Holocaust Remembrance Day

Israel came to a standstill for two mournful minutes on April 8 as sirens pierced the air in an annual ritual to remember the 6 million Jews systematically murdered by German Nazis and their collaborators during the Holocaust in World War II.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, right, walks after laying a wreath during a ceremony marking the annual Holocaust Remembrance Day at the Yad Vashem Holocaust Memorial in Jerusalem, Monday, April 8, 2013. Israel came to a standstill for two mournful minutes Monday as sirens pierced the air in an annual ritual to remember the 6 million Jews systematically murdered by German Nazis and their collaborators during the Holocaust in World War II. (AP Photo/Oded Balilty)

Participants of the March of the Living walk under the entrance gate to the former Nazi Death Camp Auschwitz Birkenau with the infamous German inscription 'Arbeit Macht Frei', (Work Sets You Free) in Oswiecim, Poland, Monday, April 8, 2013. Jews from Israel and around the world took part in the annual March of the Living on the 3km route from Auschwitz to Birkenau Nazi Death Camps, commemorating the Holocaust victims. (AP Photo/Alik Keplicz)

Participants of the March of the Living walk under the entrance gate to the former Nazi Death Camp Auschwitz Birkenau with the infamous German inscription 'Arbeit Macht Frei', (Work Sets You Free) in Oswiecim, Poland, Monday, April 8, 2013. Jews from Israel and around the world took part in the annual March of the Living on the 3km route from Auschwitz to Birkenau Nazi Death Camps, commemorating the Holocaust victims. (AP Photo/Alik Keplicz)

Young people hug each other during the March of the Living in Oswiecim, Poland, Monday, April 8, 2013. Jews from Israel and around the world took part in the annual March of the Living on the 3km route from Auschwitz to Birkenau Nazi Death Camps, commemorating the Holocaust victims. (AP Photo/Alik Keplicz)

Relatives of Holocaust victims lay flowers next to the names of concentration camps during a ceremony marking the annual Holocaust Remembrance Day at the Yad Vashem Holocaust Memorial in Jerusalem, Monday, April 8, 2013. Israel came to a standstill for two mournful minutes Monday as sirens pierced the air in an annual ritual to remember the 6 million Jews systematically murdered by German Nazis and their collaborators during the Holocaust in World War II. (AP Photo/Oded Balilty)

Holocaust survivors and their relatives hold flowers during a ceremony marking the annual Holocaust Remembrance Day at the Yad Vashem Holocaust Memorial in Jerusalem, Monday, April 8, 2013. Israel came to a standstill for two mournful minutes Monday as sirens pierced the air in an annual ritual to remember the 6 million Jews systematically murdered by German Nazis and their collaborators during the Holocaust in World War II. (AP Photo/Oded Balilty)

In this Thursday, April 4, 2013 photo, Warsaw ghetto Holocaust survivor Aliza Vitis-Shomron holds a photograph of herself when she was about 17 years old as she sits in her living room in Kibbutz Givat Oz, Israel. Two days before her comrades embarked on an uprising that came to symbolize Jewish resistance against the Nazis in World War II, 14-year-old Aliza Mendel got her orders: Escape from the Warsaw Ghetto. The end was near. Nazi troops had encircled the ghetto, and the remaining Jewish rebels inside were prepared to die fighting. Her job, they told her, was to survive and tell the world about how the fighters died resisting the Nazis. In the 70 years since the revolt, she's been doing just that, publishing a memoir about life in the ghetto and lecturing about the uprising.(AP Photo/Ariel Schalit)

In this Thursday, April 4, 2013 photo, Warsaw ghetto Holocaust survivor Aliza Vitis-Shomron poses for a photograph as she sits in her living room in Kibbutz Givat Oz, Israel. Two days before her comrades embarked on an uprising that came to symbolize Jewish resistance against the Nazis in World War II, 14-year-old Aliza Mendel got her orders: Escape from the Warsaw Ghetto. The end was near. Nazi troops had encircled the ghetto, and the remaining Jewish rebels inside were prepared to die fighting. Her job, they told her, was to survive and tell the world about how the fighters died resisting the Nazis. In the 70 years since the revolt, she's been doing just that, publishing a memoir about life in the ghetto and lecturing about the uprising.(AP Photo/Ariel Schalit)

In this Thursday, April 4, 2013 photo, Warsaw ghetto Holocaust survivor Aliza Vitis-Shomron's private mementos placed on a table at her living room in Kibbutz Givat Oz, Israel. Two days before her comrades embarked on an uprising that came to symbolize Jewish resistance against the Nazis in World War II, 14-year-old Aliza Mendel got her orders: Escape from the Warsaw Ghetto. The end was near. Nazi troops had encircled the ghetto, and the remaining Jewish rebels inside were prepared to die fighting. Her job, they told her, was to survive and tell the world about how the fighters died resisting the Nazis. In the 70 years since the revolt, she's been doing just that, publishing a memoir about life in the ghetto and lecturing about the uprising. (AP Photo/Ariel Schalit)