Brazil soccer star Neymar

World-class soccer player Neymar leads the Brazil team at the Olympics.

Boys, wearing Brazilian national team Neymar jerseys, celebrate because they were allowed entry at the Granja Comary training center to watch the national soccer team training session, in Teresopolis, Brazil, Friday, May 25, 2018. Neymar, the worlds highest paid soccer player, is nearly recovered from a foot operation and has joined 16 of his teammates in Teresopolis, looking ahead to competing in Russia at the World Cup in July. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)
Disgruntled fans break into Brazil pre-World Cup training
Boys, wearing Brazilian national team Neymar jerseys, celebrate because they were allowed entry at the Granja Comary training center to watch the national soccer team training session, in Teresopolis, Brazil, Friday, May 25, 2018. Neymar, the worlds highest paid soccer player, is nearly recovered from a foot operation and has joined 16 of his teammates in Teresopolis, looking ahead to competing in Russia at the World Cup in July. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)
Brazil's Neymar gives autographs to fans after a practice session of the Brazilian national soccer team ahead the World Cup in Russia, at the Granja Comary training center In Teresopolis, Brazil, Friday, May 25, 2018. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)
Disgruntled fans break into Brazil pre-World Cup training
Brazil's Neymar gives autographs to fans after a practice session of the Brazilian national soccer team ahead the World Cup in Russia, at the Granja Comary training center In Teresopolis, Brazil, Friday, May 25, 2018. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)
Brazil's Neymar, right, embraces Fernandinho during a national soccer team practice session ahead the World Cup in Russia, at the Granja Comary training center In Teresopolis, Brazil, Friday, May 25, 2018. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)
Disgruntled fans break into Brazil pre-World Cup training
Brazil's Neymar, right, embraces Fernandinho during a national soccer team practice session ahead the World Cup in Russia, at the Granja Comary training center In Teresopolis, Brazil, Friday, May 25, 2018. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)
Football Soccer - Brazil national soccer team training - World Cup 2018 - Granja Comary, Teresopolis, Brazil - May 25, 2018 - Neymar and Willian talk with fans. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes
World Cup 2018 - Brazil national soccer team training
Football Soccer - Brazil national soccer team training - World Cup 2018 - Granja Comary, Teresopolis, Brazil - May 25, 2018 - Neymar and Willian talk with fans. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes
Football Soccer - Brazil national soccer team training - World Cup 2018 - Granja Comary, Teresopolis, Brazil - May 25, 2018 - Neymar and head coach Tite talk with fans. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes
World Cup 2018 - Brazil national soccer team training
Football Soccer - Brazil national soccer team training - World Cup 2018 - Granja Comary, Teresopolis, Brazil - May 25, 2018 - Neymar and head coach Tite talk with fans. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes
Football Soccer - Brazil national soccer team training - World Cup 2018 - Granja Comary, Teresopolis, Brazil - May 25, 2018 - Neymar and head coach Tite talk with fans. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes
World Cup 2018 - Brazil national soccer team training
Football Soccer - Brazil national soccer team training - World Cup 2018 - Granja Comary, Teresopolis, Brazil - May 25, 2018 - Neymar and head coach Tite talk with fans. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes
BRA18. Teresópolis (Brazil), 25/05/2018.- Brazilian national soccer team player Neymar Jr (L) greets fans after a training session at Granja Comary center in Teresopolis, Brazil, 25 May 2018. (Brasil, Rusia) EFE/EPA/Marcelo Sayao
BRA18. Teresópolis (Brazil), 25/05/2018.- Brazilian national soccer team player Neymar Jr (L) greets fans after a training session at Granja Comary center in Teresopolis, Brazil, 25 May 2018. (Brasil, Rusia) EFE/EPA/Marcelo Sayao
BRA18. Teresópolis (Brazil), 25/05/2018.- Brazilian national soccer team player Neymar Jr (L) greets fans after a training session at Granja Comary center in Teresopolis, Brazil, 25 May 2018. (Brasil, Rusia) EFE/EPA/Marcelo Sayao
BRA18. Teresópolis (Brazil), 25/05/2018.- Brazilian national soccer team head coach Tite (L) and player Neymar Jr (2-L) greet fans after a training session at Granja Comary center in Teresopolis, Brazil, 25 May 2018. (Brasil, Rusia) EFE/EPA/Marcelo Sayao
BRA18. Teresópolis (Brazil), 25/05/2018.- Brazilian national soccer team head coach Tite (L) and player Neymar Jr (2-L) greet fans after a training session at Granja Comary center in Teresopolis, Brazil, 25 May 2018. (Brasil, Rusia) EFE/EPA/Marcelo Sayao
BRA18. Teresópolis (Brazil), 25/05/2018.- Brazilian national soccer team head coach Tite (L) and player Neymar Jr (2-L) greet fans after a training session at Granja Comary center in Teresopolis, Brazil, 25 May 2018. (Brasil, Rusia) EFE/EPA/Marcelo Sayao
BRA18. Teresópolis (Brazil), 25/05/2018.- Brazilian national soccer team head coach Tite (L) and player Neymar Jr (2-L) greet fans after a training session at Granja Comary center in Teresopolis, Brazil, 25 May 2018. (Brasil, Rusia) EFE/EPA/Marcelo Sayao
BRA18. Teresópolis (Brazil), 25/05/2018.- Brazilian national soccer team head coach Tite (L) and player Neymar Jr (2-L) greet fans after a training session at Granja Comary center in Teresopolis, Brazil, 25 May 2018. (Brasil, Rusia) EFE/EPA/Marcelo Sayao
BRA18. Teresópolis (Brazil), 25/05/2018.- Brazilian national soccer team head coach Tite (L) and player Neymar Jr (2-L) greet fans after a training session at Granja Comary center in Teresopolis, Brazil, 25 May 2018. (Brasil, Rusia) EFE/EPA/Marcelo Sayao
BRA18. Teresópolis (Brazil), 25/05/2018.- Brazilian national soccer team player Neymar Jr (R) walks accompanied by his son after a training session at Granja Comary center in Teresopolis, Brazil, 25 May 2018. (Brasil, Rusia) EFE/EPA/Marcelo Sayao
BRA18. Teresópolis (Brazil), 25/05/2018.- Brazilian national soccer team player Neymar Jr (R) walks accompanied by his son after a training session at Granja Comary center in Teresopolis, Brazil, 25 May 2018. (Brasil, Rusia) EFE/EPA/Marcelo Sayao
BRA18. Teresópolis (Brazil), 25/05/2018.- Brazilian national soccer team player Neymar Jr (R) walks accompanied by his son after a training session at Granja Comary center in Teresopolis, Brazil, 25 May 2018. (Brasil, Rusia) EFE/EPA/Marcelo Sayao
BRA18. Teresópolis (Brazil), 25/05/2018.- Brazilian national soccer team head coach Tite (2-L) and players Willian (L) and Neymar Jr (3-L) greet fans after a training session at Granja Comary center in Teresopolis, Brazil, 25 May 2018. (Brasil, Rusia) EFE/EPA/Marcelo Sayao
BRA18. Teresópolis (Brazil), 25/05/2018.- Brazilian national soccer team head coach Tite (2-L) and players Willian (L) and Neymar Jr (3-L) greet fans after a training session at Granja Comary center in Teresopolis, Brazil, 25 May 2018. (Brasil, Rusia) EFE/EPA/Marcelo Sayao
BRA18. Teresópolis (Brazil), 25/05/2018.- Brazilian national soccer team head coach Tite (2-L) and players Willian (L) and Neymar Jr (3-L) greet fans after a training session at Granja Comary center in Teresopolis, Brazil, 25 May 2018. (Brasil, Rusia) EFE/EPA/Marcelo Sayao
BRA18. Teresópolis (Brazil), 25/05/2018.- Brazilian national soccer team player Neymar Jr (R) plays with his son after a training session at Granja Comary center in Teresopolis, Brazil, 25 May 2018. (Brasil, Rusia) EFE/EPA/Marcelo Sayao
BRA18. Teresópolis (Brazil), 25/05/2018.- Brazilian national soccer team player Neymar Jr (R) plays with his son after a training session at Granja Comary center in Teresopolis, Brazil, 25 May 2018. (Brasil, Rusia) EFE/EPA/Marcelo Sayao
BRA18. Teresópolis (Brazil), 25/05/2018.- Brazilian national soccer team player Neymar Jr (R) plays with his son after a training session at Granja Comary center in Teresopolis, Brazil, 25 May 2018. (Brasil, Rusia) EFE/EPA/Marcelo Sayao
The full-back has once again stated how he would love his fellow Brazilian to return to La Liga and join him at Santiago Bernabeu
'Big players need to play in Madrid' - Marcelo urges Neymar to join Real
The full-back has once again stated how he would love his fellow Brazilian to return to La Liga and join him at Santiago Bernabeu
Frustration with the same old names and faces occupying Premier League jobs was a feature of last season, and could even prove a watershed moment in how fans think about their manager. Sam Allardyce, Mark Hughes and Alan Pardew are just three beneficiaries of the managerial merry-go-round, but a culture of safe appointments is just as true in the upper echelons of the Premier League. Arsenal appointed Unai Emery as their new head coach on Wednesday while Chelsea have a strong interest Maurizio Sarri and both feel like the 'next cab off the rank' of European coaches. The omnipotent gaffer is being phased out of the game, in favour of more democratic and collegiate structures with power shared between a technical director, recruitment guru and head coach. Here are 10 coaches who might find themselves in contention for jobs when the sacking seasons begins in autumn. Domenico Tedesco (Schalke) Dominic Tedesco led Schalke to a second place finish in the Bundesliga Credit: AFP The head coach of the team who finished second in the Bundesliga is hardly an obscure selection, but 32-year-old Domenico Tedesco looks a cast-iron certainty to be considered for the next 'Big Six' job available. Born in Italy, Tedesco's parents emigrated to Germany when he was two years old. He never played football professionally but like Hoffenheim coach Julian Nagelsmann found a break in coaching at a young age. Appointed by second-tier Erzgebirge Aue in March 2017, Tedesco won 13 points from five games to guide them to safety. Schalke took a chance on him last summer and under his guidance the Gelsenkirchen club have qualified for the Champions League after a three-year absence. Regarded as a tactically flexible coach, one highlight of a superb debut season was a comeback from 4-0 down to 4-4 in the derby against Borussia Dortmund. Gian Piero Gasperini (Atalanta) Gasperini lasted only five games as Inter Milan manager in 2011, but has bounced back since then Credit: Getty Images Lasted only five games at Inter in 2011, but Gian Piero Gasperini has a warranted reputation for getting a lot from a little. He guided Genoa to Europe in 2009 but it is his work at Atalanta over the past few seasons that has really caught the eye. Benefiting from one of Italy's most productive academies, Giasperini's Atlanta recovered from losing four of their first five league games to finish fourth in 2016-17, achieving European qualification for the first time in 26-years. The 58-year-old coach ripped up the tactical rule-book, using a Dutch-style 3-4-3 that left opponents dumbfounded. Despite losing Franck Kessie to Milan last summer and other key players, Atalanta continued to punch above their weight with a seventh-placed finish. Giasperini is not the youthful up-and-comer some clubs crave, but any club looking to maximise meagre resources could do far worse. Giovanni van Bronckhorst (Feyenoord) Giovanni van Bronckhorst was loosely linked with Arsenal before Unai Emery's appointment Credit: Getty Images The former Arsenal player received a ringing endorsement from Arsene Wenger last year and a glance at his record makes it easy to see why. Guided Feyenoord to the Dutch Cup in his first season before winning the Eredivisie in his second, coaxing the best out of a squad with a mix of talented youngsters and wise old heads such as Dirk Kuyt. Last season proved more challenging, but Feyenoord did rally late, winning their last eight league matches to finish fourth and claimed another cup. Ralph Hasenhüttl (free agent) Hasenhüttl stepped down as RB Leipzig head coach at the end of last season after two seasons in charge. Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund have made both made new appointments this summer, so Hasenhüttl must consider his next move. The Austrian guided the controversial Bundesliga newcomers to second-place and Champions League qualification with a brand of high-octane, progressive football. He may have fallen out with RB Leipzig's hierarchy over a new contract, but Hasenhüttl looks ideally suited to any club with a technical director-head coach set-up. Whether he can find a club that can unearth talent like Naby Keita or Emil Forsberg is another matter. Eddie Howe (Bournemouth) Eddie Howe's name has not been mentioned for recent managerial vacancies Credit: Reuters Not an unfamiliar name, but one who seems to be drifting down clubs' lists. In the summer of 2016 there were reports that he was well thought of by Arsenal's hierarchy, and he was also linked with Everton - the club he supported as a boy. He was frequently spoken of as a potential England manager too. Several managerial vacancies have opened up in the last few months, and Howe does not seem to have been considered for any of them. He has done nothing to diminish his reputation in the intervening period, quite the opposite in fact, so his diminished status is curious. Bournemouth's last two league finishes are ninth and 12th - a commendable achievement. His record in the transfer market is patchy however, and there is also a risk that becomes institutionalised at Bournemouth. Familiarity breeds contempt. Tite (Brazil) Tite has been praised for his man-management of Neymar Credit: Reuters The quality of manager in international football is desperately low, but Brazil's Tite is one who looks capable of stepping into a top club job. Has galvanised a group of players rocked by a 7-1 World Cup semi-final humiliation on home soil at the hands of Germany. Following the oppressive Dunga, Tite has put an arm round a few of his charges and the result is possibly the best Brazil team since 2002. Neymar, Gabriel Jesus and Philippe Coutinho will lead the charge in Russia, with Roberto Firmino and Willian in reserve, supported by a likely midfield three of Casemiro, Paulinho and Rene Augusto. Dani Alves' injury is a blow, leaving the right-back berth free in a back four otherwise compromised of Thiago Silva, Marquinhos and Marcelo. In goal, they can choose between Alisson and Ederson. Not bad. Neil Harris (Millwall) Lee Johnson, Dean Smith and Paul Cook are all promising Championship managers, but Neil Harris has done a remarkable job at the Den against all the odds. Building upon the 'siege mentality' that is part of Millwall's essential character, and thanks in no small part to Lee Gregory and Steve Morison's strike partnership, Harris has taken the London club from League One to the brink of the play-offs. It would take a hell of an offer to tempt Harris away from Millwall however, where he enjoys legendary status. Marcelo Gallardo (River Plate) Another disciple of Marcelo Bielsa, Gallardo could be the next successful Argentinian coaching export. Appointed River Plate manager in 2014, he has tucked away the Copa Sudamericana, Copa Libertadores and the Recopa already. Gallardo has a reputation as an innovator too, becoming the first coach in Argentina's first division to appoint a female assistant as well as working with a neuroscientist to hone players' mental approach. Could be on Atletico Madrid's shortlist should Diego Simeone ever depart. Slavisa Jokanovic (Fulham) There have been some recent whispers that Chelsea are interested in Slavisa Jokanovic Credit: PA There have already been whispers of Chelsea's interest, but if Fulham win their play-off final against Aston Villa and thrive in the Premier League then Jokanovic will be a wanted man. Fulham were without a doubt the best footballing side in the Championship last season, but Jokanovic also possesses an inner-steel that ensures discipline is not lost in all the pretty passing patterns. For clubs lost in the Premier League mid-table morass, Jokanovic would instill a style of play and an identity for fans to believe in. Rui Vitoria (Benfica) Has lifted two Portuguese championships and two cups in three seasons at Benfica, and at 48 Vitoria must surely be considering a fresh challenge. Losing out on the championship to Porto this season also has Vitoria under pressure Benfica are a dominant force, but a win percentage of 70% after 152 matches in charge remains impressive. Jose Mourinho's former assistant Rui Faria has been linked to the job, so that could free Vitoria to seek pastures new.
The 10 managers nobody is linking with vacant jobs...but should be
Frustration with the same old names and faces occupying Premier League jobs was a feature of last season, and could even prove a watershed moment in how fans think about their manager. Sam Allardyce, Mark Hughes and Alan Pardew are just three beneficiaries of the managerial merry-go-round, but a culture of safe appointments is just as true in the upper echelons of the Premier League. Arsenal appointed Unai Emery as their new head coach on Wednesday while Chelsea have a strong interest Maurizio Sarri and both feel like the 'next cab off the rank' of European coaches. The omnipotent gaffer is being phased out of the game, in favour of more democratic and collegiate structures with power shared between a technical director, recruitment guru and head coach. Here are 10 coaches who might find themselves in contention for jobs when the sacking seasons begins in autumn. Domenico Tedesco (Schalke) Dominic Tedesco led Schalke to a second place finish in the Bundesliga Credit: AFP The head coach of the team who finished second in the Bundesliga is hardly an obscure selection, but 32-year-old Domenico Tedesco looks a cast-iron certainty to be considered for the next 'Big Six' job available. Born in Italy, Tedesco's parents emigrated to Germany when he was two years old. He never played football professionally but like Hoffenheim coach Julian Nagelsmann found a break in coaching at a young age. Appointed by second-tier Erzgebirge Aue in March 2017, Tedesco won 13 points from five games to guide them to safety. Schalke took a chance on him last summer and under his guidance the Gelsenkirchen club have qualified for the Champions League after a three-year absence. Regarded as a tactically flexible coach, one highlight of a superb debut season was a comeback from 4-0 down to 4-4 in the derby against Borussia Dortmund. Gian Piero Gasperini (Atalanta) Gasperini lasted only five games as Inter Milan manager in 2011, but has bounced back since then Credit: Getty Images Lasted only five games at Inter in 2011, but Gian Piero Gasperini has a warranted reputation for getting a lot from a little. He guided Genoa to Europe in 2009 but it is his work at Atalanta over the past few seasons that has really caught the eye. Benefiting from one of Italy's most productive academies, Giasperini's Atlanta recovered from losing four of their first five league games to finish fourth in 2016-17, achieving European qualification for the first time in 26-years. The 58-year-old coach ripped up the tactical rule-book, using a Dutch-style 3-4-3 that left opponents dumbfounded. Despite losing Franck Kessie to Milan last summer and other key players, Atalanta continued to punch above their weight with a seventh-placed finish. Giasperini is not the youthful up-and-comer some clubs crave, but any club looking to maximise meagre resources could do far worse. Giovanni van Bronckhorst (Feyenoord) Giovanni van Bronckhorst was loosely linked with Arsenal before Unai Emery's appointment Credit: Getty Images The former Arsenal player received a ringing endorsement from Arsene Wenger last year and a glance at his record makes it easy to see why. Guided Feyenoord to the Dutch Cup in his first season before winning the Eredivisie in his second, coaxing the best out of a squad with a mix of talented youngsters and wise old heads such as Dirk Kuyt. Last season proved more challenging, but Feyenoord did rally late, winning their last eight league matches to finish fourth and claimed another cup. Ralph Hasenhüttl (free agent) Hasenhüttl stepped down as RB Leipzig head coach at the end of last season after two seasons in charge. Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund have made both made new appointments this summer, so Hasenhüttl must consider his next move. The Austrian guided the controversial Bundesliga newcomers to second-place and Champions League qualification with a brand of high-octane, progressive football. He may have fallen out with RB Leipzig's hierarchy over a new contract, but Hasenhüttl looks ideally suited to any club with a technical director-head coach set-up. Whether he can find a club that can unearth talent like Naby Keita or Emil Forsberg is another matter. Eddie Howe (Bournemouth) Eddie Howe's name has not been mentioned for recent managerial vacancies Credit: Reuters Not an unfamiliar name, but one who seems to be drifting down clubs' lists. In the summer of 2016 there were reports that he was well thought of by Arsenal's hierarchy, and he was also linked with Everton - the club he supported as a boy. He was frequently spoken of as a potential England manager too. Several managerial vacancies have opened up in the last few months, and Howe does not seem to have been considered for any of them. He has done nothing to diminish his reputation in the intervening period, quite the opposite in fact, so his diminished status is curious. Bournemouth's last two league finishes are ninth and 12th - a commendable achievement. His record in the transfer market is patchy however, and there is also a risk that becomes institutionalised at Bournemouth. Familiarity breeds contempt. Tite (Brazil) Tite has been praised for his man-management of Neymar Credit: Reuters The quality of manager in international football is desperately low, but Brazil's Tite is one who looks capable of stepping into a top club job. Has galvanised a group of players rocked by a 7-1 World Cup semi-final humiliation on home soil at the hands of Germany. Following the oppressive Dunga, Tite has put an arm round a few of his charges and the result is possibly the best Brazil team since 2002. Neymar, Gabriel Jesus and Philippe Coutinho will lead the charge in Russia, with Roberto Firmino and Willian in reserve, supported by a likely midfield three of Casemiro, Paulinho and Rene Augusto. Dani Alves' injury is a blow, leaving the right-back berth free in a back four otherwise compromised of Thiago Silva, Marquinhos and Marcelo. In goal, they can choose between Alisson and Ederson. Not bad. Neil Harris (Millwall) Lee Johnson, Dean Smith and Paul Cook are all promising Championship managers, but Neil Harris has done a remarkable job at the Den against all the odds. Building upon the 'siege mentality' that is part of Millwall's essential character, and thanks in no small part to Lee Gregory and Steve Morison's strike partnership, Harris has taken the London club from League One to the brink of the play-offs. It would take a hell of an offer to tempt Harris away from Millwall however, where he enjoys legendary status. Marcelo Gallardo (River Plate) Another disciple of Marcelo Bielsa, Gallardo could be the next successful Argentinian coaching export. Appointed River Plate manager in 2014, he has tucked away the Copa Sudamericana, Copa Libertadores and the Recopa already. Gallardo has a reputation as an innovator too, becoming the first coach in Argentina's first division to appoint a female assistant as well as working with a neuroscientist to hone players' mental approach. Could be on Atletico Madrid's shortlist should Diego Simeone ever depart. Slavisa Jokanovic (Fulham) There have been some recent whispers that Chelsea are interested in Slavisa Jokanovic Credit: PA There have already been whispers of Chelsea's interest, but if Fulham win their play-off final against Aston Villa and thrive in the Premier League then Jokanovic will be a wanted man. Fulham were without a doubt the best footballing side in the Championship last season, but Jokanovic also possesses an inner-steel that ensures discipline is not lost in all the pretty passing patterns. For clubs lost in the Premier League mid-table morass, Jokanovic would instill a style of play and an identity for fans to believe in. Rui Vitoria (Benfica) Has lifted two Portuguese championships and two cups in three seasons at Benfica, and at 48 Vitoria must surely be considering a fresh challenge. Losing out on the championship to Porto this season also has Vitoria under pressure Benfica are a dominant force, but a win percentage of 70% after 152 matches in charge remains impressive. Jose Mourinho's former assistant Rui Faria has been linked to the job, so that could free Vitoria to seek pastures new.
