Derrick Rose

Derrick Rose

NEW YORK,NY - NOVEMBER 13: Derrick Rose #1 of the Cleveland Cavaliers warms up before the game against the New York Knicks at Madison Square Garden on November 13, 2017 in New York, New York (Photo by Jesse D. Garrabrant/NBAE via Getty Images)
Cavs' Derrick Rose has bone spur in ankle, happy to be back
NEW YORK,NY - NOVEMBER 13: Derrick Rose #1 of the Cleveland Cavaliers warms up before the game against the New York Knicks at Madison Square Garden on November 13, 2017 in New York, New York (Photo by Jesse D. Garrabrant/NBAE via Getty Images)
FILE - In this Nov. 5, 2017, file photo, Cleveland Cavaliers' Derrick Rose, left, drive against Atlanta Hawks' Dennis Schroder (17), from Germany, in the first half of an NBA basketball game in Cleveland.Cavaliers guard Derick Rose revealed he has a bone spur in his left ankle contributed to him leaving the team. Rose left the Cavs on Nov. 22 and only returned this week, Friday, Dec. 8, 2017. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak, File)
FILE - In this Nov. 5, 2017, file photo, Cleveland Cavaliers' Derrick Rose, left, drive against Atlanta Hawks' Dennis Schroder (17), from Germany, in the first half of an NBA basketball game in Cleveland.Cavaliers guard Derick Rose revealed he has a bone spur in his left ankle contributed to him leaving the team. Rose left the Cavs on Nov. 22 and only returned this week, Friday, Dec. 8, 2017. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak, File)
FILE - In this Nov. 5, 2017, file photo, Cleveland Cavaliers' Derrick Rose, left, drive against Atlanta Hawks' Dennis Schroder (17), from Germany, in the first half of an NBA basketball game in Cleveland.Cavaliers guard Derick Rose revealed he has a bone spur in his left ankle contributed to him leaving the team. Rose left the Cavs on Nov. 22 and only returned this week, Friday, Dec. 8, 2017. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak, File)
Derrick Rose does not give an expletive about his $80 million Adidas contract
Derrick Rose does not give an expletive about his $80 million Adidas contract
Derrick Rose does not give an expletive about his $80 million Adidas contract
Derrick Rose does not give an expletive about his $80 million Adidas contract
Derrick Rose does not give an expletive about his $80 million Adidas contract
Derrick Rose does not give an expletive about his $80 million Adidas contract
CLEVELAND, OH - NOVEMBER 07: Derrick Rose #1 of the Cleveland Cavaliers drives around Khris Middleton #22 of the Milwaukee Bucks during the second half at Quicken Loans Arena on November 7, 2017 in Cleveland, Ohio. Cleveland won the game 124-119. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement. Gregory Shamus/Getty Images/AFPCLEVELAND, OH - NOVEMBER 07: Derrick Rose #1 of the Cleveland Cavaliers drives around Khris Middleton #22 of the Milwaukee Bucks during the second half at Quicken Loans Arena on November 7, 2017 in Cleveland, Ohio. Cleveland won the game 124-119. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement. Gregory Shamus/Getty Images/AFP (AFP Photo/Gregory Shamus)
Basketball - Rose back with Cavs, but might need ankle op
CLEVELAND, OH - NOVEMBER 07: Derrick Rose #1 of the Cleveland Cavaliers drives around Khris Middleton #22 of the Milwaukee Bucks during the second half at Quicken Loans Arena on November 7, 2017 in Cleveland, Ohio. Cleveland won the game 124-119. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement. Gregory Shamus/Getty Images/AFPCLEVELAND, OH - NOVEMBER 07: Derrick Rose #1 of the Cleveland Cavaliers drives around Khris Middleton #22 of the Milwaukee Bucks during the second half at Quicken Loans Arena on November 7, 2017 in Cleveland, Ohio. Cleveland won the game 124-119. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement. Gregory Shamus/Getty Images/AFP (AFP Photo/Gregory Shamus)
Derrick Rose of the Cleveland Cavaliers, pictured in November 2017, said he wasn't 100 percent certain that intensive rehabilitation would be enough to resolve a bone spur in his ankle (AFP Photo/Rob Carr)
Derrick Rose of the Cleveland Cavaliers, pictured in November 2017, said he wasn't 100 percent certain that intensive rehabilitation would be enough to resolve a bone spur in his ankle
Derrick Rose of the Cleveland Cavaliers, pictured in November 2017, said he wasn't 100 percent certain that intensive rehabilitation would be enough to resolve a bone spur in his ankle (AFP Photo/Rob Carr)
Derrick Rose of the Cleveland Cavaliers, pictured in November 2017, said he wasn't 100 percent certain that intensive rehabilitation would be enough to resolve a bone spur in his ankle
Derrick Rose of the Cleveland Cavaliers, pictured in November 2017, said he wasn't 100 percent certain that intensive rehabilitation would be enough to resolve a bone spur in his ankle
Derrick Rose of the Cleveland Cavaliers, pictured in November 2017, said he wasn't 100 percent certain that intensive rehabilitation would be enough to resolve a bone spur in his ankle
Derrick Rose of the Cleveland Cavaliers, pictured in November 2017, said he wasn't 100 percent certain that intensive rehabilitation would be enough to resolve a bone spur in his ankle
Derrick Rose of the Cleveland Cavaliers, pictured in November 2017, said he wasn't 100 percent certain that intensive rehabilitation would be enough to resolve a bone spur in his ankle
Derrick Rose of the Cleveland Cavaliers, pictured in November 2017, said he wasn't 100 percent certain that intensive rehabilitation would be enough to resolve a bone spur in his ankle
Derrick Rose does not give an expletive about his $80 million Adidas contract
Derrick Rose does not give an expletive about his $80 million Adidas contract
Derrick Rose does not give an expletive about his $80 million Adidas contract
Cavaliers guard's injury more serious than thought
Derrick Rose has bone spur, might need surgery
Cavaliers guard's injury more serious than thought
Cavaliers guard's injury more serious than thought
Derrick Rose has bone spur, might need surgery
Cavaliers guard's injury more serious than thought
Cavaliers guard's injury more serious than thought
Derrick Rose has bone spur, might need surgery
Cavaliers guard's injury more serious than thought
<p>Cavaliers’ Derrick Rose has bone spur in ankle, may need procedure</p>
Cavaliers’ Derrick Rose has bone spur in ankle, may need procedure

