Michael Phelps vs. Ryan Lochte at Olympic trials

Michael Phelps and Ryan Lochte battle it out at the U.S. Olympic swimming trials in Omaha.

Michael Phelps opened up about his experience with depression, anxiety, and suicidal thoughts to CNN this week at the Kennedy Forum.
Michael Phelps opens up about depression and contemplating suicide
Michael Phelps opened up about his experience with depression, anxiety, and suicidal thoughts to CNN this week at the Kennedy Forum.
Michael Phelps opened up about his experience with depression, anxiety, and suicidal thoughts to CNN this week at the Kennedy Forum.
Michael Phelps opens up about depression and contemplating suicide
Michael Phelps opened up about his experience with depression, anxiety, and suicidal thoughts to CNN this week at the Kennedy Forum.
Michael Phelps opens up about depression and contemplating suicide
Michael Phelps opens up about depression and contemplating suicide
Michael Phelps opens up about depression and contemplating suicide
Despite being the greatest Olympian of all-time and an American legend, 23-time gold medalist swimmer Michael Phelps says he contemplated suicide shortly after the 2012 Games in London.
Michael Phelps Says He Contemplated Suicide After 2012 Olympics
Despite being the greatest Olympian of all-time and an American legend, 23-time gold medalist swimmer Michael Phelps says he contemplated suicide shortly after the 2012 Games in London.
<p>Despite being the greatest Olympian of all-time and an American legend, 23-time gold medalist swimmer Michael Phelps says he contemplated suicide shortly after the 2012 Games in London. </p><p>Phelps, 32, made the comments earlier this week in a discussion with political strategist David Axelrod at the fourth annual conference of the Kennedy Forum, a mental health advocacy group. </p><p>&quot;Really, after every Olympics I think I fell into a major state of depression,&quot; Phelps said, <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2018/01/19/health/michael-phelps-depression/index.html?sr=twCNN011918michael-phelps-depression0534PMVODtop" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:per CNN" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">per CNN</a>. He said his lowest point came after the 2012 Olympics—in which he won four gold medals and two silvers—and that he spent multiple days in his room, barely eating or sleeping. </p><p>&quot;I didn&#39;t want to be in the sport anymore,&quot; he said. &quot;I didn&#39;t want to be alive.&quot; He would later say, when asked about his darkest moments, &quot;You do contemplate suicide.&quot;</p><p>Phelps said his condition improved when he started to talk about his feelings. His Michael Phelps foundation now offers stress management programs and says his ability to help those struggling has been &quot;way more powerful&quot; than any of his athletic achievements. </p><p>&quot;Those moments and those feelings and those emotions for me are light years better than winning the Olympic gold medal,&quot; he said.<br>&quot;I am extremely thankful that I did not take my life.&quot;</p><p>Since his retirement after the 2016 Games in Rio, Phelps has been outspoken about his past battles with depression and anxiety. He said in August that he <a href="https://www.si.com/olympics/2017/08/30/michael-phelps-contemplated-suicide" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:also contemplated suicide after his second DUI arrest" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">also contemplated suicide after his second DUI arrest</a>, which came in 2014. </p>
Michael Phelps Says He Contemplated Suicide After 2012 Olympics

Despite being the greatest Olympian of all-time and an American legend, 23-time gold medalist swimmer Michael Phelps says he contemplated suicide shortly after the 2012 Games in London.

Phelps, 32, made the comments earlier this week in a discussion with political strategist David Axelrod at the fourth annual conference of the Kennedy Forum, a mental health advocacy group.

"Really, after every Olympics I think I fell into a major state of depression," Phelps said, per CNN. He said his lowest point came after the 2012 Olympics—in which he won four gold medals and two silvers—and that he spent multiple days in his room, barely eating or sleeping.

"I didn't want to be in the sport anymore," he said. "I didn't want to be alive." He would later say, when asked about his darkest moments, "You do contemplate suicide."

Phelps said his condition improved when he started to talk about his feelings. His Michael Phelps foundation now offers stress management programs and says his ability to help those struggling has been "way more powerful" than any of his athletic achievements.

"Those moments and those feelings and those emotions for me are light years better than winning the Olympic gold medal," he said.
"I am extremely thankful that I did not take my life."

Since his retirement after the 2016 Games in Rio, Phelps has been outspoken about his past battles with depression and anxiety. He said in August that he also contemplated suicide after his second DUI arrest, which came in 2014.

Phelps the hedgehog was found outside in November, unable to use his back legs. Animal experts say hedgehogs don&#39;t do well in cold elements! Phelps was taken to the Scottish SPCA who has been encouraging him to strengthen his weak hind legs with hydrotherapy. Phelps has been working hard swimming laps so he&#39;ll be ready for release once the weather gets warm. Look out, Michael Phelps! InsideEdition.com&#39;s Keleigh Nealon (https://twitter.com/KeleighNealon) has more.
Injured Hedgehog Named After Michael Phelps Swims Laps in Pint-Sized Pool
Phelps the hedgehog was found outside in November, unable to use his back legs. Animal experts say hedgehogs don't do well in cold elements! Phelps was taken to the Scottish SPCA who has been encouraging him to strengthen his weak hind legs with hydrotherapy. Phelps has been working hard swimming laps so he'll be ready for release once the weather gets warm. Look out, Michael Phelps! InsideEdition.com's Keleigh Nealon (https://twitter.com/KeleighNealon) has more.
Phelps the hedgehog was found outside in November, unable to use his back legs. Animal experts say hedgehogs don&#39;t do well in cold elements! Phelps was taken to the Scottish SPCA who has been encouraging him to strengthen his weak hind legs with hydrotherapy. Phelps has been working hard swimming laps so he&#39;ll be ready for release once the weather gets warm. Look out, Michael Phelps! InsideEdition.com&#39;s Keleigh Nealon (https://twitter.com/KeleighNealon) has more.
Injured Hedgehog Named After Michael Phelps Swims Laps in Pint-Sized Pool
Phelps the hedgehog was found outside in November, unable to use his back legs. Animal experts say hedgehogs don't do well in cold elements! Phelps was taken to the Scottish SPCA who has been encouraging him to strengthen his weak hind legs with hydrotherapy. Phelps has been working hard swimming laps so he'll be ready for release once the weather gets warm. Look out, Michael Phelps! InsideEdition.com's Keleigh Nealon (https://twitter.com/KeleighNealon) has more.
Phelps the hedgehog was found outside in November, unable to use his back legs. Animal experts say hedgehogs don't do well in cold elements! Phelps was taken to the Scottish SPCA who has been encouraging him to strengthen his weak hind legs with hydrotherapy. Phelps has been working hard swimming laps so he'll be ready for release once the weather gets warm. Look out, Michael Phelps! InsideEdition.com's Keleigh Nealon (https://twitter.com/KeleighNealon) has more.
Injured Hedgehog Named After Michael Phelps Swims Laps in Pint-Sized Pool
Phelps the hedgehog was found outside in November, unable to use his back legs. Animal experts say hedgehogs don't do well in cold elements! Phelps was taken to the Scottish SPCA who has been encouraging him to strengthen his weak hind legs with hydrotherapy. Phelps has been working hard swimming laps so he'll be ready for release once the weather gets warm. Look out, Michael Phelps! InsideEdition.com's Keleigh Nealon (https://twitter.com/KeleighNealon) has more.
Phelps the hedgehog was found outside in November, unable to use his back legs. Animal experts say hedgehogs don&#39;t do well in cold elements! Phelps was taken to the Scottish SPCA who has been encouraging him to strengthen his weak hind legs with hydrotherapy. Phelps has been working hard swimming laps so he&#39;ll be ready for release once the weather gets warm. Look out, Michael Phelps! InsideEdition.com&#39;s Keleigh Nealon (https://twitter.com/KeleighNealon) has more.
Injured Hedgehog Named After Michael Phelps Swims Laps in Pint-Sized Pool
Phelps the hedgehog was found outside in November, unable to use his back legs. Animal experts say hedgehogs don't do well in cold elements! Phelps was taken to the Scottish SPCA who has been encouraging him to strengthen his weak hind legs with hydrotherapy. Phelps has been working hard swimming laps so he'll be ready for release once the weather gets warm. Look out, Michael Phelps! InsideEdition.com's Keleigh Nealon (https://twitter.com/KeleighNealon) has more.
Hoping to help others who have struggled with depression, Olympic champion Michael Phelps on Tuesday spoke about how had thoughts of suicide at the height of his record-setting career, and how helping others battle their own depression has been better than any gold medal. CBS 2&#39;s Mike Puccinelli reports.
For Phelps, Helping Others With Depression ‘Light Years Better’ Than Olympic Gold
Hoping to help others who have struggled with depression, Olympic champion Michael Phelps on Tuesday spoke about how had thoughts of suicide at the height of his record-setting career, and how helping others battle their own depression has been better than any gold medal. CBS 2's Mike Puccinelli reports.
Hoping to help others who have struggled with depression, Olympic champion Michael Phelps on Tuesday spoke about how had thoughts of suicide at the height of his record-setting career, and how helping others battle their own depression has been better than any gold medal. CBS 2's Mike Puccinelli reports.
For Phelps, Helping Others With Depression ‘Light Years Better’ Than Olympic Gold
Hoping to help others who have struggled with depression, Olympic champion Michael Phelps on Tuesday spoke about how had thoughts of suicide at the height of his record-setting career, and how helping others battle their own depression has been better than any gold medal. CBS 2's Mike Puccinelli reports.
Hoping to help others who have struggled with depression, Olympic champion Michael Phelps on Tuesday spoke about how had thoughts of suicide at the height of his record-setting career, and how helping others battle their own depression has been better than any gold medal. CBS 2&#39;s Mike Puccinelli reports.
For Phelps, Helping Others With Depression ‘Light Years Better’ Than Olympic Gold
Hoping to help others who have struggled with depression, Olympic champion Michael Phelps on Tuesday spoke about how had thoughts of suicide at the height of his record-setting career, and how helping others battle their own depression has been better than any gold medal. CBS 2's Mike Puccinelli reports.
Hoping to help others who have struggled with depression, Olympic champion Michael Phelps on Tuesday spoke about how had thoughts of suicide at the height of his record-setting career, and how helping others battle their own depression has been better than any gold medal. CBS 2&#39;s Mike Puccinelli reports.
For Phelps, Helping Others With Depression ‘Light Years Better’ Than Olympic Gold
Hoping to help others who have struggled with depression, Olympic champion Michael Phelps on Tuesday spoke about how had thoughts of suicide at the height of his record-setting career, and how helping others battle their own depression has been better than any gold medal. CBS 2's Mike Puccinelli reports.
Olympian Michael Phelps was among more than 50 speakers taking the stage Tuesday at The Kennedy Forum Annual Meeting, hoping to end some of the stigma surrounding mental illness. CBS 2&#39;s Mike Puccinelli reports.
Mental Health Advocates Hold National Summit In Chicago
Olympian Michael Phelps was among more than 50 speakers taking the stage Tuesday at The Kennedy Forum Annual Meeting, hoping to end some of the stigma surrounding mental illness. CBS 2's Mike Puccinelli reports.
Olympian Michael Phelps was among more than 50 speakers taking the stage Tuesday at The Kennedy Forum Annual Meeting, hoping to end some of the stigma surrounding mental illness. CBS 2's Mike Puccinelli reports.
Mental Health Advocates Hold National Summit In Chicago
Olympian Michael Phelps was among more than 50 speakers taking the stage Tuesday at The Kennedy Forum Annual Meeting, hoping to end some of the stigma surrounding mental illness. CBS 2's Mike Puccinelli reports.
Olympian Michael Phelps was among more than 50 speakers taking the stage Tuesday at The Kennedy Forum Annual Meeting, hoping to end some of the stigma surrounding mental illness. CBS 2&#39;s Mike Puccinelli reports.
Mental Health Advocates Hold National Summit In Chicago
Olympian Michael Phelps was among more than 50 speakers taking the stage Tuesday at The Kennedy Forum Annual Meeting, hoping to end some of the stigma surrounding mental illness. CBS 2's Mike Puccinelli reports.
Olympian Michael Phelps was among more than 50 speakers taking the stage Tuesday at The Kennedy Forum Annual Meeting, hoping to end some of the stigma surrounding mental illness. CBS 2&#39;s Mike Puccinelli reports.
Mental Health Advocates Hold National Summit In Chicago
Olympian Michael Phelps was among more than 50 speakers taking the stage Tuesday at The Kennedy Forum Annual Meeting, hoping to end some of the stigma surrounding mental illness. CBS 2's Mike Puccinelli reports.
<p>Surprise, surprise. Ray Allen sunk a shot from way out. </p><p>Allen teed it up Friday at the Diamond Resorts Invitational in Orlando and had what I can only assume is the shot of the day. With his third shot on the par-4 11th, Allen put it right in the jar from 122 yards out. </p><p>I like to imagine this is how Allen plays golf all the time, like he considers the green to be the golf equivalent of the paint and prefers to just bomb it from the perimeter. Still, when it comes to non-golfers hitting impressive golf shots, I’m still giving the nod to <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p4GgbWKcMVQ" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Michael Phelps’s 159-foot putt" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Michael Phelps’s 159-foot putt</a>. </p>
Ray Allen Is Still Good From Long Range in Retirement

Surprise, surprise. Ray Allen sunk a shot from way out.

Allen teed it up Friday at the Diamond Resorts Invitational in Orlando and had what I can only assume is the shot of the day. With his third shot on the par-4 11th, Allen put it right in the jar from 122 yards out.

I like to imagine this is how Allen plays golf all the time, like he considers the green to be the golf equivalent of the paint and prefers to just bomb it from the perimeter. Still, when it comes to non-golfers hitting impressive golf shots, I’m still giving the nod to Michael Phelps’s 159-foot putt.

