their parents over the last six weeks since Jeff Sessions, the US attorney general, introduced the new approach. Under the policy adults are being detained and prosecuted with their children taken away and sent to separate shelters. Previously, many illegal immigrants were allowed to remain at liberty while they awaited proceedings. Children who've been taken into custody related to cases of illegal entry into the United States, rest in one of the cages at a facility in McAllen, Texas Credit: AP A spokeswoman for the first lady said: "Mrs Trump hates to see children separated from their families and hopes both sides of the aisle can finally come together to achieve successful immigration reform. "She believes we need to be a country that follows all laws but also a country that governs with heart." A mural at a former Walmart where illegal immigrant boys are being held Credit: Reuters Mrs Trump, who immigrated to the United States legally from her native Slovenia, campaigns on behalf of children. The comments came amid a growing uproar over the detention of minors, including hundreds being held at a former Walmart superstore in Texas. Laura Bush was writing a guest column for The Washington Post Sunday and compared the policy to the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II. "I appreciate the need to enforce and protect our international boundaries, but this zero-tolerance policy is cruel," the wife of George W Bush wrote. She said "the US government "should not be in the business of warehousing children in converted box stores or making plans to place them in tent cities in the desert outside of El Paso." The US Border Patrol on Sunday allowed reporters to briefly visit the facility where it holds families arrested at the border. The cages in which people are held in cases of illegal entry into the United States Credit: AP Inside an old warehouse in South Texas, hundreds of children wait in a series of cages created by metal fencing. One cage had 20 children inside. Scattered about are bottles of water, bags of chips and large foil sheets intended to serve as blankets. One teenager told an advocate who visited that she was helping care for a young child she didn't know because the child's aunt was somewhere else in the facility. She said she had to show others in her cell how to change the girl's diaper. Mr Trump himself has also said he "hates to see separation of parents and children" and has accused Democrats of pursuing a "horrible and cruel legislative agenda". On Sunday Kellyanne Conway, his counsellor, tried to further distance the White House from responsibility. Mrs Conway said: "As a mother, as a Catholic, as somebody who’s got a conscience, I will tell you that nobody likes this policy. "Congress passed the law that it is a crime to enter this country illegally. So if they don’t like that law, they should change it." Democrats and some Republicans in Congress also criticised the policy, blaming the White House. Illegal immigrant boys are allowed two phone calls a week at a shelter Credit: Reuters Susan Collins, a Republican senator from Maine, accused the White House of trying to send a message "that if you cross the border with children, your children are going to be ripped away from you". She added: "That's traumatising to the children who are innocent victims and it is contrary to our values in this country." Democrats suggested Mr Trump was using the separation of families as a negotiating tool to secure funding for his proposed border wall in future immigration legislation. Adam Schiff, a Democrat congressman, said the administration was "using the grief, the tears, the pain of these kids as mortar to build the wall. It's an effort to extort a bill to their liking in the Congress". Mr Trump is due to meet with Republicans in Congress on Tuesday and there is expected to be a vote on an immigration bill next week. Steve Bannon, Mr Trump's former chief strategist, defended the separation of families at the border. He said: "We ran on a policy, very simply, stop mass illegal immigration and limit legal immigration, get our sovereignty back, and to help our workers. "And so he went to a zero tolerance policy. Zero tolerance, it's a crime to come across illegally, and children get separated."
Melania Trump and Laura Bush join debate over children separated from families at US-Mexico border
Melania Trump waded into a debate over children being separated from their families at the Mexico border, saying the United States should "govern with heart". In a rare intervention the first lady's spokeswoman said she wanted Republicans and Democrats to work together to achieve "successful immigration reform". Her comments were taken by some as an implicit criticism of her husband's recently introduced "zero tolerance" policy at the border. It was also possible she was backing the president's recent claim that Democrats in Congress were responsible for the situation. Her remarks were followed by a strong statement from former first lady Laura Bush, who called the policy "cruel" and "immoral" and said "it breaks my heart." Melania Trump said she wants an end to children being separated from their families at the Mexico border Credit: CARLOS BARRIA/Reuters More than 2,000 children have been removed from their parents over the last six weeks since Jeff Sessions, the US attorney general, introduced the new approach. Under the policy adults are being detained and prosecuted with their children taken away and sent to separate shelters. Previously, many illegal immigrants were allowed to remain at liberty while they awaited proceedings. Children who've been taken into custody related to cases of illegal entry into the United States, rest in one of the cages at a facility in McAllen, Texas Credit: AP A spokeswoman for the first lady said: "Mrs Trump hates to see children separated from their families and hopes both sides of the aisle can finally come together to achieve successful immigration reform. "She believes we need to be a country that follows all laws but also a country that governs with heart." A mural at a former Walmart where illegal immigrant boys are being held Credit: Reuters Mrs Trump, who immigrated to the United States legally from her native Slovenia, campaigns on behalf of children. The comments came amid a growing uproar over the detention of minors, including hundreds being held at a former Walmart superstore in Texas. Laura Bush was writing a guest column for The Washington Post Sunday and compared the policy to the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II. "I appreciate the need to enforce and protect our international boundaries, but this zero-tolerance policy is cruel," the wife of George W Bush wrote. She said "the US government "should not be in the business of warehousing children in converted box stores or making plans to place them in tent cities in the desert outside of El Paso." The US Border Patrol on Sunday allowed reporters to briefly visit the facility where it holds families arrested at the border. The cages in which people are held in cases of illegal entry into the United States Credit: AP Inside an old warehouse in South Texas, hundreds of children wait in a series of cages created by metal fencing. One cage had 20 children inside. Scattered about are bottles of water, bags of chips and large foil sheets intended to serve as blankets. One teenager told an advocate who visited that she was helping care for a young child she didn't know because the child's aunt was somewhere else in the facility. She said she had to show others in her cell how to change the girl's diaper. Mr Trump himself has also said he "hates to see separation of parents and children" and has accused Democrats of pursuing a "horrible and cruel legislative agenda". On Sunday Kellyanne Conway, his counsellor, tried to further distance the White House from responsibility. Mrs Conway said: "As a mother, as a Catholic, as somebody who’s got a conscience, I will tell you that nobody likes this policy. "Congress passed the law that it is a crime to enter this country illegally. So if they don’t like that law, they should change it." Democrats and some Republicans in Congress also criticised the policy, blaming the White House. Illegal immigrant boys are allowed two phone calls a week at a shelter Credit: Reuters Susan Collins, a Republican senator from Maine, accused the White House of trying to send a message "that if you cross the border with children, your children are going to be ripped away from you". She added: "That's traumatising to the children who are innocent victims and it is contrary to our values in this country." Democrats suggested Mr Trump was using the separation of families as a negotiating tool to secure funding for his proposed border wall in future immigration legislation. Adam Schiff, a Democrat congressman, said the administration was "using the grief, the tears, the pain of these kids as mortar to build the wall. It's an effort to extort a bill to their liking in the Congress". Mr Trump is due to meet with Republicans in Congress on Tuesday and there is expected to be a vote on an immigration bill next week. Steve Bannon, Mr Trump's former chief strategist, defended the separation of families at the border. He said: "We ran on a policy, very simply, stop mass illegal immigration and limit legal immigration, get our sovereignty back, and to help our workers. "And so he went to a zero tolerance policy. Zero tolerance, it's a crime to come across illegally, and children get separated."
