George H.W. Bush hospitalized

Former President George H.W. Bush is in intensive care at a Houston hospital in "guarded condition," family spokesman Jim McGrath said Dec. 28. The 88-year-old was admitted to hospital November 23 for bronchitis.

FILE - In a Tuesday, June 12, 2012 file photo, former President George H.W. Bush, and his wife, former first lady Barbara Bush, arrive for the premiere of HBO's new documentary on his life near the family compound in Kennebunkport, Maine. Bush spokesman Jim McGrath said Wednesday, Dec. 26. 2012 that doctors at the Houston hospital where Bush has been treated for a month remain “cautiously optimistic” that he will recover. Still, no discharge date has been set, and McGrath says that doctors are being cautious because at Bush’s age “sometimes issues crop up that are beyond anybody’s ability to discern or foretell.”(AP Photo/Charles Krupa, File)

FILE - In a Tuesday, June 12, 2012 file photo, former President George H.W. Bush, and his wife former first lady Barbara Bush, arrive for the premiere of HBO's new documentary on his life near the family compound in Kennebunkport, Maine. Former President Bush has been hospitalized for about a week in Houston for treatment of a lingering cough. Bush’s chief of staff, Jean Becker, says the 88-year-old former president is being treated for bronchitis at Houston’s Methodist Hospital and is expected to be released by the weekend. He was admitted Friday, Nov. 23, 2012. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa, File)

FILE - In a Tuesday, June 12, 2012 file photo, former President George H.W. Bush, and his wife former first lady Barbara Bush, arrive for the premiere of HBO's new documentary on his life near the family compound in Kennebunkport, Maine. Former President Bush has been hospitalized for about a week in Houston for treatment of a lingering cough. Bush’s chief of staff, Jean Becker, says the 88-year-old former president is being treated for bronchitis at Houston’s Methodist Hospital and is expected to be released by the weekend. He was admitted Friday, Nov. 23, 2012. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa, File)

Former President of the Soviet Union Mikhail Gorbachev, left, is greeted by former President George H.W. Bush, right, as the two meet for lunch Thursday, Nov. 1, 2012, in Houston. Gorbachev is in Houston to speak at the Brilliant Lecture Series. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)

This undated image released by HBO shows former President George H.W. Bush on his boat in Kennebunkport, Maine during the filming of the documentary "41," premiering Thursday, June 14, at 9:00 p.m. EST on HBO. (AP Photo/HBO, Jeffrey Roth)

This undated image released by HBO shows former President George H.W. Bush on his boat in Kennebunkport, Maine during the filming of the documentary "41," premiering Thursday, June 14, at 9:00 p.m. EST on HBO. (AP Photo/HBO, Jeffrey Roth)

FILE - In this July 4, 1991 file photo, President George Bush congratulates Desert Storm commander Gen. Norman Schwarzkopf after presenting him with the medal of freedom at the White House in Washington. Schwarzkopf died Thursday, Dec. 27, 2012 in Tampa, Fla. He was 78. (AP Photo/Doug Mills, File)

FILE - In this Aug. 18, 1988 file photo, Republican presidential candidate, Vice President George H.W. Bush, right, and his running mate Sen. Dan Quayle, R-Ind., wave to the assembly of the Republican National Convention in New Orleans after their acceptance speeches for the presidential and vice-presidential nomination. Long gone are the passionate debates. Long gone is the suspense about who will emerge as the party's presidential nominee. Political conventions now are carefully scripted pep rallies aimed at a national TV audience. Not since the 1970s, in fact, has the nation had a major-party national convention begin with the nominee in doubt. Americans already know how the story will end at this year's Republican and Democratic national gatherings. So have modern-day conventions become irrelevant? (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

FILE - In this Aug. 18, 1988 file photo, Republican presidential candidate, Vice President George H.W. Bush, right, and his running mate Sen. Dan Quayle, R-Ind., wave to the assembly of the Republican National Convention in New Orleans after their acceptance speeches for the presidential and vice-presidential nomination. Long gone are the passionate debates. Long gone is the suspense about who will emerge as the party's presidential nominee. Political conventions now are carefully scripted pep rallies aimed at a national TV audience. Not since the 1970s, in fact, has the nation had a major-party national convention begin with the nominee in doubt. Americans already know how the story will end at this year's Republican and Democratic national gatherings. So have modern-day conventions become irrelevant? (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

FILE - In this Aug. 18, 1988 file photo, Republican presidential candidate George H.W. Bush and his running mate Sen. Dan Quayle, R-Ind., stand together during the final night of the Republican National Convention in New Orleans. Mitt Romney did not mention the war in Afghanistan, where 79,000 US troops are fighting, in his speech accepting the Republican presidential nomination on Thursday. The last time a Republican presidential nominee did not address war was 1952, when Dwight Eisenhower spoke generally about American power and spreading freedom around the world but did not explicitly mention armed conflict. Below are examples of how other Republican nominees have addressed the issue over the years, both in peacetime and in war. (AP Photo/Bob Daugherty, File)

FILE - In this Aug. 18, 1988 file photo, Republican presidential candidate George H.W. Bush and his running mate Sen. Dan Quayle, R-Ind., stand together during the final night of the Republican National Convention in New Orleans. Mitt Romney did not mention the war in Afghanistan, where 79,000 US troops are fighting, in his speech accepting the Republican presidential nomination on Thursday. The last time a Republican presidential nominee did not address war was 1952, when Dwight Eisenhower spoke generally about American power and spreading freedom around the world but did not explicitly mention armed conflict. Below are examples of how other Republican nominees have addressed the issue over the years, both in peacetime and in war. (AP Photo/Bob Daugherty, File)

FILE - In this Oct. 15, 1992, file photo President George H.W. Bush looks at his watch during the 1992 presidential campaign debate with other candidates, Independent Ross Perot, top, and Democrat Bill Clinton, not shown, at the University of Richmond, Va. The “town hall” style presidential debates began 20 years ago as a nerve-racking experiment in live television. Moderator Carole Simpson was so nervous about turning over the microphone to regular folks that she spent days mapping out the presidential candidates and their issues on 3-by 5-cards, just in case. Viewers want the candidates to show respect for those voters in the room, who stand in proxy for all Americans. Bush was thrown by a women's oddly and even worse just as she began her question, TV cameras caught Bush checking his watch. That gesture would be replayed over and again as evidence that the president was indifferent and out of touch. “I took a huge hit,” Bush said years later. (AP Photo/Ron Edmonds, File)