Derrick Rose

Derrick Rose

The Adidas D Rose 9's reportedly be coming in July 2018.
Derrick Rose Plots Summer Release For Adidas Signature Sneakers
The Adidas D Rose 9's reportedly be coming in July 2018.
The Adidas D Rose 9's reportedly be coming in July 2018.
Derrick Rose Plots Summer Release For Adidas Signature Sneakers
The Adidas D Rose 9's reportedly be coming in July 2018.
The Adidas D Rose 9's reportedly be coming in July 2018.
Derrick Rose Plots Summer Release For Adidas Signature Sneakers
The Adidas D Rose 9's reportedly be coming in July 2018.
The Adidas D Rose 9's reportedly be coming in July 2018.
Derrick Rose Plots Summer Release For Adidas Signature Sneakers
The Adidas D Rose 9's reportedly be coming in July 2018.
Highlights of 2019 WR Derrick Rose at The Opening Dallas regional camp (April 29, 2018)
Derrick Rose highlights at The Opening Dallas
Highlights of 2019 WR Derrick Rose at The Opening Dallas regional camp (April 29, 2018)
Highlights of 2019 WR Derrick Rose at The Opening Dallas regional camp (April 29, 2018)
Derrick Rose highlights at The Opening Dallas
Highlights of 2019 WR Derrick Rose at The Opening Dallas regional camp (April 29, 2018)
Highlights of 2019 WR Derrick Rose at The Opening Dallas regional camp (April 29, 2018)
Derrick Rose highlights at The Opening Dallas
Highlights of 2019 WR Derrick Rose at The Opening Dallas regional camp (April 29, 2018)
Highlights of 2019 WR Derrick Rose at The Opening Dallas regional camp (April 29, 2018)
Derrick Rose highlights at The Opening Dallas
Highlights of 2019 WR Derrick Rose at The Opening Dallas regional camp (April 29, 2018)
<p>Derrick Rose was slotted No. 36 in ESPN's third annual World Fame 100 list, which takes into account searches, social media following and endorsements.</p>
ESPN ranks Derrick Rose No. 36 in its World Fame 100 list

Derrick Rose was slotted No. 36 in ESPN's third annual World Fame 100 list, which takes into account searches, social media following and endorsements.

Minnesota is interested in re-signing Derrick Rose, who signed a one-year, $2.1 million contract in March.
Timberwolves want to re-sign Derrick Rose, report says
Minnesota is interested in re-signing Derrick Rose, who signed a one-year, $2.1 million contract in March.
Thibodeau and the Timberwolves want Rose back, reports Jon Krawczynski of The Athletic.
Timberwolves want to bring back Derrick Rose
Thibodeau and the Timberwolves want Rose back, reports Jon Krawczynski of The Athletic.
Thibodeau and the Timberwolves want Rose back, reports Jon Krawczynski of The Athletic.
Timberwolves want to bring back Derrick Rose
Thibodeau and the Timberwolves want Rose back, reports Jon Krawczynski of The Athletic.
When Tom Thibodeau signed Derrick Rose — after the former MVP was traded at the deadline when Cleveland cleaned house, then waived instantly by Utah — NBA Twitter was a combination of scorn and derision. Especially Timberwolves fans. The consensus was Rose was going to be wretched on defense and certainly didn’t solve the team’s
Report: Timberwolves want to bring back Derrick Rose
When Tom Thibodeau signed Derrick Rose — after the former MVP was traded at the deadline when Cleveland cleaned house, then waived instantly by Utah — NBA Twitter was a combination of scorn and derision. Especially Timberwolves fans. The consensus was Rose was going to be wretched on defense and certainly didn’t solve the team’s
When Tom Thibodeau signed Derrick Rose — after the former MVP was traded at the deadline when Cleveland cleaned house, then waived instantly by Utah — NBA Twitter was a combination of scorn and derision. Especially Timberwolves fans. The consensus was Rose was going to be wretched on defense and certainly didn’t solve the team’s
Report: Timberwolves want to bring back Derrick Rose
When Tom Thibodeau signed Derrick Rose — after the former MVP was traded at the deadline when Cleveland cleaned house, then waived instantly by Utah — NBA Twitter was a combination of scorn and derision. Especially Timberwolves fans. The consensus was Rose was going to be wretched on defense and certainly didn’t solve the team’s
<p>Derrick Rose returned to his old stomping grounds to train in the offseason.</p>
Derrick Rose is training at the Bulls' practice facility

Derrick Rose returned to his old stomping grounds to train in the offseason.