Cavaliers’ Derrick Rose has bone spur in ankle, may need procedure

<p>Cavaliers’ Derrick Rose has bone spur in ankle, may need procedure</p>
Cavaliers’ Derrick Rose has bone spur in ankle, may need procedure

Cavaliers’ Derrick Rose has bone spur in ankle, may need procedure

Cavaliers PG Derrick Rose revealed he has a bone spur in his left ankle, which may require a procedure if rehab doesn’t fix the issue.
Cavaliers’ Derrick Rose has bone spur in ankle, may need procedure
Cavaliers PG Derrick Rose revealed he has a bone spur in his left ankle, which may require a procedure if rehab doesn’t fix the issue.
He even poked fun at the three-time NBA champion&#39;s hairline and highlighted the trade of Kyrie Irving and Derrick Rose&#39;s uncertain future with the Cavs.
Heckling Spectator Tells LeBron James To “Stop Crying”
He even poked fun at the three-time NBA champion's hairline and highlighted the trade of Kyrie Irving and Derrick Rose's uncertain future with the Cavs.
<p>Long before LeBron James iced the Kings with a ruthless step-back three—the finishing touch on a 32-point, 11-rebound, nine-assist masterpiece—his fellow Cavaliers plugged away in relative quiet. Sacramento had led for almost the entire game, and by as many as 14 in the second half. Cleveland&#39;s reserves chipped away: a 5–0 spurt here, a 9–1 run there. All involved know that to play with LeBron is to play in his shadow. It&#39;s a credit to the Cavs&#39; second unit that they&#39;re now using that cover to do some of their most important work—all of it crucial to Cleveland&#39;s 13-game winning streak.</p><p>For the first time ever, a LeBron James team is performing slightly better with him off the floor. This is an astounding reversal—not because the Cavs are actually better without LeBron, but because they&#39;ve closed what has been a devastating margin. Over the years, LeBron-led teams have largely cratered in his absence. Hard-earned leads withered. Deficits swelled. That this iteration is holding strong makes everything that James does all the more overwhelming. At long last, the best player in the game isn&#39;t working from an inherent handicap.</p><p>It would be one thing if the bench were sustaining by staggering Kevin Love into second units or leaning on Isaiah Thomas (who has yet to appear in a game for the Cavs) to carry them. Neither is the case. This is essentially a self-contained platoon: Dwyane Wade, Kyle Korver, Channing Frye, and Jeff Green are joined by rotating guests to wallop backups around the league. That grouping is Cleveland&#39;s second-most-played foursome this season. In their nearly 200 minutes together, they&#39;ve blown out opponents by 14.5 points per 100 possessions.</p><p>This is a collection of players who can get worked over in the wrong matchup but make a killing in going against more limited reserves. Whatever liabilities they have are limited; Wade may not have the lateral quickness at this point to defend the league&#39;s top point guards, but he can manage the likes of Jameer Nelson and Isaiah Taylor.</p><p>The nature of those matchups exaggerates what each already does best. A smart, well-prepared defense can track Korver as he moves around the floor and largely neutralize him. Put second- and third-string defenders to the task, however, and he&#39;ll spring all sorts of leaks in the coverage. Even more important: this group, already fully in tune with one another, will actually wait for those options to develop:</p><p>Wade runs the show like a situational superstar. When working in these lineups, he puts up 25 points and eight assists per 36 minutes, creating the equivalent of 44 points. His usage in that context hovers around 32%—similar to that of Stephen Curry or Kyrie Irving. It&#39;s crazy to think that the Cavs once tried to jam Wade into an awkward role starting between James and Derrick Rose. The best of intentions—the team&#39;s deference to Wade and his career—backfired by making the offensive dynamic more awkward than it needed to be. This, instead, is Wade in his element: running high pick-and-rolls, bullying smaller guards, and operating with a full view of the floor. </p><p>The rhythms of a Wade-Frye pick-and-roll (well-spaced by Korver and Green) make the 35-year-old Wade play five years younger. Around one of Frye&#39;s screens is space for days; opponents are understandably wary of leaving a 6&#39;11&quot; center who shoots 39% on threes for his career unattended. Wade toys with his timing and approach to get the most out of each setup.</p><p>In some cases, Wade almost telegraphs the screen&#39;s position to his defender. Once they start to tilt toward the screen to deny him, Wade will cross back over into a quick drive—as he does here to Rookie of the Year lock Ben Simmons:</p><p>Frye, for his part, transforms. Since joining the Cavs in 2016, Frye has been an accessory to James—a big whose shooting could clear the lane for potent, physical drives. His entire game was boiled down to specialty. Frye is still a shooter when he plays with the reserves, but it&#39;s not a coincidence that essentially all of his two-point field goals this season came as a part of that lineup. Frye will actually roll to the rim after screening for Wade, forcing defenses to account for their two different cadences: </p><p>If given the chance, Frye will even floor the ball from the perimeter all the way to the rim—something you&#39;d never see were he playing with the starters:</p><p>Some 22% of Frye&#39;s shots this season have come within three feet of the rim, the highest rate since his rookie year. This bench configuration is the central reason why. The players involved have such naturally complementary games that to arrange them together barely took any work at all. Even some pairings one might not expect—like Frye and Korver—turned out to have an easy chemistry:</p><p>Korver actually assists Frye in equal measure to James and Wade, in part because of how immediately Frye can punish defenders who leave him. Tune in to a Cavs game and you&#39;re likely to see this basic setup: Korver curls around a Frye screen toward the top of the key, where he receives a pass from Wade. Both defenders (especially when backup bigs are involved) tend to follow Korver, leaving open a quick hook pass back to Frye. Rarely is the defender anywhere near fry at the moment he catches the ball:</p><p>Second units aren&#39;t conditioned to defend against this kind of continuity. Most teams rely on fairly straightforward offense where their bench is involved, often hammering possessions through one or two key creators. Cleveland plays with that expectation, setting up the obvious option only to jump the defense from a different angle:</p><p>The results have been incredible. LeBron&#39;s passing has a profound effect on his teammates&#39; shooting percentages, but Wade and Green—the two members of the bench unit who aren&#39;t standout shooters—have actually been at their most efficient in these lineups. The ingredients are balanced in a way that brings out their best. Wade puts his savvy to work against overmatched defenders, flanked by Korver and Frye. Green roams free, cutting and slashing without the specific needs and higher stakes in playing against starters. All involved come as they are, do what they do, and find that each element fits just so. </p>
The Cavaliers Find New Life in Revamped Bench

Long before LeBron James iced the Kings with a ruthless step-back three—the finishing touch on a 32-point, 11-rebound, nine-assist masterpiece—his fellow Cavaliers plugged away in relative quiet. Sacramento had led for almost the entire game, and by as many as 14 in the second half. Cleveland's reserves chipped away: a 5–0 spurt here, a 9–1 run there. All involved know that to play with LeBron is to play in his shadow. It's a credit to the Cavs' second unit that they're now using that cover to do some of their most important work—all of it crucial to Cleveland's 13-game winning streak.