<p>Katie Ledecky got her start in swimming because she just wanted to make friends. Her brother was eager to join a team at a pool near their house and as a 6-year-old, she tagged along.</p><p>By summer’s end, the Ledecky siblings had made 100 friends ranging in age from 6 to 18. Some of them remain good friends with Katie, who went on to become the world’s best swimmer in the post-Michael Phelps era.</p><p>She earned five golds and a silver at this year’s world championships in Budapest, maintaining the upward trajectory she first established as a surprise gold medalist at the 2012 London Olympics.</p><p>Her dominant performance in Hungary earned Ledecky Associated Press Female Athlete of the Year honors.</p><p>In balloting by U.S. editors and news directors announced Tuesday, Ledecky received 351 points, edging out Serena Williams with 343. Williams won the Australian Open for her Open era-record 23rd Grand Slam tennis title . Olympic track star Allyson Felix finished third in voting, with 248 points.</p><p>Last year, Ledecky was second to gymnast Simone Biles in the balloting.</p><p>The AP Male Athlete of the Year will be announced Wednesday.</p><p>Ledecky is the eighth female swimmer to win and the first since Amy Van Dyken in 1996. Among the others is 1969 winner Debbie Meyer. At last year’s Rio de Janeiro Games, Ledecky equaled Meyer’s feat of sweeping the 200, 400 and 800 freestyles in a single Olympics.</p><p>“It’s a really great history of women swimmers and freestylers,” Ledecky said of the AP honor roll. “I really look up to a lot of those women.”</p><p>She is the first active college athlete to win since UConn basketball player Rebecca Lobo in 1995.</p><p>Ledecky is a sophomore at Stanford, still debating whether to major in psychology or political science, and enjoying life in the dorms, where she lives with five other swimmers.</p><p>“Just being in the college environment has kind of added another layer of fun,” she said. “Being with teammates and working toward NCAA championships and having that team goal, that’s another thing that is fun.”</p><p>Ledecky heads to Colorado Springs, Colorado, for high-altitude training with her Stanford team this week. Her focus is on the collegiate season through the NCAAs in March.</p><p>In moving cross-country from her home in Bethesda, Maryland, to attend college in California, Ledecky left behind longtime coach Bruce Gemmell. But like some of those old summer league teammates, Ledecky has stayed in touch. She trains with Gemmell when she returns to visit her family.</p><p>She was a star to them in 2012 but a little-known 15-year-old to the rest of the world when she won the 800-meter freestyle in world-record time in London.</p><p>In 2013, Ledecky won four golds at the worlds in Barcelona, setting a pair of world records. Two years later in Kazan, she swept every freestyle from 200 to 1,500 meters, setting two more world records. Another two world records fell last year in Rio.</p><p>In her typically understated way, Ledecky said: “I really pride myself on the consistency I’ve had over the past couple years. Just being able to compete at the international level and come away with some gold medals each year.”</p><p>Ledecky didn’t set any personal bests or world records in Budapest, something she’s done with such frequency that people expect to witness something spectacular anytime she dives in the pool.</p><p>Her loss in the 200 free in Hungary was considered an upset.</p><p>“If they’re disappointed with me not breaking a world record, it’s an honor because it’s representative of what I’ve done in the past and a benchmark for myself,” she said. “I don’t focus on what anyone thinks of my goals or wants to see me do.”</p><p>Not yet halfway toward the 2020 Tokyo Games, Ledecky already is thinking ahead. Like Phelps, she never publicly reveals her target times or placements.</p><p>“I set big goals for myself and that’s always what has motivated me,” she said.</p><p>Despite living in a results-focused world, Ledecky enjoys the journey, something she learned between London and Rio.</p><p>“Trying to find those little things to improve on and the process of getting better,” she said. “Doing everything in practice to set yourself up well each year.”</p><p>Her sunny smile and friendly demeanor belie the competitor who is always plotting ahead and moving forward ever faster.</p><p>“I know the four years goes by very quickly,” Ledecky said, “and I want to do everything I can to prepare.”</p>
Katie Ledecky Swims to AP Female Athlete of the Year Honors

Katie Ledecky got her start in swimming because she just wanted to make friends. Her brother was eager to join a team at a pool near their house and as a 6-year-old, she tagged along.

By summer’s end, the Ledecky siblings had made 100 friends ranging in age from 6 to 18. Some of them remain good friends with Katie, who went on to become the world’s best swimmer in the post-Michael Phelps era.

She earned five golds and a silver at this year’s world championships in Budapest, maintaining the upward trajectory she first established as a surprise gold medalist at the 2012 London Olympics.

Her dominant performance in Hungary earned Ledecky Associated Press Female Athlete of the Year honors.

In balloting by U.S. editors and news directors announced Tuesday, Ledecky received 351 points, edging out Serena Williams with 343. Williams won the Australian Open for her Open era-record 23rd Grand Slam tennis title . Olympic track star Allyson Felix finished third in voting, with 248 points.

Last year, Ledecky was second to gymnast Simone Biles in the balloting.

The AP Male Athlete of the Year will be announced Wednesday.

Ledecky is the eighth female swimmer to win and the first since Amy Van Dyken in 1996. Among the others is 1969 winner Debbie Meyer. At last year’s Rio de Janeiro Games, Ledecky equaled Meyer’s feat of sweeping the 200, 400 and 800 freestyles in a single Olympics.

“It’s a really great history of women swimmers and freestylers,” Ledecky said of the AP honor roll. “I really look up to a lot of those women.”

She is the first active college athlete to win since UConn basketball player Rebecca Lobo in 1995.

Ledecky is a sophomore at Stanford, still debating whether to major in psychology or political science, and enjoying life in the dorms, where she lives with five other swimmers.

“Just being in the college environment has kind of added another layer of fun,” she said. “Being with teammates and working toward NCAA championships and having that team goal, that’s another thing that is fun.”

Ledecky heads to Colorado Springs, Colorado, for high-altitude training with her Stanford team this week. Her focus is on the collegiate season through the NCAAs in March.

In moving cross-country from her home in Bethesda, Maryland, to attend college in California, Ledecky left behind longtime coach Bruce Gemmell. But like some of those old summer league teammates, Ledecky has stayed in touch. She trains with Gemmell when she returns to visit her family.

She was a star to them in 2012 but a little-known 15-year-old to the rest of the world when she won the 800-meter freestyle in world-record time in London.

In 2013, Ledecky won four golds at the worlds in Barcelona, setting a pair of world records. Two years later in Kazan, she swept every freestyle from 200 to 1,500 meters, setting two more world records. Another two world records fell last year in Rio.

In her typically understated way, Ledecky said: “I really pride myself on the consistency I’ve had over the past couple years. Just being able to compete at the international level and come away with some gold medals each year.”

Ledecky didn’t set any personal bests or world records in Budapest, something she’s done with such frequency that people expect to witness something spectacular anytime she dives in the pool.

Her loss in the 200 free in Hungary was considered an upset.

“If they’re disappointed with me not breaking a world record, it’s an honor because it’s representative of what I’ve done in the past and a benchmark for myself,” she said. “I don’t focus on what anyone thinks of my goals or wants to see me do.”

Not yet halfway toward the 2020 Tokyo Games, Ledecky already is thinking ahead. Like Phelps, she never publicly reveals her target times or placements.

“I set big goals for myself and that’s always what has motivated me,” she said.

Despite living in a results-focused world, Ledecky enjoys the journey, something she learned between London and Rio.

“Trying to find those little things to improve on and the process of getting better,” she said. “Doing everything in practice to set yourself up well each year.”

Her sunny smile and friendly demeanor belie the competitor who is always plotting ahead and moving forward ever faster.

“I know the four years goes by very quickly,” Ledecky said, “and I want to do everything I can to prepare.”