Frustration with the same old names and faces occupying Premier League jobs was a feature of last season, and could even prove a watershed moment in how fans think about their manager. Sam Allardyce, Mark Hughes and Alan Pardew are just three beneficiaries of the managerial merry-go-round, but a culture of safe appointments is just as true in the upper echelons of the Premier League. Arsenal appointed Unai Emery as their new head coach on Wednesday while Chelsea have a strong interest Maurizio Sarri and both feel like the 'next cab off the rank' of European coaches. The omnipotent gaffer is being phased out of the game, in favour of more democratic and collegiate structures with power shared between a technical director, recruitment guru and head coach. Here are 10 coaches who might find themselves in contention for jobs when the sacking seasons begins in autumn. Domenico Tedesco (Schalke) Dominic Tedesco led Schalke to a second place finish in the Bundesliga Credit: AFP The head coach of the team who finished second in the Bundesliga is hardly an obscure selection, but 32-year-old Domenico Tedesco looks a cast-iron certainty to be considered for the next 'Big Six' job available. Born in Italy, Tedesco's parents emigrated to Germany when he was two years old. He never played football professionally but like Hoffenheim coach Julian Nagelsmann found a break in coaching at a young age. Appointed by second-tier Erzgebirge Aue in March 2017, Tedesco won 13 points from five games to guide them to safety. Schalke took a chance on him last summer and under his guidance the Gelsenkirchen club have qualified for the Champions League after a three-year absence. Regarded as a tactically flexible coach, one highlight of a superb debut season was a comeback from 4-0 down to 4-4 in the derby against Borussia Dortmund. Gian Piero Gasperini (Atalanta) Gasperini lasted only five games as Inter Milan manager in 2011, but has bounced back since then Credit: Getty Images Lasted only five games at Inter in 2011, but Gian Piero Gasperini has a warranted reputation for getting a lot from a little. He guided Genoa to Europe in 2009 but it is his work at Atalanta over the past few seasons that has really caught the eye. Benefiting from one of Italy's most productive academies, Giasperini's Atlanta recovered from losing four of their first five league games to finish fourth in 2016-17, achieving European qualification for the first time in 26-years. The 58-year-old coach ripped up the tactical rule-book, using a Dutch-style 3-4-3 that left opponents dumbfounded. Despite losing Franck Kessie to Milan last summer and other key players, Atalanta continued to punch above their weight with a seventh-placed finish. Giasperini is not the youthful up-and-comer some clubs crave, but any club looking to maximise meagre resources could do far worse. Giovanni van Bronckhorst (Feyenoord) Giovanni van Bronckhorst was loosely linked with Arsenal before Unai Emery's appointment Credit: Getty Images The former Arsenal player received a ringing endorsement from Arsene Wenger last year and a glance at his record makes it easy to see why. Guided Feyenoord to the Dutch Cup in his first season before winning the Eredivisie in his second, coaxing the best out of a squad with a mix of talented youngsters and wise old heads such as Dirk Kuyt. Last season proved more challenging, but Feyenoord did rally late, winning their last eight league matches to finish fourth and claimed another cup. Ralph Hasenhüttl (free agent) Hasenhüttl stepped down as RB Leipzig head coach at the end of last season after two seasons in charge. Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund have made both made new appointments this summer, so Hasenhüttl must consider his next move. The Austrian guided the controversial Bundesliga newcomers to second-place and Champions League qualification with a brand of high-octane, progressive football. He may have fallen out with RB Leipzig's hierarchy over a new contract, but Hasenhüttl looks ideally suited to any club with a technical director-head coach set-up. Whether he can find a club that can unearth talent like Naby Keita or Emil Forsberg is another matter. Eddie Howe (Bournemouth) Eddie Howe's name has not been mentioned for recent managerial vacancies Credit: Reuters Not an unfamiliar name, but one who seems to be drifting down clubs' lists. In the summer of 2016 there were reports that he was well thought of by Arsenal's hierarchy, and he was also linked with Everton - the club he supported as a boy. He was frequently spoken of as a potential England manager too. Several managerial vacancies have opened up in the last few months, and Howe does not seem to have been considered for any of them. He has done nothing to diminish his reputation in the intervening period, quite the opposite in fact, so his diminished status is curious. Bournemouth's last two league finishes are ninth and 12th - a commendable achievement. His record in the transfer market is patchy however, and there is also a risk that becomes institutionalised at Bournemouth. Familiarity breeds contempt. Tite (Brazil) Tite has been praised for his man-management of Neymar Credit: Reuters The quality of manager in international football is desperately low, but Brazil's Tite is one who looks capable of stepping into a top club job. Has galvanised a group of players rocked by a 7-1 World Cup semi-final humiliation on home soil at the hands of Germany. Following the oppressive Dunga, Tite has put an arm round a few of his charges and the result is possibly the best Brazil team since 2002. Neymar, Gabriel Jesus and Philippe Coutinho will lead the charge in Russia, with Roberto Firmino and Willian in reserve, supported by a likely midfield three of Casemiro, Paulinho and Rene Augusto. Dani Alves' injury is a blow, leaving the right-back berth free in a back four otherwise compromised of Thiago Silva, Marquinhos and Marcelo. In goal, they can choose between Alisson and Ederson. Not bad. Neil Harris (Millwall) Lee Johnson, Dean Smith and Paul Cook are all promising Championship managers, but Neil Harris has done a remarkable job at the Den against all the odds. Building upon the 'siege mentality' that is part of Millwall's essential character, and thanks in no small part to Lee Gregory and Steve Morison's strike partnership, Harris has taken the London club from League One to the brink of the play-offs. It would take a hell of an offer to tempt Harris away from Millwall however, where he enjoys legendary status. Marcelo Gallardo (River Plate) Another disciple of Marcelo Bielsa, Gallardo could be the next successful Argentinian coaching export. Appointed River Plate manager in 2014, he has tucked away the Copa Sudamericana, Copa Libertadores and the Recopa already. Gallardo has a reputation as an innovator too, becoming the first coach in Argentina's first division to appoint a female assistant as well as working with a neuroscientist to hone players' mental approach. Could be on Atletico Madrid's shortlist should Diego Simeone ever depart. Slavisa Jokanovic (Fulham) There have been some recent whispers that Chelsea are interested in Slavisa Jokanovic Credit: PA There have already been whispers of Chelsea's interest, but if Fulham win their play-off final against Aston Villa and thrive in the Premier League then Jokanovic will be a wanted man. Fulham were without a doubt the best footballing side in the Championship last season, but Jokanovic also possesses an inner-steel that ensures discipline is not lost in all the pretty passing patterns. For clubs lost in the Premier League mid-table morass, Jokanovic would instill a style of play and an identity for fans to believe in. Rui Vitoria (Benfica) Has lifted two Portuguese championships and two cups in three seasons at Benfica, and at 48 Vitoria must surely be considering a fresh challenge. Losing out on the championship to Porto this season also has Vitoria under pressure Benfica are a dominant force, but a win percentage of 70% after 152 matches in charge remains impressive. Jose Mourinho's former assistant Rui Faria has been linked to the job, so that could free Vitoria to seek pastures new.
The 10 managers nobody is linking with vacant jobs...but should be
Frustration with the same old names and faces occupying Premier League jobs was a feature of last season, and could even prove a watershed moment in how fans think about their manager. Sam Allardyce, Mark Hughes and Alan Pardew are just three beneficiaries of the managerial merry-go-round, but a culture of safe appointments is just as true in the upper echelons of the Premier League. Arsenal appointed Unai Emery as their new head coach on Wednesday while Chelsea have a strong interest Maurizio Sarri and both feel like the 'next cab off the rank' of European coaches. The omnipotent gaffer is being phased out of the game, in favour of more democratic and collegiate structures with power shared between a technical director, recruitment guru and head coach. Here are 10 coaches who might find themselves in contention for jobs when the sacking seasons begins in autumn. Domenico Tedesco (Schalke) Dominic Tedesco led Schalke to a second place finish in the Bundesliga Credit: AFP The head coach of the team who finished second in the Bundesliga is hardly an obscure selection, but 32-year-old Domenico Tedesco looks a cast-iron certainty to be considered for the next 'Big Six' job available. Born in Italy, Tedesco's parents emigrated to Germany when he was two years old. He never played football professionally but like Hoffenheim coach Julian Nagelsmann found a break in coaching at a young age. Appointed by second-tier Erzgebirge Aue in March 2017, Tedesco won 13 points from five games to guide them to safety. Schalke took a chance on him last summer and under his guidance the Gelsenkirchen club have qualified for the Champions League after a three-year absence. Regarded as a tactically flexible coach, one highlight of a superb debut season was a comeback from 4-0 down to 4-4 in the derby against Borussia Dortmund. Gian Piero Gasperini (Atalanta) Gasperini lasted only five games as Inter Milan manager in 2011, but has bounced back since then Credit: Getty Images Lasted only five games at Inter in 2011, but Gian Piero Gasperini has a warranted reputation for getting a lot from a little. He guided Genoa to Europe in 2009 but it is his work at Atalanta over the past few seasons that has really caught the eye. Benefiting from one of Italy's most productive academies, Giasperini's Atlanta recovered from losing four of their first five league games to finish fourth in 2016-17, achieving European qualification for the first time in 26-years. The 58-year-old coach ripped up the tactical rule-book, using a Dutch-style 3-4-3 that left opponents dumbfounded. Despite losing Franck Kessie to Milan last summer and other key players, Atalanta continued to punch above their weight with a seventh-placed finish. Giasperini is not the youthful up-and-comer some clubs crave, but any club looking to maximise meagre resources could do far worse. Giovanni van Bronckhorst (Feyenoord) Giovanni van Bronckhorst was loosely linked with Arsenal before Unai Emery's appointment Credit: Getty Images The former Arsenal player received a ringing endorsement from Arsene Wenger last year and a glance at his record makes it easy to see why. Guided Feyenoord to the Dutch Cup in his first season before winning the Eredivisie in his second, coaxing the best out of a squad with a mix of talented youngsters and wise old heads such as Dirk Kuyt. Last season proved more challenging, but Feyenoord did rally late, winning their last eight league matches to finish fourth and claimed another cup. Ralph Hasenhüttl (free agent) Hasenhüttl stepped down as RB Leipzig head coach at the end of last season after two seasons in charge. Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund have made both made new appointments this summer, so Hasenhüttl must consider his next move. The Austrian guided the controversial Bundesliga newcomers to second-place and Champions League qualification with a brand of high-octane, progressive football. He may have fallen out with RB Leipzig's hierarchy over a new contract, but Hasenhüttl looks ideally suited to any club with a technical director-head coach set-up. Whether he can find a club that can unearth talent like Naby Keita or Emil Forsberg is another matter. Eddie Howe (Bournemouth) Eddie Howe's name has not been mentioned for recent managerial vacancies Credit: Reuters Not an unfamiliar name, but one who seems to be drifting down clubs' lists. In the summer of 2016 there were reports that he was well thought of by Arsenal's hierarchy, and he was also linked with Everton - the club he supported as a boy. He was frequently spoken of as a potential England manager too. Several managerial vacancies have opened up in the last few months, and Howe does not seem to have been considered for any of them. He has done nothing to diminish his reputation in the intervening period, quite the opposite in fact, so his diminished status is curious. Bournemouth's last two league finishes are ninth and 12th - a commendable achievement. His record in the transfer market is patchy however, and there is also a risk that becomes institutionalised at Bournemouth. Familiarity breeds contempt. Tite (Brazil) Tite has been praised for his man-management of Neymar Credit: Reuters The quality of manager in international football is desperately low, but Brazil's Tite is one who looks capable of stepping into a top club job. Has galvanised a group of players rocked by a 7-1 World Cup semi-final humiliation on home soil at the hands of Germany. Following the oppressive Dunga, Tite has put an arm round a few of his charges and the result is possibly the best Brazil team since 2002. Neymar, Gabriel Jesus and Philippe Coutinho will lead the charge in Russia, with Roberto Firmino and Willian in reserve, supported by a likely midfield three of Casemiro, Paulinho and Rene Augusto. Dani Alves' injury is a blow, leaving the right-back berth free in a back four otherwise compromised of Thiago Silva, Marquinhos and Marcelo. In goal, they can choose between Alisson and Ederson. Not bad. Neil Harris (Millwall) Lee Johnson, Dean Smith and Paul Cook are all promising Championship managers, but Neil Harris has done a remarkable job at the Den against all the odds. Building upon the 'siege mentality' that is part of Millwall's essential character, and thanks in no small part to Lee Gregory and Steve Morison's strike partnership, Harris has taken the London club from League One to the brink of the play-offs. It would take a hell of an offer to tempt Harris away from Millwall however, where he enjoys legendary status. Marcelo Gallardo (River Plate) Another disciple of Marcelo Bielsa, Gallardo could be the next successful Argentinian coaching export. Appointed River Plate manager in 2014, he has tucked away the Copa Sudamericana, Copa Libertadores and the Recopa already. Gallardo has a reputation as an innovator too, becoming the first coach in Argentina's first division to appoint a female assistant as well as working with a neuroscientist to hone players' mental approach. Could be on Atletico Madrid's shortlist should Diego Simeone ever depart. Slavisa Jokanovic (Fulham) There have been some recent whispers that Chelsea are interested in Slavisa Jokanovic Credit: PA There have already been whispers of Chelsea's interest, but if Fulham win their play-off final against Aston Villa and thrive in the Premier League then Jokanovic will be a wanted man. Fulham were without a doubt the best footballing side in the Championship last season, but Jokanovic also possesses an inner-steel that ensures discipline is not lost in all the pretty passing patterns. For clubs lost in the Premier League mid-table morass, Jokanovic would instill a style of play and an identity for fans to believe in. Rui Vitoria (Benfica) Has lifted two Portuguese championships and two cups in three seasons at Benfica, and at 48 Vitoria must surely be considering a fresh challenge. Losing out on the championship to Porto this season also has Vitoria under pressure Benfica are a dominant force, but a win percentage of 70% after 152 matches in charge remains impressive. Jose Mourinho's former assistant Rui Faria has been linked to the job, so that could free Vitoria to seek pastures new.
Frustration with the same old names and faces occupying Premier League jobs was a feature of last season, and could even prove a watershed moment in how fans think about their manager. Sam Allardyce, Mark Hughes and Alan Pardew are just three beneficiaries of the managerial merry-go-round, but a culture of safe appointments is just as true in the upper echelons of the Premier League. Arsenal appointed Unai Emery as their new head coach on Wednesday while Chelsea have a strong interest Maurizio Sarri and both feel like the 'next cab off the rank' of European coaches. The omnipotent gaffer is being phased out of the game, in favour of more democratic and collegiate structures with power shared between a technical director, recruitment guru and head coach. Here are 10 coaches who might find themselves in contention for jobs when the sacking seasons begins in autumn. Domenico Tedesco (Schalke) Dominic Tedesco led Schalke to a second place finish in the Bundesliga Credit: AFP The head coach of the team who finished second in the Bundesliga is hardly an obscure selection, but 32-year-old Domenico Tedesco looks a cast-iron certainty to be considered for the next 'Big Six' job available. Born in Italy, Tedesco's parents emigrated to Germany when he was two years old. He never played football professionally but like Hoffenheim coach Julian Nagelsmann found a break in coaching at a young age. Appointed by second-tier Erzgebirge Aue in March 2017, Tedesco won 13 points from five games to guide them to safety. Schalke took a chance on him last summer and under his guidance the Gelsenkirchen club have qualified for the Champions League after a three-year absence. Regarded as a tactically flexible coach, one highlight of a superb debut season was a comeback from 4-0 down to 4-4 in the derby against Borussia Dortmund. Gian Piero Gasperini (Atalanta) Gasperini lasted only five games as Inter Milan manager in 2011, but has bounced back since then Credit: Getty Images Lasted only five games at Inter in 2011, but Gian Piero Gasperini has a warranted reputation for getting a lot from a little. He guided Genoa to Europe in 2009 but it is his work at Atalanta over the past few seasons that has really caught the eye. Benefiting from one of Italy's most productive academies, Giasperini's Atlanta recovered from losing four of their first five league games to finish fourth in 2016-17, achieving European qualification for the first time in 26-years. The 58-year-old coach ripped up the tactical rule-book, using a Dutch-style 3-4-3 that left opponents dumbfounded. Despite losing Franck Kessie to Milan last summer and other key players, Atalanta continued to punch above their weight with a seventh-placed finish. Giasperini is not the youthful up-and-comer some clubs crave, but any club looking to maximise meagre resources could do far worse. Giovanni van Bronckhorst (Feyenoord) Giovanni van Bronckhorst was loosely linked with Arsenal before Unai Emery's appointment Credit: Getty Images The former Arsenal player received a ringing endorsement from Arsene Wenger last year and a glance at his record makes it easy to see why. Guided Feyenoord to the Dutch Cup in his first season before winning the Eredivisie in his second, coaxing the best out of a squad with a mix of talented youngsters and wise old heads such as Dirk Kuyt. Last season proved more challenging, but Feyenoord did rally late, winning their last eight league matches to finish fourth and claimed another cup. Ralph Hasenhüttl (free agent) Hasenhüttl stepped down as RB Leipzig head coach at the end of last season after two seasons in charge. Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund have made both made new appointments this summer, so Hasenhüttl must consider his next move. The Austrian guided the controversial Bundesliga newcomers to second-place and Champions League qualification with a brand of high-octane, progressive football. He may have fallen out with RB Leipzig's hierarchy over a new contract, but Hasenhüttl looks ideally suited to any club with a technical director-head coach set-up. Whether he can find a club that can unearth talent like Naby Keita or Emil Forsberg is another matter. Eddie Howe (Bournemouth) Eddie Howe's name has not been mentioned for recent managerial vacancies Credit: Reuters Not an unfamiliar name, but one who seems to be drifting down clubs' lists. In the summer of 2016 there were reports that he was well thought of by Arsenal's hierarchy, and he was also linked with Everton - the club he supported as a boy. He was frequently spoken of as a potential England manager too. Several managerial vacancies have opened up in the last few months, and Howe does not seem to have been considered for any of them. He has done nothing to diminish his reputation in the intervening period, quite the opposite in fact, so his diminished status is curious. Bournemouth's last two league finishes are ninth and 12th - a commendable achievement. His record in the transfer market is patchy however, and there is also a risk that becomes institutionalised at Bournemouth. Familiarity breeds contempt. Tite (Brazil) Tite has been praised for his man-management of Neymar Credit: Reuters The quality of manager in international football is desperately low, but Brazil's Tite is one who looks capable of stepping into a top club job. Has galvanised a group of players rocked by a 7-1 World Cup semi-final humiliation on home soil at the hands of Germany. Following the oppressive Dunga, Tite has put an arm round a few of his charges and the result is possibly the best Brazil team since 2002. Neymar, Gabriel Jesus and Philippe Coutinho will lead the charge in Russia, with Roberto Firmino and Willian in reserve, supported by a likely midfield three of Casemiro, Paulinho and Rene Augusto. Dani Alves' injury is a blow, leaving the right-back berth free in a back four otherwise compromised of Thiago Silva, Marquinhos and Marcelo. In goal, they can choose between Alisson and Ederson. Not bad. Neil Harris (Millwall) Lee Johnson, Dean Smith and Paul Cook are all promising Championship managers, but Neil Harris has done a remarkable job at the Den against all the odds. Building upon the 'siege mentality' that is part of Millwall's essential character, and thanks in no small part to Lee Gregory and Steve Morison's strike partnership, Harris has taken the London club from League One to the brink of the play-offs. It would take a hell of an offer to tempt Harris away from Millwall however, where he enjoys legendary status. Marcelo Gallardo (River Plate) Another disciple of Marcelo Bielsa, Gallardo could be the next successful Argentinian coaching export. Appointed River Plate manager in 2014, he has tucked away the Copa Sudamericana, Copa Libertadores and the Recopa already. Gallardo has a reputation as an innovator too, becoming the first coach in Argentina's first division to appoint a female assistant as well as working with a neuroscientist to hone players' mental approach. Could be on Atletico Madrid's shortlist should Diego Simeone ever depart. Slavisa Jokanovic (Fulham) There have been some recent whispers that Chelsea are interested in Slavisa Jokanovic Credit: PA There have already been whispers of Chelsea's interest, but if Fulham win their play-off final against Aston Villa and thrive in the Premier League then Jokanovic will be a wanted man. Fulham were without a doubt the best footballing side in the Championship last season, but Jokanovic also possesses an inner-steel that ensures discipline is not lost in all the pretty passing patterns. For clubs lost in the Premier League mid-table morass, Jokanovic would instill a style of play and an identity for fans to believe in. Rui Vitoria (Benfica) Has lifted two Portuguese championships and two cups in three seasons at Benfica, and at 48 Vitoria must surely be considering a fresh challenge. Losing out on the championship to Porto this season also has Vitoria under pressure Benfica are a dominant force, but a win percentage of 70% after 152 matches in charge remains impressive. Jose Mourinho's former assistant Rui Faria has been linked to the job, so that could free Vitoria to seek pastures new.
