Michigan 40, Ohio State 34

Denard Robinson accounted for five touchdowns, helping 17th-ranked Michigan beat Ohio State 40-34 on Saturday and snap a school-record seven-game losing streak against the Wolverines’ archrival.

ANN ARBOR, MI - NOVEMBER 26: Denard Robinson #16 of the Michigan Wolverines celebrates with students after beating Ohio State 40-34 at Michigan Stadium on November 26, 2011 in Ann Arbor, Michigan. (Photo by Gregory Shamus/Getty Images)
Ohio State v Michigan
ANN ARBOR, MI - NOVEMBER 26: Denard Robinson #16 of the Michigan Wolverines celebrates with students after beating Ohio State 40-34 at Michigan Stadium on November 26, 2011 in Ann Arbor, Michigan. (Photo by Gregory Shamus/Getty Images)
Former Michigan star and Heisman Trophy winner Charles Woodson spoke at Michigan's commencement on Saturday, where he guaranteed a victory for the Wolverines over rivals Ohio State next season.
Charles Woodson Guarantees Michigan Victory Over Ohio State Next Season
Former Michigan star and Heisman Trophy winner Charles Woodson spoke at Michigan's commencement on Saturday, where he guaranteed a victory for the Wolverines over rivals Ohio State next season.
Former Michigan defensive back and Heisman Trophy winner Charles Woodson spoke at Michigan’s commencement ceremony on Saturday and guaranteed a win over the Buckeyes when the two teams meet in November of 2018.
Charles Woodson says Michigan will beat Ohio State in 2018
Former Michigan defensive back and Heisman Trophy winner Charles Woodson spoke at Michigan’s commencement ceremony on Saturday and guaranteed a win over the Buckeyes when the two teams meet in November of 2018.
Former Michigan defensive back and Heisman Trophy winner Charles Woodson spoke at Michigan’s commencement ceremony on Saturday and guaranteed a win over the Buckeyes when the two teams meet in November of 2018.
Charles Woodson says Michigan will beat Ohio State in 2018
Former Michigan defensive back and Heisman Trophy winner Charles Woodson spoke at Michigan’s commencement ceremony on Saturday and guaranteed a win over the Buckeyes when the two teams meet in November of 2018.
Charles Woodson says Michigan will beat Ohio State in 2018
Charles Woodson says Michigan will beat Ohio State in 2018
Charles Woodson says Michigan will beat Ohio State in 2018
FILE - In this Nov. 25, 2017, file photo, Ohio State wide receiver Austin Mack (11) makes a catch defended by Michigan defensive backs Tyree Kinnel (23) and Brandon Watson (28), in the third quarter of an NCAA college football game in Ann Arbor, Mich. The junior was the fifth-leading receiver last year with 24 catches for 343 yards and two TDs. (AP Photo/Tony Ding, File)
14 Big Ten football players poised to break out in the fall
FILE - In this Nov. 25, 2017, file photo, Ohio State wide receiver Austin Mack (11) makes a catch defended by Michigan defensive backs Tyree Kinnel (23) and Brandon Watson (28), in the third quarter of an NCAA college football game in Ann Arbor, Mich. The junior was the fifth-leading receiver last year with 24 catches for 343 yards and two TDs. (AP Photo/Tony Ding, File)
FILE - In this Nov. 25, 2017, file photo, Ohio State wide receiver Austin Mack (11) makes a catch defended by Michigan defensive backs Tyree Kinnel (23) and Brandon Watson (28), in the third quarter of an NCAA college football game in Ann Arbor, Mich. The junior was the fifth-leading receiver last year with 24 catches for 343 yards and two TDs. (AP Photo/Tony Ding, File)
FILE - In this Nov. 25, 2017, file photo, Ohio State wide receiver Austin Mack (11) makes a catch defended by Michigan defensive backs Tyree Kinnel (23) and Brandon Watson (28), in the third quarter of an NCAA college football game in Ann Arbor, Mich. The junior was the fifth-leading receiver last year with 24 catches for 343 yards and two TDs. (AP Photo/Tony Ding, File)
FILE - In this Nov. 25, 2017, file photo, Ohio State wide receiver Austin Mack (11) makes a catch defended by Michigan defensive backs Tyree Kinnel (23) and Brandon Watson (28), in the third quarter of an NCAA college football game in Ann Arbor, Mich. The junior was the fifth-leading receiver last year with 24 catches for 343 yards and two TDs. (AP Photo/Tony Ding, File)
FILE - In this Nov. 11, 2017, file photo, Ohio State cornerback Denzel Ward plays against Michigan State during an NCAA college football game, in Columbus, Ohio. Ward is a posssible first round pick in the NFL Draft.(AP Photo/Jay LaPrete, File)
4 QBs likely to go high, 6 could be picked in 1st round
FILE - In this Nov. 11, 2017, file photo, Ohio State cornerback Denzel Ward plays against Michigan State during an NCAA college football game, in Columbus, Ohio. Ward is a posssible first round pick in the NFL Draft.(AP Photo/Jay LaPrete, File)
FILE - These 2018 photos provided by the NFL show possible NFL Draft picks. The Draft will be held April 26-28 at AT&T Stadium in Arlington, Texas. Top row from left are: Minkah Fitzpatrick, Alabama; Mike Gesicki, Penn State; Dallas Goedert, South Dakota State; Derrius Guice, LSU; Will Hernandez, Texas -El Paso and Sam Hubbard, Ohio State. Bottom row from left are: Mike Hughes, Central Florida; Hayden Hurst, South Carolina; Maurice Hurst, Michigan, Josh Jackson, Iowa; Lamar Jackson, Louisville and Derwin James, Florida State. (Ben Liebenberg/NFL via AP)
FILE - These 2018 photos provided by the NFL show possible NFL Draft picks. The Draft will be held April 26-28 at AT&T Stadium in Arlington, Texas. Top row from left are: Minkah Fitzpatrick, Alabama; Mike Gesicki, Penn State; Dallas Goedert, South Dakota State; Derrius Guice, LSU; Will Hernandez, Texas -El Paso and Sam Hubbard, Ohio State. Bottom row from left are: Mike Hughes, Central Florida; Hayden Hurst, South Carolina; Maurice Hurst, Michigan, Josh Jackson, Iowa; Lamar Jackson, Louisville and Derwin James, Florida State. (Ben Liebenberg/NFL via AP)
FILE - These 2018 photos provided by the NFL show possible NFL Draft picks. The Draft will be held April 26-28 at AT&T Stadium in Arlington, Texas. Top row from left are: Minkah Fitzpatrick, Alabama; Mike Gesicki, Penn State; Dallas Goedert, South Dakota State; Derrius Guice, LSU; Will Hernandez, Texas -El Paso and Sam Hubbard, Ohio State. Bottom row from left are: Mike Hughes, Central Florida; Hayden Hurst, South Carolina; Maurice Hurst, Michigan, Josh Jackson, Iowa; Lamar Jackson, Louisville and Derwin James, Florida State. (Ben Liebenberg/NFL via AP)
FILE - In this Nov. 11, 2017, file photo, Ohio State cornerback Denzel Ward plays against Michigan State during an NCAA college football game, in Columbus, Ohio. Ward is a posssible first round pick in the NFL Draft.(AP Photo/Jay LaPrete, File)
FILE - In this Nov. 11, 2017, file photo, Ohio State cornerback Denzel Ward plays against Michigan State during an NCAA college football game, in Columbus, Ohio. Ward is a posssible first round pick in the NFL Draft.(AP Photo/Jay LaPrete, File)
FILE - In this Nov. 11, 2017, file photo, Ohio State cornerback Denzel Ward plays against Michigan State during an NCAA college football game, in Columbus, Ohio. Ward is a posssible first round pick in the NFL Draft.(AP Photo/Jay LaPrete, File)
FILE - In this Nov. 21, 1987, file photo, Ohio State head coach Earle Bruce gestures on the sidelines during a game against Michigan in Ann Arbor, Mich. Bruce died in Columbus, Ohio at the age of 87, according to a statement released by his daughters through Ohio State on Friday. Hed been suffering from Alzheimers disease. (AP Photo/Robert Kozloff, File)
Earle Bruce, Ohio State coach who followed Hayes, dies at 87
FILE - In this Nov. 21, 1987, file photo, Ohio State head coach Earle Bruce gestures on the sidelines during a game against Michigan in Ann Arbor, Mich. Bruce died in Columbus, Ohio at the age of 87, according to a statement released by his daughters through Ohio State on Friday. Hed been suffering from Alzheimers disease. (AP Photo/Robert Kozloff, File)
FILE - In this Nov. 21, 1987, file photo, Ohio State football coach Earle Bruce is carried by his players after the Buckeyes beat Michigan 23-20 in Ann Arbor, Mich. Bruce died in Columbus, Ohio at the age of 87, according to a statement released by his daughters through Ohio State on Friday. Hed been suffering from Alzheimers disease. (AP Photo/Robert Kozloff, File)
Earle Bruce, Ohio State coach who followed Hayes, dies at 87
FILE - In this Nov. 21, 1987, file photo, Ohio State football coach Earle Bruce is carried by his players after the Buckeyes beat Michigan 23-20 in Ann Arbor, Mich. Bruce died in Columbus, Ohio at the age of 87, according to a statement released by his daughters through Ohio State on Friday. Hed been suffering from Alzheimers disease. (AP Photo/Robert Kozloff, File)
FILE - In this Nov. 21, 1987, file photo, Ohio State head coach Earle Bruce gestures on the sidelines during a game against Michigan in Ann Arbor, Mich. Bruce died in Columbus, Ohio at the age of 87, according to a statement released by his daughters through Ohio State on Friday. He’d been suffering from Alzheimer’s disease. (AP Photo/Robert Kozloff, File)
FILE - In this Nov. 21, 1987, file photo, Ohio State head coach Earle Bruce gestures on the sidelines during a game against Michigan in Ann Arbor, Mich. Bruce died in Columbus, Ohio at the age of 87, according to a statement released by his daughters through Ohio State on Friday. He’d been suffering from Alzheimer’s disease. (AP Photo/Robert Kozloff, File)
FILE - In this Nov. 21, 1987, file photo, Ohio State head coach Earle Bruce gestures on the sidelines during a game against Michigan in Ann Arbor, Mich. Bruce died in Columbus, Ohio at the age of 87, according to a statement released by his daughters through Ohio State on Friday. He’d been suffering from Alzheimer’s disease. (AP Photo/Robert Kozloff, File)
FILE - In this Nov. 21, 1987, file photo, Ohio State football coach Earle Bruce is carried by his players after the Buckeyes beat Michigan 23-20 in Ann Arbor, Mich. Bruce died in Columbus, Ohio at the age of 87, according to a statement released by his daughters through Ohio State on Friday. He’d been suffering from Alzheimer’s disease. (AP Photo/Robert Kozloff, File)
FILE - In this Nov. 21, 1987, file photo, Ohio State football coach Earle Bruce is carried by his players after the Buckeyes beat Michigan 23-20 in Ann Arbor, Mich. Bruce died in Columbus, Ohio at the age of 87, according to a statement released by his daughters through Ohio State on Friday. He’d been suffering from Alzheimer’s disease. (AP Photo/Robert Kozloff, File)
FILE - In this Nov. 21, 1987, file photo, Ohio State football coach Earle Bruce is carried by his players after the Buckeyes beat Michigan 23-20 in Ann Arbor, Mich. Bruce died in Columbus, Ohio at the age of 87, according to a statement released by his daughters through Ohio State on Friday. He’d been suffering from Alzheimer’s disease. (AP Photo/Robert Kozloff, File)
On CBS Sports HQ, college football writer Dennis Dodd joins Hakem Dermish to discuss that Harbaugh needs to improve in the Big Ten, especially against Penn State, Ohio State and Michigan State.
Pressure mounting on Jim Harbaugh
On CBS Sports HQ, college football writer Dennis Dodd joins Hakem Dermish to discuss that Harbaugh needs to improve in the Big Ten, especially against Penn State, Ohio State and Michigan State.
On CBS Sports HQ, college football writer Dennis Dodd joins Hakem Dermish to discuss that Harbaugh needs to improve in the Big Ten, especially against Penn State, Ohio State and Michigan State.
Pressure mounting on Jim Harbaugh
On CBS Sports HQ, college football writer Dennis Dodd joins Hakem Dermish to discuss that Harbaugh needs to improve in the Big Ten, especially against Penn State, Ohio State and Michigan State.
On CBS Sports HQ, college football writer Dennis Dodd joins Hakem Dermish to discuss that Harbaugh needs to improve in the Big Ten, especially against Penn State, Ohio State and Michigan State.
Pressure mounting on Jim Harbaugh
On CBS Sports HQ, college football writer Dennis Dodd joins Hakem Dermish to discuss that Harbaugh needs to improve in the Big Ten, especially against Penn State, Ohio State and Michigan State.
On CBS Sports HQ, college football writer Dennis Dodd joins Hakem Dermish to discuss that Harbaugh needs to improve in the Big Ten, especially against Penn State, Ohio State and Michigan State.
Pressure mounting on Jim Harbaugh
On CBS Sports HQ, college football writer Dennis Dodd joins Hakem Dermish to discuss that Harbaugh needs to improve in the Big Ten, especially against Penn State, Ohio State and Michigan State.
This mic'd moment from the Michigan-Ohio State game features a classic Harbaugh flip-out
This mic'd moment from the Michigan-Ohio State game features a classic Harbaugh flip-out
This mic'd moment from the Michigan-Ohio State game features a classic Harbaugh flip-out
Jon Runyan Jr. shares what it's like working with Ed Warinner now that he's at Michigan and what it was like back in the day being recruited by him when he was at Ohio State.
What it's like for the Michigan OL working with a former OSU coach
Jon Runyan Jr. shares what it's like working with Ed Warinner now that he's at Michigan and what it was like back in the day being recruited by him when he was at Ohio State.
Jon Runyan Jr. shares what it's like working with Ed Warinner now that he's at Michigan and what it was like back in the day being recruited by him when he was at Ohio State.
What it's like for the Michigan OL working with a former OSU coach
Jon Runyan Jr. shares what it's like working with Ed Warinner now that he's at Michigan and what it was like back in the day being recruited by him when he was at Ohio State.
Jon Runyan Jr. shares what it's like working with Ed Warinner now that he's at Michigan and what it was like back in the day being recruited by him when he was at Ohio State.
What it's like for the Michigan OL working with a former OSU coach
Jon Runyan Jr. shares what it's like working with Ed Warinner now that he's at Michigan and what it was like back in the day being recruited by him when he was at Ohio State.
Jon Runyan Jr. shares what it's like working with Ed Warinner now that he's at Michigan and what it was like back in the day being recruited by him when he was at Ohio State.
What it's like for the Michigan OL working with a former OSU coach
Jon Runyan Jr. shares what it's like working with Ed Warinner now that he's at Michigan and what it was like back in the day being recruited by him when he was at Ohio State.
New Michigan offensive line coach Ed Warinner was recently the offensive coordinator at archrival Ohio State, but just two years removed from Columbus, now wears maize and blue.
Warinner shares what it's like to be on the Michigan side of the rivalry
New Michigan offensive line coach Ed Warinner was recently the offensive coordinator at archrival Ohio State, but just two years removed from Columbus, now wears maize and blue.
New Michigan offensive line coach Ed Warinner was recently the offensive coordinator at archrival Ohio State, but just two years removed from Columbus, now wears maize and blue.
Warinner shares what it's like to be on the Michigan side of the rivalry
New Michigan offensive line coach Ed Warinner was recently the offensive coordinator at archrival Ohio State, but just two years removed from Columbus, now wears maize and blue.
New Michigan offensive line coach Ed Warinner was recently the offensive coordinator at archrival Ohio State, but just two years removed from Columbus, now wears maize and blue.
Warinner shares what it's like to be on the Michigan side of the rivalry
New Michigan offensive line coach Ed Warinner was recently the offensive coordinator at archrival Ohio State, but just two years removed from Columbus, now wears maize and blue.
New Michigan offensive line coach Ed Warinner was recently the offensive coordinator at archrival Ohio State, but just two years removed from Columbus, now wears maize and blue.
Warinner shares what it's like to be on the Michigan side of the rivalry
New Michigan offensive line coach Ed Warinner was recently the offensive coordinator at archrival Ohio State, but just two years removed from Columbus, now wears maize and blue.
FILE - In this Saturday, March 24, 2018, file photo, Minnesota-Duluth celebrates a 2-1 win over Air Force in an NCAA regional men's college hockey tournament game in Sioux Falls, S.D. Five years in to its existence, the Big Ten’s presence has finally been felt in college hockey. The conference has three teams at the Frozen Four this weekend, with Ohio State taking, Minnesota Duluth and Michigan. (AP Photo/Dave Eggen, File)
FILE - In this Saturday, March 24, 2018, file photo, Minnesota-Duluth celebrates a 2-1 win over Air Force in an NCAA regional men's college hockey tournament game in Sioux Falls, S.D. Five years in to its existence, the Big Ten’s presence has finally been felt in college hockey. The conference has three teams at the Frozen Four this weekend, with Ohio State taking, Minnesota Duluth and Michigan. (AP Photo/Dave Eggen, File)
FILE - In this Saturday, March 24, 2018, file photo, Minnesota-Duluth celebrates a 2-1 win over Air Force in an NCAA regional men's college hockey tournament game in Sioux Falls, S.D. Five years in to its existence, the Big Ten’s presence has finally been felt in college hockey. The conference has three teams at the Frozen Four this weekend, with Ohio State taking, Minnesota Duluth and Michigan. (AP Photo/Dave Eggen, File)
FILE - In this Sunday, March 25, 2018, file photo, Ohio State forwards Luke Stork, left and Christian Lampasso celebrate their 5-1 win over Denver in the NCAA college hockey Midwest regional final in Allentown, Pa. Five years in to its existence, the Big Ten’s presence has finally been felt in college hockey. The conference has three teams at the Frozen Four this weekend, with Ohio State taking, Minnesota Duluth and Michigan. (AP Photo/Rich Schultz, File)
FILE - In this Sunday, March 25, 2018, file photo, Ohio State forwards Luke Stork, left and Christian Lampasso celebrate their 5-1 win over Denver in the NCAA college hockey Midwest regional final in Allentown, Pa. Five years in to its existence, the Big Ten’s presence has finally been felt in college hockey. The conference has three teams at the Frozen Four this weekend, with Ohio State taking, Minnesota Duluth and Michigan. (AP Photo/Rich Schultz, File)
FILE - In this Sunday, March 25, 2018, file photo, Ohio State forwards Luke Stork, left and Christian Lampasso celebrate their 5-1 win over Denver in the NCAA college hockey Midwest regional final in Allentown, Pa. Five years in to its existence, the Big Ten’s presence has finally been felt in college hockey. The conference has three teams at the Frozen Four this weekend, with Ohio State taking, Minnesota Duluth and Michigan. (AP Photo/Rich Schultz, File)
FILE - In this Sunday, March 25, 2018, file photo, Michigan players celebrate after defeating Boston University 6-3 in the NCAA northeast regional championship hockey game in Worcester, Mass. Five years in to its existence, the Big Ten’s presence has finally been felt in college hockey. The conference has three teams at the Frozen Four this weekend, with Ohio State taking, Minnesota Duluth and Michigan. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer, File)
FILE - In this Sunday, March 25, 2018, file photo, Michigan players celebrate after defeating Boston University 6-3 in the NCAA northeast regional championship hockey game in Worcester, Mass. Five years in to its existence, the Big Ten’s presence has finally been felt in college hockey. The conference has three teams at the Frozen Four this weekend, with Ohio State taking, Minnesota Duluth and Michigan. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer, File)
FILE - In this Sunday, March 25, 2018, file photo, Michigan players celebrate after defeating Boston University 6-3 in the NCAA northeast regional championship hockey game in Worcester, Mass. Five years in to its existence, the Big Ten’s presence has finally been felt in college hockey. The conference has three teams at the Frozen Four this weekend, with Ohio State taking, Minnesota Duluth and Michigan. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer, File)
<p>In 2000 <em>Survivor</em> premiered to set a new standard for reality television. 18 years later, it&#39;s still making waves on college campuses.</p> <p>While mock Survivor tribal eliminations have existed <a href="http://insidesurvivor.com/survivor-maryland-the-best-survivor-youve-never-seen-18178" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:since the show began" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">since the show began</a>, a growing accessibility to advanced filming and editing software has allowed more fans to create their own high-quality <em>Survivor</em> games. Hundreds of series have been uploaded to YouTube over the years. Now, as the show&#39;s 36th season airs on CBS, it&#39;s college students who are taking the artistic lead, filming their own DIY versions on campuses across the nation.&#160;</p> <div><p>SEE ALSO: <a href="https://mashable.com/2018/03/02/bachelor-british-viewer/?utm_campaign=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Watercooler-Full&#38;utm_cid=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Watercooler-Full" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:7 things I learned as a British person watching &#39;The Bachelor&#39;" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">7 things I learned as a British person watching &#39;The Bachelor&#39;</a></p></div> <p>There are important twists that separate these DIY shows from televised versions. Students can&#39;t neatly mimic the island&#39;s physical landscape on their own campus lawns. University presidents are just not comfortable with &quot;castaways&quot; who spend up to 39 days acting stranded, building their own shelter, and providing themselves with food.</p> <p>Students can, however, create their own unique versions &#8212; and they sometimes go viral.</p> <p>One of the most popular recreations is Hunter Snider&#39;s <a href="https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCn7QsnaRdqxGPKYKlO7OJYw" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Survivor: Washington" class="link rapid-noclick-resp"><em>Survivor: Washington</em></a>. Filmed outside Seattle on his grandparents&#39; farm, contestants camp outside for 39 hours as they vote each other out over the course of a weekend.</p>  <p>Like the beginning of most DIY versions, Snider cast his first season with friends from school before recruiting superfans through an open casting call in the Seattle area for his second season.&#160;</p> <p>It&#39;s easy to find more than enough people who want to play in well-produced, fan-made series, Snider says. The <em>Survivor</em> community rivals that of shows like <em>RuPaul&#39;s Drag Race </em>and <em>The Bachelor</em>, with podcasts, energetic forums, and <a href="https://mashable.com/2008/05/17/tengadged/?utm_campaign=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Watercooler-Full&#38;utm_cid=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Watercooler-Full" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:whole websites" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">whole websites</a> dedicated to hosting online versions of the reality competition (And you&#39;re a monster if you judge these kids while filling out your Bach Bracket).</p> <p>Yet this lack of diversity in who plays these homemade games has been a pitfall when trying to create compelling narrative arcs within seasons and attract viewers. Casts need a variety of personalities and play styles to create a dynamic season and have characters who &quot;aren&#39;t out there strictly to play the game and not give any insight into who they are as people,&quot; Snider says.</p> <p>Austin Trupp, the creator of <em>Survivor: Maryland</em>, circumvents this problem by keeping his series exclusive to students at his school, the University of Maryland. His seasons last an entire semester, enough time for whispering roommates and screenshotted texts to rip players apart and ruin real-world friendships.</p>  <p>While a cast of college students aren&#39;t necessarily coming from all walks of life in terms of age and experience, Trupp describes them as &quot;in these flux periods,&quot; where they&#39;re trying new things and figuring out who they are.</p> <p>&quot;They&#39;re in kind of limbo in college. So once you add in that they have other friends, real lives, mutual friends, I think you get a more interesting interaction of people and clashing personalities over months of a time,&quot; Trupp says.</p> <p>It&#39;s a new iteration of the game initially branded in 2000 as a &quot;<a href="http://www.dnaindia.com/television/interview-survivor-is-an-appealing-and-dramatic-social-experiment-jeff-probst-2549192" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:social experiment" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">social experiment</a>.&quot; The format is enough of a conceptual shift to nearly be its own show.&#160;</p> <p>&quot;Rather than dealing with starving and rain and the elements, you&#39;re dealing with your life, people you know, your own personal stressors,&quot; Trupp adds.</p> <p>Both players share an &quot;elastic interpretation&quot; of the game, highlighting the original series&#39; core themes. They don&#39;t believe strict recreation is necessary. Snider loves when when fans reach out for advice on how to produce their own series.</p> <p>Another value these creators emphasize is production value. High-quality videos and edits help attract audiences and create a more immersive experience for players.&#160;</p> <p>&quot;It ups the stakes when people feel they&#39;re on a show,&quot; Trupp says. &quot;They feel like they&#39;re part of this reality TV universe. It may challenge people to be more interesting, some people play up to the cameras.&quot;</p>  <p>Contestants in the final six of Trupp&#39;s third season hang on campus lamp posts through out the night in an immunity challenge</p><div><p>Image: Austin trupp/youtube</p></div><p>The editing on both <em>Survivor: Washington</em> and <em>Survivor: Maryland </em>make them both extremely watchable. Surprisingly, Trupp says video editing is something he &quot;picked up on the spot,&quot; despite committing to hundreds of hours of editing per season.&#160;</p> <p>&quot;I didn&#39;t expect to be doing so much as a hobby. I&#39;ve had people reach out with job options, but it&#39;s not a career path I want to take.&quot;&#160;</p> <p>Some creators do parlay their passion project into a job in television, as <a href="https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCSDj1T1tr2q8tOjuwwMPXPQ" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Survivor: Brooklyn" class="link rapid-noclick-resp"><em>Survivor: Brooklyn</em></a> creator Matt Pavlovich, now a segment producer for Big Brother, has done after multiple, bicoastal seasons of both <em>Survivor</em> and<em> Big Brother.</em></p> <p>While Snider&#39;s 36-hour game demands the cameras constantly roll, Trupp films his season throughout an entire semester, often requiring players to film themselves having late night discussions or strategize through google hangouts when players leave campus for a weekend.&#160;</p>  <p>One student speaks to the camera during an episode of Survivor: Maryland</p><div><p>Image: Austin Trupp/Youtube</p></div><p>By giving players cameras and allowing them to film confessionals, players become more engaged in the production. Taylor Luke in Lafayette, Louisiana, hosts games of <a href="https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC3D7EiH7uOYL3UEPDyfWtzw" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:both Survivor and Big Brother" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">both <em>Survivor</em> and <em>Big Brothe</em>r</a>. He says having confessionals helps players &quot;process the game as it&#39;s happening&quot; and create more nuanced strategy.&#160;</p> <p>&quot;It&#39;s also creates the funniest moments,&quot; Luke says. He recounts a time his best friend threw an entire cup of water in the face of his younger sister after getting voted out of Survivor. Their kind of antics one wouldn&#39;t fall into if they didn&#39;t think it could create a dramatic moment in the episode.&#160;</p> <p>Unlike Snider and Trupp, Luke bases his games completely on this speed-style, split-decision strategy. Players are assigned their tribes at 7 a.m. and vote for a winner between the final three around 11 p.m. &#160;Luke says the constant strategizing and alliance shifting he tries to stimulate with quick rounds is &quot;the best way for me to create fatigue, so then you actually feel as if you&#39;re on the show when you become mentally and physically drained by the final rounds.&quot;</p> <p>The quickness also helps Luke turn out more seasons than most. With 15 seasons of his versions of <em>Survivo</em>r and 13 of his <em>Big Brother</em>, hundreds of people have traveled to his family&#39;s home to compete at the crack of dawn, many of them more than once.</p> <p>It&#39;s a grueling day of mind games that leaves contestants with a special bond. Luke often receives pictures when former players run into each other, like a new friend from college and someone Luke was in middle school theater with. &quot;It&#39;s a weird blend of everyone I&#39;ve met throughout my life, and clearly a unifying experience for everyone who plays. Whether you played together or against each other.&quot;</p>  <p>In a recreation of Big Brother, CBS&#39;s other hit reality competition, one player host a crucial veto ceremony</p><div><p>Image: TayloR luke/youtube</p></div><p>The brief but fervent experience of homemade <em>Survivor</em> and <em>Big Brother</em> draws comparisons to <a href="https://psmag.com/social-justice/there-are-spikes-and-snakes-please-help-me" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:escape room games" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">escape room games</a>. While it often calls for a bit more ruthlessness, most players don&#39;t take the competition personally considering there&#39;s no million dollar prize.</p> <p>Some superfans of <em>Survivor</em> prefer earlier versions that replicate the physical hardships of living on an island with only a small allotment of rice, but most younger players find the strategical evolutions and variations more fascinating.&#160;</p> <p>This split mirrors the <a href="http://datameetsmedia.com/surviving-survivors-tribal-council-old-school-and-new-school/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:two eras" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">two eras</a> of the CBS show: old school contestants who vote out physical liabilities over strategic threats, and new school players whose strategical contortions and rigid study of the game has turned Survivor into mental game before a physical one.&#160;</p> <p>The evolution into a strategic game has allowed more variations of homemade <em>Survivor</em> to thrive, and drawn ambitious college students to test their social prowess. Dozens have asked the creators interviewed in this article for advice on how to start their own series, most coming to fruition, on campuses from <a href="https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtAcyaqnxR2dugYt--Bt5eA/featured" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Florida" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Florida</a> to <a href="https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCZuh90xk54hjnx7ZV-bjlzw/featured" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Massachusetts" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Massachusetts</a>.&#160;</p> <p>One group at Ohio State recently became a <a href="https://www.thelantern.com/2016/10/students-bring-survivor-to-ohio-states-campus/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:legitimized student organization" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">legitimized student organization</a> to film and compete on campus. Others, like <em>Survivor: Michigan,</em> <a href="https://www.michigandaily.com/section/campus-life/survivor-based-show-coming-campus" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:decided" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">decided</a> to stay unaffiliated with their campus to avoid any possible regulations in production.&#160;</p> <p>What makes these series more spectacular than escape rooms are that other people can watch and enjoy them as well. The best-produced series rack up thousands of views an episode, while others unite entire towns of parents, teachers, and students across school districts and neighborhood rivals.&#160;</p> <p>My freshman year of college I played in a homemade Survivor game myself. As someone who walks around with headphones in 24/7 to avoid social interaction, I was skeptical about my ability to ensure my tribe mates liked me enough to not vote me out the first chance they got.</p> <p>Had I played for more than one day I probably would have broken down under paranoia, but staying outside all day with my phone off was the perfect catharsis to drown out the chemistry class I was failing and the boy not texting me back.</p> <p>Aside from the escapism of pretending your dreams of being on reality TV have finally come true, there&#39;s also truth to the name of being an epic social experiment. You learn about your ability (or lack thereof) to lie, manipulate, and mask your emotions (turns out I&#39;m only good at the first two).</p> <p>To anyone who also can&#39;t help gloating a bit when they pull ahead in Monopoly, the rush of these games are tenfold. Who knew spending hours plotting how to backstab my best friend only to meet an epic demise myself would be so fun?</p> <p>It only served to prove that this growth of DIY <em>Survivor</em> is more than just some passing fad, and will not be voted off the island anytime soon.&#160;</p> <div> <h2><a href="https://mashable.com/2017/11/28/jersey-shore-revival-series/?utm_campaign=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Watercooler-Full&#38;utm_cid=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Watercooler-Full" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:WATCH: MTV is bringing the &#39;Jersey Shore&#39; cast back for a wild reunion" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">WATCH: MTV is bringing the &#39;Jersey Shore&#39; cast back for a wild reunion</a></h2>  </div>
CBS's 'Survivor' is getting a second wind on college campuses

