Jersey Shore reopens post-Sandy

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie cut a ribbon to symbolically reopen the state's shore for the summer season, seven months after being devastated by Superstorm Sandy. This year's ceremonies are more poignant seven months after a storm that did an estimated $37 billion of damage in the state.

President Barack Obama speaks outside the Asbury Park Convention Hall ,Tuesday, May 28, 2013 in Asbury Park, New Jersey. Obama traveled to New Jersey to join Gov. Chris Christie to inspect and tour the Jersey Shore's recovery efforts from Hurricane Sandy. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

President Barack Obama shakes hands with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie before speaking outside at Asbury Park Convention Hall ,Tuesday, May 28, 2013 in Asbury Park, New Jersey. Obama traveled to New Jersey to join Christie to inspect and tour the Jersey Shore's recovery efforts from Hurricane Sandy. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

President Barack Obama shakes hands with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie before speaking outside at Asbury Park Convention Hall ,Tuesday, May 28, 2013 in Asbury Park, New Jersey. Obama traveled to New Jersey to join Christie to inspect and tour the Jersey Shore's recovery efforts from Hurricane Sandy. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

President Barack Obama holds up a stuffed bear that New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, not shown, had won tossing a football after playing the 'Touchdown Fever' game on the boardwalk during their visit to Point Pleasant, NJ., Tuesday, May 28, 2013. Obama traveled to New Jersey to join Christie to inspect and tour the Jersey Shore's recovery efforts from Hurricane Sandy. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, right, talks to Carla Pilla, of Seaside Heights, N.J., while Robert Hilton, left, executive director of the Jersey Shore Convention and Visitor's Bureau, holds a sign, Friday, May 24, 2013, in Seaside Heights, N.J. Christie cut a ribbon to symbolically reopen the state's shore for the summer season, seven months after being devastated by Superstorm Sandy. Several beach communities have annual beach ribbon cuttings, announcing they are back in business. But this year's ceremonies are more poignant seven months after a storm that did an estimated $37 billion of damage in the state. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

Peg Allen, of Franklinville, N.J., with arms raised, watches a live performance by musical group Fun at the Seaside Heights boardwalk, Friday, May 24, 2013, in Seaside Heights, N.J. New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie cut a ribbon to symbolically reopen the state's shore for the summer season, seven months after being devastated by Superstorm Sandy. Several beach communities have annual beach ribbon cuttings, announcing they are back in business. But this year's ceremonies are more poignant seven months after a storm that did an estimated $37 billion of damage in the state. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, right, holds 6-week-old Willow DeParre, as first lady Mary Pat Christie looks on as they greet people during the opening of the New Jersey shore, Friday, May 24, 2013, in Seaside Heights, N.J. Christie cut a ribbon to symbolically reopen the state's shore for the summer season, seven months after being devastated by Superstorm Sandy. Several beach communities have annual beach ribbon cuttings, announcing they are back in business. But this year's ceremonies are more poignant seven months after a storm that did an estimated $37 billion of damage in the state. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

Daryl Gottilla, left, and his wife Denise, right, sit on a storm-damaged beach in Point Pleasant Beach NJ on May 10, 2013. Visitors to the Jersey shore this Memorial Day weekend will find many of their favorite beaches and boardwalks ready for summer, thanks to a massive rebuilding effort after Superstorm Sandy. While several neighborhoods remain damaged, all but one of the storm-wrecked boardwalks should be ready for Memorial Day weekend, and amusement rides will still be available from Keansburg to Wildwood. Most beaches will be open, despite losing sand during the storm. (AP Photo/Wayne Parry)

People gather around a stage as musical group Fun performs on the beach, Friday, May 24, 2013, in Seaside Heights, N.J. New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie cut a ribbon to symbolically reopen the state's shore for the summer season, seven months after being devastated by Superstorm Sandy. Several beach communities have annual beach ribbon cuttings, announcing they are back in business. But this year's ceremonies are more poignant seven months after a storm that did an estimated $37 billion of damage in the state. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

The claw of a crane, center, tears through the structure of the Jet Star Roller Coaster, Tuesday, May 14, 2013, in Seaside Heights, N.J. Workers began to demolish the roller coaster, which fell in the ocean when part of the Casino Pier was washed away by Superstorm Sandy in October. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

FILE - In a Feb. 25, 2013 file photo, the sun rises in Seaside Heights, N.J., behind the Jet Star Roller Coaster which has been sitting in the ocean after part of the Casino Pier was destroyed during Superstorm Sandy. Work is expected to start Tuesday afternoon, May 14, 2013 to remove the Jet Star coaster from the surf in Seaside Heights. (AP Photo/Mel Evans, File)

FILE - This Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012 file photo made available by the New Jersey Governor's Office shows flooding on the bay side of Seaside, N.J., after Superstorm Sandy made landfall. The unprecedented storm surge created by the storm caused the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to increase the number of storm surge forecasters at the National Hurricane Center starting with the 2013 Atlantic Hurricane season. They will also provide potential storm surge hazards at least 48 hours before the onset of tropical storm or gale-force winds. (AP Photo/New Jersey Governor's Office, Tim Larsen)

FILE - This Oct. 30, 2012 aerial file photo provided by the U.S. Air Force shows flooding on the New Jersey shoreline caused by Superstorm Sandy. The unprecedented storm surge caused by the storm caused the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to increase the number of storm surge forecasters at the National Hurricane Center starting with the 2013 Atlantic Hurricane season. They will also provide potential storm surge hazards at least 48 hours before the onset of tropical storm or gale-force winds. (AP Photo/U.S. Air Force, Master Sgt. Mark C. Olsen, File)

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