Melania Trump waded into a debate over children being separated from their families at the Mexico border, saying the United States should "govern with heart". In a rare intervention the first lady's spokeswoman said she wanted Republicans and Democrats to work together to achieve "successful immigration reform". Her comments were taken by some as an implicit criticism of her husband's recently introduced "zero tolerance" policy at the border. It was also possible she was backing the president's recent claim that Democrats in Congress were responsible for the situation. Her remarks were followed by a strong statement from former first lady Laura Bush, who called the policy "cruel" and "immoral" and said "it breaks my heart." Melania Trump said she wants an end to children being separated from their families at the Mexico border Credit: CARLOS BARRIA/Reuters More than 2,000 children have been removed from their parents over the last six weeks since Jeff Sessions, the US attorney general, introduced the new approach. Under the policy adults are being detained and prosecuted with their children taken away and sent to separate shelters. Previously, many illegal immigrants were allowed to remain at liberty while they awaited proceedings. Children who've been taken into custody related to cases of illegal entry into the United States, rest in one of the cages at a facility in McAllen, Texas Credit: AP A spokeswoman for the first lady said: "Mrs Trump hates to see children separated from their families and hopes both sides of the aisle can finally come together to achieve successful immigration reform. "She believes we need to be a country that follows all laws but also a country that governs with heart." A mural at a former Walmart where illegal immigrant boys are being held Credit: Reuters Mrs Trump, who immigrated to the United States legally from her native Slovenia, campaigns on behalf of children. The comments came amid a growing uproar over the detention of minors, including hundreds being held at a former Walmart superstore in Texas. Laura Bush was writing a guest column for The Washington Post Sunday and compared the policy to the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II. "I appreciate the need to enforce and protect our international boundaries, but this zero-tolerance policy is cruel," the wife of George W Bush wrote. She said "the US government "should not be in the business of warehousing children in converted box stores or making plans to place them in tent cities in the desert outside of El Paso." The US Border Patrol on Sunday allowed reporters to briefly visit the facility where it holds families arrested at the border. The cages in which people are held in cases of illegal entry into the United States Credit: AP Inside an old warehouse in South Texas, hundreds of children wait in a series of cages created by metal fencing. One cage had 20 children inside. Scattered about are bottles of water, bags of chips and large foil sheets intended to serve as blankets. One teenager told an advocate who visited that she was helping care for a young child she didn't know because the child's aunt was somewhere else in the facility. She said she had to show others in her cell how to change the girl's diaper. Mr Trump himself has also said he "hates to see separation of parents and children" and has accused Democrats of pursuing a "horrible and cruel legislative agenda". On Sunday Kellyanne Conway, his counsellor, tried to further distance the White House from responsibility. Mrs Conway said: "As a mother, as a Catholic, as somebody who’s got a conscience, I will tell you that nobody likes this policy. "Congress passed the law that it is a crime to enter this country illegally. So if they don’t like that law, they should change it." Democrats and some Republicans in Congress also criticised the policy, blaming the White House. Illegal immigrant boys are allowed two phone calls a week at a shelter Credit: Reuters Susan Collins, a Republican senator from Maine, accused the White House of trying to send a message "that if you cross the border with children, your children are going to be ripped away from you". She added: "That's traumatising to the children who are innocent victims and it is contrary to our values in this country." Democrats suggested Mr Trump was using the separation of families as a negotiating tool to secure funding for his proposed border wall in future immigration legislation. Adam Schiff, a Democrat congressman, said the administration was "using the grief, the tears, the pain of these kids as mortar to build the wall. It's an effort to extort a bill to their liking in the Congress". Mr Trump is due to meet with Republicans in Congress on Tuesday and there is expected to be a vote on an immigration bill next week. Steve Bannon, Mr Trump's former chief strategist, defended the separation of families at the border. He said: "We ran on a policy, very simply, stop mass illegal immigration and limit legal immigration, get our sovereignty back, and to help our workers. "And so he went to a zero tolerance policy. Zero tolerance, it's a crime to come across illegally, and children get separated."
Melania Trump and Laura Bush join debate over children separated from families at US-Mexico border
Melania Trump waded into a debate over children being separated from their families at the Mexico border, saying the United States should "govern with heart". In a rare intervention the first lady's spokeswoman said she wanted Republicans and Democrats to work together to achieve "successful immigration reform". Her comments were taken by some as an implicit criticism of her husband's recently introduced "zero tolerance" policy at the border. It was also possible she was backing the president's recent claim that Democrats in Congress were responsible for the situation. Her remarks were followed by a strong statement from former first lady Laura Bush, who called the policy "cruel" and "immoral" and said "it breaks my heart." Melania Trump said she wants an end to children being separated from their families at the Mexico border Credit: CARLOS BARRIA/Reuters More than 2,000 children have been removed from their parents over the last six weeks since Jeff Sessions, the US attorney general, introduced the new approach. Under the policy adults are being detained and prosecuted with their children taken away and sent to separate shelters. Previously, many illegal immigrants were allowed to remain at liberty while they awaited proceedings. Children who've been taken into custody related to cases of illegal entry into the United States, rest in one of the cages at a facility in McAllen, Texas Credit: AP A spokeswoman for the first lady said: "Mrs Trump hates to see children separated from their families and hopes both sides of the aisle can finally come together to achieve successful immigration reform. "She believes we need to be a country that follows all laws but also a country that governs with heart." A mural at a former Walmart where illegal immigrant boys are being held Credit: Reuters Mrs Trump, who immigrated to the United States legally from her native Slovenia, campaigns on behalf of children. The comments came amid a growing uproar over the detention of minors, including hundreds being held at a former Walmart superstore in Texas. Laura Bush was writing a guest column for The Washington Post Sunday and compared the policy to the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II. "I appreciate the need to enforce and protect our international boundaries, but this zero-tolerance policy is cruel," the wife of George W Bush wrote. She said "the US government "should not be in the business of warehousing children in converted box stores or making plans to place them in tent cities in the desert outside of El Paso." The US Border Patrol on Sunday allowed reporters to briefly visit the facility where it holds families arrested at the border. The cages in which people are held in cases of illegal entry into the United States Credit: AP Inside an old warehouse in South Texas, hundreds of children wait in a series of cages created by metal fencing. One cage had 20 children inside. Scattered about are bottles of water, bags of chips and large foil sheets intended to serve as blankets. One teenager told an advocate who visited that she was helping care for a young child she didn't know because the child's aunt was somewhere else in the facility. She said she had to show others in her cell how to change the girl's diaper. Mr Trump himself has also said he "hates to see separation of parents and children" and has accused Democrats of pursuing a "horrible and cruel legislative agenda". On Sunday Kellyanne Conway, his counsellor, tried to further distance the White House from responsibility. Mrs Conway said: "As a mother, as a Catholic, as somebody who’s got a conscience, I will tell you that nobody likes this policy. "Congress passed the law that it is a crime to enter this country illegally. So if they don’t like that law, they should change it." Democrats and some Republicans in Congress also criticised the policy, blaming the White House. Illegal immigrant boys are allowed two phone calls a week at a shelter Credit: Reuters Susan Collins, a Republican senator from Maine, accused the White House of trying to send a message "that if you cross the border with children, your children are going to be ripped away from you". She added: "That's traumatising to the children who are innocent victims and it is contrary to our values in this country." Democrats suggested Mr Trump was using the separation of families as a negotiating tool to secure funding for his proposed border wall in future immigration legislation. Adam Schiff, a Democrat congressman, said the administration was "using the grief, the tears, the pain of these kids as mortar to build the wall. It's an effort to extort a bill to their liking in the Congress". Mr Trump is due to meet with Republicans in Congress on Tuesday and there is expected to be a vote on an immigration bill next week. Steve Bannon, Mr Trump's former chief strategist, defended the separation of families at the border. He said: "We ran on a policy, very simply, stop mass illegal immigration and limit legal immigration, get our sovereignty back, and to help our workers. "And so he went to a zero tolerance policy. Zero tolerance, it's a crime to come across illegally, and children get separated."