In 2000 Survivor premiered to set a new standard for reality television. 18 years later, it's still making waves on college campuses.

While mock Survivor tribal eliminations have existed since the show began, a growing accessibility to advanced filming and editing software has allowed more fans to create their own high-quality Survivor games. Hundreds of series have been uploaded to YouTube over the years. Now, as the show's 36th season airs on CBS, it's college students who are taking the artistic lead, filming their own DIY versions on campuses across the nation. 

There are important twists that separate these DIY shows from televised versions. Students can't neatly mimic the island's physical landscape on their own campus lawns. University presidents are just not comfortable with "castaways" who spend up to 39 days acting stranded, building their own shelter, and providing themselves with food.

Students can, however, create their own unique versions — and they sometimes go viral.

One of the most popular recreations is Hunter Snider's Survivor: Washington. Filmed outside Seattle on his grandparents' farm, contestants camp outside for 39 hours as they vote each other out over the course of a weekend.

Like the beginning of most DIY versions, Snider cast his first season with friends from school before recruiting superfans through an open casting call in the Seattle area for his second season. 

It's easy to find more than enough people who want to play in well-produced, fan-made series, Snider says. The Survivor community rivals that of shows like RuPaul's Drag Race and The Bachelor, with podcasts, energetic forums, and whole websites dedicated to hosting online versions of the reality competition (And you're a monster if you judge these kids while filling out your Bach Bracket).

Yet this lack of diversity in who plays these homemade games has been a pitfall when trying to create compelling narrative arcs within seasons and attract viewers. Casts need a variety of personalities and play styles to create a dynamic season and have characters who "aren't out there strictly to play the game and not give any insight into who they are as people," Snider says.

Austin Trupp, the creator of Survivor: Maryland, circumvents this problem by keeping his series exclusive to students at his school, the University of Maryland. His seasons last an entire semester, enough time for whispering roommates and screenshotted texts to rip players apart and ruin real-world friendships.

While a cast of college students aren't necessarily coming from all walks of life in terms of age and experience, Trupp describes them as "in these flux periods," where they're trying new things and figuring out who they are.

"They're in kind of limbo in college. So once you add in that they have other friends, real lives, mutual friends, I think you get a more interesting interaction of people and clashing personalities over months of a time," Trupp says.

It's a new iteration of the game initially branded in 2000 as a "social experiment." The format is enough of a conceptual shift to nearly be its own show. 

"Rather than dealing with starving and rain and the elements, you're dealing with your life, people you know, your own personal stressors," Trupp adds.

Both players share an "elastic interpretation" of the game, highlighting the original series' core themes. They don't believe strict recreation is necessary. Snider loves when when fans reach out for advice on how to produce their own series.

Another value these creators emphasize is production value. High-quality videos and edits help attract audiences and create a more immersive experience for players. 

"It ups the stakes when people feel they're on a show," Trupp says. "They feel like they're part of this reality TV universe. It may challenge people to be more interesting, some people play up to the cameras."

Contestants in the final six of Trupp's third season hang on campus lamp posts through out the night in an immunity challenge

Image: Austin trupp/youtube

The editing on both Survivor: Washington and Survivor: Maryland make them both extremely watchable. Surprisingly, Trupp says video editing is something he "picked up on the spot," despite committing to hundreds of hours of editing per season. 

"I didn't expect to be doing so much as a hobby. I've had people reach out with job options, but it's not a career path I want to take." 

Some creators do parlay their passion project into a job in television, as Survivor: Brooklyn creator Matt Pavlovich, now a segment producer for Big Brother, has done after multiple, bicoastal seasons of both Survivor and Big Brother.

While Snider's 36-hour game demands the cameras constantly roll, Trupp films his season throughout an entire semester, often requiring players to film themselves having late night discussions or strategize through google hangouts when players leave campus for a weekend. 

One student speaks to the camera during an episode of Survivor: Maryland

Image: Austin Trupp/Youtube

By giving players cameras and allowing them to film confessionals, players become more engaged in the production. Taylor Luke in Lafayette, Louisiana, hosts games of both Survivor and Big Brother. He says having confessionals helps players "process the game as it's happening" and create more nuanced strategy. 

"It's also creates the funniest moments," Luke says. He recounts a time his best friend threw an entire cup of water in the face of his younger sister after getting voted out of Survivor. Their kind of antics one wouldn't fall into if they didn't think it could create a dramatic moment in the episode. 

Unlike Snider and Trupp, Luke bases his games completely on this speed-style, split-decision strategy. Players are assigned their tribes at 7 a.m. and vote for a winner between the final three around 11 p.m.  Luke says the constant strategizing and alliance shifting he tries to stimulate with quick rounds is "the best way for me to create fatigue, so then you actually feel as if you're on the show when you become mentally and physically drained by the final rounds."

The quickness also helps Luke turn out more seasons than most. With 15 seasons of his versions of Survivor and 13 of his Big Brother, hundreds of people have traveled to his family's home to compete at the crack of dawn, many of them more than once.

It's a grueling day of mind games that leaves contestants with a special bond. Luke often receives pictures when former players run into each other, like a new friend from college and someone Luke was in middle school theater with. "It's a weird blend of everyone I've met throughout my life, and clearly a unifying experience for everyone who plays. Whether you played together or against each other."

In a recreation of Big Brother, CBS's other hit reality competition, one player host a crucial veto ceremony

Image: TayloR luke/youtube

The brief but fervent experience of homemade Survivor and Big Brother draws comparisons to escape room games. While it often calls for a bit more ruthlessness, most players don't take the competition personally considering there's no million dollar prize.

Some superfans of Survivor prefer earlier versions that replicate the physical hardships of living on an island with only a small allotment of rice, but most younger players find the strategical evolutions and variations more fascinating. 

This split mirrors the two eras of the CBS show: old school contestants who vote out physical liabilities over strategic threats, and new school players whose strategical contortions and rigid study of the game has turned Survivor into mental game before a physical one. 

The evolution into a strategic game has allowed more variations of homemade Survivor to thrive, and drawn ambitious college students to test their social prowess. Dozens have asked the creators interviewed in this article for advice on how to start their own series, most coming to fruition, on campuses from Florida to Massachusetts

One group at Ohio State recently became a legitimized student organization to film and compete on campus. Others, like Survivor: Michigan, decided to stay unaffiliated with their campus to avoid any possible regulations in production. 

What makes these series more spectacular than escape rooms are that other people can watch and enjoy them as well. The best-produced series rack up thousands of views an episode, while others unite entire towns of parents, teachers, and students across school districts and neighborhood rivals. 

My freshman year of college I played in a homemade Survivor game myself. As someone who walks around with headphones in 24/7 to avoid social interaction, I was skeptical about my ability to ensure my tribe mates liked me enough to not vote me out the first chance they got.

Had I played for more than one day I probably would have broken down under paranoia, but staying outside all day with my phone off was the perfect catharsis to drown out the chemistry class I was failing and the boy not texting me back.

Aside from the escapism of pretending your dreams of being on reality TV have finally come true, there's also truth to the name of being an epic social experiment. You learn about your ability (or lack thereof) to lie, manipulate, and mask your emotions (turns out I'm only good at the first two).