<p>Jordan or Pippen over Ewing? Zach LaVine reminding everyone he's still the dunk king? Derrick Rose sending a memo to Dragic? Here are the 5 best dunks in Bulls history.</p>
Jordan, Rose, Pippen, Gibson, LaVine: The five best dunks in Bulls history

Jordan or Pippen over Ewing? Zach LaVine reminding everyone he's still the dunk king? Derrick Rose sending a memo to Dragic? Here are the 5 best dunks in Bulls history.

<p>What would have happened to Derrick Rose and the Bulls' franchise if Pooh never tore his ACL? We asked our Bulls experts and here's what they said.</p>
What happens to the Bulls if Derrick Rose never tears his ACL in 2012?

What would have happened to Derrick Rose and the Bulls' franchise if Pooh never tore his ACL? We asked our Bulls experts and here's what they said.

Derrick Rose proved he still has plenty to offer at both ends of the basketball court late in the first half for the Minnesota Timberwolves on Monday.
Play of the Day - Rose goes coast-to-coast against Rockets
Derrick Rose proved he still has plenty to offer at both ends of the basketball court late in the first half for the Minnesota Timberwolves on Monday.
Derrick Rose proved he still has plenty to offer at both ends of the basketball court late in the first half for the Minnesota Timberwolves on Monday.
Play of the Day - Rose goes coast-to-coast against Rockets
Derrick Rose proved he still has plenty to offer at both ends of the basketball court late in the first half for the Minnesota Timberwolves on Monday.
Derrick Rose proved he still has plenty to offer at both ends of the basketball court late in the first half for the Minnesota Timberwolves on Monday.
Play of the Day - Rose goes coast-to-coast against Rockets
Derrick Rose proved he still has plenty to offer at both ends of the basketball court late in the first half for the Minnesota Timberwolves on Monday.
Houston Rockets' Chris Paul, right, makes a pass as Minnesota Timberwolves' Derrick Rose pursues during the second half of Game 4 in an NBA basketball first-round playoff series Monday, April 23, 2018, in Minneapolis. The Rockets won 119-100. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)
Houston Rockets' Chris Paul, right, makes a pass as Minnesota Timberwolves' Derrick Rose pursues during the second half of Game 4 in an NBA basketball first-round playoff series Monday, April 23, 2018, in Minneapolis. The Rockets won 119-100. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)
Houston Rockets' Chris Paul, right, makes a pass as Minnesota Timberwolves' Derrick Rose pursues during the second half of Game 4 in an NBA basketball first-round playoff series Monday, April 23, 2018, in Minneapolis. The Rockets won 119-100. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)
Minnesota Timberwolves' Derrick Rose plays against the Houston Rockets during the first half of Game 4 in an NBA basketball first-round playoff series Monday, April 23, 2018, in Minneapolis. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)
Minnesota Timberwolves' Derrick Rose plays against the Houston Rockets during the first half of Game 4 in an NBA basketball first-round playoff series Monday, April 23, 2018, in Minneapolis. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)
Minnesota Timberwolves' Derrick Rose plays against the Houston Rockets during the first half of Game 4 in an NBA basketball first-round playoff series Monday, April 23, 2018, in Minneapolis. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)
Minnesota Timberwolves' Derrick Rose plays against the Houston Rockets during the first half of Game 4 in an NBA basketball first-round playoff series Monday, April 23, 2018, in Minneapolis. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)
Minnesota Timberwolves' Derrick Rose plays against the Houston Rockets during the first half of Game 4 in an NBA basketball first-round playoff series Monday, April 23, 2018, in Minneapolis. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)
Minnesota Timberwolves' Derrick Rose plays against the Houston Rockets during the first half of Game 4 in an NBA basketball first-round playoff series Monday, April 23, 2018, in Minneapolis. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)
Minnesota Timberwolves' Derrick Rose plays against the Houston Rockets during the second half of Game 4 in an NBA basketball first-round playoff series Monday, April 23, 2018, in Minneapolis. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)