For a blessed spell on the Albany course, it was 2007 all over again. Tiger Woods was out on his own on top of the leaderboard and the watching world was open-mouthed. Of all his comebacks this is already his most remarkable. Yes, there were a few late bogeys in his 68 for a seven-under total to take away a touch of the sparkle, but surely only the Grinch would put a downer on this resurrection. After all, this is his first competitive round in 10 months, following a spinal-fusion operation which was basically a make-of-break on his career. Add this rust to ridicule he suffered when being found slumped across his steering wheel in May, out of his mind on prescription drugs, and then you may approximate the scale of his achievement so far at the Hero World Challenge in Bahamas. This was his ninth round in 27 months and, after all he has been through, it must be doubted if many other of the game’s legends would have been similarly capable. He is ranked 1199th in the world and is more than holding his own in a field boasting eight of the world’s top 10. Typical Tiger, however, was refusing to follow everyone else and get carried away. “After a 31 on the front nine I could have done better on the back nine,” he said. “I struggled with the speed all day on the greens. But I’ve proved the surgery has been successful, the rehab has been fantastic, and now I have the chance to play golf again. I’m just getting back, though, and have a way to go.” Woods lines up a putt on the second green at the Hero World Challenge Credit: Getty Images Before Thursday’s round he had Steph Curry and Michael Phelps taking to social media to describe their excitement. This time it was Donovan Bailey, the former 100m world champion, and Niall Horan, the One Direction singer, expressing their feverish enthusiasm. Even for Woods this seemed surreal. Granted, the Hero World Challenge is essentially an end of season hit-and-giggle in which the lucky invitees get to fight it out for the honour of a $1 million winning cheque none of them really needs. But it boasts the best and the best do not appreciate losing. If the 41-year-old had stirred the memory bank with his first-round 69, then with three birdies in his first four holes, he switched on the mixer and made all the high points of his career suddenly pour over back into the consciousness. There was a fine approach to five feet on the first, a two-putt birdie from 30ft on the par-five third and a brilliant second shot to four feet on the third. And all the while, he was driving it in the style one of the celebrated young generation – long, straight. There was a lip-out for another birdie on the fifth and two of those six-foot knee-janglers on the sixth and seventh for par. It was on the par-five ninth where vintage Tiger leapt up and said “remember me?” The three-wood to 18ft set up the eagle putt and, inevitably, the fist pump. Why we are hooked on the Tiger Woods story At eight-under he was in the outright lead and for that moment, at least, golf was recalling its heyday. Yet perhaps the most satisfying factor for Woods was his chipping. In the first round there had been two “chunks” and the cynics had rolled their eyes and made the point that before his back completely cut out, Woods had been plagued by the chipping yips. On the 10th, there was a notable effort to a few feet and on the par-five 11th, after missing the green, his chip was exquisitely played to take him to nine-under. There was a three-putt bogey on the 12th, after charging his 50-footer almost 20 feet past the hole, and, once again, he failed to birdie a par five on the 15th. Woods played a wonderful par-saving pitch on the 17th, but a wayward drive on the 18th resulted in a five to finish the day in fifth, five behind Charley Hoffmann, on 12-under, with Tommy Fleetwood in a tie for second alongside Jordan Spieth on nine-under. No matter. It had been another stunning day.
Tiger Woods continues his remarkable comeback at the Hero World Challenge
For a blessed spell on the Albany course, it was 2007 all over again. Tiger Woods was out on his own on top of the leaderboard and the watching world was open-mouthed. Of all his comebacks this is already his most remarkable. Yes, there were a few late bogeys in his 68 for a seven-under total to take away a touch of the sparkle, but surely only the Grinch would put a downer on this resurrection. After all, this is his first competitive round in 10 months, following a spinal-fusion operation which was basically a make-of-break on his career. Add this rust to ridicule he suffered when being found slumped across his steering wheel in May, out of his mind on prescription drugs, and then you may approximate the scale of his achievement so far at the Hero World Challenge in Bahamas. This was his ninth round in 27 months and, after all he has been through, it must be doubted if many other of the game’s legends would have been similarly capable. He is ranked 1199th in the world and is more than holding his own in a field boasting eight of the world’s top 10. Typical Tiger, however, was refusing to follow everyone else and get carried away. “After a 31 on the front nine I could have done better on the back nine,” he said. “I struggled with the speed all day on the greens. But I’ve proved the surgery has been successful, the rehab has been fantastic, and now I have the chance to play golf again. I’m just getting back, though, and have a way to go.” Woods lines up a putt on the second green at the Hero World Challenge Credit: Getty Images Before Thursday’s round he had Steph Curry and Michael Phelps taking to social media to describe their excitement. This time it was Donovan Bailey, the former 100m world champion, and Niall Horan, the One Direction singer, expressing their feverish enthusiasm. Even for Woods this seemed surreal. Granted, the Hero World Challenge is essentially an end of season hit-and-giggle in which the lucky invitees get to fight it out for the honour of a $1 million winning cheque none of them really needs. But it boasts the best and the best do not appreciate losing. If the 41-year-old had stirred the memory bank with his first-round 69, then with three birdies in his first four holes, he switched on the mixer and made all the high points of his career suddenly pour over back into the consciousness. There was a fine approach to five feet on the first, a two-putt birdie from 30ft on the par-five third and a brilliant second shot to four feet on the third. And all the while, he was driving it in the style one of the celebrated young generation – long, straight. There was a lip-out for another birdie on the fifth and two of those six-foot knee-janglers on the sixth and seventh for par. It was on the par-five ninth where vintage Tiger leapt up and said “remember me?” The three-wood to 18ft set up the eagle putt and, inevitably, the fist pump. Why we are hooked on the Tiger Woods story At eight-under he was in the outright lead and for that moment, at least, golf was recalling its heyday. Yet perhaps the most satisfying factor for Woods was his chipping. In the first round there had been two “chunks” and the cynics had rolled their eyes and made the point that before his back completely cut out, Woods had been plagued by the chipping yips. On the 10th, there was a notable effort to a few feet and on the par-five 11th, after missing the green, his chip was exquisitely played to take him to nine-under. There was a three-putt bogey on the 12th, after charging his 50-footer almost 20 feet past the hole, and, once again, he failed to birdie a par five on the 15th. Woods played a wonderful par-saving pitch on the 17th, but a wayward drive on the 18th resulted in a five to finish the day in fifth, five behind Charley Hoffmann, on 12-under, with Tommy Fleetwood in a tie for second alongside Jordan Spieth on nine-under. No matter. It had been another stunning day.
For a blessed spell on the Albany course, it was 2007 all over again. Tiger Woods was out on his own on top of the leaderboard and the watching world was open-mouthed. Of all his comebacks this is already his most remarkable. Yes, there were a few late bogeys in his 68 for a seven-under total to take away a touch of the sparkle, but surely only the Grinch would put a downer on this resurrection. After all, this is his first competitive round in 10 months, following a spinal-fusion operation which was basically a make-of-break on his career. Add this rust to ridicule he suffered when being found slumped across his steering wheel in May, out of his mind on prescription drugs, and then you may approximate the scale of his achievement so far at the Hero World Challenge in Bahamas. This was his ninth round in 27 months and, after all he has been through, it must be doubted if many other of the game’s legends would have been similarly capable. He is ranked 1199th in the world and is more than holding his own in a field boasting eight of the world’s top 10. Typical Tiger, however, was refusing to follow everyone else and get carried away. “After a 31 on the front nine I could have done better on the back nine,” he said. “I struggled with the speed all day on the greens. But I’ve proved the surgery has been successful, the rehab has been fantastic, and now I have the chance to play golf again. I’m just getting back, though, and have a way to go.” Woods lines up a putt on the second green at the Hero World Challenge Credit: Getty Images Before Thursday’s round he had Steph Curry and Michael Phelps taking to social media to describe their excitement. This time it was Donovan Bailey, the former 100m world champion, and Niall Horan, the One Direction singer, expressing their feverish enthusiasm. Even for Woods this seemed surreal. Granted, the Hero World Challenge is essentially an end of season hit-and-giggle in which the lucky invitees get to fight it out for the honour of a $1 million winning cheque none of them really needs. But it boasts the best and the best do not appreciate losing. If the 41-year-old had stirred the memory bank with his first-round 69, then with three birdies in his first four holes, he switched on the mixer and made all the high points of his career suddenly pour over back into the consciousness. There was a fine approach to five feet on the first, a two-putt birdie from 30ft on the par-five third and a brilliant second shot to four feet on the third. And all the while, he was driving it in the style one of the celebrated young generation – long, straight. There was a lip-out for another birdie on the fifth and two of those six-foot knee-janglers on the sixth and seventh for par. It was on the par-five ninth where vintage Tiger leapt up and said “remember me?” The three-wood to 18ft set up the eagle putt and, inevitably, the fist pump. Why we are hooked on the Tiger Woods story At eight-under he was in the outright lead and for that moment, at least, golf was recalling its heyday. Yet perhaps the most satisfying factor for Woods was his chipping. In the first round there had been two “chunks” and the cynics had rolled their eyes and made the point that before his back completely cut out, Woods had been plagued by the chipping yips. On the 10th, there was a notable effort to a few feet and on the par-five 11th, after missing the green, his chip was exquisitely played to take him to nine-under. There was a three-putt bogey on the 12th, after charging his 50-footer almost 20 feet past the hole, and, once again, he failed to birdie a par five on the 15th. Woods played a wonderful par-saving pitch on the 17th, but a wayward drive on the 18th resulted in a five to finish the day in fifth, five behind Charley Hoffmann, on 12-under, with Tommy Fleetwood in a tie for second alongside Jordan Spieth on nine-under. No matter. It had been another stunning day.
Tiger Woods continues his remarkable comeback at the Hero World Challenge
For a blessed spell on the Albany course, it was 2007 all over again. Tiger Woods was out on his own on top of the leaderboard and the watching world was open-mouthed. Of all his comebacks this is already his most remarkable. Yes, there were a few late bogeys in his 68 for a seven-under total to take away a touch of the sparkle, but surely only the Grinch would put a downer on this resurrection. After all, this is his first competitive round in 10 months, following a spinal-fusion operation which was basically a make-of-break on his career. Add this rust to ridicule he suffered when being found slumped across his steering wheel in May, out of his mind on prescription drugs, and then you may approximate the scale of his achievement so far at the Hero World Challenge in Bahamas. This was his ninth round in 27 months and, after all he has been through, it must be doubted if many other of the game’s legends would have been similarly capable. He is ranked 1199th in the world and is more than holding his own in a field boasting eight of the world’s top 10. Typical Tiger, however, was refusing to follow everyone else and get carried away. “After a 31 on the front nine I could have done better on the back nine,” he said. “I struggled with the speed all day on the greens. But I’ve proved the surgery has been successful, the rehab has been fantastic, and now I have the chance to play golf again. I’m just getting back, though, and have a way to go.” Woods lines up a putt on the second green at the Hero World Challenge Credit: Getty Images Before Thursday’s round he had Steph Curry and Michael Phelps taking to social media to describe their excitement. This time it was Donovan Bailey, the former 100m world champion, and Niall Horan, the One Direction singer, expressing their feverish enthusiasm. Even for Woods this seemed surreal. Granted, the Hero World Challenge is essentially an end of season hit-and-giggle in which the lucky invitees get to fight it out for the honour of a $1 million winning cheque none of them really needs. But it boasts the best and the best do not appreciate losing. If the 41-year-old had stirred the memory bank with his first-round 69, then with three birdies in his first four holes, he switched on the mixer and made all the high points of his career suddenly pour over back into the consciousness. There was a fine approach to five feet on the first, a two-putt birdie from 30ft on the par-five third and a brilliant second shot to four feet on the third. And all the while, he was driving it in the style one of the celebrated young generation – long, straight. There was a lip-out for another birdie on the fifth and two of those six-foot knee-janglers on the sixth and seventh for par. It was on the par-five ninth where vintage Tiger leapt up and said “remember me?” The three-wood to 18ft set up the eagle putt and, inevitably, the fist pump. Why we are hooked on the Tiger Woods story At eight-under he was in the outright lead and for that moment, at least, golf was recalling its heyday. Yet perhaps the most satisfying factor for Woods was his chipping. In the first round there had been two “chunks” and the cynics had rolled their eyes and made the point that before his back completely cut out, Woods had been plagued by the chipping yips. On the 10th, there was a notable effort to a few feet and on the par-five 11th, after missing the green, his chip was exquisitely played to take him to nine-under. There was a three-putt bogey on the 12th, after charging his 50-footer almost 20 feet past the hole, and, once again, he failed to birdie a par five on the 15th. Woods played a wonderful par-saving pitch on the 17th, but a wayward drive on the 18th resulted in a five to finish the day in fifth, five behind Charley Hoffmann, on 12-under, with Tommy Fleetwood in a tie for second alongside Jordan Spieth on nine-under. No matter. It had been another stunning day.
<p>Sports Illustrated&#39;s Sportsperson of the Year has been awarded since 1954 to the &quot;athlete or team whose performance that year most embodies the spirit of sportsmanship and achievement.&quot; The 2017 award has been given to Houston Texans defensive end J.J. Watt and Houston Astros second baseman Jose Altuve.</p><p>Watt is the first NFL player to win the honor since Peyton Manning was named the 2013 Sportsman of the Year. Watt earned the honor after he raised more than $37 million for Hurricane Harvey relief.</p><p>Altuve was named the American League&#39;s Most Valuable Player and helped deliver the Astros&#39; first World Series championship as the city continues to recover from the storm. He is the first baseball player to earn the honor since San Francisco Giants pitcher Madison Bumgarner in 2014. Altuve is the first international recipient of the award since Sammy Sosa shared the cover with Mark McGwire in 1998.</p><p>Last year, Cavaliers star LeBron James was named the Sportsperson of the Year after fulfilling his promise to win a championship for the city of Cleveland. </p><p>The <a href="https://www.si.com/sportsperson/2017/12/01/joel-mchale-host-sports-illustrated-sportsperson-awards" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:2017 Sportsman of the Year show" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">2017 Sportsman of the Year show</a> will take place on Tuesday, Dec. 5.</p><p><em>Here we examine notable numbers and notes from the past winners of the Sports Illustrated Sportsperson of the Year Award:</em></p><h3><strong>Individual notes:</strong></h3><p>First male winner: Roger Bannister, 1954</p><p>First female winner: Billie Jean King, 1972</p><p>Last man to win: J.J. Watt and Jose Altuve, 2017</p><p>Last woman to win: Serena Williams, 2015</p><p>No. of individual men who have won the award: 6</p><p>No. of individual women who have won the award: 9</p><p>Teams that have won the award: 1980 U.S. Olympic hockey team, 1999 U.S. women&#39;s soccer team, 2004 Boston Red Sox</p><p>First African-American man to win: Rafer Johnson, 1958</p><p>First African-American woman to win: Judi Brown-King, 1987</p><p>Multiple-time champions: Tiger Woods (1996 &#38; 2000) and LeBron James (2012 &#38; 2016)</p><h3>Who was the last ...?</h3><p>Last NFL figure to win: J.J. Watt, 2017</p><p>Last NBA figure to win: LeBron James, 2016</p><p>Last tennis figure to win: Serena Williams, 2015</p><p>Last MLB figure to win: Jose Altuve, 2017</p><p>Last college basketball figures to win: Mike Krzyzewski and Pat Summitt, 2011</p><p>Last swimming figure to win: Michael Phelps, 2008</p><p>Last cycling figure to win: Lance Armstrong, 2002</p><p>Last golf figure to win: Tiger Woods, 2000</p><p>Last soccer figures to win: The 1999 U.S. women&#39;s soccer team, 1999</p><p>Last speed skating figures to win: Bonnie Blair and Johann Olav Koss, 1994</p><p>Last track and field figures to win: Kipchoge Keino and Judi Brown King, 1987</p><p>Last gymnastics figure to win: Mary Lou Retton, 1984</p><p>Last hockey figure to win: Wayne Gretzky, 1982</p><p>Last boxing figure to win: Sugar Ray Leonard, 1981</p><p>Last horse racing figure to win: Steve Cauthen, 1977</p><p>Last auto racing figure to win: Jackie Stewart, 1973</p><h3><strong>No. of winners by sport</strong></h3><p>Baseball: 18</p><p>NFL: 10</p><p>NBA: 9</p><p>Track and field: 8</p><p>Golf: 7</p><p>College basketball: 5</p><p>Tennis: 4</p><p>Hockey: 4</p><p>Boxing: 3</p><p>College football: 3</p><p>Speed skating: 2</p><p>Cycling: 2</p><p>Swimming: 1</p><p>Soccer: 1</p><p>Horse racing: 1</p><p>Gymnastics: 1</p><h3><strong>Winners by country</strong></h3><p>United States: 70</p><p>Great Britain: 2</p><p>Canada: 1</p><p>Dominican Republic: 1</p><p>Kenya: 1</p><p>Norway: 1</p><p>Sweden: 1</p><p>Venezuela: 1</p><p>First international winner: Roger Bannister (Great Britain) in 1954</p><p>Latest international winner: Jose Altuve (Venezuela) in 2017</p>
Sports Illustrated's Sportsperson Of The Year: By The Numbers

Sports Illustrated's Sportsperson of the Year has been awarded since 1954 to the "athlete or team whose performance that year most embodies the spirit of sportsmanship and achievement." The 2017 award has been given to Houston Texans defensive end J.J. Watt and Houston Astros second baseman Jose Altuve.

Watt is the first NFL player to win the honor since Peyton Manning was named the 2013 Sportsman of the Year. Watt earned the honor after he raised more than $37 million for Hurricane Harvey relief.

Altuve was named the American League's Most Valuable Player and helped deliver the Astros' first World Series championship as the city continues to recover from the storm. He is the first baseball player to earn the honor since San Francisco Giants pitcher Madison Bumgarner in 2014. Altuve is the first international recipient of the award since Sammy Sosa shared the cover with Mark McGwire in 1998.

Last year, Cavaliers star LeBron James was named the Sportsperson of the Year after fulfilling his promise to win a championship for the city of Cleveland.

The 2017 Sportsman of the Year show will take place on Tuesday, Dec. 5.

Here we examine notable numbers and notes from the past winners of the Sports Illustrated Sportsperson of the Year Award:

Individual notes:

First male winner: Roger Bannister, 1954

First female winner: Billie Jean King, 1972

Last man to win: J.J. Watt and Jose Altuve, 2017

Last woman to win: Serena Williams, 2015

No. of individual men who have won the award: 6

No. of individual women who have won the award: 9

Teams that have won the award: 1980 U.S. Olympic hockey team, 1999 U.S. women's soccer team, 2004 Boston Red Sox

First African-American man to win: Rafer Johnson, 1958

First African-American woman to win: Judi Brown-King, 1987

Multiple-time champions: Tiger Woods (1996 & 2000) and LeBron James (2012 & 2016)

Who was the last ...?

