Sen. Marco Rubio

Yahoo News

Addressing what he calls a "growing opportunity gap" between people with and without advanced educations, Sen. Marco Rubio is calling for state-accredited alternatives to four-year colleges and income-based repayments for college loans.

The Florida senator and possible 2016 Republican presidential contender also says Congress should establish an independent accrediting agency to assess free courses offered over the Internet and elsewhere as transferrable credits. (AP)

Find more news related pictures in our photo galleries and follow us on Tumblr

Sen. Marco Rubio R-Fla., gestures as he speaks during the Values Voter Summit, held by the Family Research Council Action, Friday, Oct. 11, 2013, in Washington. ( AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)
Sen. Marco Rubio R-Fla., gestures as he speaks during the Values Voter Summit, held by the Family Research Council Action, Friday, Oct. 11, 2013, in Washington. ( AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)
Sen. Marco Rubio R-Fla., gestures as he speaks during the Values Voter Summit, held by the Family Research Council Action, Friday, Oct. 11, 2013, in Washington. ( AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)
Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., speaks at the 40th annual Conservative Political Action Conference in National Harbor, MD., Thursday, March 14, 2013. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)
Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., speaks at the 40th annual Conservative Political Action Conference in National Harbor, MD., Thursday, March 14, 2013. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)
Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., speaks at the 40th annual Conservative Political Action Conference in National Harbor, MD., Thursday, March 14, 2013. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)
FILE – In this Jan. 28, 2013, file photo Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., center, speaks at a Capitol Hill news conference on immigration legislation with a members of a bipartisan group of leading senators, including, from left, Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y. and Sen. Robert Menendez, D-N.J., in Washington. Tens of thousands are expected to rally in dozens of cities from New York to Bozeman, Mont., on Wednesday in what has become an annual cry for easing the nation's immigration laws. The rallies carry a special sense of urgency this year, two weeks after a bipartisan group of senators introduced a bill that would bring many of the estimated 11 million living in the U.S. illegally out of the shadows. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
FILE – In this Jan. 28, 2013, file photo Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., center, speaks at a Capitol Hill news conference on immigration legislation with a members of a bipartisan group of leading senators, including, from left, Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y. and Sen. Robert Menendez, D-N.J., in Washington. Tens of thousands are expected to rally in dozens of cities from New York to Bozeman, Mont., on Wednesday in what has become an annual cry for easing the nation's immigration laws. The rallies carry a special sense of urgency this year, two weeks after a bipartisan group of senators introduced a bill that would bring many of the estimated 11 million living in the U.S. illegally out of the shadows. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
FILE – In this Jan. 28, 2013, file photo Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., center, speaks at a Capitol Hill news conference on immigration legislation with a members of a bipartisan group of leading senators, including, from left, Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y. and Sen. Robert Menendez, D-N.J., in Washington. Tens of thousands are expected to rally in dozens of cities from New York to Bozeman, Mont., on Wednesday in what has become an annual cry for easing the nation's immigration laws. The rallies carry a special sense of urgency this year, two weeks after a bipartisan group of senators introduced a bill that would bring many of the estimated 11 million living in the U.S. illegally out of the shadows. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., center, greets attendees as he is followed by Ralph Reed, founder of the Faith and Freedom Coalition, left, after he spoke at the "Road to Majority" conference in Washington, Thursday, June 13, 2013. The fight for the direction of the Republican Party will be on display Thursday at a Washington conference hosted by the Faith and Freedom Coalition, a group created by former Christian Coalition leader Ralph Reed. Designed to strengthen the evangelical influence in national politics, the conference gives many religious conservative activists their first look at potential 2016 presidential candidates. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., center, greets attendees as he is followed by Ralph Reed, founder of the Faith and Freedom Coalition, left, after he spoke at the "Road to Majority" conference in Washington, Thursday, June 13, 2013. The fight for the direction of the Republican Party will be on display Thursday at a Washington conference hosted by the Faith and Freedom Coalition, a group created by former Christian Coalition leader Ralph Reed. Designed to strengthen the evangelical influence in national politics, the conference gives many religious conservative activists their first look at potential 2016 presidential candidates. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., center, greets attendees as he is followed by Ralph Reed, founder of the Faith and Freedom Coalition, left, after he spoke at the "Road to Majority" conference in Washington, Thursday, June 13, 2013. The fight for the direction of the Republican Party will be on display Thursday at a Washington conference hosted by the Faith and Freedom Coalition, a group created by former Christian Coalition leader Ralph Reed. Designed to strengthen the evangelical influence in national politics, the conference gives many religious conservative activists their first look at potential 2016 presidential candidates. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