The 10 managers nobody is linking with vacant jobs...but should be
Frustration with the same old names and faces occupying Premier League jobs was a feature of last season, and could even prove a watershed moment in how fans think about their manager. Sam Allardyce, Mark Hughes and Alan Pardew are just three beneficiaries of the managerial merry-go-round, but a culture of safe appointments is just as true in the upper echelons of the Premier League. Arsenal appointed Unai Emery as their new head coach on Wednesday while Chelsea have a strong interest Maurizio Sarri and both feel like the 'next cab off the rank' of European coaches. The omnipotent gaffer is being phased out of the game, in favour of more democratic and collegiate structures with power shared between a technical director, recruitment guru and head coach. Here are 10 coaches who might find themselves in contention for jobs when the sacking seasons begins in autumn. Domenico Tedesco (Schalke) Dominic Tedesco led Schalke to a second place finish in the Bundesliga Credit: AFP The head coach of the team who finished second in the Bundesliga is hardly an obscure selection, but 32-year-old Domenico Tedesco looks a cast-iron certainty to be considered for the next 'Big Six' job available. Born in Italy, Tedesco's parents emigrated to Germany when he was two years old. He never played football professionally but like Hoffenheim coach Julian Nagelsmann found a break in coaching at a young age. Appointed by second-tier Erzgebirge Aue in March 2017, Tedesco won 13 points from five games to guide them to safety. Schalke took a chance on him last summer and under his guidance the Gelsenkirchen club have qualified for the Champions League after a three-year absence. Regarded as a tactically flexible coach, one highlight of a superb debut season was a comeback from 4-0 down to 4-4 in the derby against Borussia Dortmund. Gian Piero Gasperini (Atalanta) Gasperini lasted only five games as Inter Milan manager in 2011, but has bounced back since then Credit: Getty Images Lasted only five games at Inter in 2011, but Gian Piero Gasperini has a warranted reputation for getting a lot from a little. He guided Genoa to Europe in 2009 but it is his work at Atalanta over the past few seasons that has really caught the eye. Benefiting from one of Italy's most productive academies, Giasperini's Atlanta recovered from losing four of their first five league games to finish fourth in 2016-17, achieving European qualification for the first time in 26-years. The 58-year-old coach ripped up the tactical rule-book, using a Dutch-style 3-4-3 that left opponents dumbfounded. Despite losing Franck Kessie to Milan last summer and other key players, Atalanta continued to punch above their weight with a seventh-placed finish. Giasperini is not the youthful up-and-comer some clubs crave, but any club looking to maximise meagre resources could do far worse. Giovanni van Bronckhorst (Feyenoord) Giovanni van Bronckhorst was loosely linked with Arsenal before Unai Emery's appointment Credit: Getty Images The former Arsenal player received a ringing endorsement from Arsene Wenger last year and a glance at his record makes it easy to see why. Guided Feyenoord to the Dutch Cup in his first season before winning the Eredivisie in his second, coaxing the best out of a squad with a mix of talented youngsters and wise old heads such as Dirk Kuyt. Last season proved more challenging, but Feyenoord did rally late, winning their last eight league matches to finish fourth and claimed another cup. Ralph Hasenhüttl (free agent) Hasenhüttl stepped down as RB Leipzig head coach at the end of last season after two seasons in charge. Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund have made both made new appointments this summer, so Hasenhüttl must consider his next move. The Austrian guided the controversial Bundesliga newcomers to second-place and Champions League qualification with a brand of high-octane, progressive football. He may have fallen out with RB Leipzig's hierarchy over a new contract, but Hasenhüttl looks ideally suited to any club with a technical director-head coach set-up. Whether he can find a club that can unearth talent like Naby Keita or Emil Forsberg is another matter. Eddie Howe (Bournemouth) Eddie Howe's name has not been mentioned for recent managerial vacancies Credit: Reuters Not an unfamiliar name, but one who seems to be drifting down clubs' lists. In the summer of 2016 there were reports that he was well thought of by Arsenal's hierarchy, and he was also linked with Everton - the club he supported as a boy. He was frequently spoken of as a potential England manager too. Several managerial vacancies have opened up in the last few months, and Howe does not seem to have been considered for any of them. He has done nothing to diminish his reputation in the intervening period, quite the opposite in fact, so his diminished status is curious. Bournemouth's last two league finishes are ninth and 12th - a commendable achievement. His record in the transfer market is patchy however, and there is also a risk that becomes institutionalised at Bournemouth. Familiarity breeds contempt. Tite (Brazil) Tite has been praised for his man-management of Neymar Credit: Reuters The quality of manager in international football is desperately low, but Brazil's Tite is one who looks capable of stepping into a top club job. Has galvanised a group of players rocked by a 7-1 World Cup semi-final humiliation on home soil at the hands of Germany. Following the oppressive Dunga, Tite has put an arm round a few of his charges and the result is possibly the best Brazil team since 2002. Neymar, Gabriel Jesus and Philippe Coutinho will lead the charge in Russia, with Roberto Firmino and Willian in reserve, supported by a likely midfield three of Casemiro, Paulinho and Rene Augusto. Dani Alves' injury is a blow, leaving the right-back berth free in a back four otherwise compromised of Thiago Silva, Marquinhos and Marcelo. In goal, they can choose between Alisson and Ederson. Not bad. Neil Harris (Millwall) Lee Johnson, Dean Smith and Paul Cook are all promising Championship managers, but Neil Harris has done a remarkable job at the Den against all the odds. Building upon the 'siege mentality' that is part of Millwall's essential character, and thanks in no small part to Lee Gregory and Steve Morison's strike partnership, Harris has taken the London club from League One to the brink of the play-offs. It would take a hell of an offer to tempt Harris away from Millwall however, where he enjoys legendary status. Marcelo Gallardo (River Plate) Another disciple of Marcelo Bielsa, Gallardo could be the next successful Argentinian coaching export. Appointed River Plate manager in 2014, he has tucked away the Copa Sudamericana, Copa Libertadores and the Recopa already. Gallardo has a reputation as an innovator too, becoming the first coach in Argentina's first division to appoint a female assistant as well as working with a neuroscientist to hone players' mental approach. Could be on Atletico Madrid's shortlist should Diego Simeone ever depart. Slavisa Jokanovic (Fulham) There have been some recent whispers that Chelsea are interested in Slavisa Jokanovic Credit: PA There have already been whispers of Chelsea's interest, but if Fulham win their play-off final against Aston Villa and thrive in the Premier League then Jokanovic will be a wanted man. Fulham were without a doubt the best footballing side in the Championship last season, but Jokanovic also possesses an inner-steel that ensures discipline is not lost in all the pretty passing patterns. For clubs lost in the Premier League mid-table morass, Jokanovic would instill a style of play and an identity for fans to believe in. Rui Vitoria (Benfica) Has lifted two Portuguese championships and two cups in three seasons at Benfica, and at 48 Vitoria must surely be considering a fresh challenge. Losing out on the championship to Porto this season also has Vitoria under pressure Benfica are a dominant force, but a win percentage of 70% after 152 matches in charge remains impressive. Jose Mourinho's former assistant Rui Faria has been linked to the job, so that could free Vitoria to seek pastures new.
Frustration with the same old names and faces occupying Premier League jobs was a feature of last season, and could even prove a watershed moment in how fans think about their manager. Sam Allardyce, Mark Hughes and Alan Pardew are just three beneficiaries of the managerial merry-go-round, but a culture of safe appointments is just as true in the upper echelons of the Premier League. Arsenal appointed Unai Emery as their new head coach on Wednesday while Chelsea have a strong interest Maurizio Sarri and both feel like the 'next cab off the rank' of European coaches. The omnipotent gaffer is being phased out of the game, in favour of more democratic and collegiate structures with power shared between a technical director, recruitment guru and head coach. Here are 10 coaches who might find themselves in contention for jobs when the sacking seasons begins in autumn. Domenico Tedesco (Schalke) Dominic Tedesco led Schalke to a second place finish in the Bundesliga Credit: AFP The head coach of the team who finished second in the Bundesliga is hardly an obscure selection, but 32-year-old Domenico Tedesco looks a cast-iron certainty to be considered for the next 'Big Six' job available. Born in Italy, Tedesco's parents emigrated to Germany when he was two years old. He never played football professionally but like Hoffenheim coach Julian Nagelsmann found a break in coaching at a young age. Appointed by second-tier Erzgebirge Aue in March 2017, Tedesco won 13 points from five games to guide them to safety. Schalke took a chance on him last summer and under his guidance the Gelsenkirchen club have qualified for the Champions League after a three-year absence. Regarded as a tactically flexible coach, one highlight of a superb debut season was a comeback from 4-0 down to 4-4 in the derby against Borussia Dortmund. Gian Piero Gasperini (Atalanta) Gasperini lasted only five games as Inter Milan manager in 2011, but has bounced back since then Credit: Getty Images Lasted only five games at Inter in 2011, but Gian Piero Gasperini has a warranted reputation for getting a lot from a little. He guided Genoa to Europe in 2009 but it is his work at Atalanta over the past few seasons that has really caught the eye. Benefiting from one of Italy's most productive academies, Giasperini's Atlanta recovered from losing four of their first five league games to finish fourth in 2016-17, achieving European qualification for the first time in 26-years. The 58-year-old coach ripped up the tactical rule-book, using a Dutch-style 3-4-3 that left opponents dumbfounded. Despite losing Franck Kessie to Milan last summer and other key players, Atalanta continued to punch above their weight with a seventh-placed finish. Giasperini is not the youthful up-and-comer some clubs crave, but any club looking to maximise meagre resources could do far worse. Giovanni van Bronckhorst (Feyenoord) Giovanni van Bronckhorst was loosely linked with Arsenal before Unai Emery's appointment Credit: Getty Images The former Arsenal player received a ringing endorsement from Arsene Wenger last year and a glance at his record makes it easy to see why. Guided Feyenoord to the Dutch Cup in his first season before winning the Eredivisie in his second, coaxing the best out of a squad with a mix of talented youngsters and wise old heads such as Dirk Kuyt. Last season proved more challenging, but Feyenoord did rally late, winning their last eight league matches to finish fourth and claimed another cup. Ralph Hasenhüttl (free agent) Hasenhüttl stepped down as RB Leipzig head coach at the end of last season after two seasons in charge. Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund have made both made new appointments this summer, so Hasenhüttl must consider his next move. The Austrian guided the controversial Bundesliga newcomers to second-place and Champions League qualification with a brand of high-octane, progressive football. He may have fallen out with RB Leipzig's hierarchy over a new contract, but Hasenhüttl looks ideally suited to any club with a technical director-head coach set-up. Whether he can find a club that can unearth talent like Naby Keita or Emil Forsberg is another matter. Eddie Howe (Bournemouth) Eddie Howe's name has not been mentioned for recent managerial vacancies Credit: Reuters Not an unfamiliar name, but one who seems to be drifting down clubs' lists. In the summer of 2016 there were reports that he was well thought of by Arsenal's hierarchy, and he was also linked with Everton - the club he supported as a boy. He was frequently spoken of as a potential England manager too. Several managerial vacancies have opened up in the last few months, and Howe does not seem to have been considered for any of them. He has done nothing to diminish his reputation in the intervening period, quite the opposite in fact, so his diminished status is curious. Bournemouth's last two league finishes are ninth and 12th - a commendable achievement. His record in the transfer market is patchy however, and there is also a risk that becomes institutionalised at Bournemouth. Familiarity breeds contempt. Tite (Brazil) Tite has been praised for his man-management of Neymar Credit: Reuters The quality of manager in international football is desperately low, but Brazil's Tite is one who looks capable of stepping into a top club job. Has galvanised a group of players rocked by a 7-1 World Cup semi-final humiliation on home soil at the hands of Germany. Following the oppressive Dunga, Tite has put an arm round a few of his charges and the result is possibly the best Brazil team since 2002. Neymar, Gabriel Jesus and Philippe Coutinho will lead the charge in Russia, with Roberto Firmino and Willian in reserve, supported by a likely midfield three of Casemiro, Paulinho and Rene Augusto. Dani Alves' injury is a blow, leaving the right-back berth free in a back four otherwise compromised of Thiago Silva, Marquinhos and Marcelo. In goal, they can choose between Alisson and Ederson. Not bad. Neil Harris (Millwall) Lee Johnson, Dean Smith and Paul Cook are all promising Championship managers, but Neil Harris has done a remarkable job at the Den against all the odds. Building upon the 'siege mentality' that is part of Millwall's essential character, and thanks in no small part to Lee Gregory and Steve Morison's strike partnership, Harris has taken the London club from League One to the brink of the play-offs. It would take a hell of an offer to tempt Harris away from Millwall however, where he enjoys legendary status. Marcelo Gallardo (River Plate) Another disciple of Marcelo Bielsa, Gallardo could be the next successful Argentinian coaching export. Appointed River Plate manager in 2014, he has tucked away the Copa Sudamericana, Copa Libertadores and the Recopa already. Gallardo has a reputation as an innovator too, becoming the first coach in Argentina's first division to appoint a female assistant as well as working with a neuroscientist to hone players' mental approach. Could be on Atletico Madrid's shortlist should Diego Simeone ever depart. Slavisa Jokanovic (Fulham) There have been some recent whispers that Chelsea are interested in Slavisa Jokanovic Credit: PA There have already been whispers of Chelsea's interest, but if Fulham win their play-off final against Aston Villa and thrive in the Premier League then Jokanovic will be a wanted man. Fulham were without a doubt the best footballing side in the Championship last season, but Jokanovic also possesses an inner-steel that ensures discipline is not lost in all the pretty passing patterns. For clubs lost in the Premier League mid-table morass, Jokanovic would instill a style of play and an identity for fans to believe in. Rui Vitoria (Benfica) Has lifted two Portuguese championships and two cups in three seasons at Benfica, and at 48 Vitoria must surely be considering a fresh challenge. Losing out on the championship to Porto this season also has Vitoria under pressure Benfica are a dominant force, but a win percentage of 70% after 152 matches in charge remains impressive. Jose Mourinho's former assistant Rui Faria has been linked to the job, so that could free Vitoria to seek pastures new.
The 10 managers nobody is linking with vacant jobs...but should be
Frustration with the same old names and faces occupying Premier League jobs was a feature of last season, and could even prove a watershed moment in how fans think about their manager. Sam Allardyce, Mark Hughes and Alan Pardew are just three beneficiaries of the managerial merry-go-round, but a culture of safe appointments is just as true in the upper echelons of the Premier League. Arsenal appointed Unai Emery as their new head coach on Wednesday while Chelsea have a strong interest Maurizio Sarri and both feel like the 'next cab off the rank' of European coaches. The omnipotent gaffer is being phased out of the game, in favour of more democratic and collegiate structures with power shared between a technical director, recruitment guru and head coach. Here are 10 coaches who might find themselves in contention for jobs when the sacking seasons begins in autumn. Domenico Tedesco (Schalke) Dominic Tedesco led Schalke to a second place finish in the Bundesliga Credit: AFP The head coach of the team who finished second in the Bundesliga is hardly an obscure selection, but 32-year-old Domenico Tedesco looks a cast-iron certainty to be considered for the next 'Big Six' job available. Born in Italy, Tedesco's parents emigrated to Germany when he was two years old. He never played football professionally but like Hoffenheim coach Julian Nagelsmann found a break in coaching at a young age. Appointed by second-tier Erzgebirge Aue in March 2017, Tedesco won 13 points from five games to guide them to safety. Schalke took a chance on him last summer and under his guidance the Gelsenkirchen club have qualified for the Champions League after a three-year absence. Regarded as a tactically flexible coach, one highlight of a superb debut season was a comeback from 4-0 down to 4-4 in the derby against Borussia Dortmund. Gian Piero Gasperini (Atalanta) Gasperini lasted only five games as Inter Milan manager in 2011, but has bounced back since then Credit: Getty Images Lasted only five games at Inter in 2011, but Gian Piero Gasperini has a warranted reputation for getting a lot from a little. He guided Genoa to Europe in 2009 but it is his work at Atalanta over the past few seasons that has really caught the eye. Benefiting from one of Italy's most productive academies, Giasperini's Atlanta recovered from losing four of their first five league games to finish fourth in 2016-17, achieving European qualification for the first time in 26-years. The 58-year-old coach ripped up the tactical rule-book, using a Dutch-style 3-4-3 that left opponents dumbfounded. Despite losing Franck Kessie to Milan last summer and other key players, Atalanta continued to punch above their weight with a seventh-placed finish. Giasperini is not the youthful up-and-comer some clubs crave, but any club looking to maximise meagre resources could do far worse. Giovanni van Bronckhorst (Feyenoord) Giovanni van Bronckhorst was loosely linked with Arsenal before Unai Emery's appointment Credit: Getty Images The former Arsenal player received a ringing endorsement from Arsene Wenger last year and a glance at his record makes it easy to see why. Guided Feyenoord to the Dutch Cup in his first season before winning the Eredivisie in his second, coaxing the best out of a squad with a mix of talented youngsters and wise old heads such as Dirk Kuyt. Last season proved more challenging, but Feyenoord did rally late, winning their last eight league matches to finish fourth and claimed another cup. Ralph Hasenhüttl (free agent) Hasenhüttl stepped down as RB Leipzig head coach at the end of last season after two seasons in charge. Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund have made both made new appointments this summer, so Hasenhüttl must consider his next move. The Austrian guided the controversial Bundesliga newcomers to second-place and Champions League qualification with a brand of high-octane, progressive football. He may have fallen out with RB Leipzig's hierarchy over a new contract, but Hasenhüttl looks ideally suited to any club with a technical director-head coach set-up. Whether he can find a club that can unearth talent like Naby Keita or Emil Forsberg is another matter. Eddie Howe (Bournemouth) Eddie Howe's name has not been mentioned for recent managerial vacancies Credit: Reuters Not an unfamiliar name, but one who seems to be drifting down clubs' lists. In the summer of 2016 there were reports that he was well thought of by Arsenal's hierarchy, and he was also linked with Everton - the club he supported as a boy. He was frequently spoken of as a potential England manager too. Several managerial vacancies have opened up in the last few months, and Howe does not seem to have been considered for any of them. He has done nothing to diminish his reputation in the intervening period, quite the opposite in fact, so his diminished status is curious. Bournemouth's last two league finishes are ninth and 12th - a commendable achievement. His record in the transfer market is patchy however, and there is also a risk that becomes institutionalised at Bournemouth. Familiarity breeds contempt. Tite (Brazil) Tite has been praised for his man-management of Neymar Credit: Reuters The quality of manager in international football is desperately low, but Brazil's Tite is one who looks capable of stepping into a top club job. Has galvanised a group of players rocked by a 7-1 World Cup semi-final humiliation on home soil at the hands of Germany. Following the oppressive Dunga, Tite has put an arm round a few of his charges and the result is possibly the best Brazil team since 2002. Neymar, Gabriel Jesus and Philippe Coutinho will lead the charge in Russia, with Roberto Firmino and Willian in reserve, supported by a likely midfield three of Casemiro, Paulinho and Rene Augusto. Dani Alves' injury is a blow, leaving the right-back berth free in a back four otherwise compromised of Thiago Silva, Marquinhos and Marcelo. In goal, they can choose between Alisson and Ederson. Not bad. Neil Harris (Millwall) Lee Johnson, Dean Smith and Paul Cook are all promising Championship managers, but Neil Harris has done a remarkable job at the Den against all the odds. Building upon the 'siege mentality' that is part of Millwall's essential character, and thanks in no small part to Lee Gregory and Steve Morison's strike partnership, Harris has taken the London club from League One to the brink of the play-offs. It would take a hell of an offer to tempt Harris away from Millwall however, where he enjoys legendary status. Marcelo Gallardo (River Plate) Another disciple of Marcelo Bielsa, Gallardo could be the next successful Argentinian coaching export. Appointed River Plate manager in 2014, he has tucked away the Copa Sudamericana, Copa Libertadores and the Recopa already. Gallardo has a reputation as an innovator too, becoming the first coach in Argentina's first division to appoint a female assistant as well as working with a neuroscientist to hone players' mental approach. Could be on Atletico Madrid's shortlist should Diego Simeone ever depart. Slavisa Jokanovic (Fulham) There have been some recent whispers that Chelsea are interested in Slavisa Jokanovic Credit: PA There have already been whispers of Chelsea's interest, but if Fulham win their play-off final against Aston Villa and thrive in the Premier League then Jokanovic will be a wanted man. Fulham were without a doubt the best footballing side in the Championship last season, but Jokanovic also possesses an inner-steel that ensures discipline is not lost in all the pretty passing patterns. For clubs lost in the Premier League mid-table morass, Jokanovic would instill a style of play and an identity for fans to believe in. Rui Vitoria (Benfica) Has lifted two Portuguese championships and two cups in three seasons at Benfica, and at 48 Vitoria must surely be considering a fresh challenge. Losing out on the championship to Porto this season also has Vitoria under pressure Benfica are a dominant force, but a win percentage of 70% after 152 matches in charge remains impressive. Jose Mourinho's former assistant Rui Faria has been linked to the job, so that could free Vitoria to seek pastures new.