Last NFL figure to win: J.J. Watt, 2017

Last NBA figure to win: LeBron James, 2016

Last tennis figure to win: Serena Williams, 2015

Last MLB figure to win: Jose Altuve, 2017

Last college basketball figures to win: Mike Krzyzewski and Pat Summitt, 2011

Last swimming figure to win: Michael Phelps, 2008

Last cycling figure to win: Lance Armstrong, 2002

Last golf figure to win: Tiger Woods, 2000

Last soccer figures to win: The 1999 U.S. women's soccer team, 1999

Last speed skating figures to win: Bonnie Blair and Johann Olav Koss, 1994

Last track and field figures to win: Kipchoge Keino and Judi Brown King, 1987

Last gymnastics figure to win: Mary Lou Retton, 1984

Last hockey figure to win: Wayne Gretzky, 1982

Last boxing figure to win: Sugar Ray Leonard, 1981

Last horse racing figure to win: Steve Cauthen, 1977

Last auto racing figure to win: Jackie Stewart, 1973

No. of winners by sport

Baseball: 18

NFL: 10

NBA: 9

Track and field: 8

Golf: 7

College basketball: 5

Tennis: 4

Hockey: 4

Boxing: 3

College football: 3

Speed skating: 2

Cycling: 2

Swimming: 1

Soccer: 1

Horse racing: 1

Gymnastics: 1

Winners by country

United States: 70

Great Britain: 2

Canada: 1

Dominican Republic: 1

Kenya: 1

Norway: 1

Sweden: 1

Venezuela: 1

First international winner: Roger Bannister (Great Britain) in 1954

Latest international winner: Jose Altuve (Venezuela) in 2017

<p>Comedian and actor Joel McHale will host this year’s Sportsperson of the Year event, which will be broadcast on television for the first time this year. The show will take place on Dec. 5 and will be televised on NBCSN at 8 p.m. ET on Dec. 8, and on Univision Deportes at 8 p.m. ET on Dec. 9.</p><p>McHale is best known for his starring role on the hit comedy series “Community,” which ended its sixth season on Yahoo! after five seasons on NBC. For 12 seasons, he hosted E!’s “The Soup,” which satirized pop culture and current events. More recently, he starred in CBS’s “The Great Indoors” and was seen in FOX’s revival of “The X-Files.” He has also acted in numerous feature films including Seth MacFarlane’s “Ted” and Steven Soderbergh’s “The Informant.” Upcoming projects for McHale include STX’s “The Happytime Murders” and Netflix’s “A Futile &#38; Stupid Gesture.”</p><p>In addition to the Sportsperson of the Year, <a href="https://www.si.com/sportsperson/2017/11/30/colin-kaepernick-muhammad-ali-legacy-award" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Muhammad Ali Legacy Award" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Muhammad Ali Legacy Award</a>, SI Kids <a href="https://www.sikids.com/si-kids/2017/11/21/bunchie-young-our-2017-sportskid-year" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:SportsKid of the Year" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">SportsKid of the Year</a>, and <a href="https://www.si.com/sportsperson/2017/11/28/philadelphia-joel-embiid-sports-illustrated-rising-star-award" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Rising Star" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Rising Star</a>, two new categories make their debut this year: <a href="https://www.si.com/sportsperson/2017/11/29/minnesota-lynx-maya-moore-sports-illustrated-performer-year-award" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Performer of the Year" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Performer of the Year</a> and the <a href="https://www.si.com/sportsperson/2017/11/29/carlos-beltran-sports-illustrated-hope-award" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Hope Award" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Hope Award</a>, the latter of which honors athletes who continue to give back to their home communities as they find success across the globe.</p><p>The telecast is being produced by Time Inc. Productions, the company’s television production division, which has tapped JASH, a Group Nine company, to co-produce. Highly regarded producers Robert Morton and Daniel Kellison will serve as executive producers. Executive producers from Time Inc. are Steve Cannella, Ian Orefice and Josh Oshinsky.</p><p>NBCSN will air an encore presentation of Sports Illustrated’s Sportsperson of the Year celebration on Sunday, Dec. 10 at 10 p.m. ET and Tuesday, Dec. 12 at 11:30 p.m. ET.</p><p>Presented annually since 1954, the SI Sportsperson of the Year award is bestowed upon the athlete, team or coach who transcended the year in sports by achieving the highest level of athletic excellence while demonstrating the ideals of sportsmanship. The 2016 selection, Cavaliers superstar LeBron James, was honored at the Sportsperson event last December, which was also attended by Ali Legacy recipients Jim Brown, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and Bill Russell, as well as Michael Phelps, who was honored for his five gold medals at the the &#39;16 Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro.</p><p>Comedian, actor and writer J.B. Smoove, best known for his role in &quot;Curb Your Enthusiasm&quot; and roles in movies such as &quot;Pootie Tang&quot; and &quot;Mr. Deeds,&quot; hosted last year&#39;s event.</p>
Comedian Joel McHale to Host Sports Illustrated's Sportsperson of the Year Show

Comedian and actor Joel McHale will host this year’s Sportsperson of the Year event, which will be broadcast on television for the first time this year. The show will take place on Dec. 5 and will be televised on NBCSN at 8 p.m. ET on Dec. 8, and on Univision Deportes at 8 p.m. ET on Dec. 9.

McHale is best known for his starring role on the hit comedy series “Community,” which ended its sixth season on Yahoo! after five seasons on NBC. For 12 seasons, he hosted E!’s “The Soup,” which satirized pop culture and current events. More recently, he starred in CBS’s “The Great Indoors” and was seen in FOX’s revival of “The X-Files.” He has also acted in numerous feature films including Seth MacFarlane’s “Ted” and Steven Soderbergh’s “The Informant.” Upcoming projects for McHale include STX’s “The Happytime Murders” and Netflix’s “A Futile & Stupid Gesture.”

In addition to the Sportsperson of the Year, Muhammad Ali Legacy Award, SI Kids SportsKid of the Year, and Rising Star, two new categories make their debut this year: Performer of the Year and the Hope Award, the latter of which honors athletes who continue to give back to their home communities as they find success across the globe.

The telecast is being produced by Time Inc. Productions, the company’s television production division, which has tapped JASH, a Group Nine company, to co-produce. Highly regarded producers Robert Morton and Daniel Kellison will serve as executive producers. Executive producers from Time Inc. are Steve Cannella, Ian Orefice and Josh Oshinsky.

NBCSN will air an encore presentation of Sports Illustrated’s Sportsperson of the Year celebration on Sunday, Dec. 10 at 10 p.m. ET and Tuesday, Dec. 12 at 11:30 p.m. ET.

Presented annually since 1954, the SI Sportsperson of the Year award is bestowed upon the athlete, team or coach who transcended the year in sports by achieving the highest level of athletic excellence while demonstrating the ideals of sportsmanship. The 2016 selection, Cavaliers superstar LeBron James, was honored at the Sportsperson event last December, which was also attended by Ali Legacy recipients Jim Brown, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and Bill Russell, as well as Michael Phelps, who was honored for his five gold medals at the the '16 Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro.

Comedian, actor and writer J.B. Smoove, best known for his role in "Curb Your Enthusiasm" and roles in movies such as "Pootie Tang" and "Mr. Deeds," hosted last year's event.

US swimmer Caeleb Dressel emerged from the shadow of his idol Michael Phelps in Budapest becoming the first swimmer to win three world championships gold medals in a single day (AFP Photo/Martin BUREAU)
US swimmer Caeleb Dressel emerged from the shadow of his idol Michael Phelps in Budapest becoming the first swimmer to win three world championships gold medals in a single day
US swimmer Caeleb Dressel emerged from the shadow of his idol Michael Phelps in Budapest becoming the first swimmer to win three world championships gold medals in a single day (AFP Photo/Martin BUREAU)
<p>“One year ago I had the privilege of marrying my best friend!” the Olympian wrote, sharing this kissy pic with his wife, Nicole. “Love you forever and ever @mrs.nicolephelps” (Photo: <a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Ba1oh2_HUMQ/?taken-by=m_phelps00" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Michael Phelps via Instagram" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Michael Phelps via Instagram</a>) </p>
Michael Phelps

“One year ago I had the privilege of marrying my best friend!” the Olympian wrote, sharing this kissy pic with his wife, Nicole. “Love you forever and ever @mrs.nicolephelps” (Photo: Michael Phelps via Instagram)