Melania Trump waded into a debate over children being separated from their families at the Mexico border, saying the United States should "govern with heart". In a rare intervention the first lady's spokeswoman said she wanted Republicans and Democrats to work together to achieve "successful immigration reform". Her comments were taken by some as an implicit criticism of her husband's recently introduced "zero tolerance" policy at the border. It was also possible she was backing the president's recent claim that Democrats in Congress were responsible for the situation. Her remarks were followed by a strong statement from former first lady Laura Bush, who called the policy "cruel" and "immoral" and said "it breaks my heart." Children who've been taken into custody related to cases of illegal entry into the United States, rest in one of the cages at a facility in McAllen, Texas Credit: AP More than 2,000 children have been removed from their parents over the last six weeks since Jeff Sessions, the US attorney general, introduced the new approach. Under the policy adults are being detained and prosecuted with their children taken away and sent to separate shelters. Previously, many illegal immigrants were allowed to remain at liberty while they awaited proceedings. A spokeswoman for the first lady said: "Mrs Trump hates to see children separated from their families and hopes both sides of the aisle can finally come together to achieve successful immigration reform. "She believes we need to be a country that follows all laws but also a country that governs with heart." A mural at a former Walmart where illegal immigrant boys are being held Credit: Reuters Mrs Trump, who immigrated to the United States legally from her native Slovenia, campaigns on behalf of children. The comments came amid a growing uproar over the detention of minors, including hundreds being held at a former Walmart superstore in Texas. Laura Bush was writing a guest column for The Washington Post Sunday and compared the policy to the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II. "I appreciate the need to enforce and protect our international boundaries, but this zero-tolerance policy is cruel," the wife of George W Bush wrote. She said "the US government "should not be in the business of warehousing children in converted box stores or making plans to place them in tent cities in the desert outside of El Paso." The US Border Patrol on Sunday allowed reporters to briefly visit the facility where it holds families arrested at the border. The cages in which people are held in cases of illegal entry into the United States Credit: AP Inside an old warehouse in South Texas, hundreds of children wait in a series of cages created by metal fencing. One cage had 20 children inside. Scattered about are bottles of water, bags of chips and large foil sheets intended to serve as blankets. One teenager told an advocate who visited that she was helping care for a young child she didn't know because the child's aunt was somewhere else in the facility. She said she had to show others in her cell how to change the girl's diaper. Mr Trump himself has also said he "hates to see separation of parents and children" and has accused Democrats of pursuing a "horrible and cruel legislative agenda". On Sunday Kellyanne Conway, his counsellor, tried to further distance the White House from responsibility. Mrs Conway said: "As a mother, as a Catholic, as somebody who’s got a conscience, I will tell you that nobody likes this policy. "Congress passed the law that it is a crime to enter this country illegally. So if they don’t like that law, they should change it." Democrats and some Republicans in Congress also criticised the policy, blaming the White House. Illegal immigrant boys are allowed two phone calls a week at a shelter Credit: Reuters Susan Collins, a Republican senator from Maine, accused the White House of trying to send a message "that if you cross the border with children, your children are going to be ripped away from you". She added: "That's traumatising to the children who are innocent victims and it is contrary to our values in this country." Democrats suggested Mr Trump was using the separation of families as a negotiating tool to secure funding for his proposed border wall in future immigration legislation. Adam Schiff, a Democrat congressman, said the administration was "using the grief, the tears, the pain of these kids as mortar to build the wall. It's an effort to extort a bill to their liking in the Congress". Mr Trump is due to meet with Republicans in Congress on Tuesday and there is expected to be a vote on an immigration bill next week. Steve Bannon, Mr Trump's former chief strategist, defended the separation of families at the border. He said: "We ran on a policy, very simply, stop mass illegal immigration and limit legal immigration, get our sovereignty back, and to help our workers. "And so he went to a zero tolerance policy. Zero tolerance, it's a crime to come across illegally, and children get separated."
Melania Trump and Laura Bush wade into debate over children separated from families at US-Mexico border
Melania Trump waded into a debate over children being separated from their families at the Mexico border, saying the United States should "govern with heart". In a rare intervention the first lady's spokeswoman said she wanted Republicans and Democrats to work together to achieve "successful immigration reform". Her comments were taken by some as an implicit criticism of her husband's recently introduced "zero tolerance" policy at the border. It was also possible she was backing the president's recent claim that Democrats in Congress were responsible for the situation. Her remarks were followed by a strong statement from former first lady Laura Bush, who called the policy "cruel" and "immoral" and said "it breaks my heart." Children who've been taken into custody related to cases of illegal entry into the United States, rest in one of the cages at a facility in McAllen, Texas Credit: AP More than 2,000 children have been removed from their parents over the last six weeks since Jeff Sessions, the US attorney general, introduced the new approach. Under the policy adults are being detained and prosecuted with their children taken away and sent to separate shelters. Previously, many illegal immigrants were allowed to remain at liberty while they awaited proceedings. A spokeswoman for the first lady said: "Mrs Trump hates to see children separated from their families and hopes both sides of the aisle can finally come together to achieve successful immigration reform. "She believes we need to be a country that follows all laws but also a country that governs with heart." A mural at a former Walmart where illegal immigrant boys are being held Credit: Reuters Mrs Trump, who immigrated to the United States legally from her native Slovenia, campaigns on behalf of children. The comments came amid a growing uproar over the detention of minors, including hundreds being held at a former Walmart superstore in Texas. Laura Bush was writing a guest column for The Washington Post Sunday and compared the policy to the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II. "I appreciate the need to enforce and protect our international boundaries, but this zero-tolerance policy is cruel," the wife of George W Bush wrote. She said "the US government "should not be in the business of warehousing children in converted box stores or making plans to place them in tent cities in the desert outside of El Paso." The US Border Patrol on Sunday allowed reporters to briefly visit the facility where it holds families arrested at the border. The cages in which people are held in cases of illegal entry into the United States Credit: AP Inside an old warehouse in South Texas, hundreds of children wait in a series of cages created by metal fencing. One cage had 20 children inside. Scattered about are bottles of water, bags of chips and large foil sheets intended to serve as blankets. One teenager told an advocate who visited that she was helping care for a young child she didn't know because the child's aunt was somewhere else in the facility. She said she had to show others in her cell how to change the girl's diaper. Mr Trump himself has also said he "hates to see separation of parents and children" and has accused Democrats of pursuing a "horrible and cruel legislative agenda". On Sunday Kellyanne Conway, his counsellor, tried to further distance the White House from responsibility. Mrs Conway said: "As a mother, as a Catholic, as somebody who’s got a conscience, I will tell you that nobody likes this policy. "Congress passed the law that it is a crime to enter this country illegally. So if they don’t like that law, they should change it." Democrats and some Republicans in Congress also criticised the policy, blaming the White House. Illegal immigrant boys are allowed two phone calls a week at a shelter Credit: Reuters Susan Collins, a Republican senator from Maine, accused the White House of trying to send a message "that if you cross the border with children, your children are going to be ripped away from you". She added: "That's traumatising to the children who are innocent victims and it is contrary to our values in this country." Democrats suggested Mr Trump was using the separation of families as a negotiating tool to secure funding for his proposed border wall in future immigration legislation. Adam Schiff, a Democrat congressman, said the administration was "using the grief, the tears, the pain of these kids as mortar to build the wall. It's an effort to extort a bill to their liking in the Congress". Mr Trump is due to meet with Republicans in Congress on Tuesday and there is expected to be a vote on an immigration bill next week. Steve Bannon, Mr Trump's former chief strategist, defended the separation of families at the border. He said: "We ran on a policy, very simply, stop mass illegal immigration and limit legal immigration, get our sovereignty back, and to help our workers. "And so he went to a zero tolerance policy. Zero tolerance, it's a crime to come across illegally, and children get separated."
