Flesh-eating bacteria victim Aimee Copeland

A 24-year-old Georgia woman who survived a rare, flesh-eating disease is back home after more than three months in the hospital and a rehabilitation clinic. (Aug. 23)

In this image released Monday, July 2, 2012, by Tom Adkins, shows Aimee Copeland, right, with medic Kori Mills as Copeland leaves a hospital in Augusta Ga., headed for an inpatient rehabilitation clinic. Copeland left a Georgia hospital just weeks after a flesh-eating disease took her limbs but not her life. After nearly two months of battling the rare infection, called necrotizing fasciitis, Copeland headed to an inpatient rehabilitation clinic, where she’ll learn to use a wheelchair after having her left leg, right foot and both hands amputated. (AP Photo/Tom Adkins)

In this image provided by Tom Adkins, Andy Copeland takes a photo of his daughter, Aimee, as she leaves a hospital in Augusta Ga., Monday, July 2, 2012, headed for an inpatient rehabilitation clinic. Copeland left a Georgia hospital just weeks after a flesh-eating disease took her limbs but not her life. After nearly two months of battling the rare infection, called necrotizing fasciitis, Copeland headed to an inpatient rehabilitation clinic, where she’ll learn to use a wheelchair after having her left leg, right foot and both hands amputated. (AP Photo/Tom Adkins)

FILE - In this Saturday, June 23 2012 file photo provided by the Copeland family, Aimee Copeland, left, poses with her parents, Andy and Donna Copeland, outside Doctors Hospital in Augusta, Ga. Aimee Copeland was released from Doctors Hospital on Monday, July 2, 2012. She will move to an inpatient rehabilitation clinic and spend the next several weeks learning to move herself with the aid of a wheelchair after having her left leg, right foot and both hands amputated. (AP Photo/Copeland Family, File)

This undated photo provided by the family shows Aimee Copeland. the 24-year-old Georgia graduate student is fighting to survive a flesh-eating bacterial infection that forced doctors to amputate most of her left leg. They warned she would likely lose her other foot and both hands. (AP Photo/Copeland Family)

This undated photo provided by the family shows Aimee Copeland, second from right, the 24-year-old Georgia graduate student fighting to survive a flesh-eating bacterial infection that forced doctors to amputate most of her left leg. They warned she would likely lose her other foot and both hands. (AP Photo/Copeland Family)

This undated photo provided by the family shows Aimee Copeland, second from right, the 24-year-old Georgia graduate student fighting to survive a flesh-eating bacterial infection that forced doctors to amputate most of her left leg. They warned she would likely lose her other foot and both hands. (AP Photo/Copeland Family)

FILE - This undated photo provided by the family shows Aimee Copeland, the 24-year-old Georgia graduate student fighting to survive a flesh-eating bacterial infection. Copeland is refusing to take pain medications during some procedures, partly because of her personal convictions. She despises the use of morphine in her treatment, despite its effectiveness at blocking her pain, her father said in a Friday, June 15, 2012 update on his daughter’s condition. (AP Photo/Copeland Family)

FILE - This undated photo provided by the family shows Aimee Copeland, the 24-year-old Georgia graduate student fighting to survive a flesh-eating bacterial infection. Copeland is refusing to take pain medications during some procedures, partly because of her personal convictions. She despises the use of morphine in her treatment, despite its effectiveness at blocking her pain, her father said in a Friday, June 15, 2012 update on his daughter’s condition. (AP Photo/Copeland Family)

FILE - This undated photo provided by the family shows Aimee Copeland, the 24-year-old Georgia graduate student fighting to survive a flesh-eating bacterial infection that she contracted after an accident. Copeland's father tells The Associated Press, Monday, May 28, 2012, that his daughter has spoken for the first time since she was taken to an Augusta hospital weeks ago for treatment. (AP Photo/Copeland Family, File)

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