To anyone who also can't help gloating a bit when they pull ahead in Monopoly, the rush of these games are tenfold. Who knew spending hours plotting how to backstab my best friend only to meet an epic demise myself would be so fun?

It only served to prove that this growth of DIY Survivor is more than just some passing fad, and will not be voted off the island anytime soon. 

<p>In 2000 <em>Survivor</em> premiered to set a new standard for reality television. 18 years later, it&#39;s still making waves on college campuses.</p> <p>While mock Survivor tribal eliminations have existed <a href="http://insidesurvivor.com/survivor-maryland-the-best-survivor-youve-never-seen-18178" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:since the show began" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">since the show began</a>, a growing accessibility to advanced filming and editing software has allowed more fans to create their own high-quality <em>Survivor</em> games. Hundreds of series have been uploaded to YouTube over the years. Now, as the show&#39;s 36th season airs on CBS, it&#39;s college students who are taking the artistic lead, filming their own DIY versions on campuses across the nation.&#160;</p> <div><p>SEE ALSO: <a href="https://mashable.com/2018/03/02/bachelor-british-viewer/?utm_campaign=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Watercooler-Full&#38;utm_cid=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Watercooler-Full" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:7 things I learned as a British person watching &#39;The Bachelor&#39;" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">7 things I learned as a British person watching &#39;The Bachelor&#39;</a></p></div> <p>There are important twists that separate these DIY shows from televised versions. Students can&#39;t neatly mimic the island&#39;s physical landscape on their own campus lawns. University presidents are just not comfortable with &quot;castaways&quot; who spend up to 39 days acting stranded, building their own shelter, and providing themselves with food.</p> <p>Students can, however, create their own unique versions &#8212; and they sometimes go viral.</p> <p>One of the most popular recreations is Hunter Snider&#39;s <a href="https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCn7QsnaRdqxGPKYKlO7OJYw" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Survivor: Washington" class="link rapid-noclick-resp"><em>Survivor: Washington</em></a>. Filmed outside Seattle on his grandparents&#39; farm, contestants camp outside for 39 hours as they vote each other out over the course of a weekend.</p>  <p>Like the beginning of most DIY versions, Snider cast his first season with friends from school before recruiting superfans through an open casting call in the Seattle area for his second season.&#160;</p> <p>It&#39;s easy to find more than enough people who want to play in well-produced, fan-made series, Snider says. The <em>Survivor</em> community rivals that of shows like <em>RuPaul&#39;s Drag Race </em>and <em>The Bachelor</em>, with podcasts, energetic forums, and <a href="https://mashable.com/2008/05/17/tengadged/?utm_campaign=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Watercooler-Full&#38;utm_cid=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Watercooler-Full" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:whole websites" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">whole websites</a> dedicated to hosting online versions of the reality competition (And you&#39;re a monster if you judge these kids while filling out your Bach Bracket).</p> <p>Yet this lack of diversity in who plays these homemade games has been a pitfall when trying to create compelling narrative arcs within seasons and attract viewers. Casts need a variety of personalities and play styles to create a dynamic season and have characters who &quot;aren&#39;t out there strictly to play the game and not give any insight into who they are as people,&quot; Snider says.</p> <p>Austin Trupp, the creator of <em>Survivor: Maryland</em>, circumvents this problem by keeping his series exclusive to students at his school, the University of Maryland. His seasons last an entire semester, enough time for whispering roommates and screenshotted texts to rip players apart and ruin real-world friendships.</p>  <p>While a cast of college students aren&#39;t necessarily coming from all walks of life in terms of age and experience, Trupp describes them as &quot;in these flux periods,&quot; where they&#39;re trying new things and figuring out who they are.</p> <p>&quot;They&#39;re in kind of limbo in college. So once you add in that they have other friends, real lives, mutual friends, I think you get a more interesting interaction of people and clashing personalities over months of a time,&quot; Trupp says.</p> <p>It&#39;s a new iteration of the game initially branded in 2000 as a &quot;<a href="http://www.dnaindia.com/television/interview-survivor-is-an-appealing-and-dramatic-social-experiment-jeff-probst-2549192" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:social experiment" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">social experiment</a>.&quot; The format is enough of a conceptual shift to nearly be its own show.&#160;</p> <p>&quot;Rather than dealing with starving and rain and the elements, you&#39;re dealing with your life, people you know, your own personal stressors,&quot; Trupp adds.</p> <p>Both players share an &quot;elastic interpretation&quot; of the game, highlighting the original series&#39; core themes. They don&#39;t believe strict recreation is necessary. Snider loves when when fans reach out for advice on how to produce their own series.</p> <p>Another value these creators emphasize is production value. High-quality videos and edits help attract audiences and create a more immersive experience for players.&#160;</p> <p>&quot;It ups the stakes when people feel they&#39;re on a show,&quot; Trupp says. &quot;They feel like they&#39;re part of this reality TV universe. It may challenge people to be more interesting, some people play up to the cameras.&quot;</p>  <p>Contestants in the final six of Trupp&#39;s third season hang on campus lamp posts through out the night in an immunity challenge</p><div><p>Image: Austin trupp/youtube</p></div><p>The editing on both <em>Survivor: Washington</em> and <em>Survivor: Maryland </em>make them both extremely watchable. Surprisingly, Trupp says video editing is something he &quot;picked up on the spot,&quot; despite committing to hundreds of hours of editing per season.&#160;</p> <p>&quot;I didn&#39;t expect to be doing so much as a hobby. I&#39;ve had people reach out with job options, but it&#39;s not a career path I want to take.&quot;&#160;</p> <p>Some creators do parlay their passion project into a job in television, as <a href="https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCSDj1T1tr2q8tOjuwwMPXPQ" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Survivor: Brooklyn" class="link rapid-noclick-resp"><em>Survivor: Brooklyn</em></a> creator Matt Pavlovich, now a segment producer for Big Brother, has done after multiple, bicoastal seasons of both <em>Survivor</em> and<em> Big Brother.</em></p> <p>While Snider&#39;s 36-hour game demands the cameras constantly roll, Trupp films his season throughout an entire semester, often requiring players to film themselves having late night discussions or strategize through google hangouts when players leave campus for a weekend.&#160;</p>  <p>One student speaks to the camera during an episode of Survivor: Maryland</p><div><p>Image: Austin Trupp/Youtube</p></div><p>By giving players cameras and allowing them to film confessionals, players become more engaged in the production. Taylor Luke in Lafayette, Louisiana, hosts games of <a href="https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC3D7EiH7uOYL3UEPDyfWtzw" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:both Survivor and Big Brother" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">both <em>Survivor</em> and <em>Big Brothe</em>r</a>. He says having confessionals helps players &quot;process the game as it&#39;s happening&quot; and create more nuanced strategy.&#160;</p> <p>&quot;It&#39;s also creates the funniest moments,&quot; Luke says. He recounts a time his best friend threw an entire cup of water in the face of his younger sister after getting voted out of Survivor. Their kind of antics one wouldn&#39;t fall into if they didn&#39;t think it could create a dramatic moment in the episode.&#160;</p> <p>Unlike Snider and Trupp, Luke bases his games completely on this speed-style, split-decision strategy. Players are assigned their tribes at 7 a.m. and vote for a winner between the final three around 11 p.m. &#160;Luke says the constant strategizing and alliance shifting he tries to stimulate with quick rounds is &quot;the best way for me to create fatigue, so then you actually feel as if you&#39;re on the show when you become mentally and physically drained by the final rounds.&quot;</p> <p>The quickness also helps Luke turn out more seasons than most. With 15 seasons of his versions of <em>Survivo</em>r and 13 of his <em>Big Brother</em>, hundreds of people have traveled to his family&#39;s home to compete at the crack of dawn, many of them more than once.</p> <p>It&#39;s a grueling day of mind games that leaves contestants with a special bond. Luke often receives pictures when former players run into each other, like a new friend from college and someone Luke was in middle school theater with. &quot;It&#39;s a weird blend of everyone I&#39;ve met throughout my life, and clearly a unifying experience for everyone who plays. Whether you played together or against each other.&quot;</p>  <p>In a recreation of Big Brother, CBS&#39;s other hit reality competition, one player host a crucial veto ceremony</p><div><p>Image: TayloR luke/youtube</p></div><p>The brief but fervent experience of homemade <em>Survivor</em> and <em>Big Brother</em> draws comparisons to <a href="https://psmag.com/social-justice/there-are-spikes-and-snakes-please-help-me" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:escape room games" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">escape room games</a>. While it often calls for a bit more ruthlessness, most players don&#39;t take the competition personally considering there&#39;s no million dollar prize.</p> <p>Some superfans of <em>Survivor</em> prefer earlier versions that replicate the physical hardships of living on an island with only a small allotment of rice, but most younger players find the strategical evolutions and variations more fascinating.&#160;</p> <p>This split mirrors the <a href="http://datameetsmedia.com/surviving-survivors-tribal-council-old-school-and-new-school/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:two eras" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">two eras</a> of the CBS show: old school contestants who vote out physical liabilities over strategic threats, and new school players whose strategical contortions and rigid study of the game has turned Survivor into mental game before a physical one.&#160;</p> <p>The evolution into a strategic game has allowed more variations of homemade <em>Survivor</em> to thrive, and drawn ambitious college students to test their social prowess. Dozens have asked the creators interviewed in this article for advice on how to start their own series, most coming to fruition, on campuses from <a href="https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtAcyaqnxR2dugYt--Bt5eA/featured" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Florida" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Florida</a> to <a href="https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCZuh90xk54hjnx7ZV-bjlzw/featured" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Massachusetts" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Massachusetts</a>.&#160;</p> <p>One group at Ohio State recently became a <a href="https://www.thelantern.com/2016/10/students-bring-survivor-to-ohio-states-campus/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:legitimized student organization" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">legitimized student organization</a> to film and compete on campus. Others, like <em>Survivor: Michigan,</em> <a href="https://www.michigandaily.com/section/campus-life/survivor-based-show-coming-campus" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:decided" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">decided</a> to stay unaffiliated with their campus to avoid any possible regulations in production.&#160;</p> <p>What makes these series more spectacular than escape rooms are that other people can watch and enjoy them as well. The best-produced series rack up thousands of views an episode, while others unite entire towns of parents, teachers, and students across school districts and neighborhood rivals.&#160;</p> <p>My freshman year of college I played in a homemade Survivor game myself. As someone who walks around with headphones in 24/7 to avoid social interaction, I was skeptical about my ability to ensure my tribe mates liked me enough to not vote me out the first chance they got.</p> <p>Had I played for more than one day I probably would have broken down under paranoia, but staying outside all day with my phone off was the perfect catharsis to drown out the chemistry class I was failing and the boy not texting me back.</p> <p>Aside from the escapism of pretending your dreams of being on reality TV have finally come true, there&#39;s also truth to the name of being an epic social experiment. You learn about your ability (or lack thereof) to lie, manipulate, and mask your emotions (turns out I&#39;m only good at the first two).</p> <p>To anyone who also can&#39;t help gloating a bit when they pull ahead in Monopoly, the rush of these games are tenfold. Who knew spending hours plotting how to backstab my best friend only to meet an epic demise myself would be so fun?</p> <p>It only served to prove that this growth of DIY <em>Survivor</em> is more than just some passing fad, and will not be voted off the island anytime soon.&#160;</p> <div> <h2><a href="https://mashable.com/2017/11/28/jersey-shore-revival-series/?utm_campaign=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Watercooler-Full&#38;utm_cid=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Watercooler-Full" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:WATCH: MTV is bringing the &#39;Jersey Shore&#39; cast back for a wild reunion" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">WATCH: MTV is bringing the &#39;Jersey Shore&#39; cast back for a wild reunion</a></h2>  </div>
CBS's 'Survivor' is getting a second wind on college campuses

In 2000 Survivor premiered to set a new standard for reality television. 18 years later, it's still making waves on college campuses.

While mock Survivor tribal eliminations have existed since the show began, a growing accessibility to advanced filming and editing software has allowed more fans to create their own high-quality Survivor games. Hundreds of series have been uploaded to YouTube over the years. Now, as the show's 36th season airs on CBS, it's college students who are taking the artistic lead, filming their own DIY versions on campuses across the nation. 

There are important twists that separate these DIY shows from televised versions. Students can't neatly mimic the island's physical landscape on their own campus lawns. University presidents are just not comfortable with "castaways" who spend up to 39 days acting stranded, building their own shelter, and providing themselves with food.

Students can, however, create their own unique versions — and they sometimes go viral.

One of the most popular recreations is Hunter Snider's Survivor: Washington. Filmed outside Seattle on his grandparents' farm, contestants camp outside for 39 hours as they vote each other out over the course of a weekend.

Like the beginning of most DIY versions, Snider cast his first season with friends from school before recruiting superfans through an open casting call in the Seattle area for his second season. 

It's easy to find more than enough people who want to play in well-produced, fan-made series, Snider says. The Survivor community rivals that of shows like RuPaul's Drag Race and The Bachelor, with podcasts, energetic forums, and whole websites dedicated to hosting online versions of the reality competition (And you're a monster if you judge these kids while filling out your Bach Bracket).

Yet this lack of diversity in who plays these homemade games has been a pitfall when trying to create compelling narrative arcs within seasons and attract viewers. Casts need a variety of personalities and play styles to create a dynamic season and have characters who "aren't out there strictly to play the game and not give any insight into who they are as people," Snider says.

Austin Trupp, the creator of Survivor: Maryland, circumvents this problem by keeping his series exclusive to students at his school, the University of Maryland. His seasons last an entire semester, enough time for whispering roommates and screenshotted texts to rip players apart and ruin real-world friendships.

While a cast of college students aren't necessarily coming from all walks of life in terms of age and experience, Trupp describes them as "in these flux periods," where they're trying new things and figuring out who they are.

"They're in kind of limbo in college. So once you add in that they have other friends, real lives, mutual friends, I think you get a more interesting interaction of people and clashing personalities over months of a time," Trupp says.

It's a new iteration of the game initially branded in 2000 as a "social experiment." The format is enough of a conceptual shift to nearly be its own show. 

"Rather than dealing with starving and rain and the elements, you're dealing with your life, people you know, your own personal stressors," Trupp adds.

Both players share an "elastic interpretation" of the game, highlighting the original series' core themes. They don't believe strict recreation is necessary. Snider loves when when fans reach out for advice on how to produce their own series.

Another value these creators emphasize is production value. High-quality videos and edits help attract audiences and create a more immersive experience for players. 

"It ups the stakes when people feel they're on a show," Trupp says. "They feel like they're part of this reality TV universe. It may challenge people to be more interesting, some people play up to the cameras."

Contestants in the final six of Trupp's third season hang on campus lamp posts through out the night in an immunity challenge

Image: Austin trupp/youtube

The editing on both Survivor: Washington and Survivor: Maryland make them both extremely watchable. Surprisingly, Trupp says video editing is something he "picked up on the spot," despite committing to hundreds of hours of editing per season. 

"I didn't expect to be doing so much as a hobby. I've had people reach out with job options, but it's not a career path I want to take." 

Some creators do parlay their passion project into a job in television, as Survivor: Brooklyn creator Matt Pavlovich, now a segment producer for Big Brother, has done after multiple, bicoastal seasons of both Survivor and Big Brother.

While Snider's 36-hour game demands the cameras constantly roll, Trupp films his season throughout an entire semester, often requiring players to film themselves having late night discussions or strategize through google hangouts when players leave campus for a weekend. 

One student speaks to the camera during an episode of Survivor: Maryland

Image: Austin Trupp/Youtube

By giving players cameras and allowing them to film confessionals, players become more engaged in the production. Taylor Luke in Lafayette, Louisiana, hosts games of both Survivor and Big Brother. He says having confessionals helps players "process the game as it's happening" and create more nuanced strategy. 

"It's also creates the funniest moments," Luke says. He recounts a time his best friend threw an entire cup of water in the face of his younger sister after getting voted out of Survivor. Their kind of antics one wouldn't fall into if they didn't think it could create a dramatic moment in the episode. 

Unlike Snider and Trupp, Luke bases his games completely on this speed-style, split-decision strategy. Players are assigned their tribes at 7 a.m. and vote for a winner between the final three around 11 p.m.  Luke says the constant strategizing and alliance shifting he tries to stimulate with quick rounds is "the best way for me to create fatigue, so then you actually feel as if you're on the show when you become mentally and physically drained by the final rounds."

The quickness also helps Luke turn out more seasons than most. With 15 seasons of his versions of Survivor and 13 of his Big Brother, hundreds of people have traveled to his family's home to compete at the crack of dawn, many of them more than once.

It's a grueling day of mind games that leaves contestants with a special bond. Luke often receives pictures when former players run into each other, like a new friend from college and someone Luke was in middle school theater with. "It's a weird blend of everyone I've met throughout my life, and clearly a unifying experience for everyone who plays. Whether you played together or against each other."

In a recreation of Big Brother, CBS's other hit reality competition, one player host a crucial veto ceremony

Image: TayloR luke/youtube

The brief but fervent experience of homemade Survivor and Big Brother draws comparisons to escape room games. While it often calls for a bit more ruthlessness, most players don't take the competition personally considering there's no million dollar prize.

Some superfans of Survivor prefer earlier versions that replicate the physical hardships of living on an island with only a small allotment of rice, but most younger players find the strategical evolutions and variations more fascinating. 

This split mirrors the two eras of the CBS show: old school contestants who vote out physical liabilities over strategic threats, and new school players whose strategical contortions and rigid study of the game has turned Survivor into mental game before a physical one. 

The evolution into a strategic game has allowed more variations of homemade Survivor to thrive, and drawn ambitious college students to test their social prowess. Dozens have asked the creators interviewed in this article for advice on how to start their own series, most coming to fruition, on campuses from Florida to Massachusetts

One group at Ohio State recently became a legitimized student organization to film and compete on campus. Others, like Survivor: Michigan, decided to stay unaffiliated with their campus to avoid any possible regulations in production. 

What makes these series more spectacular than escape rooms are that other people can watch and enjoy them as well. The best-produced series rack up thousands of views an episode, while others unite entire towns of parents, teachers, and students across school districts and neighborhood rivals. 

My freshman year of college I played in a homemade Survivor game myself. As someone who walks around with headphones in 24/7 to avoid social interaction, I was skeptical about my ability to ensure my tribe mates liked me enough to not vote me out the first chance they got.

Had I played for more than one day I probably would have broken down under paranoia, but staying outside all day with my phone off was the perfect catharsis to drown out the chemistry class I was failing and the boy not texting me back.

Aside from the escapism of pretending your dreams of being on reality TV have finally come true, there's also truth to the name of being an epic social experiment. You learn about your ability (or lack thereof) to lie, manipulate, and mask your emotions (turns out I'm only good at the first two).

To anyone who also can't help gloating a bit when they pull ahead in Monopoly, the rush of these games are tenfold. Who knew spending hours plotting how to backstab my best friend only to meet an epic demise myself would be so fun?

It only served to prove that this growth of DIY Survivor is more than just some passing fad, and will not be voted off the island anytime soon. 

