La. cemeteries sinking, washing away

At least two dozen cemeteries across the southeast Louisiana

coast that are rapidly sinking or washing away because of erosion and

subsidence accelerated by the tropical punch of storms such as Katrina,

Rita, Gustav, Ike, Lee and Isaac. (AP)

In this Dec. 29, 2012 photo, water washes around an infant's tomb in a Leeville, La., cemetery. What's left of the old Leeville cemetery is only accessible by boat. Some headstones are barely visible above the water, and waves lap at the bricks and concrete surrounding caskets buried at the site since the late 1800s. Much of the ground has subsided to barely sea level, and during Hurricane Isaac, about seven feet of land washed away in the tidal surge. (AP Photo/Dave Martin)

In this Dec. 29, 2012 photo, water washes around and against the tombs of those buried in a Leeville, La., cemetery. What's left of the old Leeville cemetery is only accessible by boat. Some headstones are barely visible above the water, and waves lap at the bricks and concrete surrounding caskets buried at the site since the late 1800s. Much of the ground has subsided to barely sea level, and during Hurricane Isaac, about seven feet of land washed away in the tidal surge. (AP Photo/Dave Martin)

In this Dec. 29, 2012 photo, water washes around the tombs of those buried in a Leeville, La., cemetery. What's left of the old Leeville cemetery is only accessible by boat. Some headstones are barely visible above the water, and waves lap at the bricks and concrete surrounding caskets buried at the site since the late 1800s. Much of the ground has subsided to barely sea level, and during Hurricane Isaac, about seven feet of land washed away in the tidal surge. (AP Photo/Dave Martin)

In this Dec. 29, 2012 photo, a leafless tree stands over graves in the Cheniere Caminada cemetery in Grand Isle, La. Many coastal Louisiana cemeteries are just skeletons of what they used to be. The few trees still standing have been killed by saltwater intrusion from the Gulf. Their leafless branches are suspended above marsh grass left brown and soggy from saltwater that has crept up from beneath the graves. (AP Photo/Dave Martin)

This Saturday, Dec. 29, 2012 photo shows a small family cemetery along the bayou near Leeville, La. Some 11 cemeteries in Jefferson Parish have repeatedly flooded since Katrina, and in Lafourche, Terrebonne and Plaquemines parishes, more than a dozen others have succumbed to tidal surges. Much of the ground has subsided to barely sea level, and during Hurricane Isaac, about seven feet of land washed away in the tidal surge. (AP Photo/Dave Martin)

In this Dec. 29, 2012 photo, water washes around and against the tombs of those buried in a Leeville, La., cemetery. What's left of the old Leeville cemetery is only accessible by boat. Some headstones are barely visible above the water, and waves lap at the bricks and concrete surrounding caskets buried at the site since the late 1800s. Much of the ground has subsided to barely sea level, and during Hurricane Isaac, about seven feet of land washed away in the tidal surge. (AP Photo/Dave Martin)

In this Dec. 29, 2012 photo, a leafless tree stands over graves in the Cheniere Caminada cemetery in Grand Isle, La. Many coastal Louisiana cemeteries are just skeletons of what they used to be. The few trees still standing have been killed by saltwater intrusion from the Gulf. Their leafless branches are suspended above marsh grass left brown and soggy from saltwater that has crept up from beneath the graves. (AP Photo/Dave Martin)

In this Dec. 29, 2012 photo, South Lafourche Levee District General Manager Windell Curole, who also serves on the state's Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority, handles pieces of headstone at his small family cemetery which sits along the bayou near Leeville, La. Some 11 cemeteries in Jefferson Parish have repeatedly flooded since Katrina, and in Lafourche, Terrebonne and Plaquemines parishes, more than a dozen others have succumbed to tidal surges. Curole said saltwater from the Gulf is causing a crippling subsidence problem. (AP Photo/Dave Martin)

In this Dec. 29, 2012 photo, South Lafourche Levee District General Manager Windell Curole, who also serves on the state's Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority, walks through his small family cemetery which sits along the bayou near Leeville, La. Some 11 cemeteries in Jefferson Parish have repeatedly flooded since Katrina, and in Lafourche, Terrebonne and Plaquemines parishes, more than a dozen others have succumbed to tidal surges. Curole said saltwater from the Gulf is causing a crippling subsidence problem. (AP Photo/Dave Martin)