With long-classified documents concerning the assassination of President John F Kennedy due to be released pending President Donald Trump&#39;s approval, conspiracy theories are running wild. The sporting world is not immune to such theories either, with a long history of alleged fixes, frame-ups, biased officiating, doped-up athletes and inside jobs filling the imagination of aggrieved and bitter fans. Let&#39;s ignore Ockham&#39;s Razor and entertain some of them. Did Sonny Liston take a dive? By 1965, Muhammad Ali was no longer Cassius Clay and had taken the world heavyweight title from the grasp of intimidating bruiser Sonny Liston. Their second title fight in Maine however, would be shrouded in controversy forevermore. Ali caught Liston with what looked an innocuous counter-punch in the first-round, but Liston hit the canvas. Referee Jersey Joe Walcott did not begin the count, and the after Liston stayed down for more than 10 seconds the fight was stopped after a brief resumption. Ali won on technical knockout, and the decisive blow was called &#39;The Phantom Punch&#39;. Rumours abound that Liston bet against on himself to pay off gambling debts, that the Nation of Islam made threats against his life or the Mafia fixed the result. Ali&#39;s punch did catch Liston a glancing blow to the temple however, and that would be the simplest explanation. Make your own mind up. The secret document that could solve the mystery: Sonny Liston&#39;s bookmaker&#39;s ledger. Did an Arsenal-supporting chef poison Tottenham? An episode that left the southern end of Seven Sisters Road in stitches for years. On the final day of the 2005-6 Premier League season, victory over West Ham would have assured Tottenham Hotspur of Champions League qualification at the expense of fierce local rivals Arsenal. At the time, Spurs had not finished above Arsene Wenger&#39;s side since 1995. However, on the eve of the final-day decider at Upton Park, the Spurs squad was plagued by a mysterious bout of food poisoning. There we even doubts about the match going ahead, with key Spurs players such as Michael Carrick, Robbie Keane and Jermain Jenas suffering. It was later revealed, that the Italian food at their Canary Wharf hotel was probably to blame. &quot;Lasagne and spaghetti Bolognese were on the menu, we ate, and then in the middle of the night we started dropping like flies,&quot; reflected Jenas. &quot;It was mayhem.&quot; Spurs lost at West Ham 2-1, while a Thierry Henry hat-trick fired Arsenal to a 4-2 victory over Wigan in the final match at Highbury. The day was a rich source of schadenfreude and mocking chants for several seasons. The secret document that could solve the mystery:The head chef&#39;s Arsenal season ticket. Martin Jol consoled Robbie Keane Credit: EPA Did Colonel Gaddafi organise the disappearance of Shergar? With the exception of the Lord Lucan mystery, no disappearing act has left such a lasting imprint on British folklore. One of the great flat-racing horses in history, Derby winner Shergar was taken by armed men in balaclavas from his stables in Co Kildare Ireland in 1983, and never seen again. His fate is still unknown, and the incident has been the source of several books and films since. One lurid conspiracy theory is that he was kidnapped by the IRA and given to Libyan dictator Colonel Gaddafi in exchange for arms. Another is that he was taken by the New Orleans Mafia. The secret document that could solve the mystery: The horse&#39;s dental records. Did Bobby Riggs rig the &#39;Battle of the Sexes&#39;? 2017 was the year of the sporting novelty event with Floyd Mayweather Jr and Conor McGregor&#39;s ludicrous bout in Las Vegas, but it was by no means sport&#39;s first publicity stunt. In 1973, professional tennis player Bobby Riggs challenged multiple Grand Slam winner Billie Jean King to a match. The implication of course, was that the match would decide whether or not the best of the women&#39;s game could keep up with their male counterparts. King wiped the floor with him, and many suggested that Riggs had bet against himself and organised the whole event as a hustle. The more likely explanation is that the premise of the event - female athletes having to prove they are &#39;as good&#39; as men- was nonsense to begin with. The secret document that could solve the mystery: Riggs&#39; bank statement before and after the event. Billie Jean King holds down the net as Bobby Riggs Credit: AP Did Michael Phelps actually lose at the Beijing Olympics? Few could dispute Michael Phelps&#39;s Olympic legacy, but some do dispute his seventh Olympic gold won at the 2008 Beijing Olympics. The American made an awful start to the 100-meter butterfly final, and trailed Serbian Milorad Cavic for most of the race until he chased him down on the final length. The human eye could not decipher who had triumphed, but Phelps was awarded gold by one-hundredth of a second. The race time is measured by swimmers touching an electronic pad when they reach the line, and many fans believe Cavic actually got their first - but did not hit the pad firmly enough to register his time. The secret document that could solve the mystery: Finger prints. Why did Ronaldo play in the 1998 World Cup final? The &#39;original&#39; Ronaldo was the most exciting footballer in the world in 1998, but hours the World Cup final between Brazil and France he mysteriously fell ill. Sources, including teammate Roberto Carlos, reported he suffered some form of seizure. He was quickly taken out of the starting line-up and whisked away to hospital. However, he made a gained recovery and was put back in the team. Ronaldo was a shadow of himself and, many thought, unfit to play, as France won 3-0. People have wondered ever since why he played. The secret document that could solve the mystery: Ronaldo&#39;s personal diary. Ronaldo was badly out-of-sorts against France Credit: AFP Did Uefa conspire to get Barcelona in the Champions League final? Nothing condones Chelsea players&#39; behaviour after their Champions League semi-final defeat to Barcelona in 2009, but they certainly were on the rough end of some bad decisions at Stamford Bridge. Chelsea had three plausible penalty shouts turned down by Norwegian referee Tom Henning Ovrebo, with Michael Ballack chasing after him shouting expletives in his face. The general secretary of Uefa, David Taylor, was forced to deny accusations of Uefa favouritism towards Barcelona. &quot;If anything it&#39;s a media conspiracy against Uefa,&quot; said Taylor. &quot;It does make me angry. It really annoys me because it&#39;s a load of rubbish.&quot; The number of red cards received by opponents of Barcelona fueled this spurious theory: Arsenal&#39;s Jens Lehman in the 2006 Champions League final, Inter&#39;s Thiago Motta in the 2009 semi-final, Arsenal&#39;s Robin van Persie in a 2011 last-16 tie and John Terry in a 2012 semi-final to name a few. The secret document that could solve the mystery: There are none. A mixture of human error and gamesmanship are to blame.
The secret documents that could shed light on sport's famous conspiracy theories
With long-classified documents concerning the assassination of President John F Kennedy due to be released pending President Donald Trump's approval, conspiracy theories are running wild. The sporting world is not immune to such theories either, with a long history of alleged fixes, frame-ups, biased officiating, doped-up athletes and inside jobs filling the imagination of aggrieved and bitter fans. Let's ignore Ockham's Razor and entertain some of them. Did Sonny Liston take a dive? By 1965, Muhammad Ali was no longer Cassius Clay and had taken the world heavyweight title from the grasp of intimidating bruiser Sonny Liston. Their second title fight in Maine however, would be shrouded in controversy forevermore. Ali caught Liston with what looked an innocuous counter-punch in the first-round, but Liston hit the canvas. Referee Jersey Joe Walcott did not begin the count, and the after Liston stayed down for more than 10 seconds the fight was stopped after a brief resumption. Ali won on technical knockout, and the decisive blow was called 'The Phantom Punch'. Rumours abound that Liston bet against on himself to pay off gambling debts, that the Nation of Islam made threats against his life or the Mafia fixed the result. Ali's punch did catch Liston a glancing blow to the temple however, and that would be the simplest explanation. Make your own mind up. The secret document that could solve the mystery: Sonny Liston's bookmaker's ledger. Did an Arsenal-supporting chef poison Tottenham? An episode that left the southern end of Seven Sisters Road in stitches for years. On the final day of the 2005-6 Premier League season, victory over West Ham would have assured Tottenham Hotspur of Champions League qualification at the expense of fierce local rivals Arsenal. At the time, Spurs had not finished above Arsene Wenger's side since 1995. However, on the eve of the final-day decider at Upton Park, the Spurs squad was plagued by a mysterious bout of food poisoning. There we even doubts about the match going ahead, with key Spurs players such as Michael Carrick, Robbie Keane and Jermain Jenas suffering. It was later revealed, that the Italian food at their Canary Wharf hotel was probably to blame. "Lasagne and spaghetti Bolognese were on the menu, we ate, and then in the middle of the night we started dropping like flies," reflected Jenas. "It was mayhem." Spurs lost at West Ham 2-1, while a Thierry Henry hat-trick fired Arsenal to a 4-2 victory over Wigan in the final match at Highbury. The day was a rich source of schadenfreude and mocking chants for several seasons. The secret document that could solve the mystery:The head chef's Arsenal season ticket. Martin Jol consoled Robbie Keane Credit: EPA Did Colonel Gaddafi organise the disappearance of Shergar? With the exception of the Lord Lucan mystery, no disappearing act has left such a lasting imprint on British folklore. One of the great flat-racing horses in history, Derby winner Shergar was taken by armed men in balaclavas from his stables in Co Kildare Ireland in 1983, and never seen again. His fate is still unknown, and the incident has been the source of several books and films since. One lurid conspiracy theory is that he was kidnapped by the IRA and given to Libyan dictator Colonel Gaddafi in exchange for arms. Another is that he was taken by the New Orleans Mafia. The secret document that could solve the mystery: The horse's dental records. Did Bobby Riggs rig the 'Battle of the Sexes'? 2017 was the year of the sporting novelty event with Floyd Mayweather Jr and Conor McGregor's ludicrous bout in Las Vegas, but it was by no means sport's first publicity stunt. In 1973, professional tennis player Bobby Riggs challenged multiple Grand Slam winner Billie Jean King to a match. The implication of course, was that the match would decide whether or not the best of the women's game could keep up with their male counterparts. King wiped the floor with him, and many suggested that Riggs had bet against himself and organised the whole event as a hustle. The more likely explanation is that the premise of the event - female athletes having to prove they are 'as good' as men- was nonsense to begin with. The secret document that could solve the mystery: Riggs' bank statement before and after the event. Billie Jean King holds down the net as Bobby Riggs Credit: AP Did Michael Phelps actually lose at the Beijing Olympics? Few could dispute Michael Phelps's Olympic legacy, but some do dispute his seventh Olympic gold won at the 2008 Beijing Olympics. The American made an awful start to the 100-meter butterfly final, and trailed Serbian Milorad Cavic for most of the race until he chased him down on the final length. The human eye could not decipher who had triumphed, but Phelps was awarded gold by one-hundredth of a second. The race time is measured by swimmers touching an electronic pad when they reach the line, and many fans believe Cavic actually got their first - but did not hit the pad firmly enough to register his time. The secret document that could solve the mystery: Finger prints. Why did Ronaldo play in the 1998 World Cup final? The 'original' Ronaldo was the most exciting footballer in the world in 1998, but hours the World Cup final between Brazil and France he mysteriously fell ill. Sources, including teammate Roberto Carlos, reported he suffered some form of seizure. He was quickly taken out of the starting line-up and whisked away to hospital. However, he made a gained recovery and was put back in the team. Ronaldo was a shadow of himself and, many thought, unfit to play, as France won 3-0. People have wondered ever since why he played. The secret document that could solve the mystery: Ronaldo's personal diary. Ronaldo was badly out-of-sorts against France Credit: AFP Did Uefa conspire to get Barcelona in the Champions League final? Nothing condones Chelsea players' behaviour after their Champions League semi-final defeat to Barcelona in 2009, but they certainly were on the rough end of some bad decisions at Stamford Bridge. Chelsea had three plausible penalty shouts turned down by Norwegian referee Tom Henning Ovrebo, with Michael Ballack chasing after him shouting expletives in his face. The general secretary of Uefa, David Taylor, was forced to deny accusations of Uefa favouritism towards Barcelona. "If anything it's a media conspiracy against Uefa," said Taylor. "It does make me angry. It really annoys me because it's a load of rubbish." The number of red cards received by opponents of Barcelona fueled this spurious theory: Arsenal's Jens Lehman in the 2006 Champions League final, Inter's Thiago Motta in the 2009 semi-final, Arsenal's Robin van Persie in a 2011 last-16 tie and John Terry in a 2012 semi-final to name a few. The secret document that could solve the mystery: There are none. A mixture of human error and gamesmanship are to blame.
With long-classified documents concerning the assassination of President John F Kennedy due to be released pending President Donald Trump&#39;s approval, conspiracy theories are running wild. The sporting world is not immune to such theories either, with a long history of alleged fixes, frame-ups, biased officiating, doped-up athletes and inside jobs filling the imagination of aggrieved and bitter fans. Let&#39;s ignore Ockham&#39;s Razor and entertain some of them. Did Sonny Liston take a dive? By 1965, Muhammad Ali was no longer Cassius Clay and had taken the world heavyweight title from the grasp of intimidating bruiser Sonny Liston. Their second title fight in Maine however, would be shrouded in controversy forevermore. Ali caught Liston with what looked an innocuous counter-punch in the first-round, but Liston hit the canvas. Referee Jersey Joe Walcott did not begin the count, and the after Liston stayed down for more than 10 seconds the fight was stopped after a brief resumption. Ali won on technical knockout, and the decisive blow was called &#39;The Phantom Punch&#39;. Rumours abound that Liston bet against on himself to pay off gambling debts, that the Nation of Islam made threats against his life or the Mafia fixed the result. Ali&#39;s punch did catch Liston a glancing blow to the temple however, and that would be the simplest explanation. Make your own mind up. The secret document that could solve the mystery: Sonny Liston&#39;s bookmaker&#39;s ledger. Did an Arsenal-supporting chef poison Tottenham? An episode that left the southern end of Seven Sisters Road in stitches for years. On the final day of the 2005-6 Premier League season, victory over West Ham would have assured Tottenham Hotspur of Champions League qualification at the expense of fierce local rivals Arsenal. At the time, Spurs had not finished above Arsene Wenger&#39;s side since 1995. However, on the eve of the final-day decider at Upton Park, the Spurs squad was plagued by a mysterious bout of food poisoning. There we even doubts about the match going ahead, with key Spurs players such as Michael Carrick, Robbie Keane and Jermain Jenas suffering. It was later revealed, that the Italian food at their Canary Wharf hotel was probably to blame. &quot;Lasagne and spaghetti Bolognese were on the menu, we ate, and then in the middle of the night we started dropping like flies,&quot; reflected Jenas. &quot;It was mayhem.&quot; Spurs lost at West Ham 2-1, while a Thierry Henry hat-trick fired Arsenal to a 4-2 victory over Wigan in the final match at Highbury. The day was a rich source of schadenfreude and mocking chants for several seasons. The secret document that could solve the mystery:The head chef&#39;s Arsenal season ticket. Martin Jol consoled Robbie Keane Credit: EPA Did Colonel Gaddafi organise the disappearance of Shergar? With the exception of the Lord Lucan mystery, no disappearing act has left such a lasting imprint on British folklore. One of the great flat-racing horses in history, Derby winner Shergar was taken by armed men in balaclavas from his stables in Co Kildare Ireland in 1983, and never seen again. His fate is still unknown, and the incident has been the source of several books and films since. One lurid conspiracy theory is that he was kidnapped by the IRA and given to Libyan dictator Colonel Gaddafi in exchange for arms. Another is that he was taken by the New Orleans Mafia. The secret document that could solve the mystery: The horse&#39;s dental records. Did Bobby Riggs rig the &#39;Battle of the Sexes&#39;? 2017 was the year of the sporting novelty event with Floyd Mayweather Jr and Conor McGregor&#39;s ludicrous bout in Las Vegas, but it was by no means sport&#39;s first publicity stunt. In 1973, professional tennis player Bobby Riggs challenged multiple Grand Slam winner Billie Jean King to a match. The implication of course, was that the match would decide whether or not the best of the women&#39;s game could keep up with their male counterparts. King wiped the floor with him, and many suggested that Riggs had bet against himself and organised the whole event as a hustle. The more likely explanation is that the premise of the event - female athletes having to prove they are &#39;as good&#39; as men- was nonsense to begin with. The secret document that could solve the mystery: Riggs&#39; bank statement before and after the event. Billie Jean King holds down the net as Bobby Riggs Credit: AP Did Michael Phelps actually lose at the Beijing Olympics? Few could dispute Michael Phelps&#39;s Olympic legacy, but some do dispute his seventh Olympic gold won at the 2008 Beijing Olympics. The American made an awful start to the 100-meter butterfly final, and trailed Serbian Milorad Cavic for most of the race until he chased him down on the final length. The human eye could not decipher who had triumphed, but Phelps was awarded gold by one-hundredth of a second. The race time is measured by swimmers touching an electronic pad when they reach the line, and many fans believe Cavic actually got their first - but did not hit the pad firmly enough to register his time. The secret document that could solve the mystery: Finger prints. Why did Ronaldo play in the 1998 World Cup final? The &#39;original&#39; Ronaldo was the most exciting footballer in the world in 1998, but hours the World Cup final between Brazil and France he mysteriously fell ill. Sources, including teammate Roberto Carlos, reported he suffered some form of seizure. He was quickly taken out of the starting line-up and whisked away to hospital. However, he made a gained recovery and was put back in the team. Ronaldo was a shadow of himself and, many thought, unfit to play, as France won 3-0. People have wondered ever since why he played. The secret document that could solve the mystery: Ronaldo&#39;s personal diary. Ronaldo was badly out-of-sorts against France Credit: AFP Did Uefa conspire to get Barcelona in the Champions League final? Nothing condones Chelsea players&#39; behaviour after their Champions League semi-final defeat to Barcelona in 2009, but they certainly were on the rough end of some bad decisions at Stamford Bridge. Chelsea had three plausible penalty shouts turned down by Norwegian referee Tom Henning Ovrebo, with Michael Ballack chasing after him shouting expletives in his face. The general secretary of Uefa, David Taylor, was forced to deny accusations of Uefa favouritism towards Barcelona. &quot;If anything it&#39;s a media conspiracy against Uefa,&quot; said Taylor. &quot;It does make me angry. It really annoys me because it&#39;s a load of rubbish.&quot; The number of red cards received by opponents of Barcelona fueled this spurious theory: Arsenal&#39;s Jens Lehman in the 2006 Champions League final, Inter&#39;s Thiago Motta in the 2009 semi-final, Arsenal&#39;s Robin van Persie in a 2011 last-16 tie and John Terry in a 2012 semi-final to name a few. The secret document that could solve the mystery: There are none. A mixture of human error and gamesmanship are to blame.