-FOTODELDIA- Bogdan Nikishin (L) of Ukraine in action against Nikolai Novosjolov (R) of Estonia during the men's Epee event at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. EFE/ANDREJ CUKIC
-FOTODELDIA- Bogdan Nikishin (L) of Ukraine in action against Nikolai Novosjolov (R) of Estonia during the men's Epee event at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. EFE/ANDREJ CUKIC
-FOTODELDIA- Bogdan Nikishin (L) of Ukraine in action against Nikolai Novosjolov (R) of Estonia during the men's Epee event at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. EFE/ANDREJ CUKIC
Inside an old warehouse in South Texas, hundreds of children wait in a series of cages created by metal fencing. One cage had 20 children inside. Scattered about are bottles of water, bags of crisps and large foil sheets intended to serve as blankets. One teenager told an advocate who visited that she was helping care for a young child she didn't know because the child's aunt was somewhere else in the facility. She said she had to show others in her cell how to change the girl's diaper. The US Border Patrol on Sunday allowed reporters to briefly visit the facility where it holds families arrested at the southern US border, responding to new criticism and protests over the Trump administration's "zero tolerance" policy and resulting separation of families. More than 1,100 people were inside the large, dark facility that's divided into separate wings for unaccompanied children, adults on their own, and mothers and fathers with children. The cages in each wing open out into common areas to use portable restrooms. The overhead lighting in the warehouse stays on around the clock. Children who've been taken into custody related to cases of illegal entry into the United States, rest in one of the cages at a facility in McAllen, Texas Credit: AP The Border Patrol said close to 200 people inside the facility were minors unaccompanied by a parent. Another 500 were "family units," parents and children. Many adults who crossed the border without legal permission could be charged with illegal entry and placed in jail, away from their children. Reporters were not allowed by agents to interview any of the detainees or take photos. Nearly 2,000 children have been taken from their parents since Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced the policy, which directs Homeland Security officials to refer all cases of illegal entry into the United States for prosecution. Church groups and human rights advocates have sharply criticized the policy, calling it inhumane. I saw chain link cages full of unaccompanied children. They sat on metal benches and stared straight ahead silently— Rep. Peter Welch (@PeterWelch) June 17, 2018 Stories have spread of children being torn from their parents' arms, and parents not being able to find where their kids have gone. A group of congressional lawmakers visited the same facility on Sunday and were set to visit a longer-term shelter holding around 1,500 children - many of whom were separated from their parents. "Those kids inside who have been separated from their parents are already being traumatised," said Democratic Sen. Jeff Merkley of Oregon, who was denied entry earlier this month to children's shelter. "It doesn't matter whether the floor is swept and the bedsheets tucked in tight." In Texas' Rio Grande Valley, the busiest corridor for people trying to enter the US, Border Patrol officials argue that they have to crack down on migrants and separate adults from children as a deterrent to others. "When you exempt a group of people from the law ... that creates a draw," said Manuel Padilla, the Border Patrol's chief agent here. "That creates the trends right here." Agents running the holding facility - generally known as "Ursula" for the name of the street it's on - said everyone detained is given adequate food, access to showers and laundered clothes, and medical care. People are supposed to move through the facility quickly. Under US law, children are required to be turned over within three days to shelters funded by the Department of Health and Human Services. People who've been taken into custody related to cases of illegal entry into the United States, sit in one of the cages at a facility in McAllen, Texas Credit: AP Padilla said agents in the Rio Grande Valley have allowed families with children under the age of 5 to stay together in most cases. An advocate who spent several hours in the facility on Friday said she was deeply troubled by what she found. Michelle Brane, director of migrant rights at the Women's Refugee Commission, met with a 16-year-old girl who had been taking care of a young girl for three days. The teen and others in their cage thought the girl was 2 years old. "She had to teach other kids in the cell to change her diaper," Brane said. Just left Border Patrol Processing Center in McAllen—aka "the dog kennel." Witnessed loads of kids massed together in large pens of chain-linked fence separated from their moms and dads. @realDonaldTrump, change your shameful policy today! #FamiliesBelongTogether— Chris Van Hollen (@ChrisVanHollen) June 17, 2018 Brane said that after an attorney started to ask questions, agents found the girl's aunt and reunited the two. It turned out that the girl was actually 4 years old. Part of the problem was that she didn't speak Spanish, but K'iche, a language indigenous to Guatemala. "She was so traumatised that she wasn't talking," Brane said. "She was just curled up in a little ball." Brane said she also saw officials at the facility scold a group of five-year-olds for playing around in their cage, telling them to settle down. There are no toys or books. Demonstrators hold a large banner that reads "Humanity Is Borderless," outside of a U.S. Border Patrol station in McAllen, Credit: Bloomberg But one boy nearby wasn't playing with the rest. According to Brane, he was quiet, clutching a piece of paper that was a photocopy of his mother's ID card. "The government is literally taking kids away from their parents and leaving them in inappropriate conditions," Brane said. "If a parent left a child in a cage with no supervision with other five-year-olds, they'd be held accountable." Dr. Colleen Kraft, the head of the American Academy of Pediatrics, said she visited a small shelter in Texas recently, which she declined to identity. A toddler inside the 60-bed facility caught her eye - she was crying uncontrollably and pounding her little fists on mat. Staff members tried to console the child, who looked to be about two years old, Kraft said. She had been taken from her mother the night before and brought to the shelter. The staff gave her books and toys - but they weren't allowed to pick her up, to hold her or hug her to try to calm her. As a rule, staff aren't allowed to touch the children there, she said. "The stress is overwhelming," she said. "The focus needs to be on the welfare of these children, absent of politics."
Children separated from parents at US border held in cages in Texas warehouse
Inside an old warehouse in South Texas, hundreds of children wait in a series of cages created by metal fencing. One cage had 20 children inside. Scattered about are bottles of water, bags of crisps and large foil sheets intended to serve as blankets. One teenager told an advocate who visited that she was helping care for a young child she didn't know because the child's aunt was somewhere else in the facility. She said she had to show others in her cell how to change the girl's diaper. The US Border Patrol on Sunday allowed reporters to briefly visit the facility where it holds families arrested at the southern US border, responding to new criticism and protests over the Trump administration's "zero tolerance" policy and resulting separation of families. More than 1,100 people were inside the large, dark facility that's divided into separate wings for unaccompanied children, adults on their own, and mothers and fathers with children. The cages in each wing open out into common areas to use portable restrooms. The overhead lighting in the warehouse stays on around the clock. Children who've been taken into custody related to cases of illegal entry into the United States, rest in one of the cages at a facility in McAllen, Texas Credit: AP The Border Patrol said close to 200 people inside the facility were minors unaccompanied by a parent. Another 500 were "family units," parents and children. Many adults who crossed the border without legal permission could be charged with illegal entry and placed in jail, away from their children. Reporters were not allowed by agents to interview any of the detainees or take photos. Nearly 2,000 children have been taken from their parents since Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced the policy, which directs Homeland Security officials to refer all cases of illegal entry into the United States for prosecution. Church groups and human rights advocates have sharply criticized the policy, calling it inhumane. I saw chain link cages full of unaccompanied children. They sat on metal benches and stared straight ahead silently— Rep. Peter Welch (@PeterWelch) June 17, 2018 Stories have spread of children being torn from their parents' arms, and parents not being able to find where their kids have gone. A group of congressional lawmakers visited the same facility on Sunday and were set to visit a longer-term shelter holding around 1,500 children - many of whom were separated from their parents. "Those kids inside who have been separated from their parents are already being traumatised," said Democratic Sen. Jeff Merkley of Oregon, who was denied entry earlier this month to children's shelter. "It doesn't matter whether the floor is swept and the bedsheets tucked in tight." In Texas' Rio Grande Valley, the busiest corridor for people trying to enter the US, Border Patrol officials argue that they have to crack down on migrants and separate adults from children as a deterrent to others. "When you exempt a group of people from the law ... that creates a draw," said Manuel Padilla, the Border Patrol's chief agent here. "That creates the trends right here." Agents running the holding facility - generally known as "Ursula" for the name of the street it's on - said everyone detained is given adequate food, access to showers and laundered clothes, and medical care. People are supposed to move through the facility quickly. Under US law, children are required to be turned over within three days to shelters funded by the Department of Health and Human Services. People who've been taken into custody related to cases of illegal entry into the United States, sit in one of the cages at a facility in McAllen, Texas Credit: AP Padilla said agents in the Rio Grande Valley have allowed families with children under the age of 5 to stay together in most cases. An advocate who spent several hours in the facility on Friday said she was deeply troubled by what she found. Michelle Brane, director of migrant rights at the Women's Refugee Commission, met with a 16-year-old girl who had been taking care of a young girl for three days. The teen and others in their cage thought the girl was 2 years old. "She had to teach other kids in the cell to change her diaper," Brane said. Just left Border Patrol Processing Center in McAllen—aka "the dog kennel." Witnessed loads of kids massed together in large pens of chain-linked fence separated from their moms and dads. @realDonaldTrump, change your shameful policy today! #FamiliesBelongTogether— Chris Van Hollen (@ChrisVanHollen) June 17, 2018 Brane said that after an attorney started to ask questions, agents found the girl's aunt and reunited the two. It turned out that the girl was actually 4 years old. Part of the problem was that she didn't speak Spanish, but K'iche, a language indigenous to Guatemala. "She was so traumatised that she wasn't talking," Brane said. "She was just curled up in a little ball." Brane said she also saw officials at the facility scold a group of five-year-olds for playing around in their cage, telling them to settle down. There are no toys or books. Demonstrators hold a large banner that reads "Humanity Is Borderless," outside of a U.S. Border Patrol station in McAllen, Credit: Bloomberg But one boy nearby wasn't playing with the rest. According to Brane, he was quiet, clutching a piece of paper that was a photocopy of his mother's ID card. "The government is literally taking kids away from their parents and leaving them in inappropriate conditions," Brane said. "If a parent left a child in a cage with no supervision with other five-year-olds, they'd be held accountable." Dr. Colleen Kraft, the head of the American Academy of Pediatrics, said she visited a small shelter in Texas recently, which she declined to identity. A toddler inside the 60-bed facility caught her eye - she was crying uncontrollably and pounding her little fists on mat. Staff members tried to console the child, who looked to be about two years old, Kraft said. She had been taken from her mother the night before and brought to the shelter. The staff gave her books and toys - but they weren't allowed to pick her up, to hold her or hug her to try to calm her. As a rule, staff aren't allowed to touch the children there, she said. "The stress is overwhelming," she said. "The focus needs to be on the welfare of these children, absent of politics."