Frustration with the same old names and faces occupying Premier League jobs was a feature of last season, and could even prove a watershed moment in how fans think about their manager. Sam Allardyce, Mark Hughes and Alan Pardew are just three beneficiaries of the managerial merry-go-round, but a culture of safe appointments is just as true in the upper echelons of the Premier League. Arsenal appointed Unai Emery as their new head coach on Wednesday while Chelsea have a strong interest Maurizio Sarri and both feel like the 'next cab off the rank' of European coaches. The omnipotent gaffer is being phased out of the game, in favour of more democratic and collegiate structures with power shared between a technical director, recruitment guru and head coach. Here are 10 coaches who might find themselves in contention for jobs when the sacking seasons begins in autumn. Domenico Tedesco (Schalke) Dominic Tedesco led Schalke to a second place finish in the Bundesliga Credit: AFP The head coach of the team who finished second in the Bundesliga is hardly an obscure selection, but 32-year-old Domenico Tedesco looks a cast-iron certainty to be considered for the next 'Big Six' job available. Born in Italy, Tedesco's parents emigrated to Germany when he was two years old. He never played football professionally but like Hoffenheim coach Julian Nagelsmann found a break in coaching at a young age. Appointed by second-tier Erzgebirge Aue in March 2017, Tedesco won 13 points from five games to guide them to safety. Schalke took a chance on him last summer and under his guidance the Gelsenkirchen club have qualified for the Champions League after a three-year absence. Regarded as a tactically flexible coach, one highlight of a superb debut season was a comeback from 4-0 down to 4-4 in the derby against Borussia Dortmund. Gian Piero Gasperini (Atalanta) Gasperini lasted only five games as Inter Milan manager in 2011, but has bounced back since then Credit: Getty Images Lasted only five games at Inter in 2011, but Gian Piero Gasperini has a warranted reputation for getting a lot from a little. He guided Genoa to Europe in 2009 but it is his work at Atalanta over the past few seasons that has really caught the eye. Benefiting from one of Italy's most productive academies, Giasperini's Atlanta recovered from losing four of their first five league games to finish fourth in 2016-17, achieving European qualification for the first time in 26-years. The 58-year-old coach ripped up the tactical rule-book, using a Dutch-style 3-4-3 that left opponents dumbfounded. Despite losing Franck Kessie to Milan last summer and other key players, Atalanta continued to punch above their weight with a seventh-placed finish. Giasperini is not the youthful up-and-comer some clubs crave, but any club looking to maximise meagre resources could do far worse. Giovanni van Bronckhorst (Feyenoord) Giovanni van Bronckhorst was loosely linked with Arsenal before Unai Emery's appointment Credit: Getty Images The former Arsenal player received a ringing endorsement from Arsene Wenger last year and a glance at his record makes it easy to see why. Guided Feyenoord to the Dutch Cup in his first season before winning the Eredivisie in his second, coaxing the best out of a squad with a mix of talented youngsters and wise old heads such as Dirk Kuyt. Last season proved more challenging, but Feyenoord did rally late, winning their last eight league matches to finish fourth and claimed another cup. Ralph Hasenhüttl (free agent) Hasenhüttl stepped down as RB Leipzig head coach at the end of last season after two seasons in charge. Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund have made both made new appointments this summer, so Hasenhüttl must consider his next move. The Austrian guided the controversial Bundesliga newcomers to second-place and Champions League qualification with a brand of high-octane, progressive football. He may have fallen out with RB Leipzig's hierarchy over a new contract, but Hasenhüttl looks ideally suited to any club with a technical director-head coach set-up. Whether he can find a club that can unearth talent like Naby Keita or Emil Forsberg is another matter. Eddie Howe (Bournemouth) Eddie Howe's name has not been mentioned for recent managerial vacancies Credit: Reuters Not an unfamiliar name, but one who seems to be drifting down clubs' lists. In the summer of 2016 there were reports that he was well thought of by Arsenal's hierarchy, and he was also linked with Everton - the club he supported as a boy. He was frequently spoken of as a potential England manager too. Several managerial vacancies have opened up in the last few months, and Howe does not seem to have been considered for any of them. He has done nothing to diminish his reputation in the intervening period, quite the opposite in fact, so his diminished status is curious. Bournemouth's last two league finishes are ninth and 12th - a commendable achievement. His record in the transfer market is patchy however, and there is also a risk that becomes institutionalised at Bournemouth. Familiarity breeds contempt. Tite (Brazil) Tite has been praised for his man-management of Neymar Credit: Reuters The quality of manager in international football is desperately low, but Brazil's Tite is one who looks capable of stepping into a top club job. Has galvanised a group of players rocked by a 7-1 World Cup semi-final humiliation on home soil at the hands of Germany. Following the oppressive Dunga, Tite has put an arm round a few of his charges and the result is possibly the best Brazil team since 2002. Neymar, Gabriel Jesus and Philippe Coutinho will lead the charge in Russia, with Roberto Firmino and Willian in reserve, supported by a likely midfield three of Casemiro, Paulinho and Rene Augusto. Dani Alves' injury is a blow, leaving the right-back berth free in a back four otherwise compromised of Thiago Silva, Marquinhos and Marcelo. In goal, they can choose between Alisson and Ederson. Not bad. Neil Harris (Millwall) Lee Johnson, Dean Smith and Paul Cook are all promising Championship managers, but Neil Harris has done a remarkable job at the Den against all the odds. Building upon the 'siege mentality' that is part of Millwall's essential character, and thanks in no small part to Lee Gregory and Steve Morison's strike partnership, Harris has taken the London club from League One to the brink of the play-offs. It would take a hell of an offer to tempt Harris away from Millwall however, where he enjoys legendary status. Marcelo Gallardo (River Plate) Another disciple of Marcelo Bielsa, Gallardo could be the next successful Argentinian coaching export. Appointed River Plate manager in 2014, he has tucked away the Copa Sudamericana, Copa Libertadores and the Recopa already. Gallardo has a reputation as an innovator too, becoming the first coach in Argentina's first division to appoint a female assistant as well as working with a neuroscientist to hone players' mental approach. Could be on Atletico Madrid's shortlist should Diego Simeone ever depart. Slavisa Jokanovic (Fulham) There have been some recent whispers that Chelsea are interested in Slavisa Jokanovic Credit: PA There have already been whispers of Chelsea's interest, but if Fulham win their play-off final against Aston Villa and thrive in the Premier League then Jokanovic will be a wanted man. Fulham were without a doubt the best footballing side in the Championship last season, but Jokanovic also possesses an inner-steel that ensures discipline is not lost in all the pretty passing patterns. For clubs lost in the Premier League mid-table morass, Jokanovic would instill a style of play and an identity for fans to believe in. Rui Vitoria (Benfica) Has lifted two Portuguese championships and two cups in three seasons at Benfica, and at 48 Vitoria must surely be considering a fresh challenge. Losing out on the championship to Porto this season also has Vitoria under pressure Benfica are a dominant force, but a win percentage of 70% after 152 matches in charge remains impressive. Jose Mourinho's former assistant Rui Faria has been linked to the job, so that could free Vitoria to seek pastures new.
The 10 managers nobody is linking with vacant jobs...but should be
Frustration with the same old names and faces occupying Premier League jobs was a feature of last season, and could even prove a watershed moment in how fans think about their manager. Sam Allardyce, Mark Hughes and Alan Pardew are just three beneficiaries of the managerial merry-go-round, but a culture of safe appointments is just as true in the upper echelons of the Premier League. Arsenal appointed Unai Emery as their new head coach on Wednesday while Chelsea have a strong interest Maurizio Sarri and both feel like the 'next cab off the rank' of European coaches. The omnipotent gaffer is being phased out of the game, in favour of more democratic and collegiate structures with power shared between a technical director, recruitment guru and head coach. Here are 10 coaches who might find themselves in contention for jobs when the sacking seasons begins in autumn. Domenico Tedesco (Schalke) Dominic Tedesco led Schalke to a second place finish in the Bundesliga Credit: AFP The head coach of the team who finished second in the Bundesliga is hardly an obscure selection, but 32-year-old Domenico Tedesco looks a cast-iron certainty to be considered for the next 'Big Six' job available. Born in Italy, Tedesco's parents emigrated to Germany when he was two years old. He never played football professionally but like Hoffenheim coach Julian Nagelsmann found a break in coaching at a young age. Appointed by second-tier Erzgebirge Aue in March 2017, Tedesco won 13 points from five games to guide them to safety. Schalke took a chance on him last summer and under his guidance the Gelsenkirchen club have qualified for the Champions League after a three-year absence. Regarded as a tactically flexible coach, one highlight of a superb debut season was a comeback from 4-0 down to 4-4 in the derby against Borussia Dortmund. Gian Piero Gasperini (Atalanta) Gasperini lasted only five games as Inter Milan manager in 2011, but has bounced back since then Credit: Getty Images Lasted only five games at Inter in 2011, but Gian Piero Gasperini has a warranted reputation for getting a lot from a little. He guided Genoa to Europe in 2009 but it is his work at Atalanta over the past few seasons that has really caught the eye. Benefiting from one of Italy's most productive academies, Giasperini's Atlanta recovered from losing four of their first five league games to finish fourth in 2016-17, achieving European qualification for the first time in 26-years. The 58-year-old coach ripped up the tactical rule-book, using a Dutch-style 3-4-3 that left opponents dumbfounded. Despite losing Franck Kessie to Milan last summer and other key players, Atalanta continued to punch above their weight with a seventh-placed finish. Giasperini is not the youthful up-and-comer some clubs crave, but any club looking to maximise meagre resources could do far worse. Giovanni van Bronckhorst (Feyenoord) Giovanni van Bronckhorst was loosely linked with Arsenal before Unai Emery's appointment Credit: Getty Images The former Arsenal player received a ringing endorsement from Arsene Wenger last year and a glance at his record makes it easy to see why. Guided Feyenoord to the Dutch Cup in his first season before winning the Eredivisie in his second, coaxing the best out of a squad with a mix of talented youngsters and wise old heads such as Dirk Kuyt. Last season proved more challenging, but Feyenoord did rally late, winning their last eight league matches to finish fourth and claimed another cup. Ralph Hasenhüttl (free agent) Hasenhüttl stepped down as RB Leipzig head coach at the end of last season after two seasons in charge. Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund have made both made new appointments this summer, so Hasenhüttl must consider his next move. The Austrian guided the controversial Bundesliga newcomers to second-place and Champions League qualification with a brand of high-octane, progressive football. He may have fallen out with RB Leipzig's hierarchy over a new contract, but Hasenhüttl looks ideally suited to any club with a technical director-head coach set-up. Whether he can find a club that can unearth talent like Naby Keita or Emil Forsberg is another matter. Eddie Howe (Bournemouth) Eddie Howe's name has not been mentioned for recent managerial vacancies Credit: Reuters Not an unfamiliar name, but one who seems to be drifting down clubs' lists. In the summer of 2016 there were reports that he was well thought of by Arsenal's hierarchy, and he was also linked with Everton - the club he supported as a boy. He was frequently spoken of as a potential England manager too. Several managerial vacancies have opened up in the last few months, and Howe does not seem to have been considered for any of them. He has done nothing to diminish his reputation in the intervening period, quite the opposite in fact, so his diminished status is curious. Bournemouth's last two league finishes are ninth and 12th - a commendable achievement. His record in the transfer market is patchy however, and there is also a risk that becomes institutionalised at Bournemouth. Familiarity breeds contempt. Tite (Brazil) Tite has been praised for his man-management of Neymar Credit: Reuters The quality of manager in international football is desperately low, but Brazil's Tite is one who looks capable of stepping into a top club job. Has galvanised a group of players rocked by a 7-1 World Cup semi-final humiliation on home soil at the hands of Germany. Following the oppressive Dunga, Tite has put an arm round a few of his charges and the result is possibly the best Brazil team since 2002. Neymar, Gabriel Jesus and Philippe Coutinho will lead the charge in Russia, with Roberto Firmino and Willian in reserve, supported by a likely midfield three of Casemiro, Paulinho and Rene Augusto. Dani Alves' injury is a blow, leaving the right-back berth free in a back four otherwise compromised of Thiago Silva, Marquinhos and Marcelo. In goal, they can choose between Alisson and Ederson. Not bad. Neil Harris (Millwall) Lee Johnson, Dean Smith and Paul Cook are all promising Championship managers, but Neil Harris has done a remarkable job at the Den against all the odds. Building upon the 'siege mentality' that is part of Millwall's essential character, and thanks in no small part to Lee Gregory and Steve Morison's strike partnership, Harris has taken the London club from League One to the brink of the play-offs. It would take a hell of an offer to tempt Harris away from Millwall however, where he enjoys legendary status. Marcelo Gallardo (River Plate) Another disciple of Marcelo Bielsa, Gallardo could be the next successful Argentinian coaching export. Appointed River Plate manager in 2014, he has tucked away the Copa Sudamericana, Copa Libertadores and the Recopa already. Gallardo has a reputation as an innovator too, becoming the first coach in Argentina's first division to appoint a female assistant as well as working with a neuroscientist to hone players' mental approach. Could be on Atletico Madrid's shortlist should Diego Simeone ever depart. Slavisa Jokanovic (Fulham) There have been some recent whispers that Chelsea are interested in Slavisa Jokanovic Credit: PA There have already been whispers of Chelsea's interest, but if Fulham win their play-off final against Aston Villa and thrive in the Premier League then Jokanovic will be a wanted man. Fulham were without a doubt the best footballing side in the Championship last season, but Jokanovic also possesses an inner-steel that ensures discipline is not lost in all the pretty passing patterns. For clubs lost in the Premier League mid-table morass, Jokanovic would instill a style of play and an identity for fans to believe in. Rui Vitoria (Benfica) Has lifted two Portuguese championships and two cups in three seasons at Benfica, and at 48 Vitoria must surely be considering a fresh challenge. Losing out on the championship to Porto this season also has Vitoria under pressure Benfica are a dominant force, but a win percentage of 70% after 152 matches in charge remains impressive. Jose Mourinho's former assistant Rui Faria has been linked to the job, so that could free Vitoria to seek pastures new.
Frustration with the same old names and faces occupying Premier League jobs was a feature of last season, and could even prove a watershed moment in how fans think about their manager. Sam Allardyce, Mark Hughes and Alan Pardew are just three beneficiaries of the managerial merry-go-round, but a culture of safe appointments is just as true in the upper echelons of the Premier League. Arsenal appointed Unai Emery as their new head coach on Wednesday while Chelsea have a strong interest Maurizio Sarri and both feel like the 'next cab off the rank' of European coaches. The omnipotent gaffer is being phased out of the game, in favour of more democratic and collegiate structures with power shared between a technical director, recruitment guru and head coach. Here are 10 coaches who might find themselves in contention for jobs when the sacking seasons begins in autumn. Domenico Tedesco (Schalke) Dominic Tedesco led Schalke to a second place finish in the Bundesliga Credit: AFP The head coach of the team who finished second in the Bundesliga is hardly an obscure selection, but 32-year-old Domenico Tedesco looks a cast-iron certainty to be considered for the next 'Big Six' job available. Born in Italy, Tedesco's parents emigrated to Germany when he was two years old. He never played football professionally but like Hoffenheim coach Julian Nagelsmann found a break in coaching at a young age. Appointed by second-tier Erzgebirge Aue in March 2017, Tedesco won 13 points from five games to guide them to safety. Schalke took a chance on him last summer and under his guidance the Gelsenkirchen club have qualified for the Champions League after a three-year absence. Regarded as a tactically flexible coach, one highlight of a superb debut season was a comeback from 4-0 down to 4-4 in the derby against Borussia Dortmund. Gian Piero Gasperini (Atalanta) Gasperini lasted only five games as Inter Milan manager in 2011, but has bounced back since then Credit: Getty Images Lasted only five games at Inter in 2011, but Gian Piero Gasperini has a warranted reputation for getting a lot from a little. He guided Genoa to Europe in 2009 but it is his work at Atalanta over the past few seasons that has really caught the eye. Benefiting from one of Italy's most productive academies, Giasperini's Atlanta recovered from losing four of their first five league games to finish fourth in 2016-17, achieving European qualification for the first time in 26-years. The 58-year-old coach ripped up the tactical rule-book, using a Dutch-style 3-4-3 that left opponents dumbfounded. Despite losing Franck Kessie to Milan last summer and other key players, Atalanta continued to punch above their weight with a seventh-placed finish. Giasperini is not the youthful up-and-comer some clubs crave, but any club looking to maximise meagre resources could do far worse. Giovanni van Bronckhorst (Feyenoord) Giovanni van Bronckhorst was loosely linked with Arsenal before Unai Emery's appointment Credit: Getty Images The former Arsenal player received a ringing endorsement from Arsene Wenger last year and a glance at his record makes it easy to see why. Guided Feyenoord to the Dutch Cup in his first season before winning the Eredivisie in his second, coaxing the best out of a squad with a mix of talented youngsters and wise old heads such as Dirk Kuyt. Last season proved more challenging, but Feyenoord did rally late, winning their last eight league matches to finish fourth and claimed another cup. Ralph Hasenhüttl (free agent) Hasenhüttl stepped down as RB Leipzig head coach at the end of last season after two seasons in charge. Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund have made both made new appointments this summer, so Hasenhüttl must consider his next move. The Austrian guided the controversial Bundesliga newcomers to second-place and Champions League qualification with a brand of high-octane, progressive football. He may have fallen out with RB Leipzig's hierarchy over a new contract, but Hasenhüttl looks ideally suited to any club with a technical director-head coach set-up. Whether he can find a club that can unearth talent like Naby Keita or Emil Forsberg is another matter. Eddie Howe (Bournemouth) Eddie Howe's name has not been mentioned for recent managerial vacancies Credit: Reuters Not an unfamiliar name, but one who seems to be drifting down clubs' lists. In the summer of 2016 there were reports that he was well thought of by Arsenal's hierarchy, and he was also linked with Everton - the club he supported as a boy. He was frequently spoken of as a potential England manager too. Several managerial vacancies have opened up in the last few months, and Howe does not seem to have been considered for any of them. He has done nothing to diminish his reputation in the intervening period, quite the opposite in fact, so his diminished status is curious. Bournemouth's last two league finishes are ninth and 12th - a commendable achievement. His record in the transfer market is patchy however, and there is also a risk that becomes institutionalised at Bournemouth. Familiarity breeds contempt. Tite (Brazil) Tite has been praised for his man-management of Neymar Credit: Reuters The quality of manager in international football is desperately low, but Brazil's Tite is one who looks capable of stepping into a top club job. Has galvanised a group of players rocked by a 7-1 World Cup semi-final humiliation on home soil at the hands of Germany. Following the oppressive Dunga, Tite has put an arm round a few of his charges and the result is possibly the best Brazil team since 2002. Neymar, Gabriel Jesus and Philippe Coutinho will lead the charge in Russia, with Roberto Firmino and Willian in reserve, supported by a likely midfield three of Casemiro, Paulinho and Rene Augusto. Dani Alves' injury is a blow, leaving the right-back berth free in a back four otherwise compromised of Thiago Silva, Marquinhos and Marcelo. In goal, they can choose between Alisson and Ederson. Not bad. Neil Harris (Millwall) Lee Johnson, Dean Smith and Paul Cook are all promising Championship managers, but Neil Harris has done a remarkable job at the Den against all the odds. Building upon the 'siege mentality' that is part of Millwall's essential character, and thanks in no small part to Lee Gregory and Steve Morison's strike partnership, Harris has taken the London club from League One to the brink of the play-offs. It would take a hell of an offer to tempt Harris away from Millwall however, where he enjoys legendary status. Marcelo Gallardo (River Plate) Another disciple of Marcelo Bielsa, Gallardo could be the next successful Argentinian coaching export. Appointed River Plate manager in 2014, he has tucked away the Copa Sudamericana, Copa Libertadores and the Recopa already. Gallardo has a reputation as an innovator too, becoming the first coach in Argentina's first division to appoint a female assistant as well as working with a neuroscientist to hone players' mental approach. Could be on Atletico Madrid's shortlist should Diego Simeone ever depart. Slavisa Jokanovic (Fulham) There have been some recent whispers that Chelsea are interested in Slavisa Jokanovic Credit: PA There have already been whispers of Chelsea's interest, but if Fulham win their play-off final against Aston Villa and thrive in the Premier League then Jokanovic will be a wanted man. Fulham were without a doubt the best footballing side in the Championship last season, but Jokanovic also possesses an inner-steel that ensures discipline is not lost in all the pretty passing patterns. For clubs lost in the Premier League mid-table morass, Jokanovic would instill a style of play and an identity for fans to believe in. Rui Vitoria (Benfica) Has lifted two Portuguese championships and two cups in three seasons at Benfica, and at 48 Vitoria must surely be considering a fresh challenge. Losing out on the championship to Porto this season also has Vitoria under pressure Benfica are a dominant force, but a win percentage of 70% after 152 matches in charge remains impressive. Jose Mourinho's former assistant Rui Faria has been linked to the job, so that could free Vitoria to seek pastures new.