For the first time ever, a LeBron James team is performing slightly better with him off the floor. This is an astounding reversal—not because the Cavs are actually better without LeBron, but because they've closed what has been a devastating margin. Over the years, LeBron-led teams have largely cratered in his absence. Hard-earned leads withered. Deficits swelled. That this iteration is holding strong makes everything that James does all the more overwhelming. At long last, the best player in the game isn't working from an inherent handicap.

It would be one thing if the bench were sustaining by staggering Kevin Love into second units or leaning on Isaiah Thomas (who has yet to appear in a game for the Cavs) to carry them. Neither is the case. This is essentially a self-contained platoon: Dwyane Wade, Kyle Korver, Channing Frye, and Jeff Green are joined by rotating guests to wallop backups around the league. That grouping is Cleveland's second-most-played foursome this season. In their nearly 200 minutes together, they've blown out opponents by 14.5 points per 100 possessions.

This is a collection of players who can get worked over in the wrong matchup but make a killing in going against more limited reserves. Whatever liabilities they have are limited; Wade may not have the lateral quickness at this point to defend the league's top point guards, but he can manage the likes of Jameer Nelson and Isaiah Taylor.

The nature of those matchups exaggerates what each already does best. A smart, well-prepared defense can track Korver as he moves around the floor and largely neutralize him. Put second- and third-string defenders to the task, however, and he'll spring all sorts of leaks in the coverage. Even more important: this group, already fully in tune with one another, will actually wait for those options to develop:

Wade runs the show like a situational superstar. When working in these lineups, he puts up 25 points and eight assists per 36 minutes, creating the equivalent of 44 points. His usage in that context hovers around 32%—similar to that of Stephen Curry or Kyrie Irving. It's crazy to think that the Cavs once tried to jam Wade into an awkward role starting between James and Derrick Rose. The best of intentions—the team's deference to Wade and his career—backfired by making the offensive dynamic more awkward than it needed to be. This, instead, is Wade in his element: running high pick-and-rolls, bullying smaller guards, and operating with a full view of the floor.

The rhythms of a Wade-Frye pick-and-roll (well-spaced by Korver and Green) make the 35-year-old Wade play five years younger. Around one of Frye's screens is space for days; opponents are understandably wary of leaving a 6'11" center who shoots 39% on threes for his career unattended. Wade toys with his timing and approach to get the most out of each setup.

In some cases, Wade almost telegraphs the screen's position to his defender. Once they start to tilt toward the screen to deny him, Wade will cross back over into a quick drive—as he does here to Rookie of the Year lock Ben Simmons:

Frye, for his part, transforms. Since joining the Cavs in 2016, Frye has been an accessory to James—a big whose shooting could clear the lane for potent, physical drives. His entire game was boiled down to specialty. Frye is still a shooter when he plays with the reserves, but it's not a coincidence that essentially all of his two-point field goals this season came as a part of that lineup. Frye will actually roll to the rim after screening for Wade, forcing defenses to account for their two different cadences:

If given the chance, Frye will even floor the ball from the perimeter all the way to the rim—something you'd never see were he playing with the starters:

Some 22% of Frye's shots this season have come within three feet of the rim, the highest rate since his rookie year. This bench configuration is the central reason why. The players involved have such naturally complementary games that to arrange them together barely took any work at all. Even some pairings one might not expect—like Frye and Korver—turned out to have an easy chemistry:

Korver actually assists Frye in equal measure to James and Wade, in part because of how immediately Frye can punish defenders who leave him. Tune in to a Cavs game and you're likely to see this basic setup: Korver curls around a Frye screen toward the top of the key, where he receives a pass from Wade. Both defenders (especially when backup bigs are involved) tend to follow Korver, leaving open a quick hook pass back to Frye. Rarely is the defender anywhere near fry at the moment he catches the ball:

Second units aren't conditioned to defend against this kind of continuity. Most teams rely on fairly straightforward offense where their bench is involved, often hammering possessions through one or two key creators. Cleveland plays with that expectation, setting up the obvious option only to jump the defense from a different angle:

The results have been incredible. LeBron's passing has a profound effect on his teammates' shooting percentages, but Wade and Green—the two members of the bench unit who aren't standout shooters—have actually been at their most efficient in these lineups. The ingredients are balanced in a way that brings out their best. Wade puts his savvy to work against overmatched defenders, flanked by Korver and Frye. Green roams free, cutting and slashing without the specific needs and higher stakes in playing against starters. All involved come as they are, do what they do, and find that each element fits just so.

Will they accept?
Report: Derrick Rose apologizes to Cavaliers
Will they accept?
Will they accept?
Report: Derrick Rose apologizes to Cavaliers
Will they accept?
Will they accept?
Report: Derrick Rose apologizes to Cavaliers
Will they accept?
<p>Derrick Rose apologizes to Cavs teammates for two-week exile, report says</p>
Derrick Rose apologizes to Cavs teammates for two-week exile, report says

Derrick Rose apologizes to Cavs teammates for two-week exile, report says

<p>Derrick Rose apologizes to Cavs teammates for two-week exile, report says</p>
Derrick Rose apologizes to Cavs teammates for two-week exile, report says