<p>In 2000 <em>Survivor</em> premiered to set a new standard for reality television. 18 years later, it&#39;s still making waves on college campuses.</p> <p>While mock Survivor tribal eliminations have existed <a href="http://insidesurvivor.com/survivor-maryland-the-best-survivor-youve-never-seen-18178" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:since the show began" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">since the show began</a>, a growing accessibility to advanced filming and editing software has allowed more fans to create their own high-quality <em>Survivor</em> games. Hundreds of series have been uploaded to YouTube over the years. Now, as the show&#39;s 36th season airs on CBS, it&#39;s college students who are taking the artistic lead, filming their own DIY versions on campuses across the nation.&#160;</p> <div><p>SEE ALSO: <a href="https://mashable.com/2018/03/02/bachelor-british-viewer/?utm_campaign=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Watercooler-Full&#38;utm_cid=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Watercooler-Full" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:7 things I learned as a British person watching &#39;The Bachelor&#39;" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">7 things I learned as a British person watching &#39;The Bachelor&#39;</a></p></div> <p>There are important twists that separate these DIY shows from televised versions. Students can&#39;t neatly mimic the island&#39;s physical landscape on their own campus lawns. University presidents are just not comfortable with &quot;castaways&quot; who spend up to 39 days acting stranded, building their own shelter, and providing themselves with food.</p> <p>Students can, however, create their own unique versions &#8212; and they sometimes go viral.</p> <p>One of the most popular recreations is Hunter Snider&#39;s <a href="https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCn7QsnaRdqxGPKYKlO7OJYw" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Survivor: Washington" class="link rapid-noclick-resp"><em>Survivor: Washington</em></a>. Filmed outside Seattle on his grandparents&#39; farm, contestants camp outside for 39 hours as they vote each other out over the course of a weekend.</p>  <p>Like the beginning of most DIY versions, Snider cast his first season with friends from school before recruiting superfans through an open casting call in the Seattle area for his second season.&#160;</p> <p>It&#39;s easy to find more than enough people who want to play in well-produced, fan-made series, Snider says. The <em>Survivor</em> community rivals that of shows like <em>RuPaul&#39;s Drag Race </em>and <em>The Bachelor</em>, with podcasts, energetic forums, and <a href="https://mashable.com/2008/05/17/tengadged/?utm_campaign=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Watercooler-Full&#38;utm_cid=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Watercooler-Full" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:whole websites" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">whole websites</a> dedicated to hosting online versions of the reality competition (And you&#39;re a monster if you judge these kids while filling out your Bach Bracket).</p> <p>Yet this lack of diversity in who plays these homemade games has been a pitfall when trying to create compelling narrative arcs within seasons and attract viewers. Casts need a variety of personalities and play styles to create a dynamic season and have characters who &quot;aren&#39;t out there strictly to play the game and not give any insight into who they are as people,&quot; Snider says.</p> <p>Austin Trupp, the creator of <em>Survivor: Maryland</em>, circumvents this problem by keeping his series exclusive to students at his school, the University of Maryland. His seasons last an entire semester, enough time for whispering roommates and screenshotted texts to rip players apart and ruin real-world friendships.</p>  <p>While a cast of college students aren&#39;t necessarily coming from all walks of life in terms of age and experience, Trupp describes them as &quot;in these flux periods,&quot; where they&#39;re trying new things and figuring out who they are.</p> <p>&quot;They&#39;re in kind of limbo in college. So once you add in that they have other friends, real lives, mutual friends, I think you get a more interesting interaction of people and clashing personalities over months of a time,&quot; Trupp says.</p> <p>It&#39;s a new iteration of the game initially branded in 2000 as a &quot;<a href="http://www.dnaindia.com/television/interview-survivor-is-an-appealing-and-dramatic-social-experiment-jeff-probst-2549192" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:social experiment" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">social experiment</a>.&quot; The format is enough of a conceptual shift to nearly be its own show.&#160;</p> <p>&quot;Rather than dealing with starving and rain and the elements, you&#39;re dealing with your life, people you know, your own personal stressors,&quot; Trupp adds.</p> <p>Both players share an &quot;elastic interpretation&quot; of the game, highlighting the original series&#39; core themes. They don&#39;t believe strict recreation is necessary. Snider loves when when fans reach out for advice on how to produce their own series.</p> <p>Another value these creators emphasize is production value. High-quality videos and edits help attract audiences and create a more immersive experience for players.&#160;</p> <p>&quot;It ups the stakes when people feel they&#39;re on a show,&quot; Trupp says. &quot;They feel like they&#39;re part of this reality TV universe. It may challenge people to be more interesting, some people play up to the cameras.&quot;</p>  <p>Contestants in the final six of Trupp&#39;s third season hang on campus lamp posts through out the night in an immunity challenge</p><div><p>Image: Austin trupp/youtube</p></div><p>The editing on both <em>Survivor: Washington</em> and <em>Survivor: Maryland </em>make them both extremely watchable. Surprisingly, Trupp says video editing is something he &quot;picked up on the spot,&quot; despite committing to hundreds of hours of editing per season.&#160;</p> <p>&quot;I didn&#39;t expect to be doing so much as a hobby. I&#39;ve had people reach out with job options, but it&#39;s not a career path I want to take.&quot;&#160;</p> <p>Some creators do parlay their passion project into a job in television, as <a href="https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCSDj1T1tr2q8tOjuwwMPXPQ" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Survivor: Brooklyn" class="link rapid-noclick-resp"><em>Survivor: Brooklyn</em></a> creator Matt Pavlovich, now a segment producer for Big Brother, has done after multiple, bicoastal seasons of both <em>Survivor</em> and<em> Big Brother.</em></p> <p>While Snider&#39;s 36-hour game demands the cameras constantly roll, Trupp films his season throughout an entire semester, often requiring players to film themselves having late night discussions or strategize through google hangouts when players leave campus for a weekend.&#160;</p>  <p>One student speaks to the camera during an episode of Survivor: Maryland</p><div><p>Image: Austin Trupp/Youtube</p></div><p>By giving players cameras and allowing them to film confessionals, players become more engaged in the production. Taylor Luke in Lafayette, Louisiana, hosts games of <a href="https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC3D7EiH7uOYL3UEPDyfWtzw" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:both Survivor and Big Brother" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">both <em>Survivor</em> and <em>Big Brothe</em>r</a>. He says having confessionals helps players &quot;process the game as it&#39;s happening&quot; and create more nuanced strategy.&#160;</p> <p>&quot;It&#39;s also creates the funniest moments,&quot; Luke says. He recounts a time his best friend threw an entire cup of water in the face of his younger sister after getting voted out of Survivor. Their kind of antics one wouldn&#39;t fall into if they didn&#39;t think it could create a dramatic moment in the episode.&#160;</p> <p>Unlike Snider and Trupp, Luke bases his games completely on this speed-style, split-decision strategy. Players are assigned their tribes at 7 a.m. and vote for a winner between the final three around 11 p.m. &#160;Luke says the constant strategizing and alliance shifting he tries to stimulate with quick rounds is &quot;the best way for me to create fatigue, so then you actually feel as if you&#39;re on the show when you become mentally and physically drained by the final rounds.&quot;</p> <p>The quickness also helps Luke turn out more seasons than most. With 15 seasons of his versions of <em>Survivo</em>r and 13 of his <em>Big Brother</em>, hundreds of people have traveled to his family&#39;s home to compete at the crack of dawn, many of them more than once.</p> <p>It&#39;s a grueling day of mind games that leaves contestants with a special bond. Luke often receives pictures when former players run into each other, like a new friend from college and someone Luke was in middle school theater with. &quot;It&#39;s a weird blend of everyone I&#39;ve met throughout my life, and clearly a unifying experience for everyone who plays. Whether you played together or against each other.&quot;</p>  <p>In a recreation of Big Brother, CBS&#39;s other hit reality competition, one player host a crucial veto ceremony</p><div><p>Image: TayloR luke/youtube</p></div><p>The brief but fervent experience of homemade <em>Survivor</em> and <em>Big Brother</em> draws comparisons to <a href="https://psmag.com/social-justice/there-are-spikes-and-snakes-please-help-me" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:escape room games" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">escape room games</a>. While it often calls for a bit more ruthlessness, most players don&#39;t take the competition personally considering there&#39;s no million dollar prize.</p> <p>Some superfans of <em>Survivor</em> prefer earlier versions that replicate the physical hardships of living on an island with only a small allotment of rice, but most younger players find the strategical evolutions and variations more fascinating.&#160;</p> <p>This split mirrors the <a href="http://datameetsmedia.com/surviving-survivors-tribal-council-old-school-and-new-school/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:two eras" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">two eras</a> of the CBS show: old school contestants who vote out physical liabilities over strategic threats, and new school players whose strategical contortions and rigid study of the game has turned Survivor into mental game before a physical one.&#160;</p> <p>The evolution into a strategic game has allowed more variations of homemade <em>Survivor</em> to thrive, and drawn ambitious college students to test their social prowess. Dozens have asked the creators interviewed in this article for advice on how to start their own series, most coming to fruition, on campuses from <a href="https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtAcyaqnxR2dugYt--Bt5eA/featured" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Florida" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Florida</a> to <a href="https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCZuh90xk54hjnx7ZV-bjlzw/featured" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Massachusetts" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Massachusetts</a>.&#160;</p> <p>One group at Ohio State recently became a <a href="https://www.thelantern.com/2016/10/students-bring-survivor-to-ohio-states-campus/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:legitimized student organization" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">legitimized student organization</a> to film and compete on campus. Others, like <em>Survivor: Michigan,</em> <a href="https://www.michigandaily.com/section/campus-life/survivor-based-show-coming-campus" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:decided" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">decided</a> to stay unaffiliated with their campus to avoid any possible regulations in production.&#160;</p> <p>What makes these series more spectacular than escape rooms are that other people can watch and enjoy them as well. The best-produced series rack up thousands of views an episode, while others unite entire towns of parents, teachers, and students across school districts and neighborhood rivals.&#160;</p> <p>My freshman year of college I played in a homemade Survivor game myself. As someone who walks around with headphones in 24/7 to avoid social interaction, I was skeptical about my ability to ensure my tribe mates liked me enough to not vote me out the first chance they got.</p> <p>Had I played for more than one day I probably would have broken down under paranoia, but staying outside all day with my phone off was the perfect catharsis to drown out the chemistry class I was failing and the boy not texting me back.</p> <p>Aside from the escapism of pretending your dreams of being on reality TV have finally come true, there&#39;s also truth to the name of being an epic social experiment. You learn about your ability (or lack thereof) to lie, manipulate, and mask your emotions (turns out I&#39;m only good at the first two).</p> <p>To anyone who also can&#39;t help gloating a bit when they pull ahead in Monopoly, the rush of these games are tenfold. Who knew spending hours plotting how to backstab my best friend only to meet an epic demise myself would be so fun?</p> <p>It only served to prove that this growth of DIY <em>Survivor</em> is more than just some passing fad, and will not be voted off the island anytime soon.&#160;</p> <div> <h2><a href="https://mashable.com/2017/11/28/jersey-shore-revival-series/?utm_campaign=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Watercooler-Full&#38;utm_cid=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Watercooler-Full" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:WATCH: MTV is bringing the &#39;Jersey Shore&#39; cast back for a wild reunion" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">WATCH: MTV is bringing the &#39;Jersey Shore&#39; cast back for a wild reunion</a></h2>  </div>
CBS's 'Survivor' is getting a second wind on college campuses

In 2000 Survivor premiered to set a new standard for reality television. 18 years later, it's still making waves on college campuses.

While mock Survivor tribal eliminations have existed since the show began, a growing accessibility to advanced filming and editing software has allowed more fans to create their own high-quality Survivor games. Hundreds of series have been uploaded to YouTube over the years. Now, as the show's 36th season airs on CBS, it's college students who are taking the artistic lead, filming their own DIY versions on campuses across the nation. 

There are important twists that separate these DIY shows from televised versions. Students can't neatly mimic the island's physical landscape on their own campus lawns. University presidents are just not comfortable with "castaways" who spend up to 39 days acting stranded, building their own shelter, and providing themselves with food.

Students can, however, create their own unique versions — and they sometimes go viral.

One of the most popular recreations is Hunter Snider's Survivor: Washington. Filmed outside Seattle on his grandparents' farm, contestants camp outside for 39 hours as they vote each other out over the course of a weekend.

Like the beginning of most DIY versions, Snider cast his first season with friends from school before recruiting superfans through an open casting call in the Seattle area for his second season. 

It's easy to find more than enough people who want to play in well-produced, fan-made series, Snider says. The Survivor community rivals that of shows like RuPaul's Drag Race and The Bachelor, with podcasts, energetic forums, and whole websites dedicated to hosting online versions of the reality competition (And you're a monster if you judge these kids while filling out your Bach Bracket).

Yet this lack of diversity in who plays these homemade games has been a pitfall when trying to create compelling narrative arcs within seasons and attract viewers. Casts need a variety of personalities and play styles to create a dynamic season and have characters who "aren't out there strictly to play the game and not give any insight into who they are as people," Snider says.

Austin Trupp, the creator of Survivor: Maryland, circumvents this problem by keeping his series exclusive to students at his school, the University of Maryland. His seasons last an entire semester, enough time for whispering roommates and screenshotted texts to rip players apart and ruin real-world friendships.

While a cast of college students aren't necessarily coming from all walks of life in terms of age and experience, Trupp describes them as "in these flux periods," where they're trying new things and figuring out who they are.

"They're in kind of limbo in college. So once you add in that they have other friends, real lives, mutual friends, I think you get a more interesting interaction of people and clashing personalities over months of a time," Trupp says.

It's a new iteration of the game initially branded in 2000 as a "social experiment." The format is enough of a conceptual shift to nearly be its own show. 

"Rather than dealing with starving and rain and the elements, you're dealing with your life, people you know, your own personal stressors," Trupp adds.

Both players share an "elastic interpretation" of the game, highlighting the original series' core themes. They don't believe strict recreation is necessary. Snider loves when when fans reach out for advice on how to produce their own series.

Another value these creators emphasize is production value. High-quality videos and edits help attract audiences and create a more immersive experience for players. 

"It ups the stakes when people feel they're on a show," Trupp says. "They feel like they're part of this reality TV universe. It may challenge people to be more interesting, some people play up to the cameras."

Contestants in the final six of Trupp's third season hang on campus lamp posts through out the night in an immunity challenge

Image: Austin trupp/youtube

The editing on both Survivor: Washington and Survivor: Maryland make them both extremely watchable. Surprisingly, Trupp says video editing is something he "picked up on the spot," despite committing to hundreds of hours of editing per season. 

"I didn't expect to be doing so much as a hobby. I've had people reach out with job options, but it's not a career path I want to take." 

Some creators do parlay their passion project into a job in television, as Survivor: Brooklyn creator Matt Pavlovich, now a segment producer for Big Brother, has done after multiple, bicoastal seasons of both Survivor and Big Brother.

While Snider's 36-hour game demands the cameras constantly roll, Trupp films his season throughout an entire semester, often requiring players to film themselves having late night discussions or strategize through google hangouts when players leave campus for a weekend. 

One student speaks to the camera during an episode of Survivor: Maryland

Image: Austin Trupp/Youtube

By giving players cameras and allowing them to film confessionals, players become more engaged in the production. Taylor Luke in Lafayette, Louisiana, hosts games of both Survivor and Big Brother. He says having confessionals helps players "process the game as it's happening" and create more nuanced strategy. 

"It's also creates the funniest moments," Luke says. He recounts a time his best friend threw an entire cup of water in the face of his younger sister after getting voted out of Survivor. Their kind of antics one wouldn't fall into if they didn't think it could create a dramatic moment in the episode. 

Unlike Snider and Trupp, Luke bases his games completely on this speed-style, split-decision strategy. Players are assigned their tribes at 7 a.m. and vote for a winner between the final three around 11 p.m.  Luke says the constant strategizing and alliance shifting he tries to stimulate with quick rounds is "the best way for me to create fatigue, so then you actually feel as if you're on the show when you become mentally and physically drained by the final rounds."

The quickness also helps Luke turn out more seasons than most. With 15 seasons of his versions of Survivor and 13 of his Big Brother, hundreds of people have traveled to his family's home to compete at the crack of dawn, many of them more than once.

It's a grueling day of mind games that leaves contestants with a special bond. Luke often receives pictures when former players run into each other, like a new friend from college and someone Luke was in middle school theater with. "It's a weird blend of everyone I've met throughout my life, and clearly a unifying experience for everyone who plays. Whether you played together or against each other."

In a recreation of Big Brother, CBS's other hit reality competition, one player host a crucial veto ceremony

Image: TayloR luke/youtube

The brief but fervent experience of homemade Survivor and Big Brother draws comparisons to escape room games. While it often calls for a bit more ruthlessness, most players don't take the competition personally considering there's no million dollar prize.

Some superfans of Survivor prefer earlier versions that replicate the physical hardships of living on an island with only a small allotment of rice, but most younger players find the strategical evolutions and variations more fascinating. 

This split mirrors the two eras of the CBS show: old school contestants who vote out physical liabilities over strategic threats, and new school players whose strategical contortions and rigid study of the game has turned Survivor into mental game before a physical one. 

The evolution into a strategic game has allowed more variations of homemade Survivor to thrive, and drawn ambitious college students to test their social prowess. Dozens have asked the creators interviewed in this article for advice on how to start their own series, most coming to fruition, on campuses from Florida to Massachusetts

One group at Ohio State recently became a legitimized student organization to film and compete on campus. Others, like Survivor: Michigan, decided to stay unaffiliated with their campus to avoid any possible regulations in production. 

What makes these series more spectacular than escape rooms are that other people can watch and enjoy them as well. The best-produced series rack up thousands of views an episode, while others unite entire towns of parents, teachers, and students across school districts and neighborhood rivals. 

My freshman year of college I played in a homemade Survivor game myself. As someone who walks around with headphones in 24/7 to avoid social interaction, I was skeptical about my ability to ensure my tribe mates liked me enough to not vote me out the first chance they got.

Had I played for more than one day I probably would have broken down under paranoia, but staying outside all day with my phone off was the perfect catharsis to drown out the chemistry class I was failing and the boy not texting me back.

Aside from the escapism of pretending your dreams of being on reality TV have finally come true, there's also truth to the name of being an epic social experiment. You learn about your ability (or lack thereof) to lie, manipulate, and mask your emotions (turns out I'm only good at the first two).

To anyone who also can't help gloating a bit when they pull ahead in Monopoly, the rush of these games are tenfold. Who knew spending hours plotting how to backstab my best friend only to meet an epic demise myself would be so fun?

It only served to prove that this growth of DIY Survivor is more than just some passing fad, and will not be voted off the island anytime soon. 