Minnesota Timberwolves' Derrick Rose plays against the Houston Rockets during the second half of Game 4 in an NBA basketball first-round playoff series Monday, April 23, 2018, in Minneapolis. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)
Minnesota Timberwolves' Derrick Rose plays against the Houston Rockets during the second half of Game 4 in an NBA basketball first-round playoff series Monday, April 23, 2018, in Minneapolis. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)
Minnesota Timberwolves' Derrick Rose signals his 3-point shot during the second half against the Houston Rockets in Game 3 of an NBA basketball first-round playoff series Saturday, April 21, 2018, in Minneapolis.The Timberwolves won 121-105. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)
Minnesota Timberwolves' Derrick Rose signals his 3-point shot during the second half against the Houston Rockets in Game 3 of an NBA basketball first-round playoff series Saturday, April 21, 2018, in Minneapolis.The Timberwolves won 121-105. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)
Minnesota Timberwolves' Derrick Rose signals his 3-point shot during the second half against the Houston Rockets in Game 3 of an NBA basketball first-round playoff series Saturday, April 21, 2018, in Minneapolis.The Timberwolves won 121-105. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) falls over Houston Rockets guard Eric Gordon, left, during the second half in Game 2 of a first-round NBA basketball playoff series, Wednesday, April 18, 2018, in Houston. (AP Photo/Eric Christian Smith)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) falls over Houston Rockets guard Eric Gordon, left, during the second half in Game 2 of a first-round NBA basketball playoff series, Wednesday, April 18, 2018, in Houston. (AP Photo/Eric Christian Smith)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) falls over Houston Rockets guard Eric Gordon, left, during the second half in Game 2 of a first-round NBA basketball playoff series, Wednesday, April 18, 2018, in Houston. (AP Photo/Eric Christian Smith)
Minnesota Timberwolves' Derrick Rose shoots around Houston Rockets' James Harden during the first half in Game 1 of a first-round NBA basketball playoff series Sunday, April 15, 2018, in Houston. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
Minnesota Timberwolves' Derrick Rose shoots around Houston Rockets' James Harden during the first half in Game 1 of a first-round NBA basketball playoff series Sunday, April 15, 2018, in Houston. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
Minnesota Timberwolves' Derrick Rose shoots around Houston Rockets' James Harden during the first half in Game 1 of a first-round NBA basketball playoff series Sunday, April 15, 2018, in Houston. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
LWS127. Houston (United States), 15/04/2018.- Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (R) tries to block a shot against Houston Rockets guard James Harden (L) in the second half of the NBA Western Conference first round Playoffs basketball game between the Minnesota Timberwolves and the Houston Rockets at the Toyota Center in Houston, Texas, USA, 15 April 2018. (Baile de la Rosa, Baloncesto, Estados Unidos) EFE/EPA/LARRY W. SMITH SHUTTERSTOCK OUT
LWS127. Houston (United States), 15/04/2018.- Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (R) tries to block a shot against Houston Rockets guard James Harden (L) in the second half of the NBA Western Conference first round Playoffs basketball game between the Minnesota Timberwolves and the Houston Rockets at the Toyota Center in Houston, Texas, USA, 15 April 2018. (Baile de la Rosa, Baloncesto, Estados Unidos) EFE/EPA/LARRY W. SMITH SHUTTERSTOCK OUT
LWS127. Houston (United States), 15/04/2018.- Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (R) tries to block a shot against Houston Rockets guard James Harden (L) in the second half of the NBA Western Conference first round Playoffs basketball game between the Minnesota Timberwolves and the Houston Rockets at the Toyota Center in Houston, Texas, USA, 15 April 2018. (Baile de la Rosa, Baloncesto, Estados Unidos) EFE/EPA/LARRY W. SMITH SHUTTERSTOCK OUT
Minnesota Timberwolves' Derrick Rose sits on the bench during a timeout against the Houston Rockets in the second half in Game 1 of a first-round NBA basketball playoff series Sunday, April 15, 2018, in Houston. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
