Millions of monarchs inhabit butterfly country

Every year, millions of monarchs migrate from the eastern United States and Canada to central Mexico, a journey of over 2,000 miles. The tiger-striped butterflies arrive in late October and early November to hibernate in fir trees until February.

In this photo taken Feb. 15, 2013, Monarch butterflies are collected in a net to be tested for the ophroyocystis elektroscirrha parasite that inhibits their flight, at El Capulin reserve, near Zitacuaro, Mexico. Every year, millions of monarchs migrate from the eastern United States and Canada to central Mexico, a journey of over 2,000 miles. The tiger-striped butterflies arrive in late October and early November to hibernate in fir trees until February. The scientist is part of a research project conducted by the World Wildlife Fund of Mexico and the University of Georgia and University of Minnesota. (AP Photo/Marjorie Miller)
In this photo taken Feb. 15, 2013, Monarch butterflies are collected in a net to be tested for the ophroyocystis elektroscirrha parasite that inhibits their flight, at El Capulin reserve, near Zitacuaro, Mexico. Every year, millions of monarchs migrate from the eastern United States and Canada to central Mexico, a journey of over 2,000 miles. The tiger-striped butterflies arrive in late October and early November to hibernate in fir trees until February. The scientist is part of a research project conducted by the World Wildlife Fund of Mexico and the University of Georgia and University of Minnesota. (AP Photo/Marjorie Miller)
In this photo taken Feb. 15, 2013, Monarch butterflies are collected in a net to be tested for the ophroyocystis elektroscirrha parasite that inhibits their flight, at El Capulin reserve, near Zitacuaro, Mexico. Every year, millions of monarchs migrate from the eastern United States and Canada to central Mexico, a journey of over 2,000 miles. The tiger-striped butterflies arrive in late October and early November to hibernate in fir trees until February. The scientist is part of a research project conducted by the World Wildlife Fund of Mexico and the University of Georgia and University of Minnesota. (AP Photo/Marjorie Miller)
In this photo taken Feb. 15, 2013, researchers from the University of Georgia and University of Minnesota select Monarch butterflies to be tested for the ophryocystis elektroscirrha parasite that attaches to the butterflies and inhibits their flight, at El Capulin reserve, near Zitacuaro, Mexico. Every year, millions of monarchs migrate from the eastern United States and Canada to central Mexico, a journey of over 2,000 miles. The tiger-striped butterflies arrive in late October and early November to hibernate in fir trees until February. The scientist is part of a research project conducted by the World Wildlife Fund of Mexico and the University of Georgia and University of Minnesota. (AP Photo/Marjorie Miller)
In this photo taken Feb. 15, 2013, researchers from the University of Georgia and University of Minnesota select Monarch butterflies to be tested for the ophryocystis elektroscirrha parasite that attaches to the butterflies and inhibits their flight, at El Capulin reserve, near Zitacuaro, Mexico. Every year, millions of monarchs migrate from the eastern United States and Canada to central Mexico, a journey of over 2,000 miles. The tiger-striped butterflies arrive in late October and early November to hibernate in fir trees until February. The scientist is part of a research project conducted by the World Wildlife Fund of Mexico and the University of Georgia and University of Minnesota. (AP Photo/Marjorie Miller)
In this photo taken Feb. 15, 2013, researchers from the University of Georgia and University of Minnesota select Monarch butterflies to be tested for the ophryocystis elektroscirrha parasite that attaches to the butterflies and inhibits their flight, at El Capulin reserve, near Zitacuaro, Mexico. Every year, millions of monarchs migrate from the eastern United States and Canada to central Mexico, a journey of over 2,000 miles. The tiger-striped butterflies arrive in late October and early November to hibernate in fir trees until February. The scientist is part of a research project conducted by the World Wildlife Fund of Mexico and the University of Georgia and University of Minnesota. (AP Photo/Marjorie Miller)
In this Feb. 15, 2013 photo, a scientist collects a Monarch butterfly to be tested for the ophryocystis elektroscirrha parasite that inhibits their flight, at El Capulin reserve, near Zitacuaro, Mexico. Every year, millions of monarchs migrate from the eastern United States and Canada to central Mexico, a journey of over 2,000 miles. The tiger-striped butterflies arrive in late October and early November to hibernate in fir trees until February. The scientist is part of a research project conducted by the World Wildlife Fund of Mexico and the University of Georgia and University of Minnesota. (AP Photo/Marjorie Miller)
In this Feb. 15, 2013 photo, a scientist collects a Monarch butterfly to be tested for the ophryocystis elektroscirrha parasite that inhibits their flight, at El Capulin reserve, near Zitacuaro, Mexico. Every year, millions of monarchs migrate from the eastern United States and Canada to central Mexico, a journey of over 2,000 miles. The tiger-striped butterflies arrive in late October and early November to hibernate in fir trees until February. The scientist is part of a research project conducted by the World Wildlife Fund of Mexico and the University of Georgia and University of Minnesota. (AP Photo/Marjorie Miller)
In this Feb. 15, 2013 photo, a scientist collects a Monarch butterfly to be tested for the ophryocystis elektroscirrha parasite that inhibits their flight, at El Capulin reserve, near Zitacuaro, Mexico. Every year, millions of monarchs migrate from the eastern United States and Canada to central Mexico, a journey of over 2,000 miles. The tiger-striped butterflies arrive in late October and early November to hibernate in fir trees until February. The scientist is part of a research project conducted by the World Wildlife Fund of Mexico and the University of Georgia and University of Minnesota. (AP Photo/Marjorie Miller)