Inside an old warehouse in South Texas, hundreds of children wait in a series of cages created by metal fencing. One cage had 20 children inside. Scattered about are bottles of water, bags of crisps and large foil sheets intended to serve as blankets. One teenager told an advocate who visited that she was helping care for a young child she didn't know because the child's aunt was somewhere else in the facility. She said she had to show others in her cell how to change the girl's diaper. The US Border Patrol on Sunday allowed reporters to briefly visit the facility where it holds families arrested at the southern US border, responding to new criticism and protests over the Trump administration's "zero tolerance" policy and resulting separation of families. More than 1,100 people were inside the large, dark facility that's divided into separate wings for unaccompanied children, adults on their own, and mothers and fathers with children. The cages in each wing open out into common areas to use portable restrooms. The overhead lighting in the warehouse stays on around the clock. Children who've been taken into custody related to cases of illegal entry into the United States, rest in one of the cages at a facility in McAllen, Texas Credit: AP The Border Patrol said close to 200 people inside the facility were minors unaccompanied by a parent. Another 500 were "family units," parents and children. Many adults who crossed the border without legal permission could be charged with illegal entry and placed in jail, away from their children. Reporters were not allowed by agents to interview any of the detainees or take photos. Nearly 2,000 children have been taken from their parents since Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced the policy, which directs Homeland Security officials to refer all cases of illegal entry into the United States for prosecution. Church groups and human rights advocates have sharply criticized the policy, calling it inhumane. I saw chain link cages full of unaccompanied children. They sat on metal benches and stared straight ahead silently— Rep. Peter Welch (@PeterWelch) June 17, 2018 Stories have spread of children being torn from their parents' arms, and parents not being able to find where their kids have gone. A group of congressional lawmakers visited the same facility on Sunday and were set to visit a longer-term shelter holding around 1,500 children - many of whom were separated from their parents. "Those kids inside who have been separated from their parents are already being traumatised," said Democratic Sen. Jeff Merkley of Oregon, who was denied entry earlier this month to children's shelter. "It doesn't matter whether the floor is swept and the bedsheets tucked in tight." In Texas' Rio Grande Valley, the busiest corridor for people trying to enter the US, Border Patrol officials argue that they have to crack down on migrants and separate adults from children as a deterrent to others. "When you exempt a group of people from the law ... that creates a draw," said Manuel Padilla, the Border Patrol's chief agent here. "That creates the trends right here." Agents running the holding facility - generally known as "Ursula" for the name of the street it's on - said everyone detained is given adequate food, access to showers and laundered clothes, and medical care. People are supposed to move through the facility quickly. Under US law, children are required to be turned over within three days to shelters funded by the Department of Health and Human Services. People who've been taken into custody related to cases of illegal entry into the United States, sit in one of the cages at a facility in McAllen, Texas Credit: AP Padilla said agents in the Rio Grande Valley have allowed families with children under the age of 5 to stay together in most cases. An advocate who spent several hours in the facility on Friday said she was deeply troubled by what she found. Michelle Brane, director of migrant rights at the Women's Refugee Commission, met with a 16-year-old girl who had been taking care of a young girl for three days. The teen and others in their cage thought the girl was 2 years old. "She had to teach other kids in the cell to change her diaper," Brane said. Just left Border Patrol Processing Center in McAllen—aka "the dog kennel." Witnessed loads of kids massed together in large pens of chain-linked fence separated from their moms and dads. @realDonaldTrump, change your shameful policy today! #FamiliesBelongTogether— Chris Van Hollen (@ChrisVanHollen) June 17, 2018 Brane said that after an attorney started to ask questions, agents found the girl's aunt and reunited the two. It turned out that the girl was actually 4 years old. Part of the problem was that she didn't speak Spanish, but K'iche, a language indigenous to Guatemala. "She was so traumatised that she wasn't talking," Brane said. "She was just curled up in a little ball." Brane said she also saw officials at the facility scold a group of five-year-olds for playing around in their cage, telling them to settle down. There are no toys or books. Demonstrators hold a large banner that reads "Humanity Is Borderless," outside of a U.S. Border Patrol station in McAllen, Credit: Bloomberg But one boy nearby wasn't playing with the rest. According to Brane, he was quiet, clutching a piece of paper that was a photocopy of his mother's ID card. "The government is literally taking kids away from their parents and leaving them in inappropriate conditions," Brane said. "If a parent left a child in a cage with no supervision with other five-year-olds, they'd be held accountable." Dr. Colleen Kraft, the head of the American Academy of Pediatrics, said she visited a small shelter in Texas recently, which she declined to identity. A toddler inside the 60-bed facility caught her eye - she was crying uncontrollably and pounding her little fists on mat. Staff members tried to console the child, who looked to be about two years old, Kraft said. She had been taken from her mother the night before and brought to the shelter. The staff gave her books and toys - but they weren't allowed to pick her up, to hold her or hug her to try to calm her. As a rule, staff aren't allowed to touch the children there, she said. "The stress is overwhelming," she said. "The focus needs to be on the welfare of these children, absent of politics."