Derrick Rose apologizes to Cavs teammates for two-week exile, report says

Chris Fedor discusses the anticipated return of Isaiah Thomas and Derrick Rose.
Anticipating the return of Cavs injured PGs
Chris Fedor discusses the anticipated return of Isaiah Thomas and Derrick Rose.
Chris Fedor discusses the anticipated return of Isaiah Thomas and Derrick Rose.
Anticipating the return of Cavs injured PGs
Chris Fedor discusses the anticipated return of Isaiah Thomas and Derrick Rose.
Chris Fedor discusses the anticipated return of Isaiah Thomas and Derrick Rose.
Anticipating the return of Cavs injured PGs
Chris Fedor discusses the anticipated return of Isaiah Thomas and Derrick Rose.
Chris Fedor discusses the anticipated return of Isaiah Thomas and Derrick Rose.
Anticipating the return of Cavs injured PGs
Chris Fedor discusses the anticipated return of Isaiah Thomas and Derrick Rose.
<p>It should never be spoken of again, but yes, Dwyane Wade&#39;s year in Chicago was rough for everyone. His defense was sporadic at best. His experiment with three-point shooting produced uneven results. He only played in 60 games, but in the locker room, he was as domineering as ever even as the team stumbled through six months of mediocrity. &quot;I can look at Jimmy [Butler] and say Jimmy is doing his job,&quot; Wade complained one night. &quot;I think Jimmy can look at me and say Dwyane is doing his job. I don’t know if we can keep going down the line and be able to say that.&quot; On the court, he had an even <a href="https://www.foxsports.com/nba/chicago-bulls-team-stats?season=2016&#38;category=ADVANCED&#38;time=0" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:higher usage rate" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">higher usage rate</a> than Butler for a Bulls team that was perfectly average (41 wins) and absolutely brutal to watch.</p><p>Wade&#39;s lone season in Chicago is generally how it goes for aging NBA superstars. We saw the same phenomenon take hold with Kobe and Iverson toward the end of their careers. Derrick Rose and Rajon Rondo have been living this story for the better part of a presidential term. Russell Westbrook, John Wall, Jimmy Butler, and Paul George could be in a similar spot four or five years from now. This is how the NBA life cycle works.</p><p>Particularly among stars who rely on athleticism to dominate, even slight regressions to mortal levels can change everything. That levels the playing field with the rest of the league and complicates their game as they try to play the way that always made them dominant. The solutions are often simple—conserve energy, pick smart spots to help, and play off the bench—but accepting those limits can be just as complicated for stars.</p><p>So given his pedigree and given last year&#39;s disaster, Dwyane Wade deserves a lot of credit for what he&#39;s doing in Cleveland this year. He&#39;s been coming off the bench and he&#39;s been excellent. With Wade working on the second unit Cleveland&#39;s discovered a rotation that gives them one of the deepest benches in the league. After getting played off the court in a few starts to begin the year, Wade&#39;s averaging 15.7 points, 4.5 rebounds, 4.0 assists, and 51.5% shooting over the past 10 games, all of which resulted in Cavs wins.</p><p>More than anything else, it&#39;s been great to watch an aging superstar find a second life that makes sense. The crafty, not-quite-washed-up veteran who picks his spots is much easier to appreciate than the slow, allergic-to-defense superstar who demands his share of touches, minutes, and shots.</p><p>This role obviously becomes far more attractive on a title contender than it was on the Bulls last year. <a href="https://twitter.com/KCJHoop/status/937372547867467779" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Earlier this week" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Earlier this week</a> Fred Hoiberg alluded to &quot;a couple conversations&quot; about a bench role for Wade that apparently went nowhere. And as <a href="https://twitter.com/KCJHoop/status/937718389602217984" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Wade himself admitted," class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Wade himself admitted,</a> &quot;I didn’t want to just come off the bench on a team that’s rebuilding. I would’ve been very unhappy in a basketball sense. And if basketball isn’t going right, nothing is going right. I didn’t want to put my family through that.&quot;</p><p>The logic underpinning that sentiment—&quot;I didn&#39;t want to come off the bench for the sake of my family&quot;—seems a bit dramatic, but it&#39;s not unique. For superstars who have spent their entire careers as franchise players, there&#39;s built-in pride that&#39;s completely reasonable, and sometimes that makes a reduced role seem inconceivable. Consider Carmelo Anthony in Oklahoma City.</p><p>The chuckling arrogance in that clip, the imperious charm, the total lack of self-awareness—all of that is classic Carmelo. He leans into every stereotype, and if it&#39;s part of what makes him easy to criticize, it&#39;s also part of what&#39;s always made him fun as a superstar. Players like him make the league more interesting. But even long-time Melo apologists (read: me) have to concede that his failure to even consider a bench role makes life a lot more difficult for Billy Donovan and the Thunder.</p><p>To begin with, OKC has ball movement issues that could potentially be solved by replacing Carmelo isos with Patrick Patterson spot-ups from three. It&#39;s not to say that Anthony deserves blame for the state of OKC&#39;s offense, but tweaking the lineup could help mitigate some of the issues. What&#39;s more, moving to the bench would allow Anthony to feast on overmatched reserves, and he&#39;d help anchor the offense for an OKC second unit that&#39;s currently relying on Raymond Felton as a catalyst. (He&#39;d also have fans and dumb writers like me fawning over his sacrifice instead of nitpicking his game to death, but that&#39;s a secondary win.)</p><p>It makes a lot of sense in theory. It&#39;s clearly worth exploring. But even as the Thunder have struggled, a lineup change remains a remote possibility. Or, as Anthony put it, &quot;Hell no.&quot;</p><p>Considering the divergent paths of both players and both teams, it&#39;s tempting to use Wade&#39;s sacrifice in Cleveland to underscore Carmelo&#39;s shortsighted approach in Oklahoma City. That&#39;s probably the logical conclusion here. Wade&#39;s clearly the blueprint for how Carmelo could succeed in OKC, and if anything, his initial failure in Chicago is the best reason to have hope for Anthony over the next few years. He still has time to figure this out. </p><p>The bigger picture is more interesting. Both players are trying to navigate changes that are tougher to pull off than most people appreciate.</p><p>Aging NBA superstars are some of the the easiest targets in sports—their games decline along with their athleticism, but their national profile stays the same. Carmelo is still a hundred times more famous than Robert Covington. So eventually every conversation about them becomes an excuse to talk about how far they&#39;ve fallen and how overrated they&#39;ve become. None of that&#39;s wrong, but it&#39;s an incomplete picture of what&#39;s actually happening. The truth is that it takes an incredible level of self-confidence to be a superstar who dominates night after night in the NBA, and that confidence can become counter-productive when it&#39;s to time to evolve. It&#39;s really difficult to be Kobe Bryant from 1997–2014 without also becoming Kobe from 2015 to retirement.</p><p>None of this should be surprising, and when stars fail to accept their own limits, I&#39;m not even sure it should be disappointing. Most critics would be every bit as stubborn if they&#39;d ever been half as successful. In life or basketball, it&#39;s more surprising when the greatest careers don&#39;t take a turn toward complacency and mediocrity as everything winds down.</p><p>That&#39;s why the past month in Cleveland has been such a delight, no different than watching Vince Carter pop up on the Grizzles and Mavs for the past five years or Manu Ginobili finding a way to harass James Harden in the playoffs last May. The rule for aging stars is Carmelo in OKC and Wade in Chicago. Wade in Cleveland—?<a href="https://protect-us.mimecast.com/s/QQJQBrFN7woaCM?domain=twitter.com" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:working through his Netflix catalog" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">working through his Netflix catalog</a>, <a href="https://protect-us.mimecast.com/s/xNaNBZcJqDrAFa?domain=instagram.com" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:taking Dad photos" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">taking Dad photos</a>, <a href="https://protect-us.mimecast.com/s/MdNdBEHQ9kMAt8?domain=youtube.com" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:killing the Bulls" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">killing the Bulls</a>, <a href="https://protect-us.mimecast.com/s/O505BLf2GneAIq?domain=espn.com" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:carrying the Cavs bench" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">carrying the Cavs bench</a>—looks like he&#39;s turning into another fun and strange exception.</p>
Dwyane Wade, Carmelo Anthony and the Rule for Aging Superstars