The secret documents that could shed light on sport's famous conspiracy theories
With long-classified documents concerning the assassination of President John F Kennedy due to be released pending President Donald Trump's approval, conspiracy theories are running wild. The sporting world is not immune to such theories either, with a long history of alleged fixes, frame-ups, biased officiating, doped-up athletes and inside jobs filling the imagination of aggrieved and bitter fans. Let's ignore Ockham's Razor and entertain some of them. Did Sonny Liston take a dive? By 1965, Muhammad Ali was no longer Cassius Clay and had taken the world heavyweight title from the grasp of intimidating bruiser Sonny Liston. Their second title fight in Maine however, would be shrouded in controversy forevermore. Ali caught Liston with what looked an innocuous counter-punch in the first-round, but Liston hit the canvas. Referee Jersey Joe Walcott did not begin the count, and the after Liston stayed down for more than 10 seconds the fight was stopped after a brief resumption. Ali won on technical knockout, and the decisive blow was called 'The Phantom Punch'. Rumours abound that Liston bet against on himself to pay off gambling debts, that the Nation of Islam made threats against his life or the Mafia fixed the result. Ali's punch did catch Liston a glancing blow to the temple however, and that would be the simplest explanation. Make your own mind up. The secret document that could solve the mystery: Sonny Liston's bookmaker's ledger. Did an Arsenal-supporting chef poison Tottenham? An episode that left the southern end of Seven Sisters Road in stitches for years. On the final day of the 2005-6 Premier League season, victory over West Ham would have assured Tottenham Hotspur of Champions League qualification at the expense of fierce local rivals Arsenal. At the time, Spurs had not finished above Arsene Wenger's side since 1995. However, on the eve of the final-day decider at Upton Park, the Spurs squad was plagued by a mysterious bout of food poisoning. There we even doubts about the match going ahead, with key Spurs players such as Michael Carrick, Robbie Keane and Jermain Jenas suffering. It was later revealed, that the Italian food at their Canary Wharf hotel was probably to blame. "Lasagne and spaghetti Bolognese were on the menu, we ate, and then in the middle of the night we started dropping like flies," reflected Jenas. "It was mayhem." Spurs lost at West Ham 2-1, while a Thierry Henry hat-trick fired Arsenal to a 4-2 victory over Wigan in the final match at Highbury. The day was a rich source of schadenfreude and mocking chants for several seasons. The secret document that could solve the mystery:The head chef's Arsenal season ticket. Martin Jol consoled Robbie Keane Credit: EPA Did Colonel Gaddafi organise the disappearance of Shergar? With the exception of the Lord Lucan mystery, no disappearing act has left such a lasting imprint on British folklore. One of the great flat-racing horses in history, Derby winner Shergar was taken by armed men in balaclavas from his stables in Co Kildare Ireland in 1983, and never seen again. His fate is still unknown, and the incident has been the source of several books and films since. One lurid conspiracy theory is that he was kidnapped by the IRA and given to Libyan dictator Colonel Gaddafi in exchange for arms. Another is that he was taken by the New Orleans Mafia. The secret document that could solve the mystery: The horse's dental records. Did Bobby Riggs rig the 'Battle of the Sexes'? 2017 was the year of the sporting novelty event with Floyd Mayweather Jr and Conor McGregor's ludicrous bout in Las Vegas, but it was by no means sport's first publicity stunt. In 1973, professional tennis player Bobby Riggs challenged multiple Grand Slam winner Billie Jean King to a match. The implication of course, was that the match would decide whether or not the best of the women's game could keep up with their male counterparts. King wiped the floor with him, and many suggested that Riggs had bet against himself and organised the whole event as a hustle. The more likely explanation is that the premise of the event - female athletes having to prove they are 'as good' as men- was nonsense to begin with. The secret document that could solve the mystery: Riggs' bank statement before and after the event. Billie Jean King holds down the net as Bobby Riggs Credit: AP Did Michael Phelps actually lose at the Beijing Olympics? Few could dispute Michael Phelps's Olympic legacy, but some do dispute his seventh Olympic gold won at the 2008 Beijing Olympics. The American made an awful start to the 100-meter butterfly final, and trailed Serbian Milorad Cavic for most of the race until he chased him down on the final length. The human eye could not decipher who had triumphed, but Phelps was awarded gold by one-hundredth of a second. The race time is measured by swimmers touching an electronic pad when they reach the line, and many fans believe Cavic actually got their first - but did not hit the pad firmly enough to register his time. The secret document that could solve the mystery: Finger prints. Why did Ronaldo play in the 1998 World Cup final? The 'original' Ronaldo was the most exciting footballer in the world in 1998, but hours the World Cup final between Brazil and France he mysteriously fell ill. Sources, including teammate Roberto Carlos, reported he suffered some form of seizure. He was quickly taken out of the starting line-up and whisked away to hospital. However, he made a gained recovery and was put back in the team. Ronaldo was a shadow of himself and, many thought, unfit to play, as France won 3-0. People have wondered ever since why he played. The secret document that could solve the mystery: Ronaldo's personal diary. Ronaldo was badly out-of-sorts against France Credit: AFP Did Uefa conspire to get Barcelona in the Champions League final? Nothing condones Chelsea players' behaviour after their Champions League semi-final defeat to Barcelona in 2009, but they certainly were on the rough end of some bad decisions at Stamford Bridge. Chelsea had three plausible penalty shouts turned down by Norwegian referee Tom Henning Ovrebo, with Michael Ballack chasing after him shouting expletives in his face. The general secretary of Uefa, David Taylor, was forced to deny accusations of Uefa favouritism towards Barcelona. "If anything it's a media conspiracy against Uefa," said Taylor. "It does make me angry. It really annoys me because it's a load of rubbish." The number of red cards received by opponents of Barcelona fueled this spurious theory: Arsenal's Jens Lehman in the 2006 Champions League final, Inter's Thiago Motta in the 2009 semi-final, Arsenal's Robin van Persie in a 2011 last-16 tie and John Terry in a 2012 semi-final to name a few. The secret document that could solve the mystery: There are none. A mixture of human error and gamesmanship are to blame.
With long-classified documents concerning the assassination of President John F Kennedy due to be released pending President Donald Trump&#39;s approval, conspiracy theories are running wild. The sporting world is not immune to such theories either, with a long history of alleged fixes, frame-ups, biased officiating, doped-up athletes and inside jobs filling the imagination of aggrieved and bitter fans. Let&#39;s ignore Ockham&#39;s Razor and entertain some of them. Did Sonny Liston take a dive? By 1965, Muhammad Ali was no longer Cassius Clay and had taken the world heavyweight title from the grasp of intimidating bruiser Sonny Liston. Their second title fight in Maine however, would be shrouded in controversy forevermore. Ali caught Liston with what looked an innocuous counter-punch in the first-round, but Liston hit the canvas. Referee Jersey Joe Walcott did not begin the count, and the after Liston stayed down for more than 10 seconds the fight was stopped after a brief resumption. Ali won on technical knockout, and the decisive blow was called &#39;The Phantom Punch&#39;. Rumours abound that Liston bet against on himself to pay off gambling debts, that the Nation of Islam made threats against his life or the Mafia fixed the result. Ali&#39;s punch did catch Liston a glancing blow to the temple however, and that would be the simplest explanation. Make your own mind up. The secret document that could solve the mystery: Sonny Liston&#39;s bookmaker&#39;s ledger. Did an Arsenal-supporting chef poison Tottenham? An episode that left the southern end of Seven Sisters Road in stitches for years. On the final day of the 2005-6 Premier League season, victory over West Ham would have assured Tottenham Hotspur of Champions League qualification at the expense of fierce local rivals Arsenal. At the time, Spurs had not finished above Arsene Wenger&#39;s side since 1995. However, on the eve of the final-day decider at Upton Park, the Spurs squad was plagued by a mysterious bout of food poisoning. There we even doubts about the match going ahead, with key Spurs players such as Michael Carrick, Robbie Keane and Jermain Jenas suffering. It was later revealed, that the Italian food at their Canary Wharf hotel was probably to blame. &quot;Lasagne and spaghetti Bolognese were on the menu, we ate, and then in the middle of the night we started dropping like flies,&quot; reflected Jenas. &quot;It was mayhem.&quot; Spurs lost at West Ham 2-1, while a Thierry Henry hat-trick fired Arsenal to a 4-2 victory over Wigan in the final match at Highbury. The day was a rich source of schadenfreude and mocking chants for several seasons. The secret document that could solve the mystery:The head chef&#39;s Arsenal season ticket. Martin Jol consoled Robbie Keane Credit: EPA Did Colonel Gaddafi organise the disappearance of Shergar? With the exception of the Lord Lucan mystery, no disappearing act has left such a lasting imprint on British folklore. One of the great flat-racing horses in history, Derby winner Shergar was taken by armed men in balaclavas from his stables in Co Kildare Ireland in 1983, and never seen again. His fate is still unknown, and the incident has been the source of several books and films since. One lurid conspiracy theory is that he was kidnapped by the IRA and given to Libyan dictator Colonel Gaddafi in exchange for arms. Another is that he was taken by the New Orleans Mafia. The secret document that could solve the mystery: The horse&#39;s dental records. Did Bobby Riggs rig the &#39;Battle of the Sexes&#39;? 2017 was the year of the sporting novelty event with Floyd Mayweather Jr and Conor McGregor&#39;s ludicrous bout in Las Vegas, but it was by no means sport&#39;s first publicity stunt. In 1973, professional tennis player Bobby Riggs challenged multiple Grand Slam winner Billie Jean King to a match. The implication of course, was that the match would decide whether or not the best of the women&#39;s game could keep up with their male counterparts. King wiped the floor with him, and many suggested that Riggs had bet against himself and organised the whole event as a hustle. The more likely explanation is that the premise of the event - female athletes having to prove they are &#39;as good&#39; as men- was nonsense to begin with. The secret document that could solve the mystery: Riggs&#39; bank statement before and after the event. Billie Jean King holds down the net as Bobby Riggs Credit: AP Did Michael Phelps actually lose at the Beijing Olympics? Few could dispute Michael Phelps&#39;s Olympic legacy, but some do dispute his seventh Olympic gold won at the 2008 Beijing Olympics. The American made an awful start to the 100-meter butterfly final, and trailed Serbian Milorad Cavic for most of the race until he chased him down on the final length. The human eye could not decipher who had triumphed, but Phelps was awarded gold by one-hundredth of a second. The race time is measured by swimmers touching an electronic pad when they reach the line, and many fans believe Cavic actually got their first - but did not hit the pad firmly enough to register his time. The secret document that could solve the mystery: Finger prints. Why did Ronaldo play in the 1998 World Cup final? The &#39;original&#39; Ronaldo was the most exciting footballer in the world in 1998, but hours the World Cup final between Brazil and France he mysteriously fell ill. Sources, including teammate Roberto Carlos, reported he suffered some form of seizure. He was quickly taken out of the starting line-up and whisked away to hospital. However, he made a gained recovery and was put back in the team. Ronaldo was a shadow of himself and, many thought, unfit to play, as France won 3-0. People have wondered ever since why he played. The secret document that could solve the mystery: Ronaldo&#39;s personal diary. Ronaldo was badly out-of-sorts against France Credit: AFP Did Uefa conspire to get Barcelona in the Champions League final? Nothing condones Chelsea players&#39; behaviour after their Champions League semi-final defeat to Barcelona in 2009, but they certainly were on the rough end of some bad decisions at Stamford Bridge. Chelsea had three plausible penalty shouts turned down by Norwegian referee Tom Henning Ovrebo, with Michael Ballack chasing after him shouting expletives in his face. The general secretary of Uefa, David Taylor, was forced to deny accusations of Uefa favouritism towards Barcelona. &quot;If anything it&#39;s a media conspiracy against Uefa,&quot; said Taylor. &quot;It does make me angry. It really annoys me because it&#39;s a load of rubbish.&quot; The number of red cards received by opponents of Barcelona fueled this spurious theory: Arsenal&#39;s Jens Lehman in the 2006 Champions League final, Inter&#39;s Thiago Motta in the 2009 semi-final, Arsenal&#39;s Robin van Persie in a 2011 last-16 tie and John Terry in a 2012 semi-final to name a few. The secret document that could solve the mystery: There are none. A mixture of human error and gamesmanship are to blame.
The secret documents that could shed light on sport's famous conspiracy theories