Children separated from parents at US border held in cages in Texas warehouse
Inside an old warehouse in South Texas, hundreds of children wait in a series of cages created by metal fencing. One cage had 20 children inside. Scattered about are bottles of water, bags of crisps and large foil sheets intended to serve as blankets. One teenager told an advocate who visited that she was helping care for a young child she didn't know because the child's aunt was somewhere else in the facility. She said she had to show others in her cell how to change the girl's diaper. The US Border Patrol on Sunday allowed reporters to briefly visit the facility where it holds families arrested at the southern US border, responding to new criticism and protests over the Trump administration's "zero tolerance" policy and resulting separation of families. More than 1,100 people were inside the large, dark facility that's divided into separate wings for unaccompanied children, adults on their own, and mothers and fathers with children. The cages in each wing open out into common areas to use portable restrooms. The overhead lighting in the warehouse stays on around the clock. Children who've been taken into custody related to cases of illegal entry into the United States, rest in one of the cages at a facility in McAllen, Texas Credit: AP The Border Patrol said close to 200 people inside the facility were minors unaccompanied by a parent. Another 500 were "family units," parents and children. Many adults who crossed the border without legal permission could be charged with illegal entry and placed in jail, away from their children. Reporters were not allowed by agents to interview any of the detainees or take photos. Nearly 2,000 children have been taken from their parents since Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced the policy, which directs Homeland Security officials to refer all cases of illegal entry into the United States for prosecution. Church groups and human rights advocates have sharply criticized the policy, calling it inhumane. I saw chain link cages full of unaccompanied children. They sat on metal benches and stared straight ahead silently— Rep. Peter Welch (@PeterWelch) June 17, 2018 Stories have spread of children being torn from their parents' arms, and parents not being able to find where their kids have gone. A group of congressional lawmakers visited the same facility on Sunday and were set to visit a longer-term shelter holding around 1,500 children - many of whom were separated from their parents. "Those kids inside who have been separated from their parents are already being traumatised," said Democratic Sen. Jeff Merkley of Oregon, who was denied entry earlier this month to children's shelter. "It doesn't matter whether the floor is swept and the bedsheets tucked in tight." In Texas' Rio Grande Valley, the busiest corridor for people trying to enter the US, Border Patrol officials argue that they have to crack down on migrants and separate adults from children as a deterrent to others. "When you exempt a group of people from the law ... that creates a draw," said Manuel Padilla, the Border Patrol's chief agent here. "That creates the trends right here." Agents running the holding facility - generally known as "Ursula" for the name of the street it's on - said everyone detained is given adequate food, access to showers and laundered clothes, and medical care. People are supposed to move through the facility quickly. Under US law, children are required to be turned over within three days to shelters funded by the Department of Health and Human Services. People who've been taken into custody related to cases of illegal entry into the United States, sit in one of the cages at a facility in McAllen, Texas Credit: AP Padilla said agents in the Rio Grande Valley have allowed families with children under the age of 5 to stay together in most cases. An advocate who spent several hours in the facility on Friday said she was deeply troubled by what she found. Michelle Brane, director of migrant rights at the Women's Refugee Commission, met with a 16-year-old girl who had been taking care of a young girl for three days. The teen and others in their cage thought the girl was 2 years old. "She had to teach other kids in the cell to change her diaper," Brane said. Just left Border Patrol Processing Center in McAllen—aka "the dog kennel." Witnessed loads of kids massed together in large pens of chain-linked fence separated from their moms and dads. @realDonaldTrump, change your shameful policy today! #FamiliesBelongTogether— Chris Van Hollen (@ChrisVanHollen) June 17, 2018 Brane said that after an attorney started to ask questions, agents found the girl's aunt and reunited the two. It turned out that the girl was actually 4 years old. Part of the problem was that she didn't speak Spanish, but K'iche, a language indigenous to Guatemala. "She was so traumatised that she wasn't talking," Brane said. "She was just curled up in a little ball." Brane said she also saw officials at the facility scold a group of five-year-olds for playing around in their cage, telling them to settle down. There are no toys or books. Demonstrators hold a large banner that reads "Humanity Is Borderless," outside of a U.S. Border Patrol station in McAllen, Credit: Bloomberg But one boy nearby wasn't playing with the rest. According to Brane, he was quiet, clutching a piece of paper that was a photocopy of his mother's ID card. "The government is literally taking kids away from their parents and leaving them in inappropriate conditions," Brane said. "If a parent left a child in a cage with no supervision with other five-year-olds, they'd be held accountable." Dr. Colleen Kraft, the head of the American Academy of Pediatrics, said she visited a small shelter in Texas recently, which she declined to identity. A toddler inside the 60-bed facility caught her eye - she was crying uncontrollably and pounding her little fists on mat. Staff members tried to console the child, who looked to be about two years old, Kraft said. She had been taken from her mother the night before and brought to the shelter. The staff gave her books and toys - but they weren't allowed to pick her up, to hold her or hug her to try to calm her. As a rule, staff aren't allowed to touch the children there, she said. "The stress is overwhelming," she said. "The focus needs to be on the welfare of these children, absent of politics."
Inside an old warehouse in South Texas, hundreds of children wait in a series of cages created by metal fencing. One cage had 20 children inside. Scattered about are bottles of water, bags of crisps and large foil sheets intended to serve as blankets. One teenager told an advocate who visited that she was helping care for a young child she didn't know because the child's aunt was somewhere else in the facility. She said she had to show others in her cell how to change the girl's diaper. The US Border Patrol on Sunday allowed reporters to briefly visit the facility where it holds families arrested at the southern US border, responding to new criticism and protests over the Trump administration's "zero tolerance" policy and resulting separation of families. More than 1,100 people were inside the large, dark facility that's divided into separate wings for unaccompanied children, adults on their own, and mothers and fathers with children. The cages in each wing open out into common areas to use portable restrooms. The overhead lighting in the warehouse stays on around the clock. Children who've been taken into custody related to cases of illegal entry into the United States, rest in one of the cages at a facility in McAllen, Texas Credit: AP The Border Patrol said close to 200 people inside the facility were minors unaccompanied by a parent. Another 500 were "family units," parents and children. Many adults who crossed the border without legal permission could be charged with illegal entry and placed in jail, away from their children. Reporters were not allowed by agents to interview any of the detainees or take photos. Nearly 2,000 children have been taken from their parents since Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced the policy, which directs Homeland Security officials to refer all cases of illegal entry into the United States for prosecution. Church groups and human rights advocates have sharply criticized the policy, calling it inhumane. I saw chain link cages full of unaccompanied children. They sat on metal benches and stared straight ahead silently— Rep. Peter Welch (@PeterWelch) June 17, 2018 Stories have spread of children being torn from their parents' arms, and parents not being able to find where their kids have gone. A group of congressional lawmakers visited the same facility on Sunday and were set to visit a longer-term shelter holding around 1,500 children - many of whom were separated from their parents. "Those kids inside who have been separated from their parents are already being traumatised," said Democratic Sen. Jeff Merkley of Oregon, who was denied entry earlier this month to children's shelter. "It doesn't matter whether the floor is swept and the bedsheets tucked in tight." In Texas' Rio Grande Valley, the busiest corridor for people trying to enter the US, Border Patrol officials argue that they have to crack down on migrants and separate adults from children as a deterrent to others. "When you exempt a group of people from the law ... that creates a draw," said Manuel Padilla, the Border Patrol's chief agent here. "That creates the trends right here." Agents running the holding facility - generally known as "Ursula" for the name of the street it's on - said everyone detained is given adequate food, access to showers and laundered clothes, and medical care. People are supposed to move through the facility quickly. Under US law, children are required to be turned over within three days to shelters funded by the Department of Health and Human Services. People who've been taken into custody related to cases of illegal entry into the United States, sit in one of the cages at a facility in McAllen, Texas Credit: AP Padilla said agents in the Rio Grande Valley have allowed families with children under the age of 5 to stay together in most cases. An advocate who spent several hours in the facility on Friday said she was deeply troubled by what she found. Michelle Brane, director of migrant rights at the Women's Refugee Commission, met with a 16-year-old girl who had been taking care of a young girl for three days. The teen and others in their cage thought the girl was 2 years old. "She had to teach other kids in the cell to change her diaper," Brane said. Just left Border Patrol Processing Center in McAllen—aka "the dog kennel." Witnessed loads of kids massed together in large pens of chain-linked fence separated from their moms and dads. @realDonaldTrump, change your shameful policy today! #FamiliesBelongTogether— Chris Van Hollen (@ChrisVanHollen) June 17, 2018 Brane said that after an attorney started to ask questions, agents found the girl's aunt and reunited the two. It turned out that the girl was actually 4 years old. Part of the problem was that she didn't speak Spanish, but K'iche, a language indigenous to Guatemala. "She was so traumatised that she wasn't talking," Brane said. "She was just curled up in a little ball." Brane said she also saw officials at the facility scold a group of five-year-olds for playing around in their cage, telling them to settle down. There are no toys or books. Demonstrators hold a large banner that reads "Humanity Is Borderless," outside of a U.S. Border Patrol station in McAllen, Credit: Bloomberg But one boy nearby wasn't playing with the rest. According to Brane, he was quiet, clutching a piece of paper that was a photocopy of his mother's ID card. "The government is literally taking kids away from their parents and leaving them in inappropriate conditions," Brane said. "If a parent left a child in a cage with no supervision with other five-year-olds, they'd be held accountable." Dr. Colleen Kraft, the head of the American Academy of Pediatrics, said she visited a small shelter in Texas recently, which she declined to identity. A toddler inside the 60-bed facility caught her eye - she was crying uncontrollably and pounding her little fists on mat. Staff members tried to console the child, who looked to be about two years old, Kraft said. She had been taken from her mother the night before and brought to the shelter. The staff gave her books and toys - but they weren't allowed to pick her up, to hold her or hug her to try to calm her. As a rule, staff aren't allowed to touch the children there, she said. "The stress is overwhelming," she said. "The focus needs to be on the welfare of these children, absent of politics."