It should never be spoken of again, but yes, Dwyane Wade's year in Chicago was rough for everyone. His defense was sporadic at best. His experiment with three-point shooting produced uneven results. He only played in 60 games, but in the locker room, he was as domineering as ever even as the team stumbled through six months of mediocrity. "I can look at Jimmy [Butler] and say Jimmy is doing his job," Wade complained one night. "I think Jimmy can look at me and say Dwyane is doing his job. I don’t know if we can keep going down the line and be able to say that." On the court, he had an even higher usage rate than Butler for a Bulls team that was perfectly average (41 wins) and absolutely brutal to watch.

Wade's lone season in Chicago is generally how it goes for aging NBA superstars. We saw the same phenomenon take hold with Kobe and Iverson toward the end of their careers. Derrick Rose and Rajon Rondo have been living this story for the better part of a presidential term. Russell Westbrook, John Wall, Jimmy Butler, and Paul George could be in a similar spot four or five years from now. This is how the NBA life cycle works.

Particularly among stars who rely on athleticism to dominate, even slight regressions to mortal levels can change everything. That levels the playing field with the rest of the league and complicates their game as they try to play the way that always made them dominant. The solutions are often simple—conserve energy, pick smart spots to help, and play off the bench—but accepting those limits can be just as complicated for stars.

So given his pedigree and given last year's disaster, Dwyane Wade deserves a lot of credit for what he's doing in Cleveland this year. He's been coming off the bench and he's been excellent. With Wade working on the second unit Cleveland's discovered a rotation that gives them one of the deepest benches in the league. After getting played off the court in a few starts to begin the year, Wade's averaging 15.7 points, 4.5 rebounds, 4.0 assists, and 51.5% shooting over the past 10 games, all of which resulted in Cavs wins.

More than anything else, it's been great to watch an aging superstar find a second life that makes sense. The crafty, not-quite-washed-up veteran who picks his spots is much easier to appreciate than the slow, allergic-to-defense superstar who demands his share of touches, minutes, and shots.

This role obviously becomes far more attractive on a title contender than it was on the Bulls last year. Earlier this week Fred Hoiberg alluded to "a couple conversations" about a bench role for Wade that apparently went nowhere. And as Wade himself admitted, "I didn’t want to just come off the bench on a team that’s rebuilding. I would’ve been very unhappy in a basketball sense. And if basketball isn’t going right, nothing is going right. I didn’t want to put my family through that."

The logic underpinning that sentiment—"I didn't want to come off the bench for the sake of my family"—seems a bit dramatic, but it's not unique. For superstars who have spent their entire careers as franchise players, there's built-in pride that's completely reasonable, and sometimes that makes a reduced role seem inconceivable. Consider Carmelo Anthony in Oklahoma City.

The chuckling arrogance in that clip, the imperious charm, the total lack of self-awareness—all of that is classic Carmelo. He leans into every stereotype, and if it's part of what makes him easy to criticize, it's also part of what's always made him fun as a superstar. Players like him make the league more interesting. But even long-time Melo apologists (read: me) have to concede that his failure to even consider a bench role makes life a lot more difficult for Billy Donovan and the Thunder.

To begin with, OKC has ball movement issues that could potentially be solved by replacing Carmelo isos with Patrick Patterson spot-ups from three. It's not to say that Anthony deserves blame for the state of OKC's offense, but tweaking the lineup could help mitigate some of the issues. What's more, moving to the bench would allow Anthony to feast on overmatched reserves, and he'd help anchor the offense for an OKC second unit that's currently relying on Raymond Felton as a catalyst. (He'd also have fans and dumb writers like me fawning over his sacrifice instead of nitpicking his game to death, but that's a secondary win.)

It makes a lot of sense in theory. It's clearly worth exploring. But even as the Thunder have struggled, a lineup change remains a remote possibility. Or, as Anthony put it, "Hell no."

Considering the divergent paths of both players and both teams, it's tempting to use Wade's sacrifice in Cleveland to underscore Carmelo's shortsighted approach in Oklahoma City. That's probably the logical conclusion here. Wade's clearly the blueprint for how Carmelo could succeed in OKC, and if anything, his initial failure in Chicago is the best reason to have hope for Anthony over the next few years. He still has time to figure this out.

The bigger picture is more interesting. Both players are trying to navigate changes that are tougher to pull off than most people appreciate.

Aging NBA superstars are some of the the easiest targets in sports—their games decline along with their athleticism, but their national profile stays the same. Carmelo is still a hundred times more famous than Robert Covington. So eventually every conversation about them becomes an excuse to talk about how far they've fallen and how overrated they've become. None of that's wrong, but it's an incomplete picture of what's actually happening. The truth is that it takes an incredible level of self-confidence to be a superstar who dominates night after night in the NBA, and that confidence can become counter-productive when it's to time to evolve. It's really difficult to be Kobe Bryant from 1997–2014 without also becoming Kobe from 2015 to retirement.

None of this should be surprising, and when stars fail to accept their own limits, I'm not even sure it should be disappointing. Most critics would be every bit as stubborn if they'd ever been half as successful. In life or basketball, it's more surprising when the greatest careers don't take a turn toward complacency and mediocrity as everything winds down.

That's why the past month in Cleveland has been such a delight, no different than watching Vince Carter pop up on the Grizzles and Mavs for the past five years or Manu Ginobili finding a way to harass James Harden in the playoffs last May. The rule for aging stars is Carmelo in OKC and Wade in Chicago. Wade in Cleveland—?working through his Netflix catalog, taking Dad photos, killing the Bulls, carrying the Cavs bench—looks like he's turning into another fun and strange exception.

