NASA's Voyager probes

Nasa's Voyager 1 spacecraft and its sister probe Voyager 2 have been traveling through space since

1977. Voyager 1 — the farthest-flung object created by human hands — has left the solar system forever, a study suggests.

NASA's Voyager 1 Probe Has Left Solar System: Study

NASA's Voyager 1 spacecraft has entered a new region between our solar system and interstellar space, which scientists are calling the stagnation region. This image shows that the inner edge of the stagnation region is located about 10.5 billio

This artist rendering provided by NASA shows Voyager 1 at the edge of the solar system. NASA said Monday, Dec. 3, 2012 that the long-running spacecraft has entered a new region at the fringes of the solar system thought to be the last layer before the beginning of interstellar space, or the space between stars. Mission chief scientist Ed Stone says it's unknown when Voyager 1 will finally break through to interstellar space. Once that happens, it'll be the first manmade object to leave the solar system. (AP Photo/NASA)

This artists rendering provided by NASA shows the Voyager spacecraft. Thirty-five years after leaving Earth, Voyager 1 is reaching for the stars. Sooner or later, the workhorse spacecraft will bid adieu to the solar system and enter a new realm of space _ the first time a man-made object will have escaped to the other side. (AP Photo/NASA)

Voyager 1 Spacecraft Enters New Realm at Solar System's Edge

This still image and set of animations show NASA's Voyager 1 spacecraft exploring a new region in our solar system called the "magnetic highway." In this region, the sun's magnetic field lines are connected to interstellar magnetic field lines,

Voyager

An artist's interpretation depicts the new view of the heliosphere in this image courtesy of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center and made available on June 9, 2011. Observations from NASA's Voyager spacecraft suggest the edge of our solar system may not be smooth, but filled with a turbulent sea of magnetic bubbles. While using a new computer model to analyze Voyager data, scientists found the sun's distant magnetic field is made up of bubbles approximately 100 million miles wide. The bubbles are created when magnetic field lines reorganize. The new model suggests the field lines are broken up into self-contained structures disconnected from the solar magnetic field. The findings are described in the June 9 edition of the Astrophysical Journal. The heliosheath is filled with "magnetic bubbles" (shown in the red pattern) that fill out the region ahead of the heliopause. REUTERS/NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center/CI Lab/Handout

Voyager

NASA undated handout image shows an artist's concept of the Voyager 2 spacecraft. Voyager 2 has successfully switched to the backup set of thrusters that controls the roll of the spacecraft. Deep Space Network personnel sent commands to the spacecraft to make the change on November 4 and received confirmation on November 14 that the switch has been made. The change allows engineers to reduce the amount of power that the 34-year-old spacecraft needs to operate by turning off the heater that keeps the fuel to the primary thrusters warm. Although the rate of energy generated by Voyager 2's nuclear power source continues to decline, by reducing its power requirements, engineers expect the spacecraft can continue to operate for another decade. Voyager 2 is currently located about 9 billion miles (14 billion kilometers) from Earth in the heliosheath -- the outermost layer of the heliosphere where the solar wind, which streams out from the sun, is slowed by the pressure of interstellar gas. REUTERS/NASA/JPL/Handout

Voyager

This undated file artist's rendering shows one of NASA's twin Voyager spacecraft. NASA says the long-running Voyager 1 spacecraft hurtling toward the edge of the solar system has reached another milestone. Since 2004, the unmanned probe has been exploring a region of space where the solar wind slows abruptly and crashes into the thin gas between stars. NASA said Monday that recent readings show the solar wind has slowed to zero, meaning the spacecraft is getting ever closer to the solar system's edge. (AP Photo/NASA, File)

Voyager 2

Voyager 2

Voyager 2

Voyager 2

Voyager 2

Voyager 2

Voyager 2