The 10 managers nobody is linking with vacant jobs...but should be
Frustration with the same old names and faces occupying Premier League jobs was a feature of last season, and could even prove a watershed moment in how fans think about their manager. Sam Allardyce, Mark Hughes and Alan Pardew are just three beneficiaries of the managerial merry-go-round, but a culture of safe appointments is just as true in the upper echelons of the Premier League. Arsenal appointed Unai Emery as their new head coach on Wednesday while Chelsea have a strong interest Maurizio Sarri and both feel like the 'next cab off the rank' of European coaches. The omnipotent gaffer is being phased out of the game, in favour of more democratic and collegiate structures with power shared between a technical director, recruitment guru and head coach. Here are 10 coaches who might find themselves in contention for jobs when the sacking seasons begins in autumn. Domenico Tedesco (Schalke) Dominic Tedesco led Schalke to a second place finish in the Bundesliga Credit: AFP The head coach of the team who finished second in the Bundesliga is hardly an obscure selection, but 32-year-old Domenico Tedesco looks a cast-iron certainty to be considered for the next 'Big Six' job available. Born in Italy, Tedesco's parents emigrated to Germany when he was two years old. He never played football professionally but like Hoffenheim coach Julian Nagelsmann found a break in coaching at a young age. Appointed by second-tier Erzgebirge Aue in March 2017, Tedesco won 13 points from five games to guide them to safety. Schalke took a chance on him last summer and under his guidance the Gelsenkirchen club have qualified for the Champions League after a three-year absence. Regarded as a tactically flexible coach, one highlight of a superb debut season was a comeback from 4-0 down to 4-4 in the derby against Borussia Dortmund. Gian Piero Gasperini (Atalanta) Gasperini lasted only five games as Inter Milan manager in 2011, but has bounced back since then Credit: Getty Images Lasted only five games at Inter in 2011, but Gian Piero Gasperini has a warranted reputation for getting a lot from a little. He guided Genoa to Europe in 2009 but it is his work at Atalanta over the past few seasons that has really caught the eye. Benefiting from one of Italy's most productive academies, Giasperini's Atlanta recovered from losing four of their first five league games to finish fourth in 2016-17, achieving European qualification for the first time in 26-years. The 58-year-old coach ripped up the tactical rule-book, using a Dutch-style 3-4-3 that left opponents dumbfounded. Despite losing Franck Kessie to Milan last summer and other key players, Atalanta continued to punch above their weight with a seventh-placed finish. Giasperini is not the youthful up-and-comer some clubs crave, but any club looking to maximise meagre resources could do far worse. Giovanni van Bronckhorst (Feyenoord) Giovanni van Bronckhorst was loosely linked with Arsenal before Unai Emery's appointment Credit: Getty Images The former Arsenal player received a ringing endorsement from Arsene Wenger last year and a glance at his record makes it easy to see why. Guided Feyenoord to the Dutch Cup in his first season before winning the Eredivisie in his second, coaxing the best out of a squad with a mix of talented youngsters and wise old heads such as Dirk Kuyt. Last season proved more challenging, but Feyenoord did rally late, winning their last eight league matches to finish fourth and claimed another cup. Ralph Hasenhüttl (free agent) Hasenhüttl stepped down as RB Leipzig head coach at the end of last season after two seasons in charge. Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund have made both made new appointments this summer, so Hasenhüttl must consider his next move. The Austrian guided the controversial Bundesliga newcomers to second-place and Champions League qualification with a brand of high-octane, progressive football. He may have fallen out with RB Leipzig's hierarchy over a new contract, but Hasenhüttl looks ideally suited to any club with a technical director-head coach set-up. Whether he can find a club that can unearth talent like Naby Keita or Emil Forsberg is another matter. Eddie Howe (Bournemouth) Eddie Howe's name has not been mentioned for recent managerial vacancies Credit: Reuters Not an unfamiliar name, but one who seems to be drifting down clubs' lists. In the summer of 2016 there were reports that he was well thought of by Arsenal's hierarchy, and he was also linked with Everton - the club he supported as a boy. He was frequently spoken of as a potential England manager too. Several managerial vacancies have opened up in the last few months, and Howe does not seem to have been considered for any of them. He has done nothing to diminish his reputation in the intervening period, quite the opposite in fact, so his diminished status is curious. Bournemouth's last two league finishes are ninth and 12th - a commendable achievement. His record in the transfer market is patchy however, and there is also a risk that becomes institutionalised at Bournemouth. Familiarity breeds contempt. Tite (Brazil) Tite has been praised for his man-management of Neymar Credit: Reuters The quality of manager in international football is desperately low, but Brazil's Tite is one who looks capable of stepping into a top club job. Has galvanised a group of players rocked by a 7-1 World Cup semi-final humiliation on home soil at the hands of Germany. Following the oppressive Dunga, Tite has put an arm round a few of his charges and the result is possibly the best Brazil team since 2002. Neymar, Gabriel Jesus and Philippe Coutinho will lead the charge in Russia, with Roberto Firmino and Willian in reserve, supported by a likely midfield three of Casemiro, Paulinho and Rene Augusto. Dani Alves' injury is a blow, leaving the right-back berth free in a back four otherwise compromised of Thiago Silva, Marquinhos and Marcelo. In goal, they can choose between Alisson and Ederson. Not bad. Neil Harris (Millwall) Lee Johnson, Dean Smith and Paul Cook are all promising Championship managers, but Neil Harris has done a remarkable job at the Den against all the odds. Building upon the 'siege mentality' that is part of Millwall's essential character, and thanks in no small part to Lee Gregory and Steve Morison's strike partnership, Harris has taken the London club from League One to the brink of the play-offs. It would take a hell of an offer to tempt Harris away from Millwall however, where he enjoys legendary status. Marcelo Gallardo (River Plate) Another disciple of Marcelo Bielsa, Gallardo could be the next successful Argentinian coaching export. Appointed River Plate manager in 2014, he has tucked away the Copa Sudamericana, Copa Libertadores and the Recopa already. Gallardo has a reputation as an innovator too, becoming the first coach in Argentina's first division to appoint a female assistant as well as working with a neuroscientist to hone players' mental approach. Could be on Atletico Madrid's shortlist should Diego Simeone ever depart. Slavisa Jokanovic (Fulham) There have been some recent whispers that Chelsea are interested in Slavisa Jokanovic Credit: PA There have already been whispers of Chelsea's interest, but if Fulham win their play-off final against Aston Villa and thrive in the Premier League then Jokanovic will be a wanted man. Fulham were without a doubt the best footballing side in the Championship last season, but Jokanovic also possesses an inner-steel that ensures discipline is not lost in all the pretty passing patterns. For clubs lost in the Premier League mid-table morass, Jokanovic would instill a style of play and an identity for fans to believe in. Rui Vitoria (Benfica) Has lifted two Portuguese championships and two cups in three seasons at Benfica, and at 48 Vitoria must surely be considering a fresh challenge. Losing out on the championship to Porto this season also has Vitoria under pressure Benfica are a dominant force, but a win percentage of 70% after 152 matches in charge remains impressive. Jose Mourinho's former assistant Rui Faria has been linked to the job, so that could free Vitoria to seek pastures new.
Frustration with the same old names and faces occupying Premier League jobs was a feature of last season, and could even prove a watershed moment in how fans think about their manager. Sam Allardyce, Mark Hughes and Alan Pardew are just three beneficiaries of the managerial merry-go-round, but a culture of safe appointments is just as true in the upper echelons of the Premier League. Arsenal appointed Unai Emery as their new head coach on Wednesday while Chelsea have a strong interest Maurizio Sarri and both feel like the 'next cab off the rank' of European coaches. The omnipotent gaffer is being phased out of the game, in favour of more democratic and collegiate structures with power shared between a technical director, recruitment guru and head coach. Here are 10 coaches who might find themselves in contention for jobs when the sacking seasons begins in autumn. Domenico Tedesco (Schalke) Dominic Tedesco led Schalke to a second place finish in the Bundesliga Credit: AFP The head coach of the team who finished second in the Bundesliga is hardly an obscure selection, but 32-year-old Domenico Tedesco looks a cast-iron certainty to be considered for the next 'Big Six' job available. Born in Italy, Tedesco's parents emigrated to Germany when he was two years old. He never played football professionally but like Hoffenheim coach Julian Nagelsmann found a break in coaching at a young age. Appointed by second-tier Erzgebirge Aue in March 2017, Tedesco won 13 points from five games to guide them to safety. Schalke took a chance on him last summer and under his guidance the Gelsenkirchen club have qualified for the Champions League after a three-year absence. Regarded as a tactically flexible coach, one highlight of a superb debut season was a comeback from 4-0 down to 4-4 in the derby against Borussia Dortmund. Gian Piero Gasperini (Atalanta) Gasperini lasted only five games as Inter Milan manager in 2011, but has bounced back since then Credit: Getty Images Lasted only five games at Inter in 2011, but Gian Piero Gasperini has a warranted reputation for getting a lot from a little. He guided Genoa to Europe in 2009 but it is his work at Atalanta over the past few seasons that has really caught the eye. Benefiting from one of Italy's most productive academies, Giasperini's Atlanta recovered from losing four of their first five league games to finish fourth in 2016-17, achieving European qualification for the first time in 26-years. The 58-year-old coach ripped up the tactical rule-book, using a Dutch-style 3-4-3 that left opponents dumbfounded. Despite losing Franck Kessie to Milan last summer and other key players, Atalanta continued to punch above their weight with a seventh-placed finish. Giasperini is not the youthful up-and-comer some clubs crave, but any club looking to maximise meagre resources could do far worse. Giovanni van Bronckhorst (Feyenoord) Giovanni van Bronckhorst was loosely linked with Arsenal before Unai Emery's appointment Credit: Getty Images The former Arsenal player received a ringing endorsement from Arsene Wenger last year and a glance at his record makes it easy to see why. Guided Feyenoord to the Dutch Cup in his first season before winning the Eredivisie in his second, coaxing the best out of a squad with a mix of talented youngsters and wise old heads such as Dirk Kuyt. Last season proved more challenging, but Feyenoord did rally late, winning their last eight league matches to finish fourth and claimed another cup. Ralph Hasenhüttl (free agent) Hasenhüttl stepped down as RB Leipzig head coach at the end of last season after two seasons in charge. Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund have made both made new appointments this summer, so Hasenhüttl must consider his next move. The Austrian guided the controversial Bundesliga newcomers to second-place and Champions League qualification with a brand of high-octane, progressive football. He may have fallen out with RB Leipzig's hierarchy over a new contract, but Hasenhüttl looks ideally suited to any club with a technical director-head coach set-up. Whether he can find a club that can unearth talent like Naby Keita or Emil Forsberg is another matter. Eddie Howe (Bournemouth) Eddie Howe's name has not been mentioned for recent managerial vacancies Credit: Reuters Not an unfamiliar name, but one who seems to be drifting down clubs' lists. In the summer of 2016 there were reports that he was well thought of by Arsenal's hierarchy, and he was also linked with Everton - the club he supported as a boy. He was frequently spoken of as a potential England manager too. Several managerial vacancies have opened up in the last few months, and Howe does not seem to have been considered for any of them. He has done nothing to diminish his reputation in the intervening period, quite the opposite in fact, so his diminished status is curious. Bournemouth's last two league finishes are ninth and 12th - a commendable achievement. His record in the transfer market is patchy however, and there is also a risk that becomes institutionalised at Bournemouth. Familiarity breeds contempt. Tite (Brazil) Tite has been praised for his man-management of Neymar Credit: Reuters The quality of manager in international football is desperately low, but Brazil's Tite is one who looks capable of stepping into a top club job. Has galvanised a group of players rocked by a 7-1 World Cup semi-final humiliation on home soil at the hands of Germany. Following the oppressive Dunga, Tite has put an arm round a few of his charges and the result is possibly the best Brazil team since 2002. Neymar, Gabriel Jesus and Philippe Coutinho will lead the charge in Russia, with Roberto Firmino and Willian in reserve, supported by a likely midfield three of Casemiro, Paulinho and Rene Augusto. Dani Alves' injury is a blow, leaving the right-back berth free in a back four otherwise compromised of Thiago Silva, Marquinhos and Marcelo. In goal, they can choose between Alisson and Ederson. Not bad. Neil Harris (Millwall) Lee Johnson, Dean Smith and Paul Cook are all promising Championship managers, but Neil Harris has done a remarkable job at the Den against all the odds. Building upon the 'siege mentality' that is part of Millwall's essential character, and thanks in no small part to Lee Gregory and Steve Morison's strike partnership, Harris has taken the London club from League One to the brink of the play-offs. It would take a hell of an offer to tempt Harris away from Millwall however, where he enjoys legendary status. Marcelo Gallardo (River Plate) Another disciple of Marcelo Bielsa, Gallardo could be the next successful Argentinian coaching export. Appointed River Plate manager in 2014, he has tucked away the Copa Sudamericana, Copa Libertadores and the Recopa already. Gallardo has a reputation as an innovator too, becoming the first coach in Argentina's first division to appoint a female assistant as well as working with a neuroscientist to hone players' mental approach. Could be on Atletico Madrid's shortlist should Diego Simeone ever depart. Slavisa Jokanovic (Fulham) There have been some recent whispers that Chelsea are interested in Slavisa Jokanovic Credit: PA There have already been whispers of Chelsea's interest, but if Fulham win their play-off final against Aston Villa and thrive in the Premier League then Jokanovic will be a wanted man. Fulham were without a doubt the best footballing side in the Championship last season, but Jokanovic also possesses an inner-steel that ensures discipline is not lost in all the pretty passing patterns. For clubs lost in the Premier League mid-table morass, Jokanovic would instill a style of play and an identity for fans to believe in. Rui Vitoria (Benfica) Has lifted two Portuguese championships and two cups in three seasons at Benfica, and at 48 Vitoria must surely be considering a fresh challenge. Losing out on the championship to Porto this season also has Vitoria under pressure Benfica are a dominant force, but a win percentage of 70% after 152 matches in charge remains impressive. Jose Mourinho's former assistant Rui Faria has been linked to the job, so that could free Vitoria to seek pastures new.
The 10 managers nobody is linking with vacant jobs...but should be
Frustration with the same old names and faces occupying Premier League jobs was a feature of last season, and could even prove a watershed moment in how fans think about their manager. Sam Allardyce, Mark Hughes and Alan Pardew are just three beneficiaries of the managerial merry-go-round, but a culture of safe appointments is just as true in the upper echelons of the Premier League. Arsenal appointed Unai Emery as their new head coach on Wednesday while Chelsea have a strong interest Maurizio Sarri and both feel like the 'next cab off the rank' of European coaches. The omnipotent gaffer is being phased out of the game, in favour of more democratic and collegiate structures with power shared between a technical director, recruitment guru and head coach. Here are 10 coaches who might find themselves in contention for jobs when the sacking seasons begins in autumn. Domenico Tedesco (Schalke) Dominic Tedesco led Schalke to a second place finish in the Bundesliga Credit: AFP The head coach of the team who finished second in the Bundesliga is hardly an obscure selection, but 32-year-old Domenico Tedesco looks a cast-iron certainty to be considered for the next 'Big Six' job available. Born in Italy, Tedesco's parents emigrated to Germany when he was two years old. He never played football professionally but like Hoffenheim coach Julian Nagelsmann found a break in coaching at a young age. Appointed by second-tier Erzgebirge Aue in March 2017, Tedesco won 13 points from five games to guide them to safety. Schalke took a chance on him last summer and under his guidance the Gelsenkirchen club have qualified for the Champions League after a three-year absence. Regarded as a tactically flexible coach, one highlight of a superb debut season was a comeback from 4-0 down to 4-4 in the derby against Borussia Dortmund. Gian Piero Gasperini (Atalanta) Gasperini lasted only five games as Inter Milan manager in 2011, but has bounced back since then Credit: Getty Images Lasted only five games at Inter in 2011, but Gian Piero Gasperini has a warranted reputation for getting a lot from a little. He guided Genoa to Europe in 2009 but it is his work at Atalanta over the past few seasons that has really caught the eye. Benefiting from one of Italy's most productive academies, Giasperini's Atlanta recovered from losing four of their first five league games to finish fourth in 2016-17, achieving European qualification for the first time in 26-years. The 58-year-old coach ripped up the tactical rule-book, using a Dutch-style 3-4-3 that left opponents dumbfounded. Despite losing Franck Kessie to Milan last summer and other key players, Atalanta continued to punch above their weight with a seventh-placed finish. Giasperini is not the youthful up-and-comer some clubs crave, but any club looking to maximise meagre resources could do far worse. Giovanni van Bronckhorst (Feyenoord) Giovanni van Bronckhorst was loosely linked with Arsenal before Unai Emery's appointment Credit: Getty Images The former Arsenal player received a ringing endorsement from Arsene Wenger last year and a glance at his record makes it easy to see why. Guided Feyenoord to the Dutch Cup in his first season before winning the Eredivisie in his second, coaxing the best out of a squad with a mix of talented youngsters and wise old heads such as Dirk Kuyt. Last season proved more challenging, but Feyenoord did rally late, winning their last eight league matches to finish fourth and claimed another cup. Ralph Hasenhüttl (free agent) Hasenhüttl stepped down as RB Leipzig head coach at the end of last season after two seasons in charge. Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund have made both made new appointments this summer, so Hasenhüttl must consider his next move. The Austrian guided the controversial Bundesliga newcomers to second-place and Champions League qualification with a brand of high-octane, progressive football. He may have fallen out with RB Leipzig's hierarchy over a new contract, but Hasenhüttl looks ideally suited to any club with a technical director-head coach set-up. Whether he can find a club that can unearth talent like Naby Keita or Emil Forsberg is another matter. Eddie Howe (Bournemouth) Eddie Howe's name has not been mentioned for recent managerial vacancies Credit: Reuters Not an unfamiliar name, but one who seems to be drifting down clubs' lists. In the summer of 2016 there were reports that he was well thought of by Arsenal's hierarchy, and he was also linked with Everton - the club he supported as a boy. He was frequently spoken of as a potential England manager too. Several managerial vacancies have opened up in the last few months, and Howe does not seem to have been considered for any of them. He has done nothing to diminish his reputation in the intervening period, quite the opposite in fact, so his diminished status is curious. Bournemouth's last two league finishes are ninth and 12th - a commendable achievement. His record in the transfer market is patchy however, and there is also a risk that becomes institutionalised at Bournemouth. Familiarity breeds contempt. Tite (Brazil) Tite has been praised for his man-management of Neymar Credit: Reuters The quality of manager in international football is desperately low, but Brazil's Tite is one who looks capable of stepping into a top club job. Has galvanised a group of players rocked by a 7-1 World Cup semi-final humiliation on home soil at the hands of Germany. Following the oppressive Dunga, Tite has put an arm round a few of his charges and the result is possibly the best Brazil team since 2002. Neymar, Gabriel Jesus and Philippe Coutinho will lead the charge in Russia, with Roberto Firmino and Willian in reserve, supported by a likely midfield three of Casemiro, Paulinho and Rene Augusto. Dani Alves' injury is a blow, leaving the right-back berth free in a back four otherwise compromised of Thiago Silva, Marquinhos and Marcelo. In goal, they can choose between Alisson and Ederson. Not bad. Neil Harris (Millwall) Lee Johnson, Dean Smith and Paul Cook are all promising Championship managers, but Neil Harris has done a remarkable job at the Den against all the odds. Building upon the 'siege mentality' that is part of Millwall's essential character, and thanks in no small part to Lee Gregory and Steve Morison's strike partnership, Harris has taken the London club from League One to the brink of the play-offs. It would take a hell of an offer to tempt Harris away from Millwall however, where he enjoys legendary status. Marcelo Gallardo (River Plate) Another disciple of Marcelo Bielsa, Gallardo could be the next successful Argentinian coaching export. Appointed River Plate manager in 2014, he has tucked away the Copa Sudamericana, Copa Libertadores and the Recopa already. Gallardo has a reputation as an innovator too, becoming the first coach in Argentina's first division to appoint a female assistant as well as working with a neuroscientist to hone players' mental approach. Could be on Atletico Madrid's shortlist should Diego Simeone ever depart. Slavisa Jokanovic (Fulham) There have been some recent whispers that Chelsea are interested in Slavisa Jokanovic Credit: PA There have already been whispers of Chelsea's interest, but if Fulham win their play-off final against Aston Villa and thrive in the Premier League then Jokanovic will be a wanted man. Fulham were without a doubt the best footballing side in the Championship last season, but Jokanovic also possesses an inner-steel that ensures discipline is not lost in all the pretty passing patterns. For clubs lost in the Premier League mid-table morass, Jokanovic would instill a style of play and an identity for fans to believe in. Rui Vitoria (Benfica) Has lifted two Portuguese championships and two cups in three seasons at Benfica, and at 48 Vitoria must surely be considering a fresh challenge. Losing out on the championship to Porto this season also has Vitoria under pressure Benfica are a dominant force, but a win percentage of 70% after 152 matches in charge remains impressive. Jose Mourinho's former assistant Rui Faria has been linked to the job, so that could free Vitoria to seek pastures new.
Brazil's second pre-World Cup training featured a hint that coach Tite might change his starting lineup.
Brazil tests Willian up front with Neymar and Jesus
Brazil's second pre-World Cup training featured a hint that coach Tite might change his starting lineup.
Brazil's second pre-World Cup training featured a hint that coach Tite might change his starting lineup.
Brazil tests Willian up front with Neymar and Jesus
Brazil's second pre-World Cup training featured a hint that coach Tite might change his starting lineup.
The two stars could coexist at the Santiago Bernabeu, according to the legendary Brazilian striker
Ronaldo: Cristiano and Neymar would be good together at Madrid
The two stars could coexist at the Santiago Bernabeu, according to the legendary Brazilian striker
Brazil's Neymar, left, and Gabriel Jesus play around during a practice session of the Brazilian national soccer team ahead the World Cup in Russia, at the Granja Comary training center in Teresopolis, Brazil, Thursday, May 24, 2018. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
Brazil tests Willian up front with Neymar and Jesus
Brazil's Neymar, left, and Gabriel Jesus play around during a practice session of the Brazilian national soccer team ahead the World Cup in Russia, at the Granja Comary training center in Teresopolis, Brazil, Thursday, May 24, 2018. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
Brazil's Neymar, center, Philippe Coutinho, left, and Miranda fight for the ball during a practice session of the Brazilian national soccer team ahead the World Cup in Russia, at the Granja Comary training center in Teresopolis, Brazil, Thursday, May 24, 2018. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
Brazil tests Willian up front with Neymar and Jesus
Brazil's Neymar, center, Philippe Coutinho, left, and Miranda fight for the ball during a practice session of the Brazilian national soccer team ahead the World Cup in Russia, at the Granja Comary training center in Teresopolis, Brazil, Thursday, May 24, 2018. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
Brazil's Neymar, right, and Thiago Silva play around during a practice session of the Brazilian national soccer team ahead the World Cup in Russia, at the Granja Comary training center in Teresopolis, Brazil, Thursday, May 24, 2018. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
Brazil tests Willian up front with Neymar and Jesus
Brazil's Neymar, right, and Thiago Silva play around during a practice session of the Brazilian national soccer team ahead the World Cup in Russia, at the Granja Comary training center in Teresopolis, Brazil, Thursday, May 24, 2018. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
Brazil's Neymar controls the ball during a practice session of the Brazilian national soccer team ahead the World Cup in Russia, at the Granja Comary training center in Teresopolis, Brazil, Thursday, May 24, 2018. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
Brazil tests Willian up front with Neymar and Jesus
Brazil's Neymar controls the ball during a practice session of the Brazilian national soccer team ahead the World Cup in Russia, at the Granja Comary training center in Teresopolis, Brazil, Thursday, May 24, 2018. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
Chelsea's Willian controls the ball during the English Premier League soccer match between Chelsea and Liverpool at Stamford Bridge stadium in London, Sunday, May 6, 2018. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)
Brazil tests Willian up front with Neymar and Jesus
Chelsea's Willian controls the ball during the English Premier League soccer match between Chelsea and Liverpool at Stamford Bridge stadium in London, Sunday, May 6, 2018. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)
Neymar looks set to be fit for Brazil's World Cup opener against Switzerland on June 17 after returning to training in Rio de Janeiro.
Neymar returns to Brazil training
Neymar looks set to be fit for Brazil's World Cup opener against Switzerland on June 17 after returning to training in Rio de Janeiro.
Neymar looks set to be fit for Brazil's World Cup opener against Switzerland on June 17 after returning to training in Rio de Janeiro.
Neymar returns to Brazil training
Neymar looks set to be fit for Brazil's World Cup opener against Switzerland on June 17 after returning to training in Rio de Janeiro.
Neymar looks set to be fit for Brazil's World Cup opener against Switzerland on June 17 after returning to training in Rio de Janeiro.
Neymar returns to Brazil training
Neymar looks set to be fit for Brazil's World Cup opener against Switzerland on June 17 after returning to training in Rio de Janeiro.