Minnesota Timberwolves' Derrick Rose sits on the bench during a timeout against the Houston Rockets in the second half in Game 1 of a first-round NBA basketball playoff series Sunday, April 15, 2018, in Houston. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
Minnesota Timberwolves' Derrick Rose sits on the bench during a timeout against the Houston Rockets in the second half in Game 1 of a first-round NBA basketball playoff series Sunday, April 15, 2018, in Houston. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
Houston Rockets' Clint Capela, right, blocks a shot by Minnesota Timberwolves' Derrick Rose during the first half in Game 1 of a first-round NBA basketball playoff series Sunday, April 15, 2018, in Houston. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
Houston Rockets' Clint Capela, right, blocks a shot by Minnesota Timberwolves' Derrick Rose during the first half in Game 1 of a first-round NBA basketball playoff series Sunday, April 15, 2018, in Houston. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
Houston Rockets' Clint Capela, right, blocks a shot by Minnesota Timberwolves' Derrick Rose during the first half in Game 1 of a first-round NBA basketball playoff series Sunday, April 15, 2018, in Houston. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
LWS120. Houston (United States), 15/04/2018.- Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (L) tries to block a shot against Houston Rockets guard Chris Paul (R) in the second half of the NBA Western Conference first round Playoffs basketball game between the Minnesota Timberwolves and the Houston Rockets at the Toyota Center in Houston, Texas, USA, 15 April 2018. (Baile de la Rosa, Baloncesto, Estados Unidos) EFE/EPA/LARRY W. SMITH SHUTTERSTOCK OUT
LWS120. Houston (United States), 15/04/2018.- Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (L) tries to block a shot against Houston Rockets guard Chris Paul (R) in the second half of the NBA Western Conference first round Playoffs basketball game between the Minnesota Timberwolves and the Houston Rockets at the Toyota Center in Houston, Texas, USA, 15 April 2018. (Baile de la Rosa, Baloncesto, Estados Unidos) EFE/EPA/LARRY W. SMITH SHUTTERSTOCK OUT
LWS120. Houston (United States), 15/04/2018.- Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (L) tries to block a shot against Houston Rockets guard Chris Paul (R) in the second half of the NBA Western Conference first round Playoffs basketball game between the Minnesota Timberwolves and the Houston Rockets at the Toyota Center in Houston, Texas, USA, 15 April 2018. (Baile de la Rosa, Baloncesto, Estados Unidos) EFE/EPA/LARRY W. SMITH SHUTTERSTOCK OUT
Minnesota Timberwolves' Derrick Rose, center, passes around Houston Rockets' Clint Capela, left, and PJ Tucker during the second half in Game 1 of a first-round NBA basketball playoff series Sunday, April 15, 2018, in Houston. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
Minnesota Timberwolves' Derrick Rose, center, passes around Houston Rockets' Clint Capela, left, and PJ Tucker during the second half in Game 1 of a first-round NBA basketball playoff series Sunday, April 15, 2018, in Houston. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
Minnesota Timberwolves' Derrick Rose, center, passes around Houston Rockets' Clint Capela, left, and PJ Tucker during the second half in Game 1 of a first-round NBA basketball playoff series Sunday, April 15, 2018, in Houston. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
LWS119. Houston (United States), 15/04/2018.- Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (R) goes to the basket against Houston Rockets guard James Harden (2-L) in the first half of the NBA Western Conference first round Playoffs basketball game between the Minnesota Timberwolves and the Houston Rockets at the Toyota Center in Houston, Texas, USA, 15 April 2018. (Baile de la Rosa, Baloncesto, Estados Unidos) EFE/EPA/LARRY W. SMITH SHUTTERSTOCK OUT
LWS119. Houston (United States), 15/04/2018.- Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (R) goes to the basket against Houston Rockets guard James Harden (2-L) in the first half of the NBA Western Conference first round Playoffs basketball game between the Minnesota Timberwolves and the Houston Rockets at the Toyota Center in Houston, Texas, USA, 15 April 2018. (Baile de la Rosa, Baloncesto, Estados Unidos) EFE/EPA/LARRY W. SMITH SHUTTERSTOCK OUT