<p>In 2000 <em>Survivor</em> premiered to set a new standard for reality television. 18 years later, it&#39;s still making waves on college campuses.</p> <p>While mock Survivor tribal eliminations have existed <a href="http://insidesurvivor.com/survivor-maryland-the-best-survivor-youve-never-seen-18178" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:since the show began" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">since the show began</a>, a growing accessibility to advanced filming and editing software has allowed more fans to create their own high-quality <em>Survivor</em> games. Hundreds of series have been uploaded to YouTube over the years. Now, as the show&#39;s 36th season airs on CBS, it&#39;s college students who are taking the artistic lead, filming their own DIY versions on campuses across the nation.&#160;</p> <div><p>SEE ALSO: <a href="https://mashable.com/2018/03/02/bachelor-british-viewer/?utm_campaign=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Watercooler-Full&#38;utm_cid=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Watercooler-Full" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:7 things I learned as a British person watching &#39;The Bachelor&#39;" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">7 things I learned as a British person watching &#39;The Bachelor&#39;</a></p></div> <p>There are important twists that separate these DIY shows from televised versions. Students can&#39;t neatly mimic the island&#39;s physical landscape on their own campus lawns. University presidents are just not comfortable with &quot;castaways&quot; who spend up to 39 days acting stranded, building their own shelter, and providing themselves with food.</p> <p>Students can, however, create their own unique versions &#8212; and they sometimes go viral.</p> <p>One of the most popular recreations is Hunter Snider&#39;s <a href="https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCn7QsnaRdqxGPKYKlO7OJYw" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Survivor: Washington" class="link rapid-noclick-resp"><em>Survivor: Washington</em></a>. Filmed outside Seattle on his grandparents&#39; farm, contestants camp outside for 39 hours as they vote each other out over the course of a weekend.</p>  <p>Like the beginning of most DIY versions, Snider cast his first season with friends from school before recruiting superfans through an open casting call in the Seattle area for his second season.&#160;</p> <p>It&#39;s easy to find more than enough people who want to play in well-produced, fan-made series, Snider says. The <em>Survivor</em> community rivals that of shows like <em>RuPaul&#39;s Drag Race </em>and <em>The Bachelor</em>, with podcasts, energetic forums, and <a href="https://mashable.com/2008/05/17/tengadged/?utm_campaign=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Watercooler-Full&#38;utm_cid=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Watercooler-Full" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:whole websites" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">whole websites</a> dedicated to hosting online versions of the reality competition (And you&#39;re a monster if you judge these kids while filling out your Bach Bracket).</p> <p>Yet this lack of diversity in who plays these homemade games has been a pitfall when trying to create compelling narrative arcs within seasons and attract viewers. Casts need a variety of personalities and play styles to create a dynamic season and have characters who &quot;aren&#39;t out there strictly to play the game and not give any insight into who they are as people,&quot; Snider says.</p> <p>Austin Trupp, the creator of <em>Survivor: Maryland</em>, circumvents this problem by keeping his series exclusive to students at his school, the University of Maryland. His seasons last an entire semester, enough time for whispering roommates and screenshotted texts to rip players apart and ruin real-world friendships.</p>  <p>While a cast of college students aren&#39;t necessarily coming from all walks of life in terms of age and experience, Trupp describes them as &quot;in these flux periods,&quot; where they&#39;re trying new things and figuring out who they are.</p> <p>&quot;They&#39;re in kind of limbo in college. So once you add in that they have other friends, real lives, mutual friends, I think you get a more interesting interaction of people and clashing personalities over months of a time,&quot; Trupp says.</p> <p>It&#39;s a new iteration of the game initially branded in 2000 as a &quot;<a href="http://www.dnaindia.com/television/interview-survivor-is-an-appealing-and-dramatic-social-experiment-jeff-probst-2549192" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:social experiment" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">social experiment</a>.&quot; The format is enough of a conceptual shift to nearly be its own show.&#160;</p> <p>&quot;Rather than dealing with starving and rain and the elements, you&#39;re dealing with your life, people you know, your own personal stressors,&quot; Trupp adds.</p> <p>Both players share an &quot;elastic interpretation&quot; of the game, highlighting the original series&#39; core themes. They don&#39;t believe strict recreation is necessary. Snider loves when when fans reach out for advice on how to produce their own series.</p> <p>Another value these creators emphasize is production value. High-quality videos and edits help attract audiences and create a more immersive experience for players.&#160;</p> <p>&quot;It ups the stakes when people feel they&#39;re on a show,&quot; Trupp says. &quot;They feel like they&#39;re part of this reality TV universe. It may challenge people to be more interesting, some people play up to the cameras.&quot;</p>  <p>Contestants in the final six of Trupp&#39;s third season hang on campus lamp posts through out the night in an immunity challenge</p><div><p>Image: Austin trupp/youtube</p></div><p>The editing on both <em>Survivor: Washington</em> and <em>Survivor: Maryland </em>make them both extremely watchable. Surprisingly, Trupp says video editing is something he &quot;picked up on the spot,&quot; despite committing to hundreds of hours of editing per season.&#160;</p> <p>&quot;I didn&#39;t expect to be doing so much as a hobby. I&#39;ve had people reach out with job options, but it&#39;s not a career path I want to take.&quot;&#160;</p> <p>Some creators do parlay their passion project into a job in television, as <a href="https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCSDj1T1tr2q8tOjuwwMPXPQ" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Survivor: Brooklyn" class="link rapid-noclick-resp"><em>Survivor: Brooklyn</em></a> creator Matt Pavlovich, now a segment producer for Big Brother, has done after multiple, bicoastal seasons of both <em>Survivor</em> and<em> Big Brother.</em></p> <p>While Snider&#39;s 36-hour game demands the cameras constantly roll, Trupp films his season throughout an entire semester, often requiring players to film themselves having late night discussions or strategize through google hangouts when players leave campus for a weekend.&#160;</p>  <p>One student speaks to the camera during an episode of Survivor: Maryland</p><div><p>Image: Austin Trupp/Youtube</p></div><p>By giving players cameras and allowing them to film confessionals, players become more engaged in the production. Taylor Luke in Lafayette, Louisiana, hosts games of <a href="https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC3D7EiH7uOYL3UEPDyfWtzw" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:both Survivor and Big Brother" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">both <em>Survivor</em> and <em>Big Brothe</em>r</a>. He says having confessionals helps players &quot;process the game as it&#39;s happening&quot; and create more nuanced strategy.&#160;</p> <p>&quot;It&#39;s also creates the funniest moments,&quot; Luke says. He recounts a time his best friend threw an entire cup of water in the face of his younger sister after getting voted out of Survivor. Their kind of antics one wouldn&#39;t fall into if they didn&#39;t think it could create a dramatic moment in the episode.&#160;</p> <p>Unlike Snider and Trupp, Luke bases his games completely on this speed-style, split-decision strategy. Players are assigned their tribes at 7 a.m. and vote for a winner between the final three around 11 p.m. &#160;Luke says the constant strategizing and alliance shifting he tries to stimulate with quick rounds is &quot;the best way for me to create fatigue, so then you actually feel as if you&#39;re on the show when you become mentally and physically drained by the final rounds.&quot;</p> <p>The quickness also helps Luke turn out more seasons than most. With 15 seasons of his versions of <em>Survivo</em>r and 13 of his <em>Big Brother</em>, hundreds of people have traveled to his family&#39;s home to compete at the crack of dawn, many of them more than once.</p> <p>It&#39;s a grueling day of mind games that leaves contestants with a special bond. Luke often receives pictures when former players run into each other, like a new friend from college and someone Luke was in middle school theater with. &quot;It&#39;s a weird blend of everyone I&#39;ve met throughout my life, and clearly a unifying experience for everyone who plays. Whether you played together or against each other.&quot;</p>  <p>In a recreation of Big Brother, CBS&#39;s other hit reality competition, one player host a crucial veto ceremony</p><div><p>Image: TayloR luke/youtube</p></div><p>The brief but fervent experience of homemade <em>Survivor</em> and <em>Big Brother</em> draws comparisons to <a href="https://psmag.com/social-justice/there-are-spikes-and-snakes-please-help-me" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:escape room games" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">escape room games</a>. While it often calls for a bit more ruthlessness, most players don&#39;t take the competition personally considering there&#39;s no million dollar prize.</p> <p>Some superfans of <em>Survivor</em> prefer earlier versions that replicate the physical hardships of living on an island with only a small allotment of rice, but most younger players find the strategical evolutions and variations more fascinating.&#160;</p> <p>This split mirrors the <a href="http://datameetsmedia.com/surviving-survivors-tribal-council-old-school-and-new-school/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:two eras" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">two eras</a> of the CBS show: old school contestants who vote out physical liabilities over strategic threats, and new school players whose strategical contortions and rigid study of the game has turned Survivor into mental game before a physical one.&#160;</p> <p>The evolution into a strategic game has allowed more variations of homemade <em>Survivor</em> to thrive, and drawn ambitious college students to test their social prowess. Dozens have asked the creators interviewed in this article for advice on how to start their own series, most coming to fruition, on campuses from <a href="https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtAcyaqnxR2dugYt--Bt5eA/featured" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Florida" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Florida</a> to <a href="https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCZuh90xk54hjnx7ZV-bjlzw/featured" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Massachusetts" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Massachusetts</a>.&#160;</p> <p>One group at Ohio State recently became a <a href="https://www.thelantern.com/2016/10/students-bring-survivor-to-ohio-states-campus/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:legitimized student organization" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">legitimized student organization</a> to film and compete on campus. Others, like <em>Survivor: Michigan,</em> <a href="https://www.michigandaily.com/section/campus-life/survivor-based-show-coming-campus" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:decided" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">decided</a> to stay unaffiliated with their campus to avoid any possible regulations in production.&#160;</p> <p>What makes these series more spectacular than escape rooms are that other people can watch and enjoy them as well. The best-produced series rack up thousands of views an episode, while others unite entire towns of parents, teachers, and students across school districts and neighborhood rivals.&#160;</p> <p>My freshman year of college I played in a homemade Survivor game myself. As someone who walks around with headphones in 24/7 to avoid social interaction, I was skeptical about my ability to ensure my tribe mates liked me enough to not vote me out the first chance they got.</p> <p>Had I played for more than one day I probably would have broken down under paranoia, but staying outside all day with my phone off was the perfect catharsis to drown out the chemistry class I was failing and the boy not texting me back.</p> <p>Aside from the escapism of pretending your dreams of being on reality TV have finally come true, there&#39;s also truth to the name of being an epic social experiment. You learn about your ability (or lack thereof) to lie, manipulate, and mask your emotions (turns out I&#39;m only good at the first two).</p> <p>To anyone who also can&#39;t help gloating a bit when they pull ahead in Monopoly, the rush of these games are tenfold. Who knew spending hours plotting how to backstab my best friend only to meet an epic demise myself would be so fun?</p> <p>It only served to prove that this growth of DIY <em>Survivor</em> is more than just some passing fad, and will not be voted off the island anytime soon.&#160;</p> <div> <h2><a href="https://mashable.com/2017/11/28/jersey-shore-revival-series/?utm_campaign=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Watercooler-Full&#38;utm_cid=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Watercooler-Full" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:WATCH: MTV is bringing the &#39;Jersey Shore&#39; cast back for a wild reunion" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">WATCH: MTV is bringing the &#39;Jersey Shore&#39; cast back for a wild reunion</a></h2>  </div>
CBS's 'Survivor' is getting a second wind on college campuses

In 2000 Survivor premiered to set a new standard for reality television. 18 years later, it's still making waves on college campuses.

While mock Survivor tribal eliminations have existed since the show began, a growing accessibility to advanced filming and editing software has allowed more fans to create their own high-quality Survivor games. Hundreds of series have been uploaded to YouTube over the years. Now, as the show's 36th season airs on CBS, it's college students who are taking the artistic lead, filming their own DIY versions on campuses across the nation. 

There are important twists that separate these DIY shows from televised versions. Students can't neatly mimic the island's physical landscape on their own campus lawns. University presidents are just not comfortable with "castaways" who spend up to 39 days acting stranded, building their own shelter, and providing themselves with food.

Students can, however, create their own unique versions — and they sometimes go viral.

One of the most popular recreations is Hunter Snider's Survivor: Washington. Filmed outside Seattle on his grandparents' farm, contestants camp outside for 39 hours as they vote each other out over the course of a weekend.

Like the beginning of most DIY versions, Snider cast his first season with friends from school before recruiting superfans through an open casting call in the Seattle area for his second season. 

It's easy to find more than enough people who want to play in well-produced, fan-made series, Snider says. The Survivor community rivals that of shows like RuPaul's Drag Race and The Bachelor, with podcasts, energetic forums, and whole websites dedicated to hosting online versions of the reality competition (And you're a monster if you judge these kids while filling out your Bach Bracket).

Yet this lack of diversity in who plays these homemade games has been a pitfall when trying to create compelling narrative arcs within seasons and attract viewers. Casts need a variety of personalities and play styles to create a dynamic season and have characters who "aren't out there strictly to play the game and not give any insight into who they are as people," Snider says.

Austin Trupp, the creator of Survivor: Maryland, circumvents this problem by keeping his series exclusive to students at his school, the University of Maryland. His seasons last an entire semester, enough time for whispering roommates and screenshotted texts to rip players apart and ruin real-world friendships.

While a cast of college students aren't necessarily coming from all walks of life in terms of age and experience, Trupp describes them as "in these flux periods," where they're trying new things and figuring out who they are.

"They're in kind of limbo in college. So once you add in that they have other friends, real lives, mutual friends, I think you get a more interesting interaction of people and clashing personalities over months of a time," Trupp says.

It's a new iteration of the game initially branded in 2000 as a "social experiment." The format is enough of a conceptual shift to nearly be its own show. 

"Rather than dealing with starving and rain and the elements, you're dealing with your life, people you know, your own personal stressors," Trupp adds.

Both players share an "elastic interpretation" of the game, highlighting the original series' core themes. They don't believe strict recreation is necessary. Snider loves when when fans reach out for advice on how to produce their own series.

Another value these creators emphasize is production value. High-quality videos and edits help attract audiences and create a more immersive experience for players. 

"It ups the stakes when people feel they're on a show," Trupp says. "They feel like they're part of this reality TV universe. It may challenge people to be more interesting, some people play up to the cameras."

Contestants in the final six of Trupp's third season hang on campus lamp posts through out the night in an immunity challenge

Image: Austin trupp/youtube

The editing on both Survivor: Washington and Survivor: Maryland make them both extremely watchable. Surprisingly, Trupp says video editing is something he "picked up on the spot," despite committing to hundreds of hours of editing per season. 

"I didn't expect to be doing so much as a hobby. I've had people reach out with job options, but it's not a career path I want to take." 

Some creators do parlay their passion project into a job in television, as Survivor: Brooklyn creator Matt Pavlovich, now a segment producer for Big Brother, has done after multiple, bicoastal seasons of both Survivor and Big Brother.

While Snider's 36-hour game demands the cameras constantly roll, Trupp films his season throughout an entire semester, often requiring players to film themselves having late night discussions or strategize through google hangouts when players leave campus for a weekend. 

One student speaks to the camera during an episode of Survivor: Maryland

Image: Austin Trupp/Youtube

By giving players cameras and allowing them to film confessionals, players become more engaged in the production. Taylor Luke in Lafayette, Louisiana, hosts games of both Survivor and Big Brother. He says having confessionals helps players "process the game as it's happening" and create more nuanced strategy. 

"It's also creates the funniest moments," Luke says. He recounts a time his best friend threw an entire cup of water in the face of his younger sister after getting voted out of Survivor. Their kind of antics one wouldn't fall into if they didn't think it could create a dramatic moment in the episode. 

Unlike Snider and Trupp, Luke bases his games completely on this speed-style, split-decision strategy. Players are assigned their tribes at 7 a.m. and vote for a winner between the final three around 11 p.m.  Luke says the constant strategizing and alliance shifting he tries to stimulate with quick rounds is "the best way for me to create fatigue, so then you actually feel as if you're on the show when you become mentally and physically drained by the final rounds."

The quickness also helps Luke turn out more seasons than most. With 15 seasons of his versions of Survivor and 13 of his Big Brother, hundreds of people have traveled to his family's home to compete at the crack of dawn, many of them more than once.

It's a grueling day of mind games that leaves contestants with a special bond. Luke often receives pictures when former players run into each other, like a new friend from college and someone Luke was in middle school theater with. "It's a weird blend of everyone I've met throughout my life, and clearly a unifying experience for everyone who plays. Whether you played together or against each other."

In a recreation of Big Brother, CBS's other hit reality competition, one player host a crucial veto ceremony

Image: TayloR luke/youtube

The brief but fervent experience of homemade Survivor and Big Brother draws comparisons to escape room games. While it often calls for a bit more ruthlessness, most players don't take the competition personally considering there's no million dollar prize.

Some superfans of Survivor prefer earlier versions that replicate the physical hardships of living on an island with only a small allotment of rice, but most younger players find the strategical evolutions and variations more fascinating. 

This split mirrors the two eras of the CBS show: old school contestants who vote out physical liabilities over strategic threats, and new school players whose strategical contortions and rigid study of the game has turned Survivor into mental game before a physical one. 

The evolution into a strategic game has allowed more variations of homemade Survivor to thrive, and drawn ambitious college students to test their social prowess. Dozens have asked the creators interviewed in this article for advice on how to start their own series, most coming to fruition, on campuses from Florida to Massachusetts

One group at Ohio State recently became a legitimized student organization to film and compete on campus. Others, like Survivor: Michigan, decided to stay unaffiliated with their campus to avoid any possible regulations in production. 

What makes these series more spectacular than escape rooms are that other people can watch and enjoy them as well. The best-produced series rack up thousands of views an episode, while others unite entire towns of parents, teachers, and students across school districts and neighborhood rivals. 

My freshman year of college I played in a homemade Survivor game myself. As someone who walks around with headphones in 24/7 to avoid social interaction, I was skeptical about my ability to ensure my tribe mates liked me enough to not vote me out the first chance they got.

Had I played for more than one day I probably would have broken down under paranoia, but staying outside all day with my phone off was the perfect catharsis to drown out the chemistry class I was failing and the boy not texting me back.

Aside from the escapism of pretending your dreams of being on reality TV have finally come true, there's also truth to the name of being an epic social experiment. You learn about your ability (or lack thereof) to lie, manipulate, and mask your emotions (turns out I'm only good at the first two).

To anyone who also can't help gloating a bit when they pull ahead in Monopoly, the rush of these games are tenfold. Who knew spending hours plotting how to backstab my best friend only to meet an epic demise myself would be so fun?

It only served to prove that this growth of DIY Survivor is more than just some passing fad, and will not be voted off the island anytime soon. 