Happy returns: Neymar smiles as he trains with Brazil teammate Gabriel Jesus on Wednesday (AFP Photo/Mauro PIMENTEL)
Happy returns: Neymar smiles as he trains with Brazil teammate Gabriel Jesus on Wednesday
Happy returns: Neymar smiles as he trains with Brazil teammate Gabriel Jesus on Wednesday (AFP Photo/Mauro PIMENTEL)
The Selecao's fitness coach Fabio Mahseredjian says their star man is ahead of expectations in his injury recovery
Neymar fitter than Brazil expected ahead of World Cup
The Selecao's fitness coach Fabio Mahseredjian says their star man is ahead of expectations in his injury recovery
Soccer Football - Ligue 1 - Paris St Germain vs Stade Rennes - Parc des Princes, Paris, France - May 12, 2018 Paris Saint-Germain's Neymar celebrates winning Ligue 1 REUTERS/Pascal Rossignol - RC1D73787C90
Ligue 1 - Paris St Germain vs Stade Rennes
Soccer Football - Ligue 1 - Paris St Germain vs Stade Rennes - Parc des Princes, Paris, France - May 12, 2018 Paris Saint-Germain's Neymar celebrates winning Ligue 1 REUTERS/Pascal Rossignol - RC1D73787C90
Soccer Football - Ligue 1 - Paris St Germain vs Stade Rennes - Parc des Princes, Paris, France - May 12, 2018 Paris Saint-Germain's Neymar celebrates winning Ligue 1 REUTERS/Pascal Rossignol - RC1D73787C90
Ligue 1 - Paris St Germain vs Stade Rennes
Soccer Football - Ligue 1 - Paris St Germain vs Stade Rennes - Parc des Princes, Paris, France - May 12, 2018 Paris Saint-Germain's Neymar celebrates winning Ligue 1 REUTERS/Pascal Rossignol - RC1D73787C90
The Brazilian is keen to force through a switch to the Liga giants but the Portuguese says he is used to big-name players being linked to the club
Ronaldo responds as Neymar attempts to seal Real Madrid move
The Brazilian is keen to force through a switch to the Liga giants but the Portuguese says he is used to big-name players being linked to the club
Brazil's Neymar heads the ball during a practice session of the Brazil national soccer team at the Granja Comary training center, in Teresopolis, Brazil, Tuesday, May 22, 2018. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)
Neymar back in training with Brazil ahead of World Cup
Brazil's Neymar heads the ball during a practice session of the Brazil national soccer team at the Granja Comary training center, in Teresopolis, Brazil, Tuesday, May 22, 2018. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)
Boys, wearing Brazilian national team Neymar jerseys, celebrate because they were allowed entry at the Granja Comary training center to watch the national soccer team training session, in Teresopolis, Brazil, Friday, May 25, 2018. Neymar, the worlds highest paid soccer player, is nearly recovered from a foot operation and has joined 16 of his teammates in Teresopolis, looking ahead to competing in Russia at the World Cup in July. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)
Disgruntled fans break into Brazil pre-World Cup training
Boys, wearing Brazilian national team Neymar jerseys, celebrate because they were allowed entry at the Granja Comary training center to watch the national soccer team training session, in Teresopolis, Brazil, Friday, May 25, 2018. Neymar, the worlds highest paid soccer player, is nearly recovered from a foot operation and has joined 16 of his teammates in Teresopolis, looking ahead to competing in Russia at the World Cup in July. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)
Brazil's Neymar, right, embraces Fernandinho during a national soccer team practice session ahead the World Cup in Russia, at the Granja Comary training center In Teresopolis, Brazil, Friday, May 25, 2018. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)
Disgruntled fans break into Brazil pre-World Cup training
Brazil's Neymar, right, embraces Fernandinho during a national soccer team practice session ahead the World Cup in Russia, at the Granja Comary training center In Teresopolis, Brazil, Friday, May 25, 2018. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)
Football Soccer - Brazil national soccer team training - World Cup 2018 - Granja Comary, Teresopolis, Brazil - May 25, 2018 - Neymar and Willian talk with fans. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes
World Cup 2018 - Brazil national soccer team training
Football Soccer - Brazil national soccer team training - World Cup 2018 - Granja Comary, Teresopolis, Brazil - May 25, 2018 - Neymar and Willian talk with fans. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes
Football Soccer - Brazil national soccer team training - World Cup 2018 - Granja Comary, Teresopolis, Brazil - May 25, 2018 - Neymar and head coach Tite talk with fans. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes
World Cup 2018 - Brazil national soccer team training
Football Soccer - Brazil national soccer team training - World Cup 2018 - Granja Comary, Teresopolis, Brazil - May 25, 2018 - Neymar and head coach Tite talk with fans. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes
Football Soccer - Brazil national soccer team training - World Cup 2018 - Granja Comary, Teresopolis, Brazil - May 25, 2018 - Neymar and head coach Tite talk with fans. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes
World Cup 2018 - Brazil national soccer team training
Football Soccer - Brazil national soccer team training - World Cup 2018 - Granja Comary, Teresopolis, Brazil - May 25, 2018 - Neymar and head coach Tite talk with fans. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes
BRA18. Teresópolis (Brazil), 25/05/2018.- Brazilian national soccer team player Neymar Jr (L) greets fans after a training session at Granja Comary center in Teresopolis, Brazil, 25 May 2018. (Brasil, Rusia) EFE/EPA/Marcelo Sayao
BRA18. Teresópolis (Brazil), 25/05/2018.- Brazilian national soccer team player Neymar Jr (L) greets fans after a training session at Granja Comary center in Teresopolis, Brazil, 25 May 2018. (Brasil, Rusia) EFE/EPA/Marcelo Sayao
BRA18. Teresópolis (Brazil), 25/05/2018.- Brazilian national soccer team player Neymar Jr (L) greets fans after a training session at Granja Comary center in Teresopolis, Brazil, 25 May 2018. (Brasil, Rusia) EFE/EPA/Marcelo Sayao
BRA18. Teresópolis (Brazil), 25/05/2018.- Brazilian national soccer team head coach Tite (L) and player Neymar Jr (2-L) greet fans after a training session at Granja Comary center in Teresopolis, Brazil, 25 May 2018. (Brasil, Rusia) EFE/EPA/Marcelo Sayao
BRA18. Teresópolis (Brazil), 25/05/2018.- Brazilian national soccer team head coach Tite (L) and player Neymar Jr (2-L) greet fans after a training session at Granja Comary center in Teresopolis, Brazil, 25 May 2018. (Brasil, Rusia) EFE/EPA/Marcelo Sayao
BRA18. Teresópolis (Brazil), 25/05/2018.- Brazilian national soccer team head coach Tite (L) and player Neymar Jr (2-L) greet fans after a training session at Granja Comary center in Teresopolis, Brazil, 25 May 2018. (Brasil, Rusia) EFE/EPA/Marcelo Sayao
BRA18. Teresópolis (Brazil), 25/05/2018.- Brazilian national soccer team head coach Tite (L) and player Neymar Jr (2-L) greet fans after a training session at Granja Comary center in Teresopolis, Brazil, 25 May 2018. (Brasil, Rusia) EFE/EPA/Marcelo Sayao
BRA18. Teresópolis (Brazil), 25/05/2018.- Brazilian national soccer team head coach Tite (L) and player Neymar Jr (2-L) greet fans after a training session at Granja Comary center in Teresopolis, Brazil, 25 May 2018. (Brasil, Rusia) EFE/EPA/Marcelo Sayao
BRA18. Teresópolis (Brazil), 25/05/2018.- Brazilian national soccer team head coach Tite (L) and player Neymar Jr (2-L) greet fans after a training session at Granja Comary center in Teresopolis, Brazil, 25 May 2018. (Brasil, Rusia) EFE/EPA/Marcelo Sayao
BRA18. Teresópolis (Brazil), 25/05/2018.- Brazilian national soccer team player Neymar Jr (R) walks accompanied by his son after a training session at Granja Comary center in Teresopolis, Brazil, 25 May 2018. (Brasil, Rusia) EFE/EPA/Marcelo Sayao
BRA18. Teresópolis (Brazil), 25/05/2018.- Brazilian national soccer team player Neymar Jr (R) walks accompanied by his son after a training session at Granja Comary center in Teresopolis, Brazil, 25 May 2018. (Brasil, Rusia) EFE/EPA/Marcelo Sayao
BRA18. Teresópolis (Brazil), 25/05/2018.- Brazilian national soccer team player Neymar Jr (R) walks accompanied by his son after a training session at Granja Comary center in Teresopolis, Brazil, 25 May 2018. (Brasil, Rusia) EFE/EPA/Marcelo Sayao
BRA18. Teresópolis (Brazil), 25/05/2018.- Brazilian national soccer team head coach Tite (2-L) and players Willian (L) and Neymar Jr (3-L) greet fans after a training session at Granja Comary center in Teresopolis, Brazil, 25 May 2018. (Brasil, Rusia) EFE/EPA/Marcelo Sayao
BRA18. Teresópolis (Brazil), 25/05/2018.- Brazilian national soccer team head coach Tite (2-L) and players Willian (L) and Neymar Jr (3-L) greet fans after a training session at Granja Comary center in Teresopolis, Brazil, 25 May 2018. (Brasil, Rusia) EFE/EPA/Marcelo Sayao
BRA18. Teresópolis (Brazil), 25/05/2018.- Brazilian national soccer team head coach Tite (2-L) and players Willian (L) and Neymar Jr (3-L) greet fans after a training session at Granja Comary center in Teresopolis, Brazil, 25 May 2018. (Brasil, Rusia) EFE/EPA/Marcelo Sayao
BRA18. Teresópolis (Brazil), 25/05/2018.- Brazilian national soccer team player Neymar Jr (R) plays with his son after a training session at Granja Comary center in Teresopolis, Brazil, 25 May 2018. (Brasil, Rusia) EFE/EPA/Marcelo Sayao
BRA18. Teresópolis (Brazil), 25/05/2018.- Brazilian national soccer team player Neymar Jr (R) plays with his son after a training session at Granja Comary center in Teresopolis, Brazil, 25 May 2018. (Brasil, Rusia) EFE/EPA/Marcelo Sayao
BRA18. Teresópolis (Brazil), 25/05/2018.- Brazilian national soccer team player Neymar Jr (R) plays with his son after a training session at Granja Comary center in Teresopolis, Brazil, 25 May 2018. (Brasil, Rusia) EFE/EPA/Marcelo Sayao
The full-back has once again stated how he would love his fellow Brazilian to return to La Liga and join him at Santiago Bernabeu
'Big players need to play in Madrid' - Marcelo urges Neymar to join Real
The full-back has once again stated how he would love his fellow Brazilian to return to La Liga and join him at Santiago Bernabeu
Frustration with the same old names and faces occupying Premier League jobs was a feature of last season, and could even prove a watershed moment in how fans think about their manager. Sam Allardyce, Mark Hughes and Alan Pardew are just three beneficiaries of the managerial merry-go-round, but a culture of safe appointments is just as true in the upper echelons of the Premier League. Arsenal appointed Unai Emery as their new head coach on Wednesday while Chelsea have a strong interest Maurizio Sarri and both feel like the 'next cab off the rank' of European coaches. The omnipotent gaffer is being phased out of the game, in favour of more democratic and collegiate structures with power shared between a technical director, recruitment guru and head coach. Here are 10 coaches who might find themselves in contention for jobs when the sacking seasons begins in autumn. Domenico Tedesco (Schalke) Dominic Tedesco led Schalke to a second place finish in the Bundesliga Credit: AFP The head coach of the team who finished second in the Bundesliga is hardly an obscure selection, but 32-year-old Domenico Tedesco looks a cast-iron certainty to be considered for the next 'Big Six' job available. Born in Italy, Tedesco's parents emigrated to Germany when he was two years old. He never played football professionally but like Hoffenheim coach Julian Nagelsmann found a break in coaching at a young age. Appointed by second-tier Erzgebirge Aue in March 2017, Tedesco won 13 points from five games to guide them to safety. Schalke took a chance on him last summer and under his guidance the Gelsenkirchen club have qualified for the Champions League after a three-year absence. Regarded as a tactically flexible coach, one highlight of a superb debut season was a comeback from 4-0 down to 4-4 in the derby against Borussia Dortmund. Gian Piero Gasperini (Atalanta) Gasperini lasted only five games as Inter Milan manager in 2011, but has bounced back since then Credit: Getty Images Lasted only five games at Inter in 2011, but Gian Piero Gasperini has a warranted reputation for getting a lot from a little. He guided Genoa to Europe in 2009 but it is his work at Atalanta over the past few seasons that has really caught the eye. Benefiting from one of Italy's most productive academies, Giasperini's Atlanta recovered from losing four of their first five league games to finish fourth in 2016-17, achieving European qualification for the first time in 26-years. The 58-year-old coach ripped up the tactical rule-book, using a Dutch-style 3-4-3 that left opponents dumbfounded. Despite losing Franck Kessie to Milan last summer and other key players, Atalanta continued to punch above their weight with a seventh-placed finish. Giasperini is not the youthful up-and-comer some clubs crave, but any club looking to maximise meagre resources could do far worse. Giovanni van Bronckhorst (Feyenoord) Giovanni van Bronckhorst was loosely linked with Arsenal before Unai Emery's appointment Credit: Getty Images The former Arsenal player received a ringing endorsement from Arsene Wenger last year and a glance at his record makes it easy to see why. Guided Feyenoord to the Dutch Cup in his first season before winning the Eredivisie in his second, coaxing the best out of a squad with a mix of talented youngsters and wise old heads such as Dirk Kuyt. Last season proved more challenging, but Feyenoord did rally late, winning their last eight league matches to finish fourth and claimed another cup. Ralph Hasenhüttl (free agent) Hasenhüttl stepped down as RB Leipzig head coach at the end of last season after two seasons in charge. Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund have made both made new appointments this summer, so Hasenhüttl must consider his next move. The Austrian guided the controversial Bundesliga newcomers to second-place and Champions League qualification with a brand of high-octane, progressive football. He may have fallen out with RB Leipzig's hierarchy over a new contract, but Hasenhüttl looks ideally suited to any club with a technical director-head coach set-up. Whether he can find a club that can unearth talent like Naby Keita or Emil Forsberg is another matter. Eddie Howe (Bournemouth) Eddie Howe's name has not been mentioned for recent managerial vacancies Credit: Reuters Not an unfamiliar name, but one who seems to be drifting down clubs' lists. In the summer of 2016 there were reports that he was well thought of by Arsenal's hierarchy, and he was also linked with Everton - the club he supported as a boy. He was frequently spoken of as a potential England manager too. Several managerial vacancies have opened up in the last few months, and Howe does not seem to have been considered for any of them. He has done nothing to diminish his reputation in the intervening period, quite the opposite in fact, so his diminished status is curious. Bournemouth's last two league finishes are ninth and 12th - a commendable achievement. His record in the transfer market is patchy however, and there is also a risk that becomes institutionalised at Bournemouth. Familiarity breeds contempt. Tite (Brazil) Tite has been praised for his man-management of Neymar Credit: Reuters The quality of manager in international football is desperately low, but Brazil's Tite is one who looks capable of stepping into a top club job. Has galvanised a group of players rocked by a 7-1 World Cup semi-final humiliation on home soil at the hands of Germany. Following the oppressive Dunga, Tite has put an arm round a few of his charges and the result is possibly the best Brazil team since 2002. Neymar, Gabriel Jesus and Philippe Coutinho will lead the charge in Russia, with Roberto Firmino and Willian in reserve, supported by a likely midfield three of Casemiro, Paulinho and Rene Augusto. Dani Alves' injury is a blow, leaving the right-back berth free in a back four otherwise compromised of Thiago Silva, Marquinhos and Marcelo. In goal, they can choose between Alisson and Ederson. Not bad. Neil Harris (Millwall) Lee Johnson, Dean Smith and Paul Cook are all promising Championship managers, but Neil Harris has done a remarkable job at the Den against all the odds. Building upon the 'siege mentality' that is part of Millwall's essential character, and thanks in no small part to Lee Gregory and Steve Morison's strike partnership, Harris has taken the London club from League One to the brink of the play-offs. It would take a hell of an offer to tempt Harris away from Millwall however, where he enjoys legendary status. Marcelo Gallardo (River Plate) Another disciple of Marcelo Bielsa, Gallardo could be the next successful Argentinian coaching export. Appointed River Plate manager in 2014, he has tucked away the Copa Sudamericana, Copa Libertadores and the Recopa already. Gallardo has a reputation as an innovator too, becoming the first coach in Argentina's first division to appoint a female assistant as well as working with a neuroscientist to hone players' mental approach. Could be on Atletico Madrid's shortlist should Diego Simeone ever depart. Slavisa Jokanovic (Fulham) There have been some recent whispers that Chelsea are interested in Slavisa Jokanovic Credit: PA There have already been whispers of Chelsea's interest, but if Fulham win their play-off final against Aston Villa and thrive in the Premier League then Jokanovic will be a wanted man. Fulham were without a doubt the best footballing side in the Championship last season, but Jokanovic also possesses an inner-steel that ensures discipline is not lost in all the pretty passing patterns. For clubs lost in the Premier League mid-table morass, Jokanovic would instill a style of play and an identity for fans to believe in. Rui Vitoria (Benfica) Has lifted two Portuguese championships and two cups in three seasons at Benfica, and at 48 Vitoria must surely be considering a fresh challenge. Losing out on the championship to Porto this season also has Vitoria under pressure Benfica are a dominant force, but a win percentage of 70% after 152 matches in charge remains impressive. Jose Mourinho's former assistant Rui Faria has been linked to the job, so that could free Vitoria to seek pastures new.
The 10 managers nobody is linking with vacant jobs...but should be
Frustration with the same old names and faces occupying Premier League jobs was a feature of last season, and could even prove a watershed moment in how fans think about their manager. Sam Allardyce, Mark Hughes and Alan Pardew are just three beneficiaries of the managerial merry-go-round, but a culture of safe appointments is just as true in the upper echelons of the Premier League. Arsenal appointed Unai Emery as their new head coach on Wednesday while Chelsea have a strong interest Maurizio Sarri and both feel like the 'next cab off the rank' of European coaches. The omnipotent gaffer is being phased out of the game, in favour of more democratic and collegiate structures with power shared between a technical director, recruitment guru and head coach. Here are 10 coaches who might find themselves in contention for jobs when the sacking seasons begins in autumn. Domenico Tedesco (Schalke) Dominic Tedesco led Schalke to a second place finish in the Bundesliga Credit: AFP The head coach of the team who finished second in the Bundesliga is hardly an obscure selection, but 32-year-old Domenico Tedesco looks a cast-iron certainty to be considered for the next 'Big Six' job available. Born in Italy, Tedesco's parents emigrated to Germany when he was two years old. He never played football professionally but like Hoffenheim coach Julian Nagelsmann found a break in coaching at a young age. Appointed by second-tier Erzgebirge Aue in March 2017, Tedesco won 13 points from five games to guide them to safety. Schalke took a chance on him last summer and under his guidance the Gelsenkirchen club have qualified for the Champions League after a three-year absence. Regarded as a tactically flexible coach, one highlight of a superb debut season was a comeback from 4-0 down to 4-4 in the derby against Borussia Dortmund. Gian Piero Gasperini (Atalanta) Gasperini lasted only five games as Inter Milan manager in 2011, but has bounced back since then Credit: Getty Images Lasted only five games at Inter in 2011, but Gian Piero Gasperini has a warranted reputation for getting a lot from a little. He guided Genoa to Europe in 2009 but it is his work at Atalanta over the past few seasons that has really caught the eye. Benefiting from one of Italy's most productive academies, Giasperini's Atlanta recovered from losing four of their first five league games to finish fourth in 2016-17, achieving European qualification for the first time in 26-years. The 58-year-old coach ripped up the tactical rule-book, using a Dutch-style 3-4-3 that left opponents dumbfounded. Despite losing Franck Kessie to Milan last summer and other key players, Atalanta continued to punch above their weight with a seventh-placed finish. Giasperini is not the youthful up-and-comer some clubs crave, but any club looking to maximise meagre resources could do far worse. Giovanni van Bronckhorst (Feyenoord) Giovanni van Bronckhorst was loosely linked with Arsenal before Unai Emery's appointment Credit: Getty Images The former Arsenal player received a ringing endorsement from Arsene Wenger last year and a glance at his record makes it easy to see why. Guided Feyenoord to the Dutch Cup in his first season before winning the Eredivisie in his second, coaxing the best out of a squad with a mix of talented youngsters and wise old heads such as Dirk Kuyt. Last season proved more challenging, but Feyenoord did rally late, winning their last eight league matches to finish fourth and claimed another cup. Ralph Hasenhüttl (free agent) Hasenhüttl stepped down as RB Leipzig head coach at the end of last season after two seasons in charge. Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund have made both made new appointments this summer, so Hasenhüttl must consider his next move. The Austrian guided the controversial Bundesliga newcomers to second-place and Champions League qualification with a brand of high-octane, progressive football. He may have fallen out with RB Leipzig's hierarchy over a new contract, but Hasenhüttl looks ideally suited to any club with a technical director-head coach set-up. Whether he can find a club that can unearth talent like Naby Keita or Emil Forsberg is another matter. Eddie Howe (Bournemouth) Eddie Howe's name has not been mentioned for recent managerial vacancies Credit: Reuters Not an unfamiliar name, but one who seems to be drifting down clubs' lists. In the summer of 2016 there were reports that he was well thought of by Arsenal's hierarchy, and he was also linked with Everton - the club he supported as a boy. He was frequently spoken of as a potential England manager too. Several managerial vacancies have opened up in the last few months, and Howe does not seem to have been considered for any of them. He has done nothing to diminish his reputation in the intervening period, quite the opposite in fact, so his diminished status is curious. Bournemouth's last two league finishes are ninth and 12th - a commendable achievement. His record in the transfer market is patchy however, and there is also a risk that becomes institutionalised at Bournemouth. Familiarity breeds contempt. Tite (Brazil) Tite has been praised for his man-management of Neymar Credit: Reuters The quality of manager in international football is desperately low, but Brazil's Tite is one who looks capable of stepping into a top club job. Has galvanised a group of players rocked by a 7-1 World Cup semi-final humiliation on home soil at the hands of Germany. Following the oppressive Dunga, Tite has put an arm round a few of his charges and the result is possibly the best Brazil team since 2002. Neymar, Gabriel Jesus and Philippe Coutinho will lead the charge in Russia, with Roberto Firmino and Willian in reserve, supported by a likely midfield three of Casemiro, Paulinho and Rene Augusto. Dani Alves' injury is a blow, leaving the right-back berth free in a back four otherwise compromised of Thiago Silva, Marquinhos and Marcelo. In goal, they can choose between Alisson and Ederson. Not bad. Neil Harris (Millwall) Lee Johnson, Dean Smith and Paul Cook are all promising Championship managers, but Neil Harris has done a remarkable job at the Den against all the odds. Building upon the 'siege mentality' that is part of Millwall's essential character, and thanks in no small part to Lee Gregory and Steve Morison's strike partnership, Harris has taken the London club from League One to the brink of the play-offs. It would take a hell of an offer to tempt Harris away from Millwall however, where he enjoys legendary status. Marcelo Gallardo (River Plate) Another disciple of Marcelo Bielsa, Gallardo could be the next successful Argentinian coaching export. Appointed River Plate manager in 2014, he has tucked away the Copa Sudamericana, Copa Libertadores and the Recopa already. Gallardo has a reputation as an innovator too, becoming the first coach in Argentina's first division to appoint a female assistant as well as working with a neuroscientist to hone players' mental approach. Could be on Atletico Madrid's shortlist should Diego Simeone ever depart. Slavisa Jokanovic (Fulham) There have been some recent whispers that Chelsea are interested in Slavisa Jokanovic Credit: PA There have already been whispers of Chelsea's interest, but if Fulham win their play-off final against Aston Villa and thrive in the Premier League then Jokanovic will be a wanted man. Fulham were without a doubt the best footballing side in the Championship last season, but Jokanovic also possesses an inner-steel that ensures discipline is not lost in all the pretty passing patterns. For clubs lost in the Premier League mid-table morass, Jokanovic would instill a style of play and an identity for fans to believe in. Rui Vitoria (Benfica) Has lifted two Portuguese championships and two cups in three seasons at Benfica, and at 48 Vitoria must surely be considering a fresh challenge. Losing out on the championship to Porto this season also has Vitoria under pressure Benfica are a dominant force, but a win percentage of 70% after 152 matches in charge remains impressive. Jose Mourinho's former assistant Rui Faria has been linked to the job, so that could free Vitoria to seek pastures new.