LWS119. Houston (United States), 15/04/2018.- Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (R) goes to the basket against Houston Rockets guard James Harden (2-L) in the first half of the NBA Western Conference first round Playoffs basketball game between the Minnesota Timberwolves and the Houston Rockets at the Toyota Center in Houston, Texas, USA, 15 April 2018. (Baile de la Rosa, Baloncesto, Estados Unidos) EFE/EPA/LARRY W. SMITH SHUTTERSTOCK OUT
LWS118. Houston (United States), 15/04/2018.- Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (R) goes to the basket against Houston Rockets guard James Harden (L) in the first half of the NBA Western Conference first round Playoffs basketball game between the Minnesota Timberwolves and the Houston Rockets at the Toyota Center in Houston, Texas, USA, 15 April 2018. (Baile de la Rosa, Baloncesto, Estados Unidos) EFE/EPA/LARRY W. SMITH SHUTTERSTOCK OUT
LWS118. Houston (United States), 15/04/2018.- Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (R) goes to the basket against Houston Rockets guard James Harden (L) in the first half of the NBA Western Conference first round Playoffs basketball game between the Minnesota Timberwolves and the Houston Rockets at the Toyota Center in Houston, Texas, USA, 15 April 2018. (Baile de la Rosa, Baloncesto, Estados Unidos) EFE/EPA/LARRY W. SMITH SHUTTERSTOCK OUT
LWS118. Houston (United States), 15/04/2018.- Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (R) goes to the basket against Houston Rockets guard James Harden (L) in the first half of the NBA Western Conference first round Playoffs basketball game between the Minnesota Timberwolves and the Houston Rockets at the Toyota Center in Houston, Texas, USA, 15 April 2018. (Baile de la Rosa, Baloncesto, Estados Unidos) EFE/EPA/LARRY W. SMITH SHUTTERSTOCK OUT
LWS110. Houston (United States), 15/04/2018.- Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (L) goes to the basket against Houston Rockets center Nene (bottom) of Brazil in the first half of the NBA Western Conference first round Playoffs basketball game between the Minnesota Timberwolves and the Houston Rockets at the Toyota Center in Houston, Texas, USA, 15 April 2018. (Baile de la Rosa, Brasil, Baloncesto, Estados Unidos) EFE/EPA/LARRY W. SMITH SHUTTERSTOCK OUT
LWS110. Houston (United States), 15/04/2018.- Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (L) goes to the basket against Houston Rockets center Nene (bottom) of Brazil in the first half of the NBA Western Conference first round Playoffs basketball game between the Minnesota Timberwolves and the Houston Rockets at the Toyota Center in Houston, Texas, USA, 15 April 2018. (Baile de la Rosa, Brasil, Baloncesto, Estados Unidos) EFE/EPA/LARRY W. SMITH SHUTTERSTOCK OUT
LWS110. Houston (United States), 15/04/2018.- Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (L) goes to the basket against Houston Rockets center Nene (bottom) of Brazil in the first half of the NBA Western Conference first round Playoffs basketball game between the Minnesota Timberwolves and the Houston Rockets at the Toyota Center in Houston, Texas, USA, 15 April 2018. (Baile de la Rosa, Brasil, Baloncesto, Estados Unidos) EFE/EPA/LARRY W. SMITH SHUTTERSTOCK OUT
Houston Rockets' Clint Capela, right, blocks a shot by Minnesota Timberwolves' Derrick Rose during the first half in Game 1 of a first-round NBA basketball playoff series Sunday, April 15, 2018, in Houston. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
Houston Rockets' Clint Capela, right, blocks a shot by Minnesota Timberwolves' Derrick Rose during the first half in Game 1 of a first-round NBA basketball playoff series Sunday, April 15, 2018, in Houston. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
Houston Rockets' Clint Capela, right, blocks a shot by Minnesota Timberwolves' Derrick Rose during the first half in Game 1 of a first-round NBA basketball playoff series Sunday, April 15, 2018, in Houston. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
Minnesota Timberwolves' Derrick Rose drives around Houston Rockets' Gerald Green during the first half in Game 1 of a first-round NBA basketball playoff series Sunday, April 15, 2018, in Houston. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
Minnesota Timberwolves' Derrick Rose drives around Houston Rockets' Gerald Green during the first half in Game 1 of a first-round NBA basketball playoff series Sunday, April 15, 2018, in Houston. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
Minnesota Timberwolves' Derrick Rose drives around Houston Rockets' Gerald Green during the first half in Game 1 of a first-round NBA basketball playoff series Sunday, April 15, 2018, in Houston. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