FILE - In this Thursday, June 13, 2013 file photo, Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., speaks at the Faith and Freedom Coalition Road to Majority Conference in Washington. Rubio warned Tuesday, Aug. 13, 2013 that if Congress doesn't pass immigration overhaul legislation, President Barack Obama may act on his own to legalize the 11 million immigrants already in the U.S. illegally. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
FILE - In this Thursday, June 13, 2013 file photo, Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., speaks at the Faith and Freedom Coalition Road to Majority Conference in Washington. Rubio warned Tuesday, Aug. 13, 2013 that if Congress doesn't pass immigration overhaul legislation, President Barack Obama may act on his own to legalize the 11 million immigrants already in the U.S. illegally. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
FILE - In this Thursday, June 13, 2013 file photo, Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., speaks at the Faith and Freedom Coalition Road to Majority Conference in Washington. Rubio warned Tuesday, Aug. 13, 2013 that if Congress doesn't pass immigration overhaul legislation, President Barack Obama may act on his own to legalize the 11 million immigrants already in the U.S. illegally. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
FILE - Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., addresses the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in Washington, in this Feb. 9, 2012 file photo. The Florida senator and potential Republican presidential hopeful will argue in remarks Wednesday Nov. 2013 at the conservative American Enterprise Institute in Washington that diplomacy and foreign aid should "vastly outnumber" the country's uses of military force, according to excerpts provided to The Associated Press. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
FILE - Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., addresses the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in Washington, in this Feb. 9, 2012 file photo. The Florida senator and potential Republican presidential hopeful will argue in remarks Wednesday Nov. 2013 at the conservative American Enterprise Institute in Washington that diplomacy and foreign aid should "vastly outnumber" the country's uses of military force, according to excerpts provided to The Associated Press. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
FILE - Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., addresses the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in Washington, in this Feb. 9, 2012 file photo. The Florida senator and potential Republican presidential hopeful will argue in remarks Wednesday Nov. 2013 at the conservative American Enterprise Institute in Washington that diplomacy and foreign aid should "vastly outnumber" the country's uses of military force, according to excerpts provided to The Associated Press. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
In this Feb. 7, 2013 photo, Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., speaks with The Associated Press in his Capitol Hill office in Washington. In the nearly 100 days since President Barack Obama won a second term, the Florida senator has taken calculated, concrete steps to emerge as a next generation leader of a rudderless party and put a 21st Century stamp on the conservative movement. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
In this Feb. 7, 2013 photo, Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., speaks with The Associated Press in his Capitol Hill office in Washington. In the nearly 100 days since President Barack Obama won a second term, the Florida senator has taken calculated, concrete steps to emerge as a next generation leader of a rudderless party and put a 21st Century stamp on the conservative movement. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
In this Feb. 7, 2013 photo, Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., speaks with The Associated Press in his Capitol Hill office in Washington. In the nearly 100 days since President Barack Obama won a second term, the Florida senator has taken calculated, concrete steps to emerge as a next generation leader of a rudderless party and put a 21st Century stamp on the conservative movement. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
FILE - In this Aug. 23, 2011 file photo, Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla. speaks in Simi Valley, Calif. Rubio's push for a Republican version of immigration legislation could be the answer to GOP election-year prayers. The telegenic son of Cuban exiles and potential vice presidential pick is putting together a bill that would allow young illegal immigrants to study and work in the United States but still deny them citizenship. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File)
FILE - In this Aug. 23, 2011 file photo, Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla. speaks in Simi Valley, Calif. Rubio's push for a Republican version of immigration legislation could be the answer to GOP election-year prayers. The telegenic son of Cuban exiles and potential vice presidential pick is putting together a bill that would allow young illegal immigrants to study and work in the United States but still deny them citizenship. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File)
FILE - In this Aug. 23, 2011 file photo, Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla. speaks in Simi Valley, Calif. Rubio's push for a Republican version of immigration legislation could be the answer to GOP election-year prayers. The telegenic son of Cuban exiles and potential vice presidential pick is putting together a bill that would allow young illegal immigrants to study and work in the United States but still deny them citizenship. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File)