<p>It should never be spoken of again, but yes, Dwyane Wade&#39;s year in Chicago was rough for everyone. His defense was sporadic at best. His experiment with three-point shooting produced uneven results. He only played in 60 games, but in the locker room, he was as domineering as ever even as the team stumbled through six months of mediocrity. &quot;I can look at Jimmy [Butler] and say Jimmy is doing his job,&quot; Wade complained one night. &quot;I think Jimmy can look at me and say Dwyane is doing his job. I don’t know if we can keep going down the line and be able to say that.&quot; On the court, he had an even <a href="https://www.foxsports.com/nba/chicago-bulls-team-stats?season=2016&#38;category=ADVANCED&#38;time=0" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:higher usage rate" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">higher usage rate</a> than Butler for a Bulls team that was perfectly average (41 wins) and absolutely brutal to watch.</p><p>Wade&#39;s lone season in Chicago is generally how it goes for aging NBA superstars. We saw the same phenomenon take hold with Kobe and Iverson toward the end of their careers. Derrick Rose and Rajon Rondo have been living this story for the better part of a presidential term. Russell Westbrook, John Wall, Jimmy Butler, and Paul George could be in a similar spot four or five years from now. This is how the NBA life cycle works.</p><p>Particularly among stars who rely on athleticism to dominate, even slight regressions to mortal levels can change everything. That levels the playing field with the rest of the league and complicates their game as they try to play the way that always made them dominant. The solutions are often simple—conserve energy, pick smart spots to help, and play off the bench—but accepting those limits can be just as complicated for stars.</p><p>So given his pedigree and given last year&#39;s disaster, Dwyane Wade deserves a lot of credit for what he&#39;s doing in Cleveland this year. He&#39;s been coming off the bench and he&#39;s been excellent. With Wade working on the second unit Cleveland&#39;s discovered a rotation that gives them one of the deepest benches in the league. After getting played off the court in a few starts to begin the year, Wade&#39;s averaging 15.7 points, 4.5 rebounds, 4.0 assists, and 51.5% shooting over the past 10 games, all of which resulted in Cavs wins.</p><p>More than anything else, it&#39;s been great to watch an aging superstar find a second life that makes sense. The crafty, not-quite-washed-up veteran who picks his spots is much easier to appreciate than the slow, allergic-to-defense superstar who demands his share of touches, minutes, and shots.</p><p>This role obviously becomes far more attractive on a title contender than it was on the Bulls last year. <a href="https://twitter.com/KCJHoop/status/937372547867467779" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Earlier this week" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Earlier this week</a> Fred Hoiberg alluded to &quot;a couple conversations&quot; about a bench role for Wade that apparently went nowhere. And as <a href="https://twitter.com/KCJHoop/status/937718389602217984" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Wade himself admitted," class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Wade himself admitted,</a> &quot;I didn’t want to just come off the bench on a team that’s rebuilding. I would’ve been very unhappy in a basketball sense. And if basketball isn’t going right, nothing is going right. I didn’t want to put my family through that.&quot;</p><p>The logic underpinning that sentiment—&quot;I didn&#39;t want to come off the bench for the sake of my family&quot;—seems a bit dramatic, but it&#39;s not unique. For superstars who have spent their entire careers as franchise players, there&#39;s built-in pride that&#39;s completely reasonable, and sometimes that makes a reduced role seem inconceivable. Consider Carmelo Anthony in Oklahoma City.</p><p>The chuckling arrogance in that clip, the imperious charm, the total lack of self-awareness—all of that is classic Carmelo. He leans into every stereotype, and if it&#39;s part of what makes him easy to criticize, it&#39;s also part of what&#39;s always made him fun as a superstar. Players like him make the league more interesting. But even long-time Melo apologists (read: me) have to concede that his failure to even consider a bench role makes life a lot more difficult for Billy Donovan and the Thunder.</p><p>To begin with, OKC has ball movement issues that could potentially be solved by replacing Carmelo isos with Patrick Patterson spot-ups from three. It&#39;s not to say that Anthony deserves blame for the state of OKC&#39;s offense, but tweaking the lineup could help mitigate some of the issues. What&#39;s more, moving to the bench would allow Anthony to feast on overmatched reserves, and he&#39;d help anchor the offense for an OKC second unit that&#39;s currently relying on Raymond Felton as a catalyst. (He&#39;d also have fans and dumb writers like me fawning over his sacrifice instead of nitpicking his game to death, but that&#39;s a secondary win.)</p><p>It makes a lot of sense in theory. It&#39;s clearly worth exploring. But even as the Thunder have struggled, a lineup change remains a remote possibility. Or, as Anthony put it, &quot;Hell no.&quot;</p><p>Considering the divergent paths of both players and both teams, it&#39;s tempting to use Wade&#39;s sacrifice in Cleveland to underscore Carmelo&#39;s shortsighted approach in Oklahoma City. That&#39;s probably the logical conclusion here. Wade&#39;s clearly the blueprint for how Carmelo could succeed in OKC, and if anything, his initial failure in Chicago is the best reason to have hope for Anthony over the next few years. He still has time to figure this out. </p><p>The bigger picture is more interesting. Both players are trying to navigate changes that are tougher to pull off than most people appreciate.</p><p>Aging NBA superstars are some of the the easiest targets in sports—their games decline along with their athleticism, but their national profile stays the same. Carmelo is still a hundred times more famous than Robert Covington. So eventually every conversation about them becomes an excuse to talk about how far they&#39;ve fallen and how overrated they&#39;ve become. None of that&#39;s wrong, but it&#39;s an incomplete picture of what&#39;s actually happening. The truth is that it takes an incredible level of self-confidence to be a superstar who dominates night after night in the NBA, and that confidence can become counter-productive when it&#39;s to time to evolve. It&#39;s really difficult to be Kobe Bryant from 1997–2014 without also becoming Kobe from 2015 to retirement.</p><p>None of this should be surprising, and when stars fail to accept their own limits, I&#39;m not even sure it should be disappointing. Most critics would be every bit as stubborn if they&#39;d ever been half as successful. In life or basketball, it&#39;s more surprising when the greatest careers don&#39;t take a turn toward complacency and mediocrity as everything winds down.</p><p>That&#39;s why the past month in Cleveland has been such a delight, no different than watching Vince Carter pop up on the Grizzles and Mavs for the past five years or Manu Ginobili finding a way to harass James Harden in the playoffs last May. The rule for aging stars is Carmelo in OKC and Wade in Chicago. Wade in Cleveland—?<a href="https://protect-us.mimecast.com/s/QQJQBrFN7woaCM?domain=twitter.com" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:working through his Netflix catalog" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">working through his Netflix catalog</a>, <a href="https://protect-us.mimecast.com/s/xNaNBZcJqDrAFa?domain=instagram.com" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:taking Dad photos" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">taking Dad photos</a>, <a href="https://protect-us.mimecast.com/s/MdNdBEHQ9kMAt8?domain=youtube.com" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:killing the Bulls" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">killing the Bulls</a>, <a href="https://protect-us.mimecast.com/s/O505BLf2GneAIq?domain=espn.com" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:carrying the Cavs bench" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">carrying the Cavs bench</a>—looks like he&#39;s turning into another fun and strange exception.</p>
Dwyane Wade, Carmelo Anthony and the Rule for Aging Superstars