Frustration with the same old names and faces occupying Premier League jobs was a feature of last season, and could even prove a watershed moment in how fans think about their manager. Sam Allardyce, Mark Hughes and Alan Pardew are just three beneficiaries of the managerial merry-go-round, but a culture of safe appointments is just as true in the upper echelons of the Premier League. Arsenal appointed Unai Emery as their new head coach on Wednesday while Chelsea have a strong interest Maurizio Sarri and both feel like the 'next cab off the rank' of European coaches. The omnipotent gaffer is being phased out of the game, in favour of more democratic and collegiate structures with power shared between a technical director, recruitment guru and head coach. Here are 10 coaches who might find themselves in contention for jobs when the sacking seasons begins in autumn. Domenico Tedesco (Schalke) Dominic Tedesco led Schalke to a second place finish in the Bundesliga Credit: AFP The head coach of the team who finished second in the Bundesliga is hardly an obscure selection, but 32-year-old Domenico Tedesco looks a cast-iron certainty to be considered for the next 'Big Six' job available. Born in Italy, Tedesco's parents emigrated to Germany when he was two years old. He never played football professionally but like Hoffenheim coach Julian Nagelsmann found a break in coaching at a young age. Appointed by second-tier Erzgebirge Aue in March 2017, Tedesco won 13 points from five games to guide them to safety. Schalke took a chance on him last summer and under his guidance the Gelsenkirchen club have qualified for the Champions League after a three-year absence. Regarded as a tactically flexible coach, one highlight of a superb debut season was a comeback from 4-0 down to 4-4 in the derby against Borussia Dortmund. Gian Piero Gasperini (Atalanta) Gasperini lasted only five games as Inter Milan manager in 2011, but has bounced back since then Credit: Getty Images Lasted only five games at Inter in 2011, but Gian Piero Gasperini has a warranted reputation for getting a lot from a little. He guided Genoa to Europe in 2009 but it is his work at Atalanta over the past few seasons that has really caught the eye. Benefiting from one of Italy's most productive academies, Giasperini's Atlanta recovered from losing four of their first five league games to finish fourth in 2016-17, achieving European qualification for the first time in 26-years. The 58-year-old coach ripped up the tactical rule-book, using a Dutch-style 3-4-3 that left opponents dumbfounded. Despite losing Franck Kessie to Milan last summer and other key players, Atalanta continued to punch above their weight with a seventh-placed finish. Giasperini is not the youthful up-and-comer some clubs crave, but any club looking to maximise meagre resources could do far worse. Giovanni van Bronckhorst (Feyenoord) Giovanni van Bronckhorst was loosely linked with Arsenal before Unai Emery's appointment Credit: Getty Images The former Arsenal player received a ringing endorsement from Arsene Wenger last year and a glance at his record makes it easy to see why. Guided Feyenoord to the Dutch Cup in his first season before winning the Eredivisie in his second, coaxing the best out of a squad with a mix of talented youngsters and wise old heads such as Dirk Kuyt. Last season proved more challenging, but Feyenoord did rally late, winning their last eight league matches to finish fourth and claimed another cup. Ralph Hasenhüttl (free agent) Hasenhüttl stepped down as RB Leipzig head coach at the end of last season after two seasons in charge. Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund have made both made new appointments this summer, so Hasenhüttl must consider his next move. The Austrian guided the controversial Bundesliga newcomers to second-place and Champions League qualification with a brand of high-octane, progressive football. He may have fallen out with RB Leipzig's hierarchy over a new contract, but Hasenhüttl looks ideally suited to any club with a technical director-head coach set-up. Whether he can find a club that can unearth talent like Naby Keita or Emil Forsberg is another matter. Eddie Howe (Bournemouth) Eddie Howe's name has not been mentioned for recent managerial vacancies Credit: Reuters Not an unfamiliar name, but one who seems to be drifting down clubs' lists. In the summer of 2016 there were reports that he was well thought of by Arsenal's hierarchy, and he was also linked with Everton - the club he supported as a boy. He was frequently spoken of as a potential England manager too. Several managerial vacancies have opened up in the last few months, and Howe does not seem to have been considered for any of them. He has done nothing to diminish his reputation in the intervening period, quite the opposite in fact, so his diminished status is curious. Bournemouth's last two league finishes are ninth and 12th - a commendable achievement. His record in the transfer market is patchy however, and there is also a risk that becomes institutionalised at Bournemouth. Familiarity breeds contempt. Tite (Brazil) Tite has been praised for his man-management of Neymar Credit: Reuters The quality of manager in international football is desperately low, but Brazil's Tite is one who looks capable of stepping into a top club job. Has galvanised a group of players rocked by a 7-1 World Cup semi-final humiliation on home soil at the hands of Germany. Following the oppressive Dunga, Tite has put an arm round a few of his charges and the result is possibly the best Brazil team since 2002. Neymar, Gabriel Jesus and Philippe Coutinho will lead the charge in Russia, with Roberto Firmino and Willian in reserve, supported by a likely midfield three of Casemiro, Paulinho and Rene Augusto. Dani Alves' injury is a blow, leaving the right-back berth free in a back four otherwise compromised of Thiago Silva, Marquinhos and Marcelo. In goal, they can choose between Alisson and Ederson. Not bad. Neil Harris (Millwall) Lee Johnson, Dean Smith and Paul Cook are all promising Championship managers, but Neil Harris has done a remarkable job at the Den against all the odds. Building upon the 'siege mentality' that is part of Millwall's essential character, and thanks in no small part to Lee Gregory and Steve Morison's strike partnership, Harris has taken the London club from League One to the brink of the play-offs. It would take a hell of an offer to tempt Harris away from Millwall however, where he enjoys legendary status. Marcelo Gallardo (River Plate) Another disciple of Marcelo Bielsa, Gallardo could be the next successful Argentinian coaching export. Appointed River Plate manager in 2014, he has tucked away the Copa Sudamericana, Copa Libertadores and the Recopa already. Gallardo has a reputation as an innovator too, becoming the first coach in Argentina's first division to appoint a female assistant as well as working with a neuroscientist to hone players' mental approach. Could be on Atletico Madrid's shortlist should Diego Simeone ever depart. Slavisa Jokanovic (Fulham) There have been some recent whispers that Chelsea are interested in Slavisa Jokanovic Credit: PA There have already been whispers of Chelsea's interest, but if Fulham win their play-off final against Aston Villa and thrive in the Premier League then Jokanovic will be a wanted man. Fulham were without a doubt the best footballing side in the Championship last season, but Jokanovic also possesses an inner-steel that ensures discipline is not lost in all the pretty passing patterns. For clubs lost in the Premier League mid-table morass, Jokanovic would instill a style of play and an identity for fans to believe in. Rui Vitoria (Benfica) Has lifted two Portuguese championships and two cups in three seasons at Benfica, and at 48 Vitoria must surely be considering a fresh challenge. Losing out on the championship to Porto this season also has Vitoria under pressure Benfica are a dominant force, but a win percentage of 70% after 152 matches in charge remains impressive. Jose Mourinho's former assistant Rui Faria has been linked to the job, so that could free Vitoria to seek pastures new.
The 10 managers nobody is linking with vacant jobs...but should be
Frustration with the same old names and faces occupying Premier League jobs was a feature of last season, and could even prove a watershed moment in how fans think about their manager. Sam Allardyce, Mark Hughes and Alan Pardew are just three beneficiaries of the managerial merry-go-round, but a culture of safe appointments is just as true in the upper echelons of the Premier League. Arsenal appointed Unai Emery as their new head coach on Wednesday while Chelsea have a strong interest Maurizio Sarri and both feel like the 'next cab off the rank' of European coaches. The omnipotent gaffer is being phased out of the game, in favour of more democratic and collegiate structures with power shared between a technical director, recruitment guru and head coach. Here are 10 coaches who might find themselves in contention for jobs when the sacking seasons begins in autumn. Domenico Tedesco (Schalke) Dominic Tedesco led Schalke to a second place finish in the Bundesliga Credit: AFP The head coach of the team who finished second in the Bundesliga is hardly an obscure selection, but 32-year-old Domenico Tedesco looks a cast-iron certainty to be considered for the next 'Big Six' job available. Born in Italy, Tedesco's parents emigrated to Germany when he was two years old. He never played football professionally but like Hoffenheim coach Julian Nagelsmann found a break in coaching at a young age. Appointed by second-tier Erzgebirge Aue in March 2017, Tedesco won 13 points from five games to guide them to safety. Schalke took a chance on him last summer and under his guidance the Gelsenkirchen club have qualified for the Champions League after a three-year absence. Regarded as a tactically flexible coach, one highlight of a superb debut season was a comeback from 4-0 down to 4-4 in the derby against Borussia Dortmund. Gian Piero Gasperini (Atalanta) Gasperini lasted only five games as Inter Milan manager in 2011, but has bounced back since then Credit: Getty Images Lasted only five games at Inter in 2011, but Gian Piero Gasperini has a warranted reputation for getting a lot from a little. He guided Genoa to Europe in 2009 but it is his work at Atalanta over the past few seasons that has really caught the eye. Benefiting from one of Italy's most productive academies, Giasperini's Atlanta recovered from losing four of their first five league games to finish fourth in 2016-17, achieving European qualification for the first time in 26-years. The 58-year-old coach ripped up the tactical rule-book, using a Dutch-style 3-4-3 that left opponents dumbfounded. Despite losing Franck Kessie to Milan last summer and other key players, Atalanta continued to punch above their weight with a seventh-placed finish. Giasperini is not the youthful up-and-comer some clubs crave, but any club looking to maximise meagre resources could do far worse. Giovanni van Bronckhorst (Feyenoord) Giovanni van Bronckhorst was loosely linked with Arsenal before Unai Emery's appointment Credit: Getty Images The former Arsenal player received a ringing endorsement from Arsene Wenger last year and a glance at his record makes it easy to see why. Guided Feyenoord to the Dutch Cup in his first season before winning the Eredivisie in his second, coaxing the best out of a squad with a mix of talented youngsters and wise old heads such as Dirk Kuyt. Last season proved more challenging, but Feyenoord did rally late, winning their last eight league matches to finish fourth and claimed another cup. Ralph Hasenhüttl (free agent) Hasenhüttl stepped down as RB Leipzig head coach at the end of last season after two seasons in charge. Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund have made both made new appointments this summer, so Hasenhüttl must consider his next move. The Austrian guided the controversial Bundesliga newcomers to second-place and Champions League qualification with a brand of high-octane, progressive football. He may have fallen out with RB Leipzig's hierarchy over a new contract, but Hasenhüttl looks ideally suited to any club with a technical director-head coach set-up. Whether he can find a club that can unearth talent like Naby Keita or Emil Forsberg is another matter. Eddie Howe (Bournemouth) Eddie Howe's name has not been mentioned for recent managerial vacancies Credit: Reuters Not an unfamiliar name, but one who seems to be drifting down clubs' lists. In the summer of 2016 there were reports that he was well thought of by Arsenal's hierarchy, and he was also linked with Everton - the club he supported as a boy. He was frequently spoken of as a potential England manager too. Several managerial vacancies have opened up in the last few months, and Howe does not seem to have been considered for any of them. He has done nothing to diminish his reputation in the intervening period, quite the opposite in fact, so his diminished status is curious. Bournemouth's last two league finishes are ninth and 12th - a commendable achievement. His record in the transfer market is patchy however, and there is also a risk that becomes institutionalised at Bournemouth. Familiarity breeds contempt. Tite (Brazil) Tite has been praised for his man-management of Neymar Credit: Reuters The quality of manager in international football is desperately low, but Brazil's Tite is one who looks capable of stepping into a top club job. Has galvanised a group of players rocked by a 7-1 World Cup semi-final humiliation on home soil at the hands of Germany. Following the oppressive Dunga, Tite has put an arm round a few of his charges and the result is possibly the best Brazil team since 2002. Neymar, Gabriel Jesus and Philippe Coutinho will lead the charge in Russia, with Roberto Firmino and Willian in reserve, supported by a likely midfield three of Casemiro, Paulinho and Rene Augusto. Dani Alves' injury is a blow, leaving the right-back berth free in a back four otherwise compromised of Thiago Silva, Marquinhos and Marcelo. In goal, they can choose between Alisson and Ederson. Not bad. Neil Harris (Millwall) Lee Johnson, Dean Smith and Paul Cook are all promising Championship managers, but Neil Harris has done a remarkable job at the Den against all the odds. Building upon the 'siege mentality' that is part of Millwall's essential character, and thanks in no small part to Lee Gregory and Steve Morison's strike partnership, Harris has taken the London club from League One to the brink of the play-offs. It would take a hell of an offer to tempt Harris away from Millwall however, where he enjoys legendary status. Marcelo Gallardo (River Plate) Another disciple of Marcelo Bielsa, Gallardo could be the next successful Argentinian coaching export. Appointed River Plate manager in 2014, he has tucked away the Copa Sudamericana, Copa Libertadores and the Recopa already. Gallardo has a reputation as an innovator too, becoming the first coach in Argentina's first division to appoint a female assistant as well as working with a neuroscientist to hone players' mental approach. Could be on Atletico Madrid's shortlist should Diego Simeone ever depart. Slavisa Jokanovic (Fulham) There have been some recent whispers that Chelsea are interested in Slavisa Jokanovic Credit: PA There have already been whispers of Chelsea's interest, but if Fulham win their play-off final against Aston Villa and thrive in the Premier League then Jokanovic will be a wanted man. Fulham were without a doubt the best footballing side in the Championship last season, but Jokanovic also possesses an inner-steel that ensures discipline is not lost in all the pretty passing patterns. For clubs lost in the Premier League mid-table morass, Jokanovic would instill a style of play and an identity for fans to believe in. Rui Vitoria (Benfica) Has lifted two Portuguese championships and two cups in three seasons at Benfica, and at 48 Vitoria must surely be considering a fresh challenge. Losing out on the championship to Porto this season also has Vitoria under pressure Benfica are a dominant force, but a win percentage of 70% after 152 matches in charge remains impressive. Jose Mourinho's former assistant Rui Faria has been linked to the job, so that could free Vitoria to seek pastures new.
Frustration with the same old names and faces occupying Premier League jobs was a feature of last season, and could even prove a watershed moment in how fans think about their manager. Sam Allardyce, Mark Hughes and Alan Pardew are just three beneficiaries of the managerial merry-go-round, but a culture of safe appointments is just as true in the upper echelons of the Premier League. Arsenal appointed Unai Emery as their new head coach on Wednesday while Chelsea have a strong interest Maurizio Sarri and both feel like the 'next cab off the rank' of European coaches. The omnipotent gaffer is being phased out of the game, in favour of more democratic and collegiate structures with power shared between a technical director, recruitment guru and head coach. Here are 10 coaches who might find themselves in contention for jobs when the sacking seasons begins in autumn. Domenico Tedesco (Schalke) Dominic Tedesco led Schalke to a second place finish in the Bundesliga Credit: AFP The head coach of the team who finished second in the Bundesliga is hardly an obscure selection, but 32-year-old Domenico Tedesco looks a cast-iron certainty to be considered for the next 'Big Six' job available. Born in Italy, Tedesco's parents emigrated to Germany when he was two years old. He never played football professionally but like Hoffenheim coach Julian Nagelsmann found a break in coaching at a young age. Appointed by second-tier Erzgebirge Aue in March 2017, Tedesco won 13 points from five games to guide them to safety. Schalke took a chance on him last summer and under his guidance the Gelsenkirchen club have qualified for the Champions League after a three-year absence. Regarded as a tactically flexible coach, one highlight of a superb debut season was a comeback from 4-0 down to 4-4 in the derby against Borussia Dortmund. Gian Piero Gasperini (Atalanta) Gasperini lasted only five games as Inter Milan manager in 2011, but has bounced back since then Credit: Getty Images Lasted only five games at Inter in 2011, but Gian Piero Gasperini has a warranted reputation for getting a lot from a little. He guided Genoa to Europe in 2009 but it is his work at Atalanta over the past few seasons that has really caught the eye. Benefiting from one of Italy's most productive academies, Giasperini's Atlanta recovered from losing four of their first five league games to finish fourth in 2016-17, achieving European qualification for the first time in 26-years. The 58-year-old coach ripped up the tactical rule-book, using a Dutch-style 3-4-3 that left opponents dumbfounded. Despite losing Franck Kessie to Milan last summer and other key players, Atalanta continued to punch above their weight with a seventh-placed finish. Giasperini is not the youthful up-and-comer some clubs crave, but any club looking to maximise meagre resources could do far worse. Giovanni van Bronckhorst (Feyenoord) Giovanni van Bronckhorst was loosely linked with Arsenal before Unai Emery's appointment Credit: Getty Images The former Arsenal player received a ringing endorsement from Arsene Wenger last year and a glance at his record makes it easy to see why. Guided Feyenoord to the Dutch Cup in his first season before winning the Eredivisie in his second, coaxing the best out of a squad with a mix of talented youngsters and wise old heads such as Dirk Kuyt. Last season proved more challenging, but Feyenoord did rally late, winning their last eight league matches to finish fourth and claimed another cup. Ralph Hasenhüttl (free agent) Hasenhüttl stepped down as RB Leipzig head coach at the end of last season after two seasons in charge. Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund have made both made new appointments this summer, so Hasenhüttl must consider his next move. The Austrian guided the controversial Bundesliga newcomers to second-place and Champions League qualification with a brand of high-octane, progressive football. He may have fallen out with RB Leipzig's hierarchy over a new contract, but Hasenhüttl looks ideally suited to any club with a technical director-head coach set-up. Whether he can find a club that can unearth talent like Naby Keita or Emil Forsberg is another matter. Eddie Howe (Bournemouth) Eddie Howe's name has not been mentioned for recent managerial vacancies Credit: Reuters Not an unfamiliar name, but one who seems to be drifting down clubs' lists. In the summer of 2016 there were reports that he was well thought of by Arsenal's hierarchy, and he was also linked with Everton - the club he supported as a boy. He was frequently spoken of as a potential England manager too. Several managerial vacancies have opened up in the last few months, and Howe does not seem to have been considered for any of them. He has done nothing to diminish his reputation in the intervening period, quite the opposite in fact, so his diminished status is curious. Bournemouth's last two league finishes are ninth and 12th - a commendable achievement. His record in the transfer market is patchy however, and there is also a risk that becomes institutionalised at Bournemouth. Familiarity breeds contempt. Tite (Brazil) Tite has been praised for his man-management of Neymar Credit: Reuters The quality of manager in international football is desperately low, but Brazil's Tite is one who looks capable of stepping into a top club job. Has galvanised a group of players rocked by a 7-1 World Cup semi-final humiliation on home soil at the hands of Germany. Following the oppressive Dunga, Tite has put an arm round a few of his charges and the result is possibly the best Brazil team since 2002. Neymar, Gabriel Jesus and Philippe Coutinho will lead the charge in Russia, with Roberto Firmino and Willian in reserve, supported by a likely midfield three of Casemiro, Paulinho and Rene Augusto. Dani Alves' injury is a blow, leaving the right-back berth free in a back four otherwise compromised of Thiago Silva, Marquinhos and Marcelo. In goal, they can choose between Alisson and Ederson. Not bad. Neil Harris (Millwall) Lee Johnson, Dean Smith and Paul Cook are all promising Championship managers, but Neil Harris has done a remarkable job at the Den against all the odds. Building upon the 'siege mentality' that is part of Millwall's essential character, and thanks in no small part to Lee Gregory and Steve Morison's strike partnership, Harris has taken the London club from League One to the brink of the play-offs. It would take a hell of an offer to tempt Harris away from Millwall however, where he enjoys legendary status. Marcelo Gallardo (River Plate) Another disciple of Marcelo Bielsa, Gallardo could be the next successful Argentinian coaching export. Appointed River Plate manager in 2014, he has tucked away the Copa Sudamericana, Copa Libertadores and the Recopa already. Gallardo has a reputation as an innovator too, becoming the first coach in Argentina's first division to appoint a female assistant as well as working with a neuroscientist to hone players' mental approach. Could be on Atletico Madrid's shortlist should Diego Simeone ever depart. Slavisa Jokanovic (Fulham) There have been some recent whispers that Chelsea are interested in Slavisa Jokanovic Credit: PA There have already been whispers of Chelsea's interest, but if Fulham win their play-off final against Aston Villa and thrive in the Premier League then Jokanovic will be a wanted man. Fulham were without a doubt the best footballing side in the Championship last season, but Jokanovic also possesses an inner-steel that ensures discipline is not lost in all the pretty passing patterns. For clubs lost in the Premier League mid-table morass, Jokanovic would instill a style of play and an identity for fans to believe in. Rui Vitoria (Benfica) Has lifted two Portuguese championships and two cups in three seasons at Benfica, and at 48 Vitoria must surely be considering a fresh challenge. Losing out on the championship to Porto this season also has Vitoria under pressure Benfica are a dominant force, but a win percentage of 70% after 152 matches in charge remains impressive. Jose Mourinho's former assistant Rui Faria has been linked to the job, so that could free Vitoria to seek pastures new.