Children separated from parents at US border held in cages in Texas warehouse
Inside an old warehouse in South Texas, hundreds of children wait in a series of cages created by metal fencing. One cage had 20 children inside. Scattered about are bottles of water, bags of crisps and large foil sheets intended to serve as blankets. One teenager told an advocate who visited that she was helping care for a young child she didn't know because the child's aunt was somewhere else in the facility. She said she had to show others in her cell how to change the girl's diaper. The US Border Patrol on Sunday allowed reporters to briefly visit the facility where it holds families arrested at the southern US border, responding to new criticism and protests over the Trump administration's "zero tolerance" policy and resulting separation of families. More than 1,100 people were inside the large, dark facility that's divided into separate wings for unaccompanied children, adults on their own, and mothers and fathers with children. The cages in each wing open out into common areas to use portable restrooms. The overhead lighting in the warehouse stays on around the clock. Children who've been taken into custody related to cases of illegal entry into the United States, rest in one of the cages at a facility in McAllen, Texas Credit: AP The Border Patrol said close to 200 people inside the facility were minors unaccompanied by a parent. Another 500 were "family units," parents and children. Many adults who crossed the border without legal permission could be charged with illegal entry and placed in jail, away from their children. Reporters were not allowed by agents to interview any of the detainees or take photos. Nearly 2,000 children have been taken from their parents since Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced the policy, which directs Homeland Security officials to refer all cases of illegal entry into the United States for prosecution. Church groups and human rights advocates have sharply criticized the policy, calling it inhumane. I saw chain link cages full of unaccompanied children. They sat on metal benches and stared straight ahead silently— Rep. Peter Welch (@PeterWelch) June 17, 2018 Stories have spread of children being torn from their parents' arms, and parents not being able to find where their kids have gone. A group of congressional lawmakers visited the same facility on Sunday and were set to visit a longer-term shelter holding around 1,500 children - many of whom were separated from their parents. "Those kids inside who have been separated from their parents are already being traumatised," said Democratic Sen. Jeff Merkley of Oregon, who was denied entry earlier this month to children's shelter. "It doesn't matter whether the floor is swept and the bedsheets tucked in tight." In Texas' Rio Grande Valley, the busiest corridor for people trying to enter the US, Border Patrol officials argue that they have to crack down on migrants and separate adults from children as a deterrent to others. "When you exempt a group of people from the law ... that creates a draw," said Manuel Padilla, the Border Patrol's chief agent here. "That creates the trends right here." Agents running the holding facility - generally known as "Ursula" for the name of the street it's on - said everyone detained is given adequate food, access to showers and laundered clothes, and medical care. People are supposed to move through the facility quickly. Under US law, children are required to be turned over within three days to shelters funded by the Department of Health and Human Services. People who've been taken into custody related to cases of illegal entry into the United States, sit in one of the cages at a facility in McAllen, Texas Credit: AP Padilla said agents in the Rio Grande Valley have allowed families with children under the age of 5 to stay together in most cases. An advocate who spent several hours in the facility on Friday said she was deeply troubled by what she found. Michelle Brane, director of migrant rights at the Women's Refugee Commission, met with a 16-year-old girl who had been taking care of a young girl for three days. The teen and others in their cage thought the girl was 2 years old. "She had to teach other kids in the cell to change her diaper," Brane said. Just left Border Patrol Processing Center in McAllen—aka "the dog kennel." Witnessed loads of kids massed together in large pens of chain-linked fence separated from their moms and dads. @realDonaldTrump, change your shameful policy today! #FamiliesBelongTogether— Chris Van Hollen (@ChrisVanHollen) June 17, 2018 Brane said that after an attorney started to ask questions, agents found the girl's aunt and reunited the two. It turned out that the girl was actually 4 years old. Part of the problem was that she didn't speak Spanish, but K'iche, a language indigenous to Guatemala. "She was so traumatised that she wasn't talking," Brane said. "She was just curled up in a little ball." Brane said she also saw officials at the facility scold a group of five-year-olds for playing around in their cage, telling them to settle down. There are no toys or books. Demonstrators hold a large banner that reads "Humanity Is Borderless," outside of a U.S. Border Patrol station in McAllen, Credit: Bloomberg But one boy nearby wasn't playing with the rest. According to Brane, he was quiet, clutching a piece of paper that was a photocopy of his mother's ID card. "The government is literally taking kids away from their parents and leaving them in inappropriate conditions," Brane said. "If a parent left a child in a cage with no supervision with other five-year-olds, they'd be held accountable." Dr. Colleen Kraft, the head of the American Academy of Pediatrics, said she visited a small shelter in Texas recently, which she declined to identity. A toddler inside the 60-bed facility caught her eye - she was crying uncontrollably and pounding her little fists on mat. Staff members tried to console the child, who looked to be about two years old, Kraft said. She had been taken from her mother the night before and brought to the shelter. The staff gave her books and toys - but they weren't allowed to pick her up, to hold her or hug her to try to calm her. As a rule, staff aren't allowed to touch the children there, she said. "The stress is overwhelming," she said. "The focus needs to be on the welfare of these children, absent of politics."