<p>In 2000 <em>Survivor</em> premiered to set a new standard for reality television. 18 years later, it&#39;s still making waves on college campuses.</p> <p>While mock Survivor tribal eliminations have existed <a href="http://insidesurvivor.com/survivor-maryland-the-best-survivor-youve-never-seen-18178" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:since the show began" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">since the show began</a>, a growing accessibility to advanced filming and editing software has allowed more fans to create their own high-quality <em>Survivor</em> games. Hundreds of series have been uploaded to YouTube over the years. Now, as the show&#39;s 36th season airs on CBS, it&#39;s college students who are taking the artistic lead, filming their own DIY versions on campuses across the nation.&#160;</p> <div><p>SEE ALSO: <a href="https://mashable.com/2018/03/02/bachelor-british-viewer/?utm_campaign=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Watercooler-Full&#38;utm_cid=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Watercooler-Full" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:7 things I learned as a British person watching &#39;The Bachelor&#39;" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">7 things I learned as a British person watching &#39;The Bachelor&#39;</a></p></div> <p>There are important twists that separate these DIY shows from televised versions. Students can&#39;t neatly mimic the island&#39;s physical landscape on their own campus lawns. University presidents are just not comfortable with &quot;castaways&quot; who spend up to 39 days acting stranded, building their own shelter, and providing themselves with food.</p> <p>Students can, however, create their own unique versions &#8212; and they sometimes go viral.</p> <p>One of the most popular recreations is Hunter Snider&#39;s <a href="https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCn7QsnaRdqxGPKYKlO7OJYw" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Survivor: Washington" class="link rapid-noclick-resp"><em>Survivor: Washington</em></a>. Filmed outside Seattle on his grandparents&#39; farm, contestants camp outside for 39 hours as they vote each other out over the course of a weekend.</p>  <p>Like the beginning of most DIY versions, Snider cast his first season with friends from school before recruiting superfans through an open casting call in the Seattle area for his second season.&#160;</p> <p>It&#39;s easy to find more than enough people who want to play in well-produced, fan-made series, Snider says. The <em>Survivor</em> community rivals that of shows like <em>RuPaul&#39;s Drag Race </em>and <em>The Bachelor</em>, with podcasts, energetic forums, and <a href="https://mashable.com/2008/05/17/tengadged/?utm_campaign=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Watercooler-Full&#38;utm_cid=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Watercooler-Full" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:whole websites" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">whole websites</a> dedicated to hosting online versions of the reality competition (And you&#39;re a monster if you judge these kids while filling out your Bach Bracket).</p> <p>Yet this lack of diversity in who plays these homemade games has been a pitfall when trying to create compelling narrative arcs within seasons and attract viewers. Casts need a variety of personalities and play styles to create a dynamic season and have characters who &quot;aren&#39;t out there strictly to play the game and not give any insight into who they are as people,&quot; Snider says.</p> <p>Austin Trupp, the creator of <em>Survivor: Maryland</em>, circumvents this problem by keeping his series exclusive to students at his school, the University of Maryland. His seasons last an entire semester, enough time for whispering roommates and screenshotted texts to rip players apart and ruin real-world friendships.</p>  <p>While a cast of college students aren&#39;t necessarily coming from all walks of life in terms of age and experience, Trupp describes them as &quot;in these flux periods,&quot; where they&#39;re trying new things and figuring out who they are.</p> <p>&quot;They&#39;re in kind of limbo in college. So once you add in that they have other friends, real lives, mutual friends, I think you get a more interesting interaction of people and clashing personalities over months of a time,&quot; Trupp says.</p> <p>It&#39;s a new iteration of the game initially branded in 2000 as a &quot;<a href="http://www.dnaindia.com/television/interview-survivor-is-an-appealing-and-dramatic-social-experiment-jeff-probst-2549192" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:social experiment" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">social experiment</a>.&quot; The format is enough of a conceptual shift to nearly be its own show.&#160;</p> <p>&quot;Rather than dealing with starving and rain and the elements, you&#39;re dealing with your life, people you know, your own personal stressors,&quot; Trupp adds.</p> <p>Both players share an &quot;elastic interpretation&quot; of the game, highlighting the original series&#39; core themes. They don&#39;t believe strict recreation is necessary. Snider loves when when fans reach out for advice on how to produce their own series.</p> <p>Another value these creators emphasize is production value. High-quality videos and edits help attract audiences and create a more immersive experience for players.&#160;</p> <p>&quot;It ups the stakes when people feel they&#39;re on a show,&quot; Trupp says. &quot;They feel like they&#39;re part of this reality TV universe. It may challenge people to be more interesting, some people play up to the cameras.&quot;</p>  <p>Contestants in the final six of Trupp&#39;s third season hang on campus lamp posts through out the night in an immunity challenge</p><div><p>Image: Austin trupp/youtube</p></div><p>The editing on both <em>Survivor: Washington</em> and <em>Survivor: Maryland </em>make them both extremely watchable. Surprisingly, Trupp says video editing is something he &quot;picked up on the spot,&quot; despite committing to hundreds of hours of editing per season.&#160;</p> <p>&quot;I didn&#39;t expect to be doing so much as a hobby. I&#39;ve had people reach out with job options, but it&#39;s not a career path I want to take.&quot;&#160;</p> <p>Some creators do parlay their passion project into a job in television, as <a href="https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCSDj1T1tr2q8tOjuwwMPXPQ" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Survivor: Brooklyn" class="link rapid-noclick-resp"><em>Survivor: Brooklyn</em></a> creator Matt Pavlovich, now a segment producer for Big Brother, has done after multiple, bicoastal seasons of both <em>Survivor</em> and<em> Big Brother.</em></p> <p>While Snider&#39;s 36-hour game demands the cameras constantly roll, Trupp films his season throughout an entire semester, often requiring players to film themselves having late night discussions or strategize through google hangouts when players leave campus for a weekend.&#160;</p>  <p>One student speaks to the camera during an episode of Survivor: Maryland</p><div><p>Image: Austin Trupp/Youtube</p></div><p>By giving players cameras and allowing them to film confessionals, players become more engaged in the production. Taylor Luke in Lafayette, Louisiana, hosts games of <a href="https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC3D7EiH7uOYL3UEPDyfWtzw" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:both Survivor and Big Brother" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">both <em>Survivor</em> and <em>Big Brothe</em>r</a>. He says having confessionals helps players &quot;process the game as it&#39;s happening&quot; and create more nuanced strategy.&#160;</p> <p>&quot;It&#39;s also creates the funniest moments,&quot; Luke says. He recounts a time his best friend threw an entire cup of water in the face of his younger sister after getting voted out of Survivor. Their kind of antics one wouldn&#39;t fall into if they didn&#39;t think it could create a dramatic moment in the episode.&#160;</p> <p>Unlike Snider and Trupp, Luke bases his games completely on this speed-style, split-decision strategy. Players are assigned their tribes at 7 a.m. and vote for a winner between the final three around 11 p.m. &#160;Luke says the constant strategizing and alliance shifting he tries to stimulate with quick rounds is &quot;the best way for me to create fatigue, so then you actually feel as if you&#39;re on the show when you become mentally and physically drained by the final rounds.&quot;</p> <p>The quickness also helps Luke turn out more seasons than most. With 15 seasons of his versions of <em>Survivo</em>r and 13 of his <em>Big Brother</em>, hundreds of people have traveled to his family&#39;s home to compete at the crack of dawn, many of them more than once.</p> <p>It&#39;s a grueling day of mind games that leaves contestants with a special bond. Luke often receives pictures when former players run into each other, like a new friend from college and someone Luke was in middle school theater with. &quot;It&#39;s a weird blend of everyone I&#39;ve met throughout my life, and clearly a unifying experience for everyone who plays. Whether you played together or against each other.&quot;</p>  <p>In a recreation of Big Brother, CBS&#39;s other hit reality competition, one player host a crucial veto ceremony</p><div><p>Image: TayloR luke/youtube</p></div><p>The brief but fervent experience of homemade <em>Survivor</em> and <em>Big Brother</em> draws comparisons to <a href="https://psmag.com/social-justice/there-are-spikes-and-snakes-please-help-me" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:escape room games" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">escape room games</a>. While it often calls for a bit more ruthlessness, most players don&#39;t take the competition personally considering there&#39;s no million dollar prize.</p> <p>Some superfans of <em>Survivor</em> prefer earlier versions that replicate the physical hardships of living on an island with only a small allotment of rice, but most younger players find the strategical evolutions and variations more fascinating.&#160;</p> <p>This split mirrors the <a href="http://datameetsmedia.com/surviving-survivors-tribal-council-old-school-and-new-school/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:two eras" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">two eras</a> of the CBS show: old school contestants who vote out physical liabilities over strategic threats, and new school players whose strategical contortions and rigid study of the game has turned Survivor into mental game before a physical one.&#160;</p> <p>The evolution into a strategic game has allowed more variations of homemade <em>Survivor</em> to thrive, and drawn ambitious college students to test their social prowess. Dozens have asked the creators interviewed in this article for advice on how to start their own series, most coming to fruition, on campuses from <a href="https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtAcyaqnxR2dugYt--Bt5eA/featured" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Florida" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Florida</a> to <a href="https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCZuh90xk54hjnx7ZV-bjlzw/featured" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Massachusetts" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Massachusetts</a>.&#160;</p> <p>One group at Ohio State recently became a <a href="https://www.thelantern.com/2016/10/students-bring-survivor-to-ohio-states-campus/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:legitimized student organization" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">legitimized student organization</a> to film and compete on campus. Others, like <em>Survivor: Michigan,</em> <a href="https://www.michigandaily.com/section/campus-life/survivor-based-show-coming-campus" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:decided" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">decided</a> to stay unaffiliated with their campus to avoid any possible regulations in production.&#160;</p> <p>What makes these series more spectacular than escape rooms are that other people can watch and enjoy them as well. The best-produced series rack up thousands of views an episode, while others unite entire towns of parents, teachers, and students across school districts and neighborhood rivals.&#160;</p> <p>My freshman year of college I played in a homemade Survivor game myself. As someone who walks around with headphones in 24/7 to avoid social interaction, I was skeptical about my ability to ensure my tribe mates liked me enough to not vote me out the first chance they got.</p> <p>Had I played for more than one day I probably would have broken down under paranoia, but staying outside all day with my phone off was the perfect catharsis to drown out the chemistry class I was failing and the boy not texting me back.</p> <p>Aside from the escapism of pretending your dreams of being on reality TV have finally come true, there&#39;s also truth to the name of being an epic social experiment. You learn about your ability (or lack thereof) to lie, manipulate, and mask your emotions (turns out I&#39;m only good at the first two).</p> <p>To anyone who also can&#39;t help gloating a bit when they pull ahead in Monopoly, the rush of these games are tenfold. Who knew spending hours plotting how to backstab my best friend only to meet an epic demise myself would be so fun?</p> <p>It only served to prove that this growth of DIY <em>Survivor</em> is more than just some passing fad, and will not be voted off the island anytime soon.&#160;</p> <div> <h2><a href="https://mashable.com/2017/11/28/jersey-shore-revival-series/?utm_campaign=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Watercooler-Full&#38;utm_cid=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Watercooler-Full" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:WATCH: MTV is bringing the &#39;Jersey Shore&#39; cast back for a wild reunion" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">WATCH: MTV is bringing the &#39;Jersey Shore&#39; cast back for a wild reunion</a></h2>  </div>
CBS's 'Survivor' is getting a second wind on college campuses

In 2000 Survivor premiered to set a new standard for reality television. 18 years later, it's still making waves on college campuses.

While mock Survivor tribal eliminations have existed since the show began, a growing accessibility to advanced filming and editing software has allowed more fans to create their own high-quality Survivor games. Hundreds of series have been uploaded to YouTube over the years. Now, as the show's 36th season airs on CBS, it's college students who are taking the artistic lead, filming their own DIY versions on campuses across the nation. 

There are important twists that separate these DIY shows from televised versions. Students can't neatly mimic the island's physical landscape on their own campus lawns. University presidents are just not comfortable with "castaways" who spend up to 39 days acting stranded, building their own shelter, and providing themselves with food.

Students can, however, create their own unique versions — and they sometimes go viral.

One of the most popular recreations is Hunter Snider's Survivor: Washington. Filmed outside Seattle on his grandparents' farm, contestants camp outside for 39 hours as they vote each other out over the course of a weekend.

Like the beginning of most DIY versions, Snider cast his first season with friends from school before recruiting superfans through an open casting call in the Seattle area for his second season. 

It's easy to find more than enough people who want to play in well-produced, fan-made series, Snider says. The Survivor community rivals that of shows like RuPaul's Drag Race and The Bachelor, with podcasts, energetic forums, and whole websites dedicated to hosting online versions of the reality competition (And you're a monster if you judge these kids while filling out your Bach Bracket).

Yet this lack of diversity in who plays these homemade games has been a pitfall when trying to create compelling narrative arcs within seasons and attract viewers. Casts need a variety of personalities and play styles to create a dynamic season and have characters who "aren't out there strictly to play the game and not give any insight into who they are as people," Snider says.

Austin Trupp, the creator of Survivor: Maryland, circumvents this problem by keeping his series exclusive to students at his school, the University of Maryland. His seasons last an entire semester, enough time for whispering roommates and screenshotted texts to rip players apart and ruin real-world friendships.

While a cast of college students aren't necessarily coming from all walks of life in terms of age and experience, Trupp describes them as "in these flux periods," where they're trying new things and figuring out who they are.

"They're in kind of limbo in college. So once you add in that they have other friends, real lives, mutual friends, I think you get a more interesting interaction of people and clashing personalities over months of a time," Trupp says.

It's a new iteration of the game initially branded in 2000 as a "social experiment." The format is enough of a conceptual shift to nearly be its own show. 

"Rather than dealing with starving and rain and the elements, you're dealing with your life, people you know, your own personal stressors," Trupp adds.

Both players share an "elastic interpretation" of the game, highlighting the original series' core themes. They don't believe strict recreation is necessary. Snider loves when when fans reach out for advice on how to produce their own series.

Another value these creators emphasize is production value. High-quality videos and edits help attract audiences and create a more immersive experience for players. 

"It ups the stakes when people feel they're on a show," Trupp says. "They feel like they're part of this reality TV universe. It may challenge people to be more interesting, some people play up to the cameras."

Contestants in the final six of Trupp's third season hang on campus lamp posts through out the night in an immunity challenge

Image: Austin trupp/youtube

The editing on both Survivor: Washington and Survivor: Maryland make them both extremely watchable. Surprisingly, Trupp says video editing is something he "picked up on the spot," despite committing to hundreds of hours of editing per season. 

"I didn't expect to be doing so much as a hobby. I've had people reach out with job options, but it's not a career path I want to take." 

Some creators do parlay their passion project into a job in television, as Survivor: Brooklyn creator Matt Pavlovich, now a segment producer for Big Brother, has done after multiple, bicoastal seasons of both Survivor and Big Brother.

While Snider's 36-hour game demands the cameras constantly roll, Trupp films his season throughout an entire semester, often requiring players to film themselves having late night discussions or strategize through google hangouts when players leave campus for a weekend. 

One student speaks to the camera during an episode of Survivor: Maryland

Image: Austin Trupp/Youtube

By giving players cameras and allowing them to film confessionals, players become more engaged in the production. Taylor Luke in Lafayette, Louisiana, hosts games of both Survivor and Big Brother. He says having confessionals helps players "process the game as it's happening" and create more nuanced strategy. 

"It's also creates the funniest moments," Luke says. He recounts a time his best friend threw an entire cup of water in the face of his younger sister after getting voted out of Survivor. Their kind of antics one wouldn't fall into if they didn't think it could create a dramatic moment in the episode. 

Unlike Snider and Trupp, Luke bases his games completely on this speed-style, split-decision strategy. Players are assigned their tribes at 7 a.m. and vote for a winner between the final three around 11 p.m.  Luke says the constant strategizing and alliance shifting he tries to stimulate with quick rounds is "the best way for me to create fatigue, so then you actually feel as if you're on the show when you become mentally and physically drained by the final rounds."

The quickness also helps Luke turn out more seasons than most. With 15 seasons of his versions of Survivor and 13 of his Big Brother, hundreds of people have traveled to his family's home to compete at the crack of dawn, many of them more than once.

It's a grueling day of mind games that leaves contestants with a special bond. Luke often receives pictures when former players run into each other, like a new friend from college and someone Luke was in middle school theater with. "It's a weird blend of everyone I've met throughout my life, and clearly a unifying experience for everyone who plays. Whether you played together or against each other."

In a recreation of Big Brother, CBS's other hit reality competition, one player host a crucial veto ceremony

Image: TayloR luke/youtube

The brief but fervent experience of homemade Survivor and Big Brother draws comparisons to escape room games. While it often calls for a bit more ruthlessness, most players don't take the competition personally considering there's no million dollar prize.

Some superfans of Survivor prefer earlier versions that replicate the physical hardships of living on an island with only a small allotment of rice, but most younger players find the strategical evolutions and variations more fascinating. 

This split mirrors the two eras of the CBS show: old school contestants who vote out physical liabilities over strategic threats, and new school players whose strategical contortions and rigid study of the game has turned Survivor into mental game before a physical one. 

The evolution into a strategic game has allowed more variations of homemade Survivor to thrive, and drawn ambitious college students to test their social prowess. Dozens have asked the creators interviewed in this article for advice on how to start their own series, most coming to fruition, on campuses from Florida to Massachusetts

One group at Ohio State recently became a legitimized student organization to film and compete on campus. Others, like Survivor: Michigan, decided to stay unaffiliated with their campus to avoid any possible regulations in production. 

What makes these series more spectacular than escape rooms are that other people can watch and enjoy them as well. The best-produced series rack up thousands of views an episode, while others unite entire towns of parents, teachers, and students across school districts and neighborhood rivals. 

My freshman year of college I played in a homemade Survivor game myself. As someone who walks around with headphones in 24/7 to avoid social interaction, I was skeptical about my ability to ensure my tribe mates liked me enough to not vote me out the first chance they got.

Had I played for more than one day I probably would have broken down under paranoia, but staying outside all day with my phone off was the perfect catharsis to drown out the chemistry class I was failing and the boy not texting me back.

Aside from the escapism of pretending your dreams of being on reality TV have finally come true, there's also truth to the name of being an epic social experiment. You learn about your ability (or lack thereof) to lie, manipulate, and mask your emotions (turns out I'm only good at the first two).

To anyone who also can't help gloating a bit when they pull ahead in Monopoly, the rush of these games are tenfold. Who knew spending hours plotting how to backstab my best friend only to meet an epic demise myself would be so fun?

It only served to prove that this growth of DIY Survivor is more than just some passing fad, and will not be voted off the island anytime soon. 