MINNEAPOLIS, MN - MARCH 18: Gerald Green #14 of the Houston Rockets gets into a altercation with Gorgui Dieng #5 of the Minnesota Timberwolves and Derrick Rose #25 and referee Ed Malloy #14 get in between them during the fourth quarter of the game on March 18, 2018 at the Target Center in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Green was ejected from the game. (Photo by Hannah Foslien/Getty Images)
NBA releases pool of 36 referees for first round
MINNEAPOLIS, MN - MARCH 18: Gerald Green #14 of the Houston Rockets gets into a altercation with Gorgui Dieng #5 of the Minnesota Timberwolves and Derrick Rose #25 and referee Ed Malloy #14 get in between them during the fourth quarter of the game on March 18, 2018 at the Target Center in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Green was ejected from the game. (Photo by Hannah Foslien/Getty Images)
Memphis Grizzlies' Ben McLemore, front right, eyes the basket between Minnesota Timberwolves' Derrick Rose, left, and Jeff Teague in the second half of an NBA basketball game Monday, April 9, 2018, in Minneapolis. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)
Memphis Grizzlies' Ben McLemore, front right, eyes the basket between Minnesota Timberwolves' Derrick Rose, left, and Jeff Teague in the second half of an NBA basketball game Monday, April 9, 2018, in Minneapolis. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)
Memphis Grizzlies' Ben McLemore, front right, eyes the basket between Minnesota Timberwolves' Derrick Rose, left, and Jeff Teague in the second half of an NBA basketball game Monday, April 9, 2018, in Minneapolis. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) in the second half of an NBA basketball game Thursday, April 5, 2018, in Denver. The Nuggets won 100-96. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) in the second half of an NBA basketball game Thursday, April 5, 2018, in Denver. The Nuggets won 100-96. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) in the second half of an NBA basketball game Thursday, April 5, 2018, in Denver. The Nuggets won 100-96. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) in the second half of an NBA basketball game Thursday, April 5, 2018, in Denver. The Nuggets won 100-96. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) in the second half of an NBA basketball game Thursday, April 5, 2018, in Denver. The Nuggets won 100-96. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) in the second half of an NBA basketball game Thursday, April 5, 2018, in Denver. The Nuggets won 100-96. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) ad Minnesota Timberwolves head coach Tom Thibodeau in the second half of an NBA basketball game Thursday, April 5, 2018, in Denver. The Nuggets won 100-96. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) ad Minnesota Timberwolves head coach Tom Thibodeau in the second half of an NBA basketball game Thursday, April 5, 2018, in Denver. The Nuggets won 100-96. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) ad Minnesota Timberwolves head coach Tom Thibodeau in the second half of an NBA basketball game Thursday, April 5, 2018, in Denver. The Nuggets won 100-96. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) in the second half of an NBA basketball game Thursday, April 5, 2018, in Denver. The Nuggets won 100-96. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) in the second half of an NBA basketball game Thursday, April 5, 2018, in Denver. The Nuggets won 100-96. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) in the second half of an NBA basketball game Thursday, April 5, 2018, in Denver. The Nuggets won 100-96. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) in the first half of an NBA basketball game Thursday, April 5, 2018, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) in the first half of an NBA basketball game Thursday, April 5, 2018, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) in the first half of an NBA basketball game Thursday, April 5, 2018, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) in the first half of an NBA basketball game Thursday, April 5, 2018, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) in the first half of an NBA basketball game Thursday, April 5, 2018, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) in the first half of an NBA basketball game Thursday, April 5, 2018, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) in the first half of an NBA basketball game