ADC66. Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Inna Deriglazova (R) of Russia celebrates winning the women's Foil final event against Arianna Errigo of Italy at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Rusia, Italia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
ADC66. Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Inna Deriglazova (R) of Russia celebrates winning the women's Foil final event against Arianna Errigo of Italy at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Rusia, Italia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
ADC66. Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Inna Deriglazova (R) of Russia celebrates winning the women's Foil final event against Arianna Errigo of Italy at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Rusia, Italia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
ADC66. Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Inna Deriglazova (R) of Russia celebrates winning the women's Foil final event against Arianna Errigo of Italy at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Rusia, Italia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
ADC66. Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Inna Deriglazova (R) of Russia celebrates winning the women's Foil final event against Arianna Errigo of Italy at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Rusia, Italia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
ADC66. Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Inna Deriglazova (R) of Russia celebrates winning the women's Foil final event against Arianna Errigo of Italy at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Rusia, Italia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
ADC66. Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Arianna Errigo (L) of Italy in action during the women's Foil final event against Inna Deriglazova (R) of Russia at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Rusia, Italia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
ADC66. Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Arianna Errigo (L) of Italy in action during the women's Foil final event against Inna Deriglazova (R) of Russia at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Rusia, Italia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
ADC66. Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Arianna Errigo (L) of Italy in action during the women's Foil final event against Inna Deriglazova (R) of Russia at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Rusia, Italia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
ADC66. Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Arianna Errigo (L) of Italy in action during the women's Foil final event against Inna Deriglazova (R) of Russia at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Rusia, Italia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
ADC66. Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Arianna Errigo (L) of Italy in action during the women's Foil final event against Inna Deriglazova (R) of Russia at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Rusia, Italia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
ADC66. Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Arianna Errigo (L) of Italy in action during the women's Foil final event against Inna Deriglazova (R) of Russia at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Rusia, Italia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
ADC66. Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Arianna Errigo (L) of Italy in action during the women's Foil final event against Inna Deriglazova (R) of Russia at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Rusia, Italia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
ADC66. Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Arianna Errigo (L) of Italy in action during the women's Foil final event against Inna Deriglazova (R) of Russia at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Rusia, Italia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
ADC66. Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Arianna Errigo (L) of Italy in action during the women's Foil final event against Inna Deriglazova (R) of Russia at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Rusia, Italia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
ADC66. Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Arianna Errigo (L) of Italy in action during the women's Foil final event against Inna Deriglazova (R) of Russia at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Rusia, Italia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
ADC66. Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Arianna Errigo (L) of Italy in action during the women's Foil final event against Inna Deriglazova (R) of Russia at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Rusia, Italia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
ADC66. Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Arianna Errigo (L) of Italy in action during the women's Foil final event against Inna Deriglazova (R) of Russia at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Rusia, Italia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
ADC66. Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Arianna Errigo (L) of Italy in action during the women's Foil final event against Inna Deriglazova (R) of Russia at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Rusia, Italia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
ADC66. Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Arianna Errigo (L) of Italy in action during the women's Foil final event against Inna Deriglazova (R) of Russia at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Rusia, Italia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
ADC66. Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Arianna Errigo (L) of Italy in action during the women's Foil final event against Inna Deriglazova (R) of Russia at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Rusia, Italia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
ADC66. Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Arianna Errigo (L) of Italy in action during the women's Foil final event against Inna Deriglazova (R) of Russia at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Rusia, Italia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
ADC66. Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Arianna Errigo (L) of Italy in action during the women's Foil final event against Inna Deriglazova (R) of Russia at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Rusia, Italia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
ADC66. Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Arianna Errigo (L) of Italy in action during the women's Foil final event against Inna Deriglazova (R) of Russia at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Rusia, Italia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
ADC66. Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Arianna Errigo (L) of Italy in action during the women's Foil final event against Inna Deriglazova (R) of Russia at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Rusia, Italia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
ADC66. Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Arianna Errigo (L) of Italy in action during the women's Foil final event against Inna Deriglazova (R) of Russia at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Rusia, Italia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
ADC66. Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Arianna Errigo (L) of Italy in action during the women's Foil final event against Inna Deriglazova (R) of Russia at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Rusia, Italia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
ADC66. Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Arianna Errigo (L) of Italy in action during the women's Foil final event against Inna Deriglazova (R) of Russia at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Rusia, Italia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
ADC66. Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Arianna Errigo (L) of Italy in action during the women's Foil final event against Inna Deriglazova (R) of Russia at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Rusia, Italia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
ADC66. Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Arianna Errigo (L) of Italy in action during the women's Foil final event against Inna Deriglazova (R) of Russia at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Rusia, Italia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
ADC66. Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Yannick Borel of France (R) shakes hands with Nikolai Novosjolov of Estonia after winning the men's Epee Final event at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Francia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
ADC66. Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Yannick Borel of France (R) shakes hands with Nikolai Novosjolov of Estonia after winning the men's Epee Final event at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Francia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
ADC66. Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Yannick Borel of France (R) shakes hands with Nikolai Novosjolov of Estonia after winning the men's Epee Final event at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Francia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
ADC66. Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Yannick Borel of France celebrates winning the men's Epee Final event against Nikolai Novosjolov of Estonia at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Francia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
ADC66. Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Yannick Borel of France celebrates winning the men's Epee Final event against Nikolai Novosjolov of Estonia at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Francia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
ADC66. Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Yannick Borel of France celebrates winning the men's Epee Final event against Nikolai Novosjolov of Estonia at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Francia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
ADC66. Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Yannick Borel of France celebrates winning the men's Epee Final event against Nikolai Novosjolov of Estonia at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Francia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
ADC66. Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Yannick Borel of France celebrates winning the men's Epee Final event against Nikolai Novosjolov of Estonia at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Francia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
ADC66. Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Yannick Borel of France celebrates winning the men's Epee Final event against Nikolai Novosjolov of Estonia at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Francia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
ADC66. Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Yannick Borel of France celebrates winning the men's Epee Final event against Nikolai Novosjolov of Estonia at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Francia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
ADC66. Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Yannick Borel of France celebrates winning the men's Epee Final event against Nikolai Novosjolov of Estonia at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Francia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
ADC66. Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Yannick Borel of France celebrates winning the men's Epee Final event against Nikolai Novosjolov of Estonia at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Francia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
ADC66. Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Yannick Borel of France reacts during the men's Epee Final event against Nikolai Novosjolov of Estonia at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Francia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
ADC66. Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Yannick Borel of France reacts during the men's Epee Final event against Nikolai Novosjolov of Estonia at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Francia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
ADC66. Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Yannick Borel of France reacts during the men's Epee Final event against Nikolai Novosjolov of Estonia at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Francia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Arianna Errigo (L) of Italy in action against Alice Volpi (R) of Italy during the women's Foil event semi final at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Italia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Arianna Errigo (L) of Italy in action against Alice Volpi (R) of Italy during the women's Foil event semi final at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Italia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Arianna Errigo (L) of Italy in action against Alice Volpi (R) of Italy during the women's Foil event semi final at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Italia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
ADC66. Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Nikolai Novosjolov (L) of Estonia in action during the men's Epee Final event against Yannick Borel (R) of France at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Francia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
ADC66. Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Nikolai Novosjolov (L) of Estonia in action during the men's Epee Final event against Yannick Borel (R) of France at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Francia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
ADC66. Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Nikolai Novosjolov (L) of Estonia in action during the men's Epee Final event against Yannick Borel (R) of France at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Francia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
ADC66. Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Nikolai Novosjolov (L) of Estonia in action during the men's Epee Final event against Yannick Borel (R) of France at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Francia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
ADC66. Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Nikolai Novosjolov (L) of Estonia in action during the men's Epee Final event against Yannick Borel (R) of France at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Francia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
ADC66. Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Nikolai Novosjolov (L) of Estonia in action during the men's Epee Final event against Yannick Borel (R) of France at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Francia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
ADC66. Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Nikolai Novosjolov (L) of Estonia in action during the men's Epee Final event against Yannick Borel (R) of France at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Francia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
ADC66. Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Nikolai Novosjolov (L) of Estonia in action during the men's Epee Final event against Yannick Borel (R) of France at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Francia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
ADC66. Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Nikolai Novosjolov (L) of Estonia in action during the men's Epee Final event against Yannick Borel (R) of France at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Francia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
ADC66. Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Arianna Errigo of Italy in action against Alice Volpi of Italy during the women's Foil event semi final at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Italia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
ADC66. Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Arianna Errigo of Italy in action against Alice Volpi of Italy during the women's Foil event semi final at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Italia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
ADC66. Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Arianna Errigo of Italy in action against Alice Volpi of Italy during the women's Foil event semi final at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Italia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Arianna Errigo (L) of Italy in action against Alice Volpi (R) of Italy during the women's Foil event semi final at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Italia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Arianna Errigo (L) of Italy in action against Alice Volpi (R) of Italy during the women's Foil event semi final at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Italia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Arianna Errigo (L) of Italy in action against Alice Volpi (R) of Italy during the women's Foil event semi final at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Italia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
ADC66. Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Arianna Errigo (L) of Italy in action against Alice Volpi (R) of Italy during the women's Foil event semi final at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Italia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
ADC66. Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Arianna Errigo (L) of Italy in action against Alice Volpi (R) of Italy during the women's Foil event semi final at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Italia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
ADC66. Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Arianna Errigo (L) of Italy in action against Alice Volpi (R) of Italy during the women's Foil event semi final at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Italia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Arianna Errigo (L) of Italy in action against Alice Volpi (R) of Italy during the women's Foil event semi final at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Italia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Arianna Errigo (L) of Italy in action against Alice Volpi (R) of Italy during the women's Foil event semi final at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Italia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Arianna Errigo (L) of Italy in action against Alice Volpi (R) of Italy during the women's Foil event semi final at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Italia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Martyna Synoradzka of Poland during the women's Foil event semi final against Inna Deriglazova (not pictured) of Russia at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Polonia, Rusia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Martyna Synoradzka of Poland during the women's Foil event semi final against Inna Deriglazova (not pictured) of Russia at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Polonia, Rusia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC
Novi Sad (Serbia), 17/06/2018.- Martyna Synoradzka of Poland during the women's Foil event semi final against Inna Deriglazova (not pictured) of Russia at the Fencing European Championships in Novi Sad, Serbia, 17 June 2018. (Polonia, Rusia) EFE/EPA/ANDREJ CUKIC

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