It should never be spoken of again, but yes, Dwyane Wade's year in Chicago was rough for everyone. His defense was sporadic at best. His experiment with three-point shooting produced uneven results. He only played in 60 games, but in the locker room, he was as domineering as ever even as the team stumbled through six months of mediocrity. "I can look at Jimmy [Butler] and say Jimmy is doing his job," Wade complained one night. "I think Jimmy can look at me and say Dwyane is doing his job. I don’t know if we can keep going down the line and be able to say that." On the court, he had an even higher usage rate than Butler for a Bulls team that was perfectly average (41 wins) and absolutely brutal to watch.

Wade's lone season in Chicago is generally how it goes for aging NBA superstars. We saw the same phenomenon take hold with Kobe and Iverson toward the end of their careers. Derrick Rose and Rajon Rondo have been living this story for the better part of a presidential term. Russell Westbrook, John Wall, Jimmy Butler, and Paul George could be in a similar spot four or five years from now. This is how the NBA life cycle works.

Particularly among stars who rely on athleticism to dominate, even slight regressions to mortal levels can change everything. That levels the playing field with the rest of the league and complicates their game as they try to play the way that always made them dominant. The solutions are often simple—conserve energy, pick smart spots to help, and play off the bench—but accepting those limits can be just as complicated for stars.

So given his pedigree and given last year's disaster, Dwyane Wade deserves a lot of credit for what he's doing in Cleveland this year. He's been coming off the bench and he's been excellent. With Wade working on the second unit Cleveland's discovered a rotation that gives them one of the deepest benches in the league. After getting played off the court in a few starts to begin the year, Wade's averaging 15.7 points, 4.5 rebounds, 4.0 assists, and 51.5% shooting over the past 10 games, all of which resulted in Cavs wins.

More than anything else, it's been great to watch an aging superstar find a second life that makes sense. The crafty, not-quite-washed-up veteran who picks his spots is much easier to appreciate than the slow, allergic-to-defense superstar who demands his share of touches, minutes, and shots.

This role obviously becomes far more attractive on a title contender than it was on the Bulls last year. Earlier this week Fred Hoiberg alluded to "a couple conversations" about a bench role for Wade that apparently went nowhere. And as Wade himself admitted, "I didn’t want to just come off the bench on a team that’s rebuilding. I would’ve been very unhappy in a basketball sense. And if basketball isn’t going right, nothing is going right. I didn’t want to put my family through that."

The logic underpinning that sentiment—"I didn't want to come off the bench for the sake of my family"—seems a bit dramatic, but it's not unique. For superstars who have spent their entire careers as franchise players, there's built-in pride that's completely reasonable, and sometimes that makes a reduced role seem inconceivable. Consider Carmelo Anthony in Oklahoma City.

The chuckling arrogance in that clip, the imperious charm, the total lack of self-awareness—all of that is classic Carmelo. He leans into every stereotype, and if it's part of what makes him easy to criticize, it's also part of what's always made him fun as a superstar. Players like him make the league more interesting. But even long-time Melo apologists (read: me) have to concede that his failure to even consider a bench role makes life a lot more difficult for Billy Donovan and the Thunder.

To begin with, OKC has ball movement issues that could potentially be solved by replacing Carmelo isos with Patrick Patterson spot-ups from three. It's not to say that Anthony deserves blame for the state of OKC's offense, but tweaking the lineup could help mitigate some of the issues. What's more, moving to the bench would allow Anthony to feast on overmatched reserves, and he'd help anchor the offense for an OKC second unit that's currently relying on Raymond Felton as a catalyst. (He'd also have fans and dumb writers like me fawning over his sacrifice instead of nitpicking his game to death, but that's a secondary win.)

It makes a lot of sense in theory. It's clearly worth exploring. But even as the Thunder have struggled, a lineup change remains a remote possibility. Or, as Anthony put it, "Hell no."

Considering the divergent paths of both players and both teams, it's tempting to use Wade's sacrifice in Cleveland to underscore Carmelo's shortsighted approach in Oklahoma City. That's probably the logical conclusion here. Wade's clearly the blueprint for how Carmelo could succeed in OKC, and if anything, his initial failure in Chicago is the best reason to have hope for Anthony over the next few years. He still has time to figure this out.

The bigger picture is more interesting. Both players are trying to navigate changes that are tougher to pull off than most people appreciate.

Aging NBA superstars are some of the the easiest targets in sports—their games decline along with their athleticism, but their national profile stays the same. Carmelo is still a hundred times more famous than Robert Covington. So eventually every conversation about them becomes an excuse to talk about how far they've fallen and how overrated they've become. None of that's wrong, but it's an incomplete picture of what's actually happening. The truth is that it takes an incredible level of self-confidence to be a superstar who dominates night after night in the NBA, and that confidence can become counter-productive when it's to time to evolve. It's really difficult to be Kobe Bryant from 1997–2014 without also becoming Kobe from 2015 to retirement.

None of this should be surprising, and when stars fail to accept their own limits, I'm not even sure it should be disappointing. Most critics would be every bit as stubborn if they'd ever been half as successful. In life or basketball, it's more surprising when the greatest careers don't take a turn toward complacency and mediocrity as everything winds down.

That's why the past month in Cleveland has been such a delight, no different than watching Vince Carter pop up on the Grizzles and Mavs for the past five years or Manu Ginobili finding a way to harass James Harden in the playoffs last May. The rule for aging stars is Carmelo in OKC and Wade in Chicago. Wade in Cleveland—?working through his Netflix catalog, taking Dad photos, killing the Bulls, carrying the Cavs bench—looks like he's turning into another fun and strange exception.