Thursday, April 5, 2018, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) in the first half of an NBA basketball game Thursday, April 5, 2018, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) in the first half of an NBA basketball game Thursday, April 5, 2018, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) in the first half of an NBA basketball game Thursday, April 5, 2018, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) in the first half of an NBA basketball game Thursday, April 5, 2018, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) in the first half of an NBA basketball game Thursday, April 5, 2018, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) in the first half of an NBA basketball game Thursday, April 5, 2018, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) in the first half of an NBA basketball game Thursday, April 5, 2018, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) in the first half of an NBA basketball game Thursday, April 5, 2018, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) in the first half of an NBA basketball game Thursday, April 5, 2018, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) in the first half of an NBA basketball game Thursday, April 5, 2018, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) in the first half of an NBA basketball game Thursday, April 5, 2018, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) in the first half of an NBA basketball game Thursday, April 5, 2018, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) in the first half of an NBA basketball game Thursday, April 5, 2018, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) in the first half of an NBA basketball game Thursday, April 5, 2018, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) in the first half of an NBA basketball game Thursday, April 5, 2018, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) in the first half of an NBA basketball game Thursday, April 5, 2018, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) in the first half of an NBA basketball game Thursday, April 5, 2018, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) in the first half of an NBA basketball game Thursday, April 5, 2018, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) in the first half of an NBA basketball game Thursday, April 5, 2018, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) in the first half of an NBA basketball game Thursday, April 5, 2018, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) in the first half of an NBA basketball game Thursday, April 5, 2018, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) in the first half of an NBA basketball game Thursday, April 5, 2018, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) in the first half of an NBA basketball game Thursday, April 5, 2018, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) in the first half of an NBA basketball game Thursday, April 5, 2018, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) in the first half of an NBA basketball game Thursday, April 5, 2018, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) in the first half of an NBA basketball game Thursday, April 5, 2018, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) in the first half of an NBA basketball game Thursday, April 5, 2018, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) in the first half of an NBA basketball game Thursday, April 5, 2018, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) in the first half of an NBA basketball game Thursday, April 5, 2018, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) in the first half of an NBA basketball game Thursday, April 5, 2018, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) in the first half of an NBA basketball game Thursday, April 5, 2018, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) in the first half of an NBA basketball game Thursday, April 5, 2018, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) in the first half of an NBA basketball game Thursday, April 5, 2018, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) in the first half of an NBA basketball game Thursday, April 5, 2018, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) in the first half of an NBA basketball game Thursday, April 5, 2018, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
In the latest HOLDAT Podcast, Carlos Boozer and Nate Robinson open the mailbag to discuss Derrick Rose, Larry Bird vs. LeBron James and NBA teams they wished they played on.