In this photo taken Feb. 16, 2013, University of Georgia scientist Sonia Altizer looks for signs of the ophroyocystis elektroscirrha parasite in the residue of Monarch butterflies, which attaches to the Monarchs inhibiting their flight, at El Capulin reserve, near Zitacuaro, Mexico. Every year, millions of monarchs migrate from the eastern United States and Canada to central Mexico, a journey of over 2,000 miles. The tiger-striped butterflies arrive in late October and early November to hibernate in fir trees until February. Altizer leads the research project conducted by the World Wildlife Fund of Mexico and the University of Georgia and University of Minnesota. (AP Photo/Marjorie Miller)
In this photo taken Feb. 16, 2013, University of Georgia scientist Sonia Altizer looks for signs of the ophroyocystis elektroscirrha parasite in the residue of Monarch butterflies, which attaches to the Monarchs inhibiting their flight, at El Capulin reserve, near Zitacuaro, Mexico. Every year, millions of monarchs migrate from the eastern United States and Canada to central Mexico, a journey of over 2,000 miles. The tiger-striped butterflies arrive in late October and early November to hibernate in fir trees until February. Altizer leads the research project conducted by the World Wildlife Fund of Mexico and the University of Georgia and University of Minnesota. (AP Photo/Marjorie Miller)
In this photo taken Feb. 16, 2013, University of Georgia scientist Sonia Altizer looks for signs of the ophroyocystis elektroscirrha parasite in the residue of Monarch butterflies, which attaches to the Monarchs inhibiting their flight, at El Capulin reserve, near Zitacuaro, Mexico. Every year, millions of monarchs migrate from the eastern United States and Canada to central Mexico, a journey of over 2,000 miles. The tiger-striped butterflies arrive in late October and early November to hibernate in fir trees until February. Altizer leads the research project conducted by the World Wildlife Fund of Mexico and the University of Georgia and University of Minnesota. (AP Photo/Marjorie Miller)
In this photo taken Feb. 14, 2013, Samantha Goldberger, left, who had just set her camera on a timer, is surprised by her boyfriend Jason Skipton, as he proposes marriage, at the El Capulin reserve, near Zitacuaro, Mexico. Skipton found the love of his life 2,000 miles from home in a chance encounter that gave him butterflies. So of course, he said, there could be no better place to propose marriage than in a swirl of orange and black butterflies that had migrated thousands of miles to mate, at the monarch butterfly sanctuary in central Mexico. (AP Photo/Samantha Goldberger)
In this photo taken Feb. 14, 2013, Samantha Goldberger, left, who had just set her camera on a timer, is surprised by her boyfriend Jason Skipton, as he proposes marriage, at the El Capulin reserve, near Zitacuaro, Mexico. Skipton found the love of his life 2,000 miles from home in a chance encounter that gave him butterflies. So of course, he said, there could be no better place to propose marriage than in a swirl of orange and black butterflies that had migrated thousands of miles to mate, at the monarch butterfly sanctuary in central Mexico. (AP Photo/Samantha Goldberger)
In this photo taken Feb. 14, 2013, Samantha Goldberger, left, who had just set her camera on a timer, is surprised by her boyfriend Jason Skipton, as he proposes marriage, at the El Capulin reserve, near Zitacuaro, Mexico. Skipton found the love of his life 2,000 miles from home in a chance encounter that gave him butterflies. So of course, he said, there could be no better place to propose marriage than in a swirl of orange and black butterflies that had migrated thousands of miles to mate, at the monarch butterfly sanctuary in central Mexico. (AP Photo/Samantha Goldberger)
This photo taken Feb. 14, 2013 shows Samantha Goldberger showing off her engagement ring next to a Monarch butterfly soon after Jason Skipton proposed to her at El Capulin reserve, near Zitacuaro, Mexico. Skipton found the love of his life 2,000 miles from home in a chance encounter that gave him butterflies. So of course, he said, there could be no better place to propose marriage than in a swirl of orange and black butterflies that had migrated thousands of miles to mate, at the monarch butterfly sanctuary in central Mexico. (AP Photo/Jason Skipton)
This photo taken Feb. 14, 2013 shows Samantha Goldberger showing off her engagement ring next to a Monarch butterfly soon after Jason Skipton proposed to her at El Capulin reserve, near Zitacuaro, Mexico. Skipton found the love of his life 2,000 miles from home in a chance encounter that gave him butterflies. So of course, he said, there could be no better place to propose marriage than in a swirl of orange and black butterflies that had migrated thousands of miles to mate, at the monarch butterfly sanctuary in central Mexico. (AP Photo/Jason Skipton)
This photo taken Feb. 14, 2013 shows Samantha Goldberger showing off her engagement ring next to a Monarch butterfly soon after Jason Skipton proposed to her at El Capulin reserve, near Zitacuaro, Mexico. Skipton found the love of his life 2,000 miles from home in a chance encounter that gave him butterflies. So of course, he said, there could be no better place to propose marriage than in a swirl of orange and black butterflies that had migrated thousands of miles to mate, at the monarch butterfly sanctuary in central Mexico. (AP Photo/Jason Skipton)
Migrant monarch butterflies in mid-air as they travel south.
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Migrant monarch butterflies in mid-air as they travel south.
Migrant monarch butterflies tanking up on nectar as they move south.
Cold Snaps Trigger Monarch Butterfly Migrations
Migrant monarch butterflies tanking up on nectar as they move south.
A migrant monarch butterfly returning north often looks a bit worse for wear after the long journey south.
Cold Snaps Trigger Monarch Butterfly Migrations
A migrant monarch butterfly returning north often looks a bit worse for wear after the long journey south.

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