FILE - In this Feb. 18, 2018, file photo, Michigan head coach John Beilein, left, stands with Austin Hatch, center, to honor Hatch&#39;s participation with the Michigan basketball team during senior day celebrations prior to an NCAA college basketball game against Ohio State, at Crisler Center in Ann Arbor, Mich. When Michigans run to the Sweet Sixteen brought Hatch back to downtown LA this week, he was grateful for the chance to see his uncle, his extended family and his Loyola coach, Jamal Adams. They all plan to be in the stands Thursday when Michigan faces Texas A&M, with Hatch helping the Wolverines from his spot on the bench. (AP Photo/Tony Ding, File)
Crash survivor Austin Hatch back in LA with Michigan hoops
FILE - In this Feb. 18, 2018, file photo, Michigan head coach John Beilein, left, stands with Austin Hatch, center, to honor Hatch's participation with the Michigan basketball team during senior day celebrations prior to an NCAA college basketball game against Ohio State, at Crisler Center in Ann Arbor, Mich. When Michigans run to the Sweet Sixteen brought Hatch back to downtown LA this week, he was grateful for the chance to see his uncle, his extended family and his Loyola coach, Jamal Adams. They all plan to be in the stands Thursday when Michigan faces Texas A&M, with Hatch helping the Wolverines from his spot on the bench. (AP Photo/Tony Ding, File)
FILE - In this Feb. 18, 2018, file photo, Michigan head coach John Beilein, left, stands with Austin Hatch, center, to honor Hatch&#39;s participation with the Michigan basketball team during senior day celebrations prior to an NCAA college basketball game against Ohio State, at Crisler Center in Ann Arbor, Mich. When Michigan’s run to the Sweet Sixteen brought Hatch back to downtown LA this week, he was grateful for the chance to see his uncle, his extended family and his Loyola coach, Jamal Adams. They all plan to be in the stands Thursday when Michigan faces Texas A&M, with Hatch helping the Wolverines from his spot on the bench. (AP Photo/Tony Ding, File)
FILE - In this Feb. 18, 2018, file photo, Michigan head coach John Beilein, left, stands with Austin Hatch, center, to honor Hatch's participation with the Michigan basketball team during senior day celebrations prior to an NCAA college basketball game against Ohio State, at Crisler Center in Ann Arbor, Mich. When Michigan’s run to the Sweet Sixteen brought Hatch back to downtown LA this week, he was grateful for the chance to see his uncle, his extended family and his Loyola coach, Jamal Adams. They all plan to be in the stands Thursday when Michigan faces Texas A&M, with Hatch helping the Wolverines from his spot on the bench. (AP Photo/Tony Ding, File)
FILE - In this Feb. 18, 2018, file photo, Michigan head coach John Beilein, left, stands with Austin Hatch, center, to honor Hatch's participation with the Michigan basketball team during senior day celebrations prior to an NCAA college basketball game against Ohio State, at Crisler Center in Ann Arbor, Mich. When Michigan’s run to the Sweet Sixteen brought Hatch back to downtown LA this week, he was grateful for the chance to see his uncle, his extended family and his Loyola coach, Jamal Adams. They all plan to be in the stands Thursday when Michigan faces Texas A&M, with Hatch helping the Wolverines from his spot on the bench. (AP Photo/Tony Ding, File)
Central Michigan guard Presley Hudson, right, goes up to shoot against Ohio State guard Linnae Harper during the first half of a second-round game in the NCAA women&#39;s college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Sue Guevara guides Central Michigan hoops to new heights
Central Michigan guard Presley Hudson, right, goes up to shoot against Ohio State guard Linnae Harper during the first half of a second-round game in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Central Michigan guard Presley Hudson, bottom, chases the ball against Ohio State guard Sierra Calhoun during the first half of a second-round game in the NCAA women&#39;s college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Sue Guevara guides Central Michigan hoops to new heights
Central Michigan guard Presley Hudson, bottom, chases the ball against Ohio State guard Sierra Calhoun during the first half of a second-round game in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Ohio State guard Linnae Harper, left, shoots against Central Michigan forward Reyna Frost during the first half of a second-round game in the NCAA women&#39;s college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Sue Guevara guides Central Michigan hoops to new heights
Ohio State guard Linnae Harper, left, shoots against Central Michigan forward Reyna Frost during the first half of a second-round game in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Central Michigan guard Cassie Breen, right, goes up for a shot against Ohio State forward Makayla Waterman during the first half of a second-round game in the NCAA women&#39;s college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Sue Guevara guides Central Michigan hoops to new heights
Central Michigan guard Cassie Breen, right, goes up for a shot against Ohio State forward Makayla Waterman during the first half of a second-round game in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
FILE -In this Monday, March 19, 2018, file photo, Central Michigan coach Sue Guevara directs her team during the second half of a second-round game against Ohio State in the NCAA women&#39;s college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio. When Guevara took her team south to cross the border last week, the school hadn&#39;t experienced any success in the NCAA women&#39;s basketball tournament. When the players and coaches returned, they had beaten Ohio State on its home court and opened with a victory over LSU. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon, File)
Sue Guevara guides Central Michigan hoops to new heights
FILE -In this Monday, March 19, 2018, file photo, Central Michigan coach Sue Guevara directs her team during the second half of a second-round game against Ohio State in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio. When Guevara took her team south to cross the border last week, the school hadn't experienced any success in the NCAA women's basketball tournament. When the players and coaches returned, they had beaten Ohio State on its home court and opened with a victory over LSU. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon, File)
Ohio State guard Kelsey Mitchell, left, and guard Linnae Harper react to a second-round game loss to Central Michigan in the NCAA women&#39;s college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Sue Guevara guides Central Michigan hoops to new heights
Ohio State guard Kelsey Mitchell, left, and guard Linnae Harper react to a second-round game loss to Central Michigan in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Central Michigan coach Sue Guevara directs her team during the second half of a second-round game against Ohio State in the NCAA women&#39;s college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Sue Guevara guides Central Michigan hoops to new heights
Central Michigan coach Sue Guevara directs her team during the second half of a second-round game against Ohio State in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Members of the Central Michigan basketball team celebrate a second-round game victory over Ohio State in the NCAA women&#39;s college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Sue Guevara guides Central Michigan hoops to new heights
Members of the Central Michigan basketball team celebrate a second-round game victory over Ohio State in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Ohio State guard Linnae Harper, left, shoots against Central Michigan forward Reyna Frost during the first half of a second-round game in the NCAA women&#39;s college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Ohio State guard Linnae Harper, left, shoots against Central Michigan forward Reyna Frost during the first half of a second-round game in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Ohio State guard Linnae Harper, left, shoots against Central Michigan forward Reyna Frost during the first half of a second-round game in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Central Michigan guard Presley Hudson, right, goes up to shoot against Ohio State guard Linnae Harper during the first half of a second-round game in the NCAA women&#39;s college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Central Michigan guard Presley Hudson, right, goes up to shoot against Ohio State guard Linnae Harper during the first half of a second-round game in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Central Michigan guard Presley Hudson, right, goes up to shoot against Ohio State guard Linnae Harper during the first half of a second-round game in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
FILE -In this Monday, March 19, 2018, file photo, Central Michigan coach Sue Guevara directs her team during the second half of a second-round game against Ohio State in the NCAA women&#39;s college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio. When Guevara took her team south to cross the border last week, the school hadn&#39;t experienced any success in the NCAA women&#39;s basketball tournament. When the players and coaches returned, they had beaten Ohio State on its home court and opened with a victory over LSU. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon, File)
FILE -In this Monday, March 19, 2018, file photo, Central Michigan coach Sue Guevara directs her team during the second half of a second-round game against Ohio State in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio. When Guevara took her team south to cross the border last week, the school hadn't experienced any success in the NCAA women's basketball tournament. When the players and coaches returned, they had beaten Ohio State on its home court and opened with a victory over LSU. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon, File)
FILE -In this Monday, March 19, 2018, file photo, Central Michigan coach Sue Guevara directs her team during the second half of a second-round game against Ohio State in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio. When Guevara took her team south to cross the border last week, the school hadn't experienced any success in the NCAA women's basketball tournament. When the players and coaches returned, they had beaten Ohio State on its home court and opened with a victory over LSU. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon, File)
Ohio State guard Kelsey Mitchell, left, and guard Linnae Harper react to a second-round game loss to Central Michigan in the NCAA women&#39;s college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Ohio State guard Kelsey Mitchell, left, and guard Linnae Harper react to a second-round game loss to Central Michigan in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Ohio State guard Kelsey Mitchell, left, and guard Linnae Harper react to a second-round game loss to Central Michigan in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Members of the Central Michigan basketball team celebrate a second-round game victory over Ohio State in the NCAA women&#39;s college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Members of the Central Michigan basketball team celebrate a second-round game victory over Ohio State in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Members of the Central Michigan basketball team celebrate a second-round game victory over Ohio State in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
<p>The first weekend of the NCAA tournament radically reshaped the pack of national championship contenders: Half of this year’s No. 1, No. 2 and No. 3 seeds were eliminated, only one No. 4 seed remains, and a pair of No. 7, No. 9 and No. 11 seeds advanced. Five of the <a href="http://www.si.com/college-basketball/2018/03/14/ncaa-tournament-march-madness-best-teams-title-contenders" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:10 teams SI.com pegged before the tourney as most likely to win it all" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">10 teams SI.com pegged before the tourney as most likely to win it all</a> will be forced to watch the remaining rounds from their couches. Before the Sweet 16 tips off on Thursday, we’re running the same exercise with every squad left in the field.</p><h3>1. Villanova (No. 1 seed, East)</h3><p>As high-major heavyweights bowed out left and right over the first four days of the NCAAs, Villanova made quick work of its first two opponents to move on to the second weekend. After throttling No. 16 seed Radford in the round of 64, the Wildcats bombarded No. 9 seed Alabama and its sturdy defense (18th in Ken Pomeroy’s adjusted efficiency) with 17 three-pointers. This has the potential to turn into the type of searing shooting run that propelled Villanova to the program’s second national title two years ago. The Wildcats’ seasoned guards won’t be fazed by No. 5-seed West Virginia’s press on Friday. </p><h3>2. Michigan (No. 3 seed, West)</h3><p>The Wolverines had a close call against Houston on Saturday. A freshman who’d made only one of his previous 10 three-point attempts heading into the round of 32 rescued them with a deep, buzzer-beating trey that <a href="https://twitter.com/CBSSports/status/975234581937897472" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:temporarily turned 65-year-old head coach John Beilein into a 10-year-old at the neighborhood Poole party" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">temporarily turned 65-year-old head coach John Beilein into a 10-year-old at the neighborhood Poole party</a>. (Sorry, couldn’t help myself.) Michigan didn’t shoot the ball well from deep overall against the Cougars (8-of-30), but it still managed to hold Rob Gray &#38; Co. below a point per possession. The Wolverines’ defensive strength gives them a bigger margin of error than they’ve typically had during Beilein’s tenure in the event their offense dries up.</p><h3>3. Kentucky (No. 5 seed, South)</h3><p>The biggest reason the Wildcats’ national title chances look so good right now isn’t directly related to their play. It’s the mayhem that shook the South region during the tourney’s opening weekend. <a href="https://www.si.com/college-basketball/2018/03/16/ncaa-tournament-arizona-loses-buffalo-sean-miller-deandre-ayton" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:No. 4-seed Arizona was upset" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">No. 4-seed Arizona was upset</a> by No. 13-seed Buffalo. No. 11-seed Loyola-Chicago downed both <a href="https://www.si.com/college-basketball/2018/03/15/loyola-chicago-ramblers-donte-ingram-sister-jean-ncaa-tournament-tennessee" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:No. 6-seed Miami" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">No. 6-seed Miami</a> and <a href="https://www.si.com/college-basketball/2018/03/17/loyola-chicago-ramblers-sweet-16-ncaa-tournament-cincinnati-nevada" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:No. 3-seed Tennessee" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">No. 3-seed Tennessee</a>. And, most unexpectedly, <a href="https://www.si.com/college-basketball/2018/03/17/umbc-virginia-upset-sports-illustrated-digital-cover" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:No. 1-seed Virginia was bulldozed by No. 16-seed UMBC" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">No. 1-seed Virginia was bulldozed by No. 16-seed UMBC</a>. When the dust settled, Kentucky was the highest seed remaining in this quadrant of the bracket. Next up for the Wildcats is a meeting with middle-tier Big 12 squad Kansas State.</p><h3>4. Duke (No. 2 seed, Midwest)</h3><p>The college hoops world was eagerly anticipating a potential matchup between the Blue Devils and third-seeded Michigan State in the Sweet 16. Instead, Syracuse tripped up the Spartans in the second round to set up a meeting between the team with a higher ceiling than any other in the bracket and a No. 11 seed that arguably didn’t deserve to get in. Duke is familiar with the Orange’s 2–3 zone, and it beat them by 16 in Cameron Indoor Stadium less than a month ago. A potential game against No. 1-seed Kansas in the Elite Eight looms if the Blue Devils can notch a similar result against Syracuse on Friday.</p><h3>5. Kansas (No. 1 seed, Midwest)</h3><p>The Jayhawks’ path to San Antonio is manageable in the short term. All they need to do to get to the Elite Eight is handle a Clemson team that ranked 11th in the ACC offensively on a per-possession basis during conference play. Things get more challenging after that, with Duke likely standing between Kansas and its first Final Four appearance in six years. The good news for the Jayhawks is that sophomore big man Udoka Azubuike is making progress recovering from the knee injury that sidelined him for the Big 12 tournament and limited him to only three minutes in the first-round win over Penn. Azubuike logged 22 minutes against Seton Hall on Saturday.</p><h3>6. Texas Tech (No. 3 seed, East)</h3><p>The Red Raiders sputtered toward the end of the regular season, dropping four consecutive games against Baylor, Oklahoma State, Kansas and West Virginia before a March 3 win over TCU, as senior point guard Keenan Evans nursed a toe injury. If the toe is still bothering Evans, it didn’t prevent him from lifting Texas Tech into the Sweet 16 by combining to score 45 points on 58.3% shooting in wins against No. 14-seed Stephen F. Austin and No. 6-seed Florida over the weekend. With Evans operating at the peak of his powers, the Red Raiders could well be the strongest team from the nation’s most challenging conference.</p><h3>7. Gonzaga (No. 4 seed, West)</h3><p>A year after reaching the national title game on the strength of a veteran-heavy lineup, the Zags have ridden a group of talented underclassmen to their fourth Sweet 16 in a row. Redshirt freshman Zach Norvell Jr. was the hero in Saturday’s 90–84 conquest of Ohio State, connecting on six of his 11 three-point tries in a 28-point showing. If his shots aren’t falling, Gonzaga can turn to one of two promising sophomore forwards, 6&#39;8&quot; Rui Hachimura and 6&#39;10&quot; Killian Tillie. The Zags are one of only two teams left in the bracket that rank in the top 15 of Pomeroy’s adjusted offensive and defensive efficiency. (Duke is the other one.)</p><h3>8. Purdue (No. 2 seed, East)</h3><p>Whether or not mammoth center <a href="https://www.si.com/college-basketball/2018/03/18/isaac-haas-fractured-right-elbow-purdue-ncaa-tournament" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Isaac Haas makes a miraculous return to the court" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Isaac Haas makes a miraculous return to the court</a> after fracturing his right elbow in Friday’s opening-round win over Cal State–Fullerton, the Boilermakers have enough offensive firepower to compromise Texas Tech’s stout defense, which ranks fourth in Pomeroy’s adjusted efficiency. This matchup could boil down to Purdue’s ability to hold its own on the other end of the floor. Evans’s bucket-getting prowess isn’t in question, and the Boilermakers also will have to account for a pair of freshman wings, Zhaire Smith and Jarrett Culver, capable of burning opponents from both sides of the three-point arc.</p><h3>9. West Virginia (No. 5 seed, East)</h3><p>The biggest hurdle the Mountaineers need to clear to cut down the nets is their Sweet 16 matchup with No. 1-seed Villanova on Friday. West Virginia will spend 40 minutes trying to turn over a Wildcats team with a deep cast of talented guards that has given the ball away on only 14.7% of its possessions this season, good for 11th in the country. Failing that, the Mountaineers will count on senior point guard Jevon Carter locking down his counterpart, National Player of the Year candidate Jalen Brunson, while delivering his third consecutive game with 20 or more points while making at least half of his shot attempts.</p><h3>10. Loyola-Chicago (No. 11 seed, South)</h3><p>The Ramblers looked like one of the mid-major ranks’ best teams on Selection Sunday, and the Missouri Valley Conference champs confirmed that by beating Miami in the first round on Thursday and Tennessee in the second round on Saturday. The fact that both of those wins were decided by one-possession margins could be framed as an indication of Loyola-Chicago’s precarious survival so far. Alternatively, it could be viewed as evidence that the basketball gods are looking favorably upon the Ramblers. Either way, the South is up for grabs, and Loyola-Chicago is in position to capitalize.</p><h3>11. Clemson (No. 5 seed, Midwest)</h3><p>Clemson silenced upset-minded bracket-fillers who picked No. 12-seed New Mexico State in the first round with an 11-point win over the Aggies and followed up with one of the most impressive Ws of the tourney to date, a 31-point beatdown of Auburn in which it allowed only 0.75 points per possession. The Tigers will have a harder time taming Kansas’s offense, which ranks fifth in Pomeroy’s adjusted efficiency and includes three players who have taken 180 or more three-point attempts and made at least 40% of them. A win there would likely earn Clemson an Elite Eight battle with Duke.</p><h3>12. Texas A&#38;M (No. 7 seed, West)</h3><p>What a strange season this has been for the Aggies. Texas A&#38;M rose as high as No. 5 in the AP Top 25 Poll while winning 11 of its first 12 games, only to drop seven of its next nine and ultimately head into the SEC tournament with a 9–9 league record. Yet after <a href="https://www.si.com/college-basketball/2018/03/18/texas-am-beats-north-carolina-ncaa-tournament" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:whipping No. 2-seed North Carolina in the second round on Sunday" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">whipping No. 2-seed North Carolina in the second round on Sunday</a>, the Aggies now stand a win over Michigan away from the program’s first Elite Eight berth. It won’t be a gimme: Texas A&#38;M has not faced a defense as formidable as the Wolverines’ (third in Pomeroy’s adjusted efficiency) so far in 2017–18.</p><h3>13. Nevada (No. 7 seed, South)</h3><p>The Wolf Pack held a lead for less than five of the 85 total minutes they played during their two wins over No. 10-seed Texas and No. 2-seed Cincinnati. Nevada isn’t going to be able to keep digging itself out of double-digit deficits in the second half, but it may not face another one of those this weekend. First, the Wolf Pack get Loyola-Chicago, whose defense rates among the best outside the high-major conferences (27th in Pomeroy’s adjusted efficiency) but isn’t as stifling as the ones Nevada took on in the first two rounds. Send the Ramblers packing, and the Wolf Pack should meet Kentucky with a Final Four berth on the line.</p><h3>14. Florida State (No. 9 seed, West)</h3><p>When the bracket was released a little more than a week ago, it was hard to imagine this Seminoles team would advance further than the one that won 26 games and earned a No. 3 seed last season. Alas, not only is Florida State in the Sweet 16 for the first time in seven years, it got there by eliminating the program (Xavier) that denied the Seminoles a place in the same round of last year’s tourney. Florida State has size and depth, and that might be enough to put a scare into Gonzaga on Thursday. Either Michigan or Texas A&#38;M would be next.</p><h3>15. Kansas State (No. 9 seed, South)</h3><p>These Wildcats will forever be linked to one of the most astonishing upsets in college basketball history. Two days after UMBC stunned Virginia in Charlotte, the Retrievers’ run came to an end at the hands of this year’s fourth-place finishers in the Big 12. The chaos in the South region could enable Kansas State to add a Final Four trip to its 2018 tourney legacy, though that will require taking down a Kentucky team that seems to be hitting its stride after a turbulent regular season. One ray of hope: Leading scorer and rebounder Dean Wade, a 6&#39;10&quot; junior forward who suffered a stress fracture in his foot earlier this month, said he is <a href="https://twitter.com/KellisRobinett/status/975570873703915520" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:“like 98% sure”" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">“like 98% sure”</a> he’ll suit up on Thursday.</p><h3>16. Syracuse (No. 11 seed, Midwest)</h3><p>The Orange were fortunate to hear their name called on Selection Sunday, but head coach Jim Boeheim should be commended for lifting a young, thin squad with a punchless offense to three tournament wins, the most recent of which came over popular preseason national championship pick Michigan State. Syracuse would have had more upward mobility in a different quadrant of the bracket, but it had the misfortune of being placed in the same region as ACC competitor and No. 2 seed Duke. The Blue Devils shouldn’t have any issues picking apart the Orange’s zone, and good shots will be hard to come by for Syracuse against Duke’s own zone.</p>
Ranking the National Championship Chances of Every Sweet 16 Team

The first weekend of the NCAA tournament radically reshaped the pack of national championship contenders: Half of this year’s No. 1, No. 2 and No. 3 seeds were eliminated, only one No. 4 seed remains, and a pair of No. 7, No. 9 and No. 11 seeds advanced. Five of the 10 teams SI.com pegged before the tourney as most likely to win it all will be forced to watch the remaining rounds from their couches. Before the Sweet 16 tips off on Thursday, we’re running the same exercise with every squad left in the field.