The 10 managers nobody is linking with vacant jobs...but should be
Frustration with the same old names and faces occupying Premier League jobs was a feature of last season, and could even prove a watershed moment in how fans think about their manager. Sam Allardyce, Mark Hughes and Alan Pardew are just three beneficiaries of the managerial merry-go-round, but a culture of safe appointments is just as true in the upper echelons of the Premier League. Arsenal appointed Unai Emery as their new head coach on Wednesday while Chelsea have a strong interest Maurizio Sarri and both feel like the 'next cab off the rank' of European coaches. The omnipotent gaffer is being phased out of the game, in favour of more democratic and collegiate structures with power shared between a technical director, recruitment guru and head coach. Here are 10 coaches who might find themselves in contention for jobs when the sacking seasons begins in autumn. Domenico Tedesco (Schalke) Dominic Tedesco led Schalke to a second place finish in the Bundesliga Credit: AFP The head coach of the team who finished second in the Bundesliga is hardly an obscure selection, but 32-year-old Domenico Tedesco looks a cast-iron certainty to be considered for the next 'Big Six' job available. Born in Italy, Tedesco's parents emigrated to Germany when he was two years old. He never played football professionally but like Hoffenheim coach Julian Nagelsmann found a break in coaching at a young age. Appointed by second-tier Erzgebirge Aue in March 2017, Tedesco won 13 points from five games to guide them to safety. Schalke took a chance on him last summer and under his guidance the Gelsenkirchen club have qualified for the Champions League after a three-year absence. Regarded as a tactically flexible coach, one highlight of a superb debut season was a comeback from 4-0 down to 4-4 in the derby against Borussia Dortmund. Gian Piero Gasperini (Atalanta) Gasperini lasted only five games as Inter Milan manager in 2011, but has bounced back since then Credit: Getty Images Lasted only five games at Inter in 2011, but Gian Piero Gasperini has a warranted reputation for getting a lot from a little. He guided Genoa to Europe in 2009 but it is his work at Atalanta over the past few seasons that has really caught the eye. Benefiting from one of Italy's most productive academies, Giasperini's Atlanta recovered from losing four of their first five league games to finish fourth in 2016-17, achieving European qualification for the first time in 26-years. The 58-year-old coach ripped up the tactical rule-book, using a Dutch-style 3-4-3 that left opponents dumbfounded. Despite losing Franck Kessie to Milan last summer and other key players, Atalanta continued to punch above their weight with a seventh-placed finish. Giasperini is not the youthful up-and-comer some clubs crave, but any club looking to maximise meagre resources could do far worse. Giovanni van Bronckhorst (Feyenoord) Giovanni van Bronckhorst was loosely linked with Arsenal before Unai Emery's appointment Credit: Getty Images The former Arsenal player received a ringing endorsement from Arsene Wenger last year and a glance at his record makes it easy to see why. Guided Feyenoord to the Dutch Cup in his first season before winning the Eredivisie in his second, coaxing the best out of a squad with a mix of talented youngsters and wise old heads such as Dirk Kuyt. Last season proved more challenging, but Feyenoord did rally late, winning their last eight league matches to finish fourth and claimed another cup. Ralph Hasenhüttl (free agent) Hasenhüttl stepped down as RB Leipzig head coach at the end of last season after two seasons in charge. Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund have made both made new appointments this summer, so Hasenhüttl must consider his next move. The Austrian guided the controversial Bundesliga newcomers to second-place and Champions League qualification with a brand of high-octane, progressive football. He may have fallen out with RB Leipzig's hierarchy over a new contract, but Hasenhüttl looks ideally suited to any club with a technical director-head coach set-up. Whether he can find a club that can unearth talent like Naby Keita or Emil Forsberg is another matter. Eddie Howe (Bournemouth) Eddie Howe's name has not been mentioned for recent managerial vacancies Credit: Reuters Not an unfamiliar name, but one who seems to be drifting down clubs' lists. In the summer of 2016 there were reports that he was well thought of by Arsenal's hierarchy, and he was also linked with Everton - the club he supported as a boy. He was frequently spoken of as a potential England manager too. Several managerial vacancies have opened up in the last few months, and Howe does not seem to have been considered for any of them. He has done nothing to diminish his reputation in the intervening period, quite the opposite in fact, so his diminished status is curious. Bournemouth's last two league finishes are ninth and 12th - a commendable achievement. His record in the transfer market is patchy however, and there is also a risk that becomes institutionalised at Bournemouth. Familiarity breeds contempt. Tite (Brazil) Tite has been praised for his man-management of Neymar Credit: Reuters The quality of manager in international football is desperately low, but Brazil's Tite is one who looks capable of stepping into a top club job. Has galvanised a group of players rocked by a 7-1 World Cup semi-final humiliation on home soil at the hands of Germany. Following the oppressive Dunga, Tite has put an arm round a few of his charges and the result is possibly the best Brazil team since 2002. Neymar, Gabriel Jesus and Philippe Coutinho will lead the charge in Russia, with Roberto Firmino and Willian in reserve, supported by a likely midfield three of Casemiro, Paulinho and Rene Augusto. Dani Alves' injury is a blow, leaving the right-back berth free in a back four otherwise compromised of Thiago Silva, Marquinhos and Marcelo. In goal, they can choose between Alisson and Ederson. Not bad. Neil Harris (Millwall) Lee Johnson, Dean Smith and Paul Cook are all promising Championship managers, but Neil Harris has done a remarkable job at the Den against all the odds. Building upon the 'siege mentality' that is part of Millwall's essential character, and thanks in no small part to Lee Gregory and Steve Morison's strike partnership, Harris has taken the London club from League One to the brink of the play-offs. It would take a hell of an offer to tempt Harris away from Millwall however, where he enjoys legendary status. Marcelo Gallardo (River Plate) Another disciple of Marcelo Bielsa, Gallardo could be the next successful Argentinian coaching export. Appointed River Plate manager in 2014, he has tucked away the Copa Sudamericana, Copa Libertadores and the Recopa already. Gallardo has a reputation as an innovator too, becoming the first coach in Argentina's first division to appoint a female assistant as well as working with a neuroscientist to hone players' mental approach. Could be on Atletico Madrid's shortlist should Diego Simeone ever depart. Slavisa Jokanovic (Fulham) There have been some recent whispers that Chelsea are interested in Slavisa Jokanovic Credit: PA There have already been whispers of Chelsea's interest, but if Fulham win their play-off final against Aston Villa and thrive in the Premier League then Jokanovic will be a wanted man. Fulham were without a doubt the best footballing side in the Championship last season, but Jokanovic also possesses an inner-steel that ensures discipline is not lost in all the pretty passing patterns. For clubs lost in the Premier League mid-table morass, Jokanovic would instill a style of play and an identity for fans to believe in. Rui Vitoria (Benfica) Has lifted two Portuguese championships and two cups in three seasons at Benfica, and at 48 Vitoria must surely be considering a fresh challenge. Losing out on the championship to Porto this season also has Vitoria under pressure Benfica are a dominant force, but a win percentage of 70% after 152 matches in charge remains impressive. Jose Mourinho's former assistant Rui Faria has been linked to the job, so that could free Vitoria to seek pastures new.
Frustration with the same old names and faces occupying Premier League jobs was a feature of last season, and could even prove a watershed moment in how fans think about their manager. Sam Allardyce, Mark Hughes and Alan Pardew are just three beneficiaries of the managerial merry-go-round, but a culture of safe appointments is just as true in the upper echelons of the Premier League. Arsenal appointed Unai Emery as their new head coach on Wednesday while Chelsea have a strong interest Maurizio Sarri and both feel like the 'next cab off the rank' of European coaches. The omnipotent gaffer is being phased out of the game, in favour of more democratic and collegiate structures with power shared between a technical director, recruitment guru and head coach. Here are 10 coaches who might find themselves in contention for jobs when the sacking seasons begins in autumn. Domenico Tedesco (Schalke) Dominic Tedesco led Schalke to a second place finish in the Bundesliga Credit: AFP The head coach of the team who finished second in the Bundesliga is hardly an obscure selection, but 32-year-old Domenico Tedesco looks a cast-iron certainty to be considered for the next 'Big Six' job available. Born in Italy, Tedesco's parents emigrated to Germany when he was two years old. He never played football professionally but like Hoffenheim coach Julian Nagelsmann found a break in coaching at a young age. Appointed by second-tier Erzgebirge Aue in March 2017, Tedesco won 13 points from five games to guide them to safety. Schalke took a chance on him last summer and under his guidance the Gelsenkirchen club have qualified for the Champions League after a three-year absence. Regarded as a tactically flexible coach, one highlight of a superb debut season was a comeback from 4-0 down to 4-4 in the derby against Borussia Dortmund. Gian Piero Gasperini (Atalanta) Gasperini lasted only five games as Inter Milan manager in 2011, but has bounced back since then Credit: Getty Images Lasted only five games at Inter in 2011, but Gian Piero Gasperini has a warranted reputation for getting a lot from a little. He guided Genoa to Europe in 2009 but it is his work at Atalanta over the past few seasons that has really caught the eye. Benefiting from one of Italy's most productive academies, Giasperini's Atlanta recovered from losing four of their first five league games to finish fourth in 2016-17, achieving European qualification for the first time in 26-years. The 58-year-old coach ripped up the tactical rule-book, using a Dutch-style 3-4-3 that left opponents dumbfounded. Despite losing Franck Kessie to Milan last summer and other key players, Atalanta continued to punch above their weight with a seventh-placed finish. Giasperini is not the youthful up-and-comer some clubs crave, but any club looking to maximise meagre resources could do far worse. Giovanni van Bronckhorst (Feyenoord) Giovanni van Bronckhorst was loosely linked with Arsenal before Unai Emery's appointment Credit: Getty Images The former Arsenal player received a ringing endorsement from Arsene Wenger last year and a glance at his record makes it easy to see why. Guided Feyenoord to the Dutch Cup in his first season before winning the Eredivisie in his second, coaxing the best out of a squad with a mix of talented youngsters and wise old heads such as Dirk Kuyt. Last season proved more challenging, but Feyenoord did rally late, winning their last eight league matches to finish fourth and claimed another cup. Ralph Hasenhüttl (free agent) Hasenhüttl stepped down as RB Leipzig head coach at the end of last season after two seasons in charge. Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund have made both made new appointments this summer, so Hasenhüttl must consider his next move. The Austrian guided the controversial Bundesliga newcomers to second-place and Champions League qualification with a brand of high-octane, progressive football. He may have fallen out with RB Leipzig's hierarchy over a new contract, but Hasenhüttl looks ideally suited to any club with a technical director-head coach set-up. Whether he can find a club that can unearth talent like Naby Keita or Emil Forsberg is another matter. Eddie Howe (Bournemouth) Eddie Howe's name has not been mentioned for recent managerial vacancies Credit: Reuters Not an unfamiliar name, but one who seems to be drifting down clubs' lists. In the summer of 2016 there were reports that he was well thought of by Arsenal's hierarchy, and he was also linked with Everton - the club he supported as a boy. He was frequently spoken of as a potential England manager too. Several managerial vacancies have opened up in the last few months, and Howe does not seem to have been considered for any of them. He has done nothing to diminish his reputation in the intervening period, quite the opposite in fact, so his diminished status is curious. Bournemouth's last two league finishes are ninth and 12th - a commendable achievement. His record in the transfer market is patchy however, and there is also a risk that becomes institutionalised at Bournemouth. Familiarity breeds contempt. Tite (Brazil) Tite has been praised for his man-management of Neymar Credit: Reuters The quality of manager in international football is desperately low, but Brazil's Tite is one who looks capable of stepping into a top club job. Has galvanised a group of players rocked by a 7-1 World Cup semi-final humiliation on home soil at the hands of Germany. Following the oppressive Dunga, Tite has put an arm round a few of his charges and the result is possibly the best Brazil team since 2002. Neymar, Gabriel Jesus and Philippe Coutinho will lead the charge in Russia, with Roberto Firmino and Willian in reserve, supported by a likely midfield three of Casemiro, Paulinho and Rene Augusto. Dani Alves' injury is a blow, leaving the right-back berth free in a back four otherwise compromised of Thiago Silva, Marquinhos and Marcelo. In goal, they can choose between Alisson and Ederson. Not bad. Neil Harris (Millwall) Lee Johnson, Dean Smith and Paul Cook are all promising Championship managers, but Neil Harris has done a remarkable job at the Den against all the odds. Building upon the 'siege mentality' that is part of Millwall's essential character, and thanks in no small part to Lee Gregory and Steve Morison's strike partnership, Harris has taken the London club from League One to the brink of the play-offs. It would take a hell of an offer to tempt Harris away from Millwall however, where he enjoys legendary status. Marcelo Gallardo (River Plate) Another disciple of Marcelo Bielsa, Gallardo could be the next successful Argentinian coaching export. Appointed River Plate manager in 2014, he has tucked away the Copa Sudamericana, Copa Libertadores and the Recopa already. Gallardo has a reputation as an innovator too, becoming the first coach in Argentina's first division to appoint a female assistant as well as working with a neuroscientist to hone players' mental approach. Could be on Atletico Madrid's shortlist should Diego Simeone ever depart. Slavisa Jokanovic (Fulham) There have been some recent whispers that Chelsea are interested in Slavisa Jokanovic Credit: PA There have already been whispers of Chelsea's interest, but if Fulham win their play-off final against Aston Villa and thrive in the Premier League then Jokanovic will be a wanted man. Fulham were without a doubt the best footballing side in the Championship last season, but Jokanovic also possesses an inner-steel that ensures discipline is not lost in all the pretty passing patterns. For clubs lost in the Premier League mid-table morass, Jokanovic would instill a style of play and an identity for fans to believe in. Rui Vitoria (Benfica) Has lifted two Portuguese championships and two cups in three seasons at Benfica, and at 48 Vitoria must surely be considering a fresh challenge. Losing out on the championship to Porto this season also has Vitoria under pressure Benfica are a dominant force, but a win percentage of 70% after 152 matches in charge remains impressive. Jose Mourinho's former assistant Rui Faria has been linked to the job, so that could free Vitoria to seek pastures new.
The 10 managers nobody is linking with vacant jobs...but should be
Frustration with the same old names and faces occupying Premier League jobs was a feature of last season, and could even prove a watershed moment in how fans think about their manager. Sam Allardyce, Mark Hughes and Alan Pardew are just three beneficiaries of the managerial merry-go-round, but a culture of safe appointments is just as true in the upper echelons of the Premier League. Arsenal appointed Unai Emery as their new head coach on Wednesday while Chelsea have a strong interest Maurizio Sarri and both feel like the 'next cab off the rank' of European coaches. The omnipotent gaffer is being phased out of the game, in favour of more democratic and collegiate structures with power shared between a technical director, recruitment guru and head coach. Here are 10 coaches who might find themselves in contention for jobs when the sacking seasons begins in autumn. Domenico Tedesco (Schalke) Dominic Tedesco led Schalke to a second place finish in the Bundesliga Credit: AFP The head coach of the team who finished second in the Bundesliga is hardly an obscure selection, but 32-year-old Domenico Tedesco looks a cast-iron certainty to be considered for the next 'Big Six' job available. Born in Italy, Tedesco's parents emigrated to Germany when he was two years old. He never played football professionally but like Hoffenheim coach Julian Nagelsmann found a break in coaching at a young age. Appointed by second-tier Erzgebirge Aue in March 2017, Tedesco won 13 points from five games to guide them to safety. Schalke took a chance on him last summer and under his guidance the Gelsenkirchen club have qualified for the Champions League after a three-year absence. Regarded as a tactically flexible coach, one highlight of a superb debut season was a comeback from 4-0 down to 4-4 in the derby against Borussia Dortmund. Gian Piero Gasperini (Atalanta) Gasperini lasted only five games as Inter Milan manager in 2011, but has bounced back since then Credit: Getty Images Lasted only five games at Inter in 2011, but Gian Piero Gasperini has a warranted reputation for getting a lot from a little. He guided Genoa to Europe in 2009 but it is his work at Atalanta over the past few seasons that has really caught the eye. Benefiting from one of Italy's most productive academies, Giasperini's Atlanta recovered from losing four of their first five league games to finish fourth in 2016-17, achieving European qualification for the first time in 26-years. The 58-year-old coach ripped up the tactical rule-book, using a Dutch-style 3-4-3 that left opponents dumbfounded. Despite losing Franck Kessie to Milan last summer and other key players, Atalanta continued to punch above their weight with a seventh-placed finish. Giasperini is not the youthful up-and-comer some clubs crave, but any club looking to maximise meagre resources could do far worse. Giovanni van Bronckhorst (Feyenoord) Giovanni van Bronckhorst was loosely linked with Arsenal before Unai Emery's appointment Credit: Getty Images The former Arsenal player received a ringing endorsement from Arsene Wenger last year and a glance at his record makes it easy to see why. Guided Feyenoord to the Dutch Cup in his first season before winning the Eredivisie in his second, coaxing the best out of a squad with a mix of talented youngsters and wise old heads such as Dirk Kuyt. Last season proved more challenging, but Feyenoord did rally late, winning their last eight league matches to finish fourth and claimed another cup. Ralph Hasenhüttl (free agent) Hasenhüttl stepped down as RB Leipzig head coach at the end of last season after two seasons in charge. Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund have made both made new appointments this summer, so Hasenhüttl must consider his next move. The Austrian guided the controversial Bundesliga newcomers to second-place and Champions League qualification with a brand of high-octane, progressive football. He may have fallen out with RB Leipzig's hierarchy over a new contract, but Hasenhüttl looks ideally suited to any club with a technical director-head coach set-up. Whether he can find a club that can unearth talent like Naby Keita or Emil Forsberg is another matter. Eddie Howe (Bournemouth) Eddie Howe's name has not been mentioned for recent managerial vacancies Credit: Reuters Not an unfamiliar name, but one who seems to be drifting down clubs' lists. In the summer of 2016 there were reports that he was well thought of by Arsenal's hierarchy, and he was also linked with Everton - the club he supported as a boy. He was frequently spoken of as a potential England manager too. Several managerial vacancies have opened up in the last few months, and Howe does not seem to have been considered for any of them. He has done nothing to diminish his reputation in the intervening period, quite the opposite in fact, so his diminished status is curious. Bournemouth's last two league finishes are ninth and 12th - a commendable achievement. His record in the transfer market is patchy however, and there is also a risk that becomes institutionalised at Bournemouth. Familiarity breeds contempt. Tite (Brazil) Tite has been praised for his man-management of Neymar Credit: Reuters The quality of manager in international football is desperately low, but Brazil's Tite is one who looks capable of stepping into a top club job. Has galvanised a group of players rocked by a 7-1 World Cup semi-final humiliation on home soil at the hands of Germany. Following the oppressive Dunga, Tite has put an arm round a few of his charges and the result is possibly the best Brazil team since 2002. Neymar, Gabriel Jesus and Philippe Coutinho will lead the charge in Russia, with Roberto Firmino and Willian in reserve, supported by a likely midfield three of Casemiro, Paulinho and Rene Augusto. Dani Alves' injury is a blow, leaving the right-back berth free in a back four otherwise compromised of Thiago Silva, Marquinhos and Marcelo. In goal, they can choose between Alisson and Ederson. Not bad. Neil Harris (Millwall) Lee Johnson, Dean Smith and Paul Cook are all promising Championship managers, but Neil Harris has done a remarkable job at the Den against all the odds. Building upon the 'siege mentality' that is part of Millwall's essential character, and thanks in no small part to Lee Gregory and Steve Morison's strike partnership, Harris has taken the London club from League One to the brink of the play-offs. It would take a hell of an offer to tempt Harris away from Millwall however, where he enjoys legendary status. Marcelo Gallardo (River Plate) Another disciple of Marcelo Bielsa, Gallardo could be the next successful Argentinian coaching export. Appointed River Plate manager in 2014, he has tucked away the Copa Sudamericana, Copa Libertadores and the Recopa already. Gallardo has a reputation as an innovator too, becoming the first coach in Argentina's first division to appoint a female assistant as well as working with a neuroscientist to hone players' mental approach. Could be on Atletico Madrid's shortlist should Diego Simeone ever depart. Slavisa Jokanovic (Fulham) There have been some recent whispers that Chelsea are interested in Slavisa Jokanovic Credit: PA There have already been whispers of Chelsea's interest, but if Fulham win their play-off final against Aston Villa and thrive in the Premier League then Jokanovic will be a wanted man. Fulham were without a doubt the best footballing side in the Championship last season, but Jokanovic also possesses an inner-steel that ensures discipline is not lost in all the pretty passing patterns. For clubs lost in the Premier League mid-table morass, Jokanovic would instill a style of play and an identity for fans to believe in. Rui Vitoria (Benfica) Has lifted two Portuguese championships and two cups in three seasons at Benfica, and at 48 Vitoria must surely be considering a fresh challenge. Losing out on the championship to Porto this season also has Vitoria under pressure Benfica are a dominant force, but a win percentage of 70% after 152 matches in charge remains impressive. Jose Mourinho's former assistant Rui Faria has been linked to the job, so that could free Vitoria to seek pastures new.

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