Last song for migrating birds

Across the Mediterranean, millions of migrating songbirds are killed for food, profit, and cruel amusement.

In the July issue of National Geographic Magazine, photographer David Guttenfelder brings this disturbing practice into light.

To read an interview with Guttenfelder and watch the video about this project, click here.



Cyprus -  A whitethroat, en route to winter grounds in Africa, is caught on a lime stick. © David Guttenfelder/National Geographic
Songbird migration
Cyprus -  A whitethroat, en route to winter grounds in Africa, is caught on a lime stick. © David Guttenfelder/National Geographic
Italy -  This poachers tray of frozen songbirds, most only inches long, was confiscated by forest rangers. Illegally hunted birds are secretly served as a delicacy in restaurants and homes. © David Guttenfelder/National Geographic
Songbird migration
Italy -  This poachers tray of frozen songbirds, most only inches long, was confiscated by forest rangers. Illegally hunted birds are secretly served as a delicacy in restaurants and homes. © David Guttenfelder/National Geographic
 Italy -  A metal snap trap operates like a mousetrap, with berries as the bait. Catching birds this way is illegal, but poachers still use the traps in the northern woods. This European robin, fatally pinned by its neck and foot, was discovered by rangers on patrol. © David Guttenfelder/National Geographic
Songbird migration
Italy -  A metal snap trap operates like a mousetrap, with berries as the bait. Catching birds this way is illegal, but poachers still use the traps in the northern woods. This European robin, fatally pinned by its neck and foot, was discovered by rangers on patrol. © David Guttenfelder/National Geographic
Egypt - A tethered raptor serves as a trapper&rsquo;s spotter. When the bird spies a falcon, it looks up. This alerts the trapper to release a small bird wearing a snare, trapping the falcon if it comes in for the kill. Falconers pay up to $35,000 for a live falcon. &copy; David Guttenfelder/National Geographic<br><br>
Songbird migration
Egypt - A tethered raptor serves as a trapper’s spotter. When the bird spies a falcon, it looks up. This alerts the trapper to release a small bird wearing a snare, trapping the falcon if it comes in for the kill. Falconers pay up to $35,000 for a live falcon. © David Guttenfelder/National Geographic

Cyprus -&nbsp; After prying this blackcap from a lime stick, the songbirds rescuer uses his saliva to remove sticky plum tree sap from its feathers and feet so that it can safely fly when released. &copy; David Guttenfelder/National Geographic
Songbird migration
Cyprus -  After prying this blackcap from a lime stick, the songbirds rescuer uses his saliva to remove sticky plum tree sap from its feathers and feet so that it can safely fly when released. © David Guttenfelder/National Geographic
THE JULY 2013 ISSUE OF NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC MAGAZINE.
Songbird migration
THE JULY 2013 ISSUE OF NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC MAGAZINE.

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