CBS Sports NBA writer Reid Forgrave discusses how the point guard&#39;s return may hinder the Cavs more than help them.
Derrick Rose set to return to Cavs practice
CBS Sports NBA writer Reid Forgrave discusses how the point guard's return may hinder the Cavs more than help them.
CBS Sports NBA writer Reid Forgrave discusses how the point guard&#39;s return may hinder the Cavs more than help them.
Derrick Rose set to return to Cavs practice
CBS Sports NBA writer Reid Forgrave discusses how the point guard's return may hinder the Cavs more than help them.
CBS Sports NBA writer Reid Forgrave discusses how the point guard&#39;s return may hinder the Cavs more than help them.
Derrick Rose set to return to Cavs practice
CBS Sports NBA writer Reid Forgrave discusses how the point guard's return may hinder the Cavs more than help them.
CBS Sports NBA writer Reid Forgrave discusses how the point guard's return may hinder the Cavs more than help them.
Derrick Rose set to return to Cavs practice
CBS Sports NBA writer Reid Forgrave discusses how the point guard's return may hinder the Cavs more than help them.
The Knicks lost Carmelo Anthony, Derrick Rose and Phil Jackson in the offseason. With no more daily drama, the Knicks are starting to look like a functional NBA team.
Led by Kristaps Porzingis, Knicks leave circus behind, slowly move toward respectability
The Knicks lost Carmelo Anthony, Derrick Rose and Phil Jackson in the offseason. With no more daily drama, the Knicks are starting to look like a functional NBA team.
The Knicks lost Carmelo Anthony, Derrick Rose and Phil Jackson in the offseason. With no more daily drama, the Knicks are starting to look like a functional NBA team.
Led by Kristaps Porzingis, Knicks leave circus behind, slowly move toward respectability
The Knicks lost Carmelo Anthony, Derrick Rose and Phil Jackson in the offseason. With no more daily drama, the Knicks are starting to look like a functional NBA team.
LeBron James has had Derrick Rose&apos;s back from the first day he signed with the Cavaliers.
LeBron James says Derrick Rose doesn’t owe team an apology
LeBron James has had Derrick Rose's back from the first day he signed with the Cavaliers.
NEW YORK,NY - NOVEMBER 13: Derrick Rose #1 of the Cleveland Cavaliers gets ready before the game against the New York Knicks at Madison Square Garden on November 13, 2017 in New York, New York (Photo by Jesse D. Garrabrant/NBAE via Getty Images)
Rose returns to Cavaliers to resume rehab on sprained ankle
NEW YORK,NY - NOVEMBER 13: Derrick Rose #1 of the Cleveland Cavaliers gets ready before the game against the New York Knicks at Madison Square Garden on November 13, 2017 in New York, New York (Photo by Jesse D. Garrabrant/NBAE via Getty Images)
FILE - In this Sept. 25, 2017, file photo, Cleveland Cavaliers&#39; Derrick Rose poses for a portrait during the NBA basketball team media day, in Independence, Ohio. Estranged point guard Derrick Rose has returned to the Cavaliers. The former NBA MVP left the team on Nov. 9 after being sidelined with a sprained left ankle. His latest injury had Rose contemplating whether to continue playing, but the Cavs said Monday, Dec. 4, 2017, that Rose has rejoined the team to resume treatment and rehabilitation. (AP Photo/Ron Schwane, File)
FILE - In this Sept. 25, 2017, file photo, Cleveland Cavaliers' Derrick Rose poses for a portrait during the NBA basketball team media day, in Independence, Ohio. Estranged point guard Derrick Rose has returned to the Cavaliers. The former NBA MVP left the team on Nov. 9 after being sidelined with a sprained left ankle. His latest injury had Rose contemplating whether to continue playing, but the Cavs said Monday, Dec. 4, 2017, that Rose has rejoined the team to resume treatment and rehabilitation. (AP Photo/Ron Schwane, File)
FILE - In this Sept. 25, 2017, file photo, Cleveland Cavaliers' Derrick Rose poses for a portrait during the NBA basketball team media day, in Independence, Ohio. Estranged point guard Derrick Rose has returned to the Cavaliers. The former NBA MVP left the team on Nov. 9 after being sidelined with a sprained left ankle. His latest injury had Rose contemplating whether to continue playing, but the Cavs said Monday, Dec. 4, 2017, that Rose has rejoined the team to resume treatment and rehabilitation. (AP Photo/Ron Schwane, File)
FILE - In this Oct. 20, 2017, file photo, Cleveland Cavaliers&#39; Derrick Rose drives against Milwaukee Bucks&#39; Thon Maker, right, during the first half of an NBA basketball game, in Milwaukee. Estranged point guard Derrick Rose has returned to the Cavaliers. The former NBA MVP left the team on Nov. 9 after being sidelined with a sprained left ankle. His latest injury had Rose contemplating whether to continue playing, but the Cavs said Monday, Dec. 4, 2017, that Rose has rejoined the team to resume treatment and rehabilitation. (AP Photo/Tom Lynn, File)
FILE - In this Oct. 20, 2017, file photo, Cleveland Cavaliers' Derrick Rose drives against Milwaukee Bucks' Thon Maker, right, during the first half of an NBA basketball game, in Milwaukee. Estranged point guard Derrick Rose has returned to the Cavaliers. The former NBA MVP left the team on Nov. 9 after being sidelined with a sprained left ankle. His latest injury had Rose contemplating whether to continue playing, but the Cavs said Monday, Dec. 4, 2017, that Rose has rejoined the team to resume treatment and rehabilitation. (AP Photo/Tom Lynn, File)
FILE - In this Oct. 20, 2017, file photo, Cleveland Cavaliers' Derrick Rose drives against Milwaukee Bucks' Thon Maker, right, during the first half of an NBA basketball game, in Milwaukee. Estranged point guard Derrick Rose has returned to the Cavaliers. The former NBA MVP left the team on Nov. 9 after being sidelined with a sprained left ankle. His latest injury had Rose contemplating whether to continue playing, but the Cavs said Monday, Dec. 4, 2017, that Rose has rejoined the team to resume treatment and rehabilitation. (AP Photo/Tom Lynn, File)
LeBron James supportive of Derrick Rose in return: &#39;He doesn&#39;t owe us an explanation&#39;
LeBron James supportive of Derrick Rose in return: 'He doesn't owe us an explanation'
LeBron James supportive of Derrick Rose in return: 'He doesn't owe us an explanation'
<p>Derrick Rose is returning to the Cavaliers, and his coach and teammates were vocal about lending their support upon the former MVP&#39;s return.</p>
Cavaliers happy to offer support upon Derrick Rose's return to the team

Derrick Rose is returning to the Cavaliers, and his coach and teammates were vocal about lending their support upon the former MVP's return.

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