1. Villanova (No. 1 seed, East)

As high-major heavyweights bowed out left and right over the first four days of the NCAAs, Villanova made quick work of its first two opponents to move on to the second weekend. After throttling No. 16 seed Radford in the round of 64, the Wildcats bombarded No. 9 seed Alabama and its sturdy defense (18th in Ken Pomeroy’s adjusted efficiency) with 17 three-pointers. This has the potential to turn into the type of searing shooting run that propelled Villanova to the program’s second national title two years ago. The Wildcats’ seasoned guards won’t be fazed by No. 5-seed West Virginia’s press on Friday.

2. Michigan (No. 3 seed, West)

The Wolverines had a close call against Houston on Saturday. A freshman who’d made only one of his previous 10 three-point attempts heading into the round of 32 rescued them with a deep, buzzer-beating trey that temporarily turned 65-year-old head coach John Beilein into a 10-year-old at the neighborhood Poole party. (Sorry, couldn’t help myself.) Michigan didn’t shoot the ball well from deep overall against the Cougars (8-of-30), but it still managed to hold Rob Gray & Co. below a point per possession. The Wolverines’ defensive strength gives them a bigger margin of error than they’ve typically had during Beilein’s tenure in the event their offense dries up.

3. Kentucky (No. 5 seed, South)

The biggest reason the Wildcats’ national title chances look so good right now isn’t directly related to their play. It’s the mayhem that shook the South region during the tourney’s opening weekend. No. 4-seed Arizona was upset by No. 13-seed Buffalo. No. 11-seed Loyola-Chicago downed both No. 6-seed Miami and No. 3-seed Tennessee. And, most unexpectedly, No. 1-seed Virginia was bulldozed by No. 16-seed UMBC. When the dust settled, Kentucky was the highest seed remaining in this quadrant of the bracket. Next up for the Wildcats is a meeting with middle-tier Big 12 squad Kansas State.

4. Duke (No. 2 seed, Midwest)

The college hoops world was eagerly anticipating a potential matchup between the Blue Devils and third-seeded Michigan State in the Sweet 16. Instead, Syracuse tripped up the Spartans in the second round to set up a meeting between the team with a higher ceiling than any other in the bracket and a No. 11 seed that arguably didn’t deserve to get in. Duke is familiar with the Orange’s 2–3 zone, and it beat them by 16 in Cameron Indoor Stadium less than a month ago. A potential game against No. 1-seed Kansas in the Elite Eight looms if the Blue Devils can notch a similar result against Syracuse on Friday.

5. Kansas (No. 1 seed, Midwest)

The Jayhawks’ path to San Antonio is manageable in the short term. All they need to do to get to the Elite Eight is handle a Clemson team that ranked 11th in the ACC offensively on a per-possession basis during conference play. Things get more challenging after that, with Duke likely standing between Kansas and its first Final Four appearance in six years. The good news for the Jayhawks is that sophomore big man Udoka Azubuike is making progress recovering from the knee injury that sidelined him for the Big 12 tournament and limited him to only three minutes in the first-round win over Penn. Azubuike logged 22 minutes against Seton Hall on Saturday.

6. Texas Tech (No. 3 seed, East)

The Red Raiders sputtered toward the end of the regular season, dropping four consecutive games against Baylor, Oklahoma State, Kansas and West Virginia before a March 3 win over TCU, as senior point guard Keenan Evans nursed a toe injury. If the toe is still bothering Evans, it didn’t prevent him from lifting Texas Tech into the Sweet 16 by combining to score 45 points on 58.3% shooting in wins against No. 14-seed Stephen F. Austin and No. 6-seed Florida over the weekend. With Evans operating at the peak of his powers, the Red Raiders could well be the strongest team from the nation’s most challenging conference.

7. Gonzaga (No. 4 seed, West)

A year after reaching the national title game on the strength of a veteran-heavy lineup, the Zags have ridden a group of talented underclassmen to their fourth Sweet 16 in a row. Redshirt freshman Zach Norvell Jr. was the hero in Saturday’s 90–84 conquest of Ohio State, connecting on six of his 11 three-point tries in a 28-point showing. If his shots aren’t falling, Gonzaga can turn to one of two promising sophomore forwards, 6'8" Rui Hachimura and 6'10" Killian Tillie. The Zags are one of only two teams left in the bracket that rank in the top 15 of Pomeroy’s adjusted offensive and defensive efficiency. (Duke is the other one.)

8. Purdue (No. 2 seed, East)

Whether or not mammoth center Isaac Haas makes a miraculous return to the court after fracturing his right elbow in Friday’s opening-round win over Cal State–Fullerton, the Boilermakers have enough offensive firepower to compromise Texas Tech’s stout defense, which ranks fourth in Pomeroy’s adjusted efficiency. This matchup could boil down to Purdue’s ability to hold its own on the other end of the floor. Evans’s bucket-getting prowess isn’t in question, and the Boilermakers also will have to account for a pair of freshman wings, Zhaire Smith and Jarrett Culver, capable of burning opponents from both sides of the three-point arc.

9. West Virginia (No. 5 seed, East)

The biggest hurdle the Mountaineers need to clear to cut down the nets is their Sweet 16 matchup with No. 1-seed Villanova on Friday. West Virginia will spend 40 minutes trying to turn over a Wildcats team with a deep cast of talented guards that has given the ball away on only 14.7% of its possessions this season, good for 11th in the country. Failing that, the Mountaineers will count on senior point guard Jevon Carter locking down his counterpart, National Player of the Year candidate Jalen Brunson, while delivering his third consecutive game with 20 or more points while making at least half of his shot attempts.

10. Loyola-Chicago (No. 11 seed, South)

The Ramblers looked like one of the mid-major ranks’ best teams on Selection Sunday, and the Missouri Valley Conference champs confirmed that by beating Miami in the first round on Thursday and Tennessee in the second round on Saturday. The fact that both of those wins were decided by one-possession margins could be framed as an indication of Loyola-Chicago’s precarious survival so far. Alternatively, it could be viewed as evidence that the basketball gods are looking favorably upon the Ramblers. Either way, the South is up for grabs, and Loyola-Chicago is in position to capitalize.

11. Clemson (No. 5 seed, Midwest)

Clemson silenced upset-minded bracket-fillers who picked No. 12-seed New Mexico State in the first round with an 11-point win over the Aggies and followed up with one of the most impressive Ws of the tourney to date, a 31-point beatdown of Auburn in which it allowed only 0.75 points per possession. The Tigers will have a harder time taming Kansas’s offense, which ranks fifth in Pomeroy’s adjusted efficiency and includes three players who have taken 180 or more three-point attempts and made at least 40% of them. A win there would likely earn Clemson an Elite Eight battle with Duke.

12. Texas A&M (No. 7 seed, West)

What a strange season this has been for the Aggies. Texas A&M rose as high as No. 5 in the AP Top 25 Poll while winning 11 of its first 12 games, only to drop seven of its next nine and ultimately head into the SEC tournament with a 9–9 league record. Yet after whipping No. 2-seed North Carolina in the second round on Sunday, the Aggies now stand a win over Michigan away from the program’s first Elite Eight berth. It won’t be a gimme: Texas A&M has not faced a defense as formidable as the Wolverines’ (third in Pomeroy’s adjusted efficiency) so far in 2017–18.

13. Nevada (No. 7 seed, South)

The Wolf Pack held a lead for less than five of the 85 total minutes they played during their two wins over No. 10-seed Texas and No. 2-seed Cincinnati. Nevada isn’t going to be able to keep digging itself out of double-digit deficits in the second half, but it may not face another one of those this weekend. First, the Wolf Pack get Loyola-Chicago, whose defense rates among the best outside the high-major conferences (27th in Pomeroy’s adjusted efficiency) but isn’t as stifling as the ones Nevada took on in the first two rounds. Send the Ramblers packing, and the Wolf Pack should meet Kentucky with a Final Four berth on the line.

14. Florida State (No. 9 seed, West)

When the bracket was released a little more than a week ago, it was hard to imagine this Seminoles team would advance further than the one that won 26 games and earned a No. 3 seed last season. Alas, not only is Florida State in the Sweet 16 for the first time in seven years, it got there by eliminating the program (Xavier) that denied the Seminoles a place in the same round of last year’s tourney. Florida State has size and depth, and that might be enough to put a scare into Gonzaga on Thursday. Either Michigan or Texas A&M would be next.

15. Kansas State (No. 9 seed, South)

These Wildcats will forever be linked to one of the most astonishing upsets in college basketball history. Two days after UMBC stunned Virginia in Charlotte, the Retrievers’ run came to an end at the hands of this year’s fourth-place finishers in the Big 12. The chaos in the South region could enable Kansas State to add a Final Four trip to its 2018 tourney legacy, though that will require taking down a Kentucky team that seems to be hitting its stride after a turbulent regular season. One ray of hope: Leading scorer and rebounder Dean Wade, a 6'10" junior forward who suffered a stress fracture in his foot earlier this month, said he is “like 98% sure” he’ll suit up on Thursday.

16. Syracuse (No. 11 seed, Midwest)

The Orange were fortunate to hear their name called on Selection Sunday, but head coach Jim Boeheim should be commended for lifting a young, thin squad with a punchless offense to three tournament wins, the most recent of which came over popular preseason national championship pick Michigan State. Syracuse would have had more upward mobility in a different quadrant of the bracket, but it had the misfortune of being placed in the same region as ACC competitor and No. 2 seed Duke. The Blue Devils shouldn’t have any issues picking apart the Orange’s zone, and good shots will be hard to come by for Syracuse against Duke’s own zone.

Central Michigan forward Reyna Frost, left, and teammate forward Tinara Moore, right, work for a rebound against Ohio State guard Sierra Calhoun, center, during a second-round game in the NCAA women&#39;s college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Central Michigan forward Reyna Frost, left, and teammate forward Tinara Moore, right, work for a rebound against Ohio State guard Sierra Calhoun, center, during a second-round game in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Central Michigan forward Reyna Frost, left, and teammate forward Tinara Moore, right, work for a rebound against Ohio State guard Sierra Calhoun, center, during a second-round game in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Central Michigan guard Presley Hudson, left, drives against Ohio State forward Alexa Hart during a second-round game in the NCAA women&#39;s college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Central Michigan guard Presley Hudson, left, drives against Ohio State forward Alexa Hart during a second-round game in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Central Michigan guard Presley Hudson, left, drives against Ohio State forward Alexa Hart during a second-round game in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Central Michigan forward Tinara Moore, left, grabs a rebound against Ohio State forward Stephanie Mavunga during a second-round game in the NCAA women&#39;s college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Central Michigan forward Tinara Moore, left, grabs a rebound against Ohio State forward Stephanie Mavunga during a second-round game in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Central Michigan forward Tinara Moore, left, grabs a rebound against Ohio State forward Stephanie Mavunga during a second-round game in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Central Michigan guard Presley Hudson, center, reaches for a loose ball against Ohio State guard Kelsey Mitchell, left, and forward Stephanie Mavunga during a second-round game in the NCAA women&#39;s college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Central Michigan guard Presley Hudson, center, reaches for a loose ball against Ohio State guard Kelsey Mitchell, left, and forward Stephanie Mavunga during a second-round game in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Central Michigan guard Presley Hudson, center, reaches for a loose ball against Ohio State guard Kelsey Mitchell, left, and forward Stephanie Mavunga during a second-round game in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Ohio State forward Alexa Hart, right, goes up for a shot against Central Michigan forward Tinara Moore during a second-round game in the NCAA women&#39;s college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Ohio State forward Alexa Hart, right, goes up for a shot against Central Michigan forward Tinara Moore during a second-round game in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Ohio State forward Alexa Hart, right, goes up for a shot against Central Michigan forward Tinara Moore during a second-round game in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Ohio State cheerleaders perform during a second-round game against Central Michigan in the NCAA women&#39;s college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Ohio State cheerleaders perform during a second-round game against Central Michigan in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Ohio State cheerleaders perform during a second-round game against Central Michigan in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Ohio State guard Asia Doss, center, goes up for a shot between Central Michigan guard Micaela Kelly, left, and guard Presley Hudson during a second-round game in the NCAA women&#39;s college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Ohio State guard Asia Doss, center, goes up for a shot between Central Michigan guard Micaela Kelly, left, and guard Presley Hudson during a second-round game in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Ohio State guard Asia Doss, center, goes up for a shot between Central Michigan guard Micaela Kelly, left, and guard Presley Hudson during a second-round game in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Ohio State guard Kelsey Mitchell, left, goes up for a shot against Central Michigan guard Micaela Kelly during a second-round game in the NCAA women&#39;s college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Ohio State guard Kelsey Mitchell, left, goes up for a shot against Central Michigan guard Micaela Kelly during a second-round game in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Ohio State guard Kelsey Mitchell, left, goes up for a shot against Central Michigan guard Micaela Kelly during a second-round game in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Ohio State guard Sierra Calhoun, right, goes up for a shot against Central Michigan guard Presley Hudson during a second-round game in the NCAA women&#39;s college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Ohio State guard Sierra Calhoun, right, goes up for a shot against Central Michigan guard Presley Hudson during a second-round game in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Ohio State guard Sierra Calhoun, right, goes up for a shot against Central Michigan guard Presley Hudson during a second-round game in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Central Michigan guard Presley Hudson, right, drives against Ohio State guard Asia Doss during a second-round game in the NCAA women&#39;s college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Central Michigan guard Presley Hudson, right, drives against Ohio State guard Asia Doss during a second-round game in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Central Michigan guard Presley Hudson, right, drives against Ohio State guard Asia Doss during a second-round game in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Central Michigan guard Micaela Kelly, left, works for a loose ball against Ohio State guard Asia Doss during a second-round game in the NCAA women&#39;s college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Central Michigan guard Micaela Kelly, left, works for a loose ball against Ohio State guard Asia Doss during a second-round game in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Central Michigan guard Micaela Kelly, left, works for a loose ball against Ohio State guard Asia Doss during a second-round game in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Ohio State guard Asia Doss, right, drives against Central Michigan guard Micaela Kelly during a second-round game in the NCAA women&#39;s college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Ohio State guard Asia Doss, right, drives against Central Michigan guard Micaela Kelly during a second-round game in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Ohio State guard Asia Doss, right, drives against Central Michigan guard Micaela Kelly during a second-round game in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Central Michigan forward Tinara Moore, center, works against Ohio State forward Stephanie Mavunga, left, and guard Kelsey Mitchell during a second-round game in the NCAA women&#39;s college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Central Michigan forward Tinara Moore, center, works against Ohio State forward Stephanie Mavunga, left, and guard Kelsey Mitchell during a second-round game in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Central Michigan forward Tinara Moore, center, works against Ohio State forward Stephanie Mavunga, left, and guard Kelsey Mitchell during a second-round game in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Central Michigan guard Presley Hudson drives against Ohio State during a second-round game in the NCAA women&#39;s college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Central Michigan guard Presley Hudson drives against Ohio State during a second-round game in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Central Michigan guard Presley Hudson drives against Ohio State during a second-round game in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Central Michigan guard Cassie Breen drives against Ohio State during a second-round game in the NCAA women&#39;s college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Central Michigan guard Cassie Breen drives against Ohio State during a second-round game in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Central Michigan guard Cassie Breen drives against Ohio State during a second-round game in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Ohio State guard Linnae Harper, right, drives against Central Michigan guard Micaela Kelly during a second-round game in the NCAA women&#39;s college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Ohio State guard Linnae Harper, right, drives against Central Michigan guard Micaela Kelly during a second-round game in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Ohio State guard Linnae Harper, right, drives against Central Michigan guard Micaela Kelly during a second-round game in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Central Michigan guard Cassie Breen, left, drives against Ohio State guard Kelsey Mitchell during a second-round game in the NCAA women&#39;s college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Central Michigan guard Cassie Breen, left, drives against Ohio State guard Kelsey Mitchell during a second-round game in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Central Michigan guard Cassie Breen, left, drives against Ohio State guard Kelsey Mitchell during a second-round game in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Central Michigan guard Presley Hudson, left, drives against Ohio State guard Kelsey Mitchell during a second-round game in the NCAA women&#39;s college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Central Michigan guard Presley Hudson, left, drives against Ohio State guard Kelsey Mitchell during a second-round game in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Central Michigan guard Presley Hudson, left, drives against Ohio State guard Kelsey Mitchell during a second-round game in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Ohio State guard Sierra Calhoun, left, goes up for a shot against Central Michigan guard Micaela Kelly during a second-round game in the NCAA women&#39;s college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Ohio State guard Sierra Calhoun, left, goes up for a shot against Central Michigan guard Micaela Kelly during a second-round game in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Ohio State guard Sierra Calhoun, left, goes up for a shot against Central Michigan guard Micaela Kelly during a second-round game in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Central Michigan forward Tinara Moore, left, works against Ohio State forward Stephanie Mavunga during a second-round game in the NCAA women&#39;s college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Central Michigan forward Tinara Moore, left, works against Ohio State forward Stephanie Mavunga during a second-round game in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Central Michigan forward Tinara Moore, left, works against Ohio State forward Stephanie Mavunga during a second-round game in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Ohio State forward Stephanie Mavunga goes up for a shot against Central Michigan during a second-round game in the NCAA women&#39;s college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Ohio State forward Stephanie Mavunga goes up for a shot against Central Michigan during a second-round game in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Ohio State forward Stephanie Mavunga goes up for a shot against Central Michigan during a second-round game in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Central Michigan guard Cassie Breen, left, goes up for a shot against Ohio State guard Kelsey Mitchell during a second-round game in the NCAA women&#39;s college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Central Michigan guard Cassie Breen, left, goes up for a shot against Ohio State guard Kelsey Mitchell during a second-round game in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Central Michigan guard Cassie Breen, left, goes up for a shot against Ohio State guard Kelsey Mitchell during a second-round game in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Ohio State guard Kelsey Mitchell, right, drives against Central Michigan forward Tinara Moore during a second-round game in the NCAA women&#39;s college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Ohio State guard Kelsey Mitchell, right, drives against Central Michigan forward Tinara Moore during a second-round game in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Ohio State guard Kelsey Mitchell, right, drives against Central Michigan forward Tinara Moore during a second-round game in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Ohio State forward Alexa Hart goes up for a shot against Central Michigan during a second-round game in the NCAA women&#39;s college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Ohio State forward Alexa Hart goes up for a shot against Central Michigan during a second-round game in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Ohio State forward Alexa Hart goes up for a shot against Central Michigan during a second-round game in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Ohio State guard Linnae Harper drives against Central Michigan during a second-round game in the NCAA women&#39;s college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Ohio State guard Linnae Harper drives against Central Michigan during a second-round game in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)
Ohio State guard Linnae Harper drives against Central Michigan during a second-round game in the NCAA women's college basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, Monday, March 19, 2018. Central Michigan won 95-78. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)

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