With long-classified documents concerning the assassination of President John F Kennedy due to be released pending President Donald Trump's approval, conspiracy theories are running wild. The sporting world is not immune to such theories either, with a long history of alleged fixes, frame-ups, biased officiating, doped-up athletes and inside jobs filling the imagination of aggrieved and bitter fans. Let's ignore Ockham's Razor and entertain some of them. Did Sonny Liston take a dive? By 1965, Muhammad Ali was no longer Cassius Clay and had taken the world heavyweight title from the grasp of intimidating bruiser Sonny Liston. Their second title fight in Maine however, would be shrouded in controversy forevermore. Ali caught Liston with what looked an innocuous counter-punch in the first-round, but Liston hit the canvas. Referee Jersey Joe Walcott did not begin the count, and the after Liston stayed down for more than 10 seconds the fight was stopped after a brief resumption. Ali won on technical knockout, and the decisive blow was called 'The Phantom Punch'. Rumours abound that Liston bet against on himself to pay off gambling debts, that the Nation of Islam made threats against his life or the Mafia fixed the result. Ali's punch did catch Liston a glancing blow to the temple however, and that would be the simplest explanation. Make your own mind up. The secret document that could solve the mystery: Sonny Liston's bookmaker's ledger. Did an Arsenal-supporting chef poison Tottenham? An episode that left the southern end of Seven Sisters Road in stitches for years. On the final day of the 2005-6 Premier League season, victory over West Ham would have assured Tottenham Hotspur of Champions League qualification at the expense of fierce local rivals Arsenal. At the time, Spurs had not finished above Arsene Wenger's side since 1995. However, on the eve of the final-day decider at Upton Park, the Spurs squad was plagued by a mysterious bout of food poisoning. There we even doubts about the match going ahead, with key Spurs players such as Michael Carrick, Robbie Keane and Jermain Jenas suffering. It was later revealed, that the Italian food at their Canary Wharf hotel was probably to blame. "Lasagne and spaghetti Bolognese were on the menu, we ate, and then in the middle of the night we started dropping like flies," reflected Jenas. "It was mayhem." Spurs lost at West Ham 2-1, while a Thierry Henry hat-trick fired Arsenal to a 4-2 victory over Wigan in the final match at Highbury. The day was a rich source of schadenfreude and mocking chants for several seasons. The secret document that could solve the mystery:The head chef's Arsenal season ticket. Martin Jol consoled Robbie Keane Credit: EPA Did Colonel Gaddafi organise the disappearance of Shergar? With the exception of the Lord Lucan mystery, no disappearing act has left such a lasting imprint on British folklore. One of the great flat-racing horses in history, Derby winner Shergar was taken by armed men in balaclavas from his stables in Co Kildare Ireland in 1983, and never seen again. His fate is still unknown, and the incident has been the source of several books and films since. One lurid conspiracy theory is that he was kidnapped by the IRA and given to Libyan dictator Colonel Gaddafi in exchange for arms. Another is that he was taken by the New Orleans Mafia. The secret document that could solve the mystery: The horse's dental records. Did Bobby Riggs rig the 'Battle of the Sexes'? 2017 was the year of the sporting novelty event with Floyd Mayweather Jr and Conor McGregor's ludicrous bout in Las Vegas, but it was by no means sport's first publicity stunt. In 1973, professional tennis player Bobby Riggs challenged multiple Grand Slam winner Billie Jean King to a match. The implication of course, was that the match would decide whether or not the best of the women's game could keep up with their male counterparts. King wiped the floor with him, and many suggested that Riggs had bet against himself and organised the whole event as a hustle. The more likely explanation is that the premise of the event - female athletes having to prove they are 'as good' as men- was nonsense to begin with. The secret document that could solve the mystery: Riggs' bank statement before and after the event. Billie Jean King holds down the net as Bobby Riggs Credit: AP Did Michael Phelps actually lose at the Beijing Olympics? Few could dispute Michael Phelps's Olympic legacy, but some do dispute his seventh Olympic gold won at the 2008 Beijing Olympics. The American made an awful start to the 100-meter butterfly final, and trailed Serbian Milorad Cavic for most of the race until he chased him down on the final length. The human eye could not decipher who had triumphed, but Phelps was awarded gold by one-hundredth of a second. The race time is measured by swimmers touching an electronic pad when they reach the line, and many fans believe Cavic actually got their first - but did not hit the pad firmly enough to register his time. The secret document that could solve the mystery: Finger prints. Why did Ronaldo play in the 1998 World Cup final? The 'original' Ronaldo was the most exciting footballer in the world in 1998, but hours the World Cup final between Brazil and France he mysteriously fell ill. Sources, including teammate Roberto Carlos, reported he suffered some form of seizure. He was quickly taken out of the starting line-up and whisked away to hospital. However, he made a gained recovery and was put back in the team. Ronaldo was a shadow of himself and, many thought, unfit to play, as France won 3-0. People have wondered ever since why he played. The secret document that could solve the mystery: Ronaldo's personal diary. Ronaldo was badly out-of-sorts against France Credit: AFP Did Uefa conspire to get Barcelona in the Champions League final? Nothing condones Chelsea players' behaviour after their Champions League semi-final defeat to Barcelona in 2009, but they certainly were on the rough end of some bad decisions at Stamford Bridge. Chelsea had three plausible penalty shouts turned down by Norwegian referee Tom Henning Ovrebo, with Michael Ballack chasing after him shouting expletives in his face. The general secretary of Uefa, David Taylor, was forced to deny accusations of Uefa favouritism towards Barcelona. "If anything it's a media conspiracy against Uefa," said Taylor. "It does make me angry. It really annoys me because it's a load of rubbish." The number of red cards received by opponents of Barcelona fueled this spurious theory: Arsenal's Jens Lehman in the 2006 Champions League final, Inter's Thiago Motta in the 2009 semi-final, Arsenal's Robin van Persie in a 2011 last-16 tie and John Terry in a 2012 semi-final to name a few. The secret document that could solve the mystery: There are none. A mixture of human error and gamesmanship are to blame.
With long-classified documents concerning the assassination of President John F Kennedy due to be released pending President Donald Trump&#39;s approval, conspiracy theories are running wild. The sporting world is not immune to such theories either, with a long history of alleged fixes, frame-ups, biased officiating, doped-up athletes and inside jobs filling the imagination of aggrieved and bitter fans. Let&#39;s ignore Ockham&#39;s Razor and entertain some of them. Did Sonny Liston take a dive? By 1965, Muhammad Ali was no longer Cassius Clay and had taken the world heavyweight title from the grasp of intimidating bruiser Sonny Liston. Their second title fight in Maine however, would be shrouded in controversy forevermore. Ali caught Liston with what looked an innocuous counter-punch in the first-round, but Liston hit the canvas. Referee Jersey Joe Walcott did not begin the count, and the after Liston stayed down for more than 10 seconds the fight was stopped after a brief resumption. Ali won on technical knockout, and the decisive blow was called &#39;The Phantom Punch&#39;. Rumours abound that Liston bet against on himself to pay off gambling debts, that the Nation of Islam made threats against his life or the Mafia fixed the result. Ali&#39;s punch did catch Liston a glancing blow to the temple however, and that would be the simplest explanation. Make your own mind up. The secret document that could solve the mystery: Sonny Liston&#39;s bookmaker&#39;s ledger. Did an Arsenal-supporting chef poison Tottenham? An episode that left the southern end of Seven Sisters Road in stitches for years. On the final day of the 2005-6 Premier League season, victory over West Ham would have assured Tottenham Hotspur of Champions League qualification at the expense of fierce local rivals Arsenal. At the time, Spurs had not finished above Arsene Wenger&#39;s side since 1995. However, on the eve of the final-day decider at Upton Park, the Spurs squad was plagued by a mysterious bout of food poisoning. There we even doubts about the match going ahead, with key Spurs players such as Michael Carrick, Robbie Keane and Jermain Jenas suffering. It was later revealed, that the Italian food at their Canary Wharf hotel was probably to blame. &quot;Lasagne and spaghetti Bolognese were on the menu, we ate, and then in the middle of the night we started dropping like flies,&quot; reflected Jenas. &quot;It was mayhem.&quot; Spurs lost at West Ham 2-1, while a Thierry Henry hat-trick fired Arsenal to a 4-2 victory over Wigan in the final match at Highbury. The day was a rich source of schadenfreude and mocking chants for several seasons. The secret document that could solve the mystery:The head chef&#39;s Arsenal season ticket. Martin Jol consoled Robbie Keane Credit: EPA Did Colonel Gaddafi organise the disappearance of Shergar? With the exception of the Lord Lucan mystery, no disappearing act has left such a lasting imprint on British folklore. One of the great flat-racing horses in history, Derby winner Shergar was taken by armed men in balaclavas from his stables in Co Kildare Ireland in 1983, and never seen again. His fate is still unknown, and the incident has been the source of several books and films since. One lurid conspiracy theory is that he was kidnapped by the IRA and given to Libyan dictator Colonel Gaddafi in exchange for arms. Another is that he was taken by the New Orleans Mafia. The secret document that could solve the mystery: The horse&#39;s dental records. Did Bobby Riggs rig the &#39;Battle of the Sexes&#39;? 2017 was the year of the sporting novelty event with Floyd Mayweather Jr and Conor McGregor&#39;s ludicrous bout in Las Vegas, but it was by no means sport&#39;s first publicity stunt. In 1973, professional tennis player Bobby Riggs challenged multiple Grand Slam winner Billie Jean King to a match. The implication of course, was that the match would decide whether or not the best of the women&#39;s game could keep up with their male counterparts. King wiped the floor with him, and many suggested that Riggs had bet against himself and organised the whole event as a hustle. The more likely explanation is that the premise of the event - female athletes having to prove they are &#39;as good&#39; as men- was nonsense to begin with. The secret document that could solve the mystery: Riggs&#39; bank statement before and after the event. Billie Jean King holds down the net as Bobby Riggs Credit: AP Did Michael Phelps actually lose at the Beijing Olympics? Few could dispute Michael Phelps&#39;s Olympic legacy, but some do dispute his seventh Olympic gold won at the 2008 Beijing Olympics. The American made an awful start to the 100-meter butterfly final, and trailed Serbian Milorad Cavic for most of the race until he chased him down on the final length. The human eye could not decipher who had triumphed, but Phelps was awarded gold by one-hundredth of a second. The race time is measured by swimmers touching an electronic pad when they reach the line, and many fans believe Cavic actually got their first - but did not hit the pad firmly enough to register his time. The secret document that could solve the mystery: Finger prints. Why did Ronaldo play in the 1998 World Cup final? The &#39;original&#39; Ronaldo was the most exciting footballer in the world in 1998, but hours the World Cup final between Brazil and France he mysteriously fell ill. Sources, including teammate Roberto Carlos, reported he suffered some form of seizure. He was quickly taken out of the starting line-up and whisked away to hospital. However, he made a gained recovery and was put back in the team. Ronaldo was a shadow of himself and, many thought, unfit to play, as France won 3-0. People have wondered ever since why he played. The secret document that could solve the mystery: Ronaldo&#39;s personal diary. Ronaldo was badly out-of-sorts against France Credit: AFP Did Uefa conspire to get Barcelona in the Champions League final? Nothing condones Chelsea players&#39; behaviour after their Champions League semi-final defeat to Barcelona in 2009, but they certainly were on the rough end of some bad decisions at Stamford Bridge. Chelsea had three plausible penalty shouts turned down by Norwegian referee Tom Henning Ovrebo, with Michael Ballack chasing after him shouting expletives in his face. The general secretary of Uefa, David Taylor, was forced to deny accusations of Uefa favouritism towards Barcelona. &quot;If anything it&#39;s a media conspiracy against Uefa,&quot; said Taylor. &quot;It does make me angry. It really annoys me because it&#39;s a load of rubbish.&quot; The number of red cards received by opponents of Barcelona fueled this spurious theory: Arsenal&#39;s Jens Lehman in the 2006 Champions League final, Inter&#39;s Thiago Motta in the 2009 semi-final, Arsenal&#39;s Robin van Persie in a 2011 last-16 tie and John Terry in a 2012 semi-final to name a few. The secret document that could solve the mystery: There are none. A mixture of human error and gamesmanship are to blame.
The secret documents that could shed light on sport's famous conspiracy theories
With long-classified documents concerning the assassination of President John F Kennedy due to be released pending President Donald Trump's approval, conspiracy theories are running wild. The sporting world is not immune to such theories either, with a long history of alleged fixes, frame-ups, biased officiating, doped-up athletes and inside jobs filling the imagination of aggrieved and bitter fans. Let's ignore Ockham's Razor and entertain some of them. Did Sonny Liston take a dive? By 1965, Muhammad Ali was no longer Cassius Clay and had taken the world heavyweight title from the grasp of intimidating bruiser Sonny Liston. Their second title fight in Maine however, would be shrouded in controversy forevermore. Ali caught Liston with what looked an innocuous counter-punch in the first-round, but Liston hit the canvas. Referee Jersey Joe Walcott did not begin the count, and the after Liston stayed down for more than 10 seconds the fight was stopped after a brief resumption. Ali won on technical knockout, and the decisive blow was called 'The Phantom Punch'. Rumours abound that Liston bet against on himself to pay off gambling debts, that the Nation of Islam made threats against his life or the Mafia fixed the result. Ali's punch did catch Liston a glancing blow to the temple however, and that would be the simplest explanation. Make your own mind up. The secret document that could solve the mystery: Sonny Liston's bookmaker's ledger. Did an Arsenal-supporting chef poison Tottenham? An episode that left the southern end of Seven Sisters Road in stitches for years. On the final day of the 2005-6 Premier League season, victory over West Ham would have assured Tottenham Hotspur of Champions League qualification at the expense of fierce local rivals Arsenal. At the time, Spurs had not finished above Arsene Wenger's side since 1995. However, on the eve of the final-day decider at Upton Park, the Spurs squad was plagued by a mysterious bout of food poisoning. There we even doubts about the match going ahead, with key Spurs players such as Michael Carrick, Robbie Keane and Jermain Jenas suffering. It was later revealed, that the Italian food at their Canary Wharf hotel was probably to blame. "Lasagne and spaghetti Bolognese were on the menu, we ate, and then in the middle of the night we started dropping like flies," reflected Jenas. "It was mayhem." Spurs lost at West Ham 2-1, while a Thierry Henry hat-trick fired Arsenal to a 4-2 victory over Wigan in the final match at Highbury. The day was a rich source of schadenfreude and mocking chants for several seasons. The secret document that could solve the mystery:The head chef's Arsenal season ticket. Martin Jol consoled Robbie Keane Credit: EPA Did Colonel Gaddafi organise the disappearance of Shergar? With the exception of the Lord Lucan mystery, no disappearing act has left such a lasting imprint on British folklore. One of the great flat-racing horses in history, Derby winner Shergar was taken by armed men in balaclavas from his stables in Co Kildare Ireland in 1983, and never seen again. His fate is still unknown, and the incident has been the source of several books and films since. One lurid conspiracy theory is that he was kidnapped by the IRA and given to Libyan dictator Colonel Gaddafi in exchange for arms. Another is that he was taken by the New Orleans Mafia. The secret document that could solve the mystery: The horse's dental records. Did Bobby Riggs rig the 'Battle of the Sexes'? 2017 was the year of the sporting novelty event with Floyd Mayweather Jr and Conor McGregor's ludicrous bout in Las Vegas, but it was by no means sport's first publicity stunt. In 1973, professional tennis player Bobby Riggs challenged multiple Grand Slam winner Billie Jean King to a match. The implication of course, was that the match would decide whether or not the best of the women's game could keep up with their male counterparts. King wiped the floor with him, and many suggested that Riggs had bet against himself and organised the whole event as a hustle. The more likely explanation is that the premise of the event - female athletes having to prove they are 'as good' as men- was nonsense to begin with. The secret document that could solve the mystery: Riggs' bank statement before and after the event. Billie Jean King holds down the net as Bobby Riggs Credit: AP Did Michael Phelps actually lose at the Beijing Olympics? Few could dispute Michael Phelps's Olympic legacy, but some do dispute his seventh Olympic gold won at the 2008 Beijing Olympics. The American made an awful start to the 100-meter butterfly final, and trailed Serbian Milorad Cavic for most of the race until he chased him down on the final length. The human eye could not decipher who had triumphed, but Phelps was awarded gold by one-hundredth of a second. The race time is measured by swimmers touching an electronic pad when they reach the line, and many fans believe Cavic actually got their first - but did not hit the pad firmly enough to register his time. The secret document that could solve the mystery: Finger prints. Why did Ronaldo play in the 1998 World Cup final? The 'original' Ronaldo was the most exciting footballer in the world in 1998, but hours the World Cup final between Brazil and France he mysteriously fell ill. Sources, including teammate Roberto Carlos, reported he suffered some form of seizure. He was quickly taken out of the starting line-up and whisked away to hospital. However, he made a gained recovery and was put back in the team. Ronaldo was a shadow of himself and, many thought, unfit to play, as France won 3-0. People have wondered ever since why he played. The secret document that could solve the mystery: Ronaldo's personal diary. Ronaldo was badly out-of-sorts against France Credit: AFP Did Uefa conspire to get Barcelona in the Champions League final? Nothing condones Chelsea players' behaviour after their Champions League semi-final defeat to Barcelona in 2009, but they certainly were on the rough end of some bad decisions at Stamford Bridge. Chelsea had three plausible penalty shouts turned down by Norwegian referee Tom Henning Ovrebo, with Michael Ballack chasing after him shouting expletives in his face. The general secretary of Uefa, David Taylor, was forced to deny accusations of Uefa favouritism towards Barcelona. "If anything it's a media conspiracy against Uefa," said Taylor. "It does make me angry. It really annoys me because it's a load of rubbish." The number of red cards received by opponents of Barcelona fueled this spurious theory: Arsenal's Jens Lehman in the 2006 Champions League final, Inter's Thiago Motta in the 2009 semi-final, Arsenal's Robin van Persie in a 2011 last-16 tie and John Terry in a 2012 semi-final to name a few. The secret document that could solve the mystery: There are none. A mixture of human error and gamesmanship are to blame.
<p>The <em>Scream Queens</em> hunk transformed himself into Olympic swimmer Ryan Lochte — who was all the talk in 2016 — silver hair and all! (Photo: SMXRF/Star Max/GC Images) </p>
Taylor Lautner