FILE - In this Nov. 13, 2012 file photo, Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., a member of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, speaks to reporters after leaving a closed-door meeting investigating the violent Sept. 11, assault on the American consulate in Benghazi, Libya at the Capitol in Washington, A struggling Republican party is hanging ever more hope for its revitalization on Sen. Marco Rubio, a Cuban-American seen by many as a top contender for its 2016 presidential nomination. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
FILE - In this Nov. 13, 2012 file photo, Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., a member of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, speaks to reporters after leaving a closed-door meeting investigating the violent Sept. 11, assault on the American consulate in Benghazi, Libya at the Capitol in Washington, A struggling Republican party is hanging ever more hope for its revitalization on Sen. Marco Rubio, a Cuban-American seen by many as a top contender for its 2016 presidential nomination. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
FILE - In this Nov. 13, 2012 file photo, Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., a member of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, speaks to reporters after leaving a closed-door meeting investigating the violent Sept. 11, assault on the American consulate in Benghazi, Libya at the Capitol in Washington, A struggling Republican party is hanging ever more hope for its revitalization on Sen. Marco Rubio, a Cuban-American seen by many as a top contender for its 2016 presidential nomination. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
FILE - In htis April 23, 2012, file photo Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, campaigning with Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., talks to reporters in Aston, Pa. When Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney picks his running mate, odds are he’ll select someone with far less wealth than his own. Unless he chooses Hewlett-Packard CEO Meg Whitman, one of the richest women in America. Some of the potential Republican vice presidential nominees are grappling with the same financial issues as many of their countrymen. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File)
FILE - In htis April 23, 2012, file photo Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, campaigning with Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., talks to reporters in Aston, Pa. When Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney picks his running mate, odds are he’ll select someone with far less wealth than his own. Unless he chooses Hewlett-Packard CEO Meg Whitman, one of the richest women in America. Some of the potential Republican vice presidential nominees are grappling with the same financial issues as many of their countrymen. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File)
FILE - In htis April 23, 2012, file photo Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, campaigning with Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., talks to reporters in Aston, Pa. When Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney picks his running mate, odds are he’ll select someone with far less wealth than his own. Unless he chooses Hewlett-Packard CEO Meg Whitman, one of the richest women in America. Some of the potential Republican vice presidential nominees are grappling with the same financial issues as many of their countrymen. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File)
U.S. Republican Senate candidate Marco Rubio (C) waves as he leaves the stage with his wife Jeanette (L), mother Oria (R), and daughter Amanda, during an outdoor victory celebration at the Biltmore Hotel in Coral Gables, Florida November 2, 2010. REUTERS/Hans Deryk
Marco Rubio
U.S. Republican Senate candidate Marco Rubio (C) waves as he leaves the stage with his wife Jeanette (L), mother Oria (R), and daughter Amanda, during an outdoor victory celebration at the Biltmore Hotel in Coral Gables, Florida November 2, 2010. REUTERS/Hans Deryk
U.S. Senator Marco Rubio (R-FL) addresses the American Conservative Union's annual Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in Washington, February 9, 2012. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Marco Rubio
U.S. Senator Marco Rubio (R-FL) addresses the American Conservative Union's annual Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in Washington, February 9, 2012. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. Senate candidate Marco Rubio (R-FL) holds his son Dominick as he sits next to his wife Jeanette (R) during a public event to sign election documents to officially qualify as a Republican party candidate for the U.S. Senate in West Miami, Florida April 27, 2010. Former Vice President Dick Cheney endorsed Republican Marco Rubio in Florida's U.S. Senate race and coupled his announcement with sharp criticism of Rubio's competitor, Governor Charlie Crist. As conservative favorite Rubio picks up momentum before the August 31 primary, support for Crist has been dropping in the Republican Party to the extent that the Florida governor has been contemplating whether to run as an independent. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
Marco Rubio
U.S. Senate candidate Marco Rubio (R-FL) holds his son Dominick as he sits next to his wife Jeanette (R) during a public event to sign election documents to officially qualify as a Republican party candidate for the U.S. Senate in West Miami, Florida April 27, 2010. Former Vice President Dick Cheney endorsed Republican Marco Rubio in Florida's U.S. Senate race and coupled his announcement with sharp criticism of Rubio's competitor, Governor Charlie Crist. As conservative favorite Rubio picks up momentum before the August 31 primary, support for Crist has been dropping in the Republican Party to the extent that the Florida governor has been contemplating whether to run as an independent. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
Republican U.S. Senate candidate Marco Rubio talks to reporters after casting his ballot in Miami November 2, 2010. REUTERS/Hans Deryk
Marco Rubio
Republican U.S. Senate candidate Marco Rubio talks to reporters after casting his ballot in Miami November 2, 2010. REUTERS/Hans Deryk

What to Read Next