The Scream Queens hunk transformed himself into Olympic swimmer Ryan Lochte — who was all the talk in 2016 — silver hair and all! (Photo: SMXRF/Star Max/GC Images)

The Olympic gold medalist sits down with Yahoo Sports and shares the lowest point of his life and what he ​had to do to overcome it.
Michael Phelps' darkest moment: 'I didn't want to be alive'
The Olympic gold medalist sits down with Yahoo Sports and shares the lowest point of his life and what he ​had to do to overcome it.
The Olympic gold medalist sits down with Yahoo Sports and shares the lowest point of his life and what he ​had to do to overcome it.
Michael Phelps' darkest moment: 'I didn't want to be alive'
The Olympic gold medalist sits down with Yahoo Sports and shares the lowest point of his life and what he ​had to do to overcome it.
The Olympic gold medalist sits down with Yahoo Sports and shares the lowest point of his life and what he ​had to do to overcome it. He also discusses the negative impact social media has on our mental health. <em>If you or someone you know needs help, call 1-800-273-8255 for the <a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="http://www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:National">National </a></em><em><a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="http://www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Suicide Prevention Lifeline">Suicide Prevention Lifeline</a>. You can also text HELLO to 741-741 for free, </em><em>24-hour support from the <a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="http://www.crisistextline.org/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Crisis Text Line">Crisis Text Line</a>.</em>
Michael Phelps' darkest moment: 'I didn't want to be alive'
The Olympic gold medalist sits down with Yahoo Sports and shares the lowest point of his life and what he ​had to do to overcome it. He also discusses the negative impact social media has on our mental health. If you or someone you know needs help, call 1-800-273-8255 for the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline. You can also text HELLO to 741-741 for free, 24-hour support from the Crisis Text Line.
The Olympic gold medalist sits down with Yahoo Sports and shares the lowest point of his life and what he ​had to do to overcome it.
Michael Phelps' darkest moment: 'I didn't want to be alive'
The Olympic gold medalist sits down with Yahoo Sports and shares the lowest point of his life and what he ​had to do to overcome it.
Michael Phelps might be sleeping soundly at night, knowing that his reign in the swimming pool is secure, but right now our attention is drawn elsewhere. In this short clip that comes to us from Chandigarh, India, we see something that might not be all too surprising, as we’ve seen <span>flying animals swim</span> before, but not yet seen a bat in the water, swimming like it is it’s second nature! Is nothing sacred anymore? These creatures of the night might not be famous for their prowess in the aquatic sports, so we just have to hand it to this guy; he looks like quite the pro! As you might have guessed it, the flying bloodsuckers are actually quite good at handling themselves during thick situations. According to the Smithsonian Museum, bats can swim if the need arises, but it’s certainly not part of their daily curriculum. Flying foxes, on the other hand, have been known to take a dive or two, if that means securing their next meal. Bats drink water on the wing; echolocation helps them track down a dam or river (or even a swimming pool), and they swoop down and skim the water's surface for some liquid refreshment. So while we don't know how this winged beast ended up in the water, we cannot exclude the possibility that the mammal was simply trying to have a drink and miscalculated its approach.
Giant Swimming Bat Confirms Your Worst Nightmares
Michael Phelps might be sleeping soundly at night, knowing that his reign in the swimming pool is secure, but right now our attention is drawn elsewhere. In this short clip that comes to us from Chandigarh, India, we see something that might not be all too surprising, as we’ve seen flying animals swim before, but not yet seen a bat in the water, swimming like it is it’s second nature! Is nothing sacred anymore? These creatures of the night might not be famous for their prowess in the aquatic sports, so we just have to hand it to this guy; he looks like quite the pro! As you might have guessed it, the flying bloodsuckers are actually quite good at handling themselves during thick situations. According to the Smithsonian Museum, bats can swim if the need arises, but it’s certainly not part of their daily curriculum. Flying foxes, on the other hand, have been known to take a dive or two, if that means securing their next meal. Bats drink water on the wing; echolocation helps them track down a dam or river (or even a swimming pool), and they swoop down and skim the water's surface for some liquid refreshment. So while we don't know how this winged beast ended up in the water, we cannot exclude the possibility that the mammal was simply trying to have a drink and miscalculated its approach.
Michael Phelps might be sleeping soundly at night, knowing that his reign in the swimming pool is secure, but right now our attention is drawn elsewhere. In this short clip that comes to us from Chandigarh, India, we see something that might not be all too surprising, as we’ve seen <span>flying animals swim</span> before, but not yet seen a bat in the water, swimming like it is it’s second nature! Is nothing sacred anymore? These creatures of the night might not be famous for their prowess in the aquatic sports, so we just have to hand it to this guy; he looks like quite the pro! As you might have guessed it, the flying bloodsuckers are actually quite good at handling themselves during thick situations. According to the Smithsonian Museum, bats can swim if the need arises, but it’s certainly not part of their daily curriculum. Flying foxes, on the other hand, have been known to take a dive or two, if that means securing their next meal. Bats drink water on the wing; echolocation helps them track down a dam or river (or even a swimming pool), and they swoop down and skim the water's surface for some liquid refreshment. So while we don't know how this winged beast ended up in the water, we cannot exclude the possibility that the mammal was simply trying to have a drink and miscalculated its approach.
Giant Swimming Bat Confirms Your Worst Nightmares
Michael Phelps might be sleeping soundly at night, knowing that his reign in the swimming pool is secure, but right now our attention is drawn elsewhere. In this short clip that comes to us from Chandigarh, India, we see something that might not be all too surprising, as we’ve seen flying animals swim before, but not yet seen a bat in the water, swimming like it is it’s second nature! Is nothing sacred anymore? These creatures of the night might not be famous for their prowess in the aquatic sports, so we just have to hand it to this guy; he looks like quite the pro! As you might have guessed it, the flying bloodsuckers are actually quite good at handling themselves during thick situations. According to the Smithsonian Museum, bats can swim if the need arises, but it’s certainly not part of their daily curriculum. Flying foxes, on the other hand, have been known to take a dive or two, if that means securing their next meal. Bats drink water on the wing; echolocation helps them track down a dam or river (or even a swimming pool), and they swoop down and skim the water's surface for some liquid refreshment. So while we don't know how this winged beast ended up in the water, we cannot exclude the possibility that the mammal was simply trying to have a drink and miscalculated its approach.
Michael Phelps might be sleeping soundly at night, knowing that his reign in the swimming pool is secure, but right now our attention is drawn elsewhere. In this short clip that comes to us from Chandigarh, India, we see something that might not be all too surprising, as we’ve seen <span>flying animals swim</span> before, but not yet seen a bat in the water, swimming like it is it’s second nature! Is nothing sacred anymore? These creatures of the night might not be famous for their prowess in the aquatic sports, so we just have to hand it to this guy; he looks like quite the pro! As you might have guessed it, the flying bloodsuckers are actually quite good at handling themselves during thick situations. According to the Smithsonian Museum, bats can swim if the need arises, but it’s certainly not part of their daily curriculum. Flying foxes, on the other hand, have been known to take a dive or two, if that means securing their next meal. Bats drink water on the wing; echolocation helps them track down a dam or river (or even a swimming pool), and they swoop down and skim the water's surface for some liquid refreshment. So while we don't know how this winged beast ended up in the water, we cannot exclude the possibility that the mammal was simply trying to have a drink and miscalculated its approach.
Giant Swimming Bat Confirms Your Worst Nightmares
Michael Phelps might be sleeping soundly at night, knowing that his reign in the swimming pool is secure, but right now our attention is drawn elsewhere. In this short clip that comes to us from Chandigarh, India, we see something that might not be all too surprising, as we’ve seen flying animals swim before, but not yet seen a bat in the water, swimming like it is it’s second nature! Is nothing sacred anymore? These creatures of the night might not be famous for their prowess in the aquatic sports, so we just have to hand it to this guy; he looks like quite the pro! As you might have guessed it, the flying bloodsuckers are actually quite good at handling themselves during thick situations. According to the Smithsonian Museum, bats can swim if the need arises, but it’s certainly not part of their daily curriculum. Flying foxes, on the other hand, have been known to take a dive or two, if that means securing their next meal. Bats drink water on the wing; echolocation helps them track down a dam or river (or even a swimming pool), and they swoop down and skim the water's surface for some liquid refreshment. So while we don't know how this winged beast ended up in the water, we cannot exclude the possibility that the mammal was simply trying to have a drink and miscalculated its approach.
Michael Phelps might be sleeping soundly at night, knowing that his reign in the swimming pool is secure, but right now our attention is drawn elsewhere. In this short clip that comes to us from Chandigarh, India, we see something that might not be all too surprising, as we’ve seen <span>flying animals swim</span> before, but not yet seen a bat in the water, swimming like it is it’s second nature! Is nothing sacred anymore? These creatures of the night might not be famous for their prowess in the aquatic sports, so we just have to hand it to this guy; he looks like quite the pro! As you might have guessed it, the flying bloodsuckers are actually quite good at handling themselves during thick situations. According to the Smithsonian Museum, bats can swim if the need arises, but it’s certainly not part of their daily curriculum. Flying foxes, on the other hand, have been known to take a dive or two, if that means securing their next meal. Bats drink water on the wing; echolocation helps them track down a dam or river (or even a swimming pool), and they swoop down and skim the water's surface for some liquid refreshment. So while we don't know how this winged beast ended up in the water, we cannot exclude the possibility that the mammal was simply trying to have a drink and miscalculated its approach.
Giant Swimming Bat Confirms Your Worst Nightmares
Michael Phelps might be sleeping soundly at night, knowing that his reign in the swimming pool is secure, but right now our attention is drawn elsewhere. In this short clip that comes to us from Chandigarh, India, we see something that might not be all too surprising, as we’ve seen flying animals swim before, but not yet seen a bat in the water, swimming like it is it’s second nature! Is nothing sacred anymore? These creatures of the night might not be famous for their prowess in the aquatic sports, so we just have to hand it to this guy; he looks like quite the pro! As you might have guessed it, the flying bloodsuckers are actually quite good at handling themselves during thick situations. According to the Smithsonian Museum, bats can swim if the need arises, but it’s certainly not part of their daily curriculum. Flying foxes, on the other hand, have been known to take a dive or two, if that means securing their next meal. Bats drink water on the wing; echolocation helps them track down a dam or river (or even a swimming pool), and they swoop down and skim the water's surface for some liquid refreshment. So while we don't know how this winged beast ended up in the water, we cannot exclude the possibility that the mammal was simply trying to have a drink and miscalculated its approach.
The Olympic gold medalist shares his son&#39;s favorite activity and what his expectations of life are going to be with a new family addition. Also, he discusses his latest environmental initiative with Colgate called Save Water.
Michael Phelps on new baby: 'Having two running around will be hectic'
The Olympic gold medalist shares his son's favorite activity and what his expectations of life are going to be with a new family addition. Also, he discusses his latest environmental initiative with Colgate called Save Water.
The Olympic gold medalist shares his son&#39;s favorite activity and what his expectations of life are going to be with a new family addition. Also, he discusses his latest environmental initiative with Colgate called Save Water.
Michael Phelps on new baby: 'Having two running around will be hectic'
The Olympic gold medalist shares his son's favorite activity and what his expectations of life are going to be with a new family addition. Also, he discusses his latest environmental initiative with Colgate called Save Water.

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