HOLDAT Mailbag: What If Derrick Rose Remained Healthy?
In the latest HOLDAT Podcast, Carlos Boozer and Nate Robinson open the mailbag to discuss Derrick Rose, Larry Bird vs. LeBron James and NBA teams they wished they played on.
In the latest HOLDAT Podcast, Carlos Boozer and Nate Robinson open the mailbag to discuss Derrick Rose, Larry Bird vs. LeBron James and NBA teams they wished they played on.
HOLDAT Mailbag: What If Derrick Rose Remained Healthy?
In the latest HOLDAT Podcast, Carlos Boozer and Nate Robinson open the mailbag to discuss Derrick Rose, Larry Bird vs. LeBron James and NBA teams they wished they played on.
Denver Nuggets guard Jamal Murray, left, drives past Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose during the second half of an NBA basketball game Thursday, April 5, 2018, in Denver. The Nuggets won 100-96. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Denver Nuggets guard Jamal Murray, left, drives past Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose during the second half of an NBA basketball game Thursday, April 5, 2018, in Denver. The Nuggets won 100-96. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Denver Nuggets guard Jamal Murray, left, drives past Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose during the second half of an NBA basketball game Thursday, April 5, 2018, in Denver. The Nuggets won 100-96. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
<p>We are down to the final two individual seasons in our Bulls Bracket Madness, and it's one MVP against the other. Vote now for the winner!</p>
Bulls Bracket Madness: Will Derrick Rose or Michael Jordan be crowned champion?

We are down to the final two individual seasons in our Bulls Bracket Madness, and it's one MVP against the other. Vote now for the winner!

Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) shoots against Los Angeles Clippers forward Tobias Harris (34) in the second quarter of an NBA basketball game Tuesday, March 20, 2018, in Minneapolis. (AP Photo/Andy Clayton-King)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) shoots against Los Angeles Clippers forward Tobias Harris (34) in the second quarter of an NBA basketball game Tuesday, March 20, 2018, in Minneapolis. (AP Photo/Andy Clayton-King)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) shoots against Los Angeles Clippers forward Tobias Harris (34) in the second quarter of an NBA basketball game Tuesday, March 20, 2018, in Minneapolis. (AP Photo/Andy Clayton-King)
Minnesota Timberwolves Derrick Rose (25) is called for a charge on Los Angeles Clippers guard Milos Teodosic (4) in the first quarter of an NBA basketball game Tuesday, March 20, 2018, in Minneapolis. (AP Photo/Andy Clayton-King)
Minnesota Timberwolves Derrick Rose (25) is called for a charge on Los Angeles Clippers guard Milos Teodosic (4) in the first quarter of an NBA basketball game Tuesday, March 20, 2018, in Minneapolis. (AP Photo/Andy Clayton-King)
Minnesota Timberwolves Derrick Rose (25) is called for a charge on Los Angeles Clippers guard Milos Teodosic (4) in the first quarter of an NBA basketball game Tuesday, March 20, 2018, in Minneapolis. (AP Photo/Andy Clayton-King)
Minnesota Timberwolves forward Nemanja Bjelica (8) celebrates a turnover with teammates Derrick Rose (25) and Gorgui Dieng (5) against the Houston Rockets in the fourth quarter of an NBA basketball game Sunday, March 18, 2018, in Minneapolis. The Rockets defeated the Timberwolves 129-120. (AP Photo/Andy Clayton-King)
Minnesota Timberwolves forward Nemanja Bjelica (8) celebrates a turnover with teammates Derrick Rose (25) and Gorgui Dieng (5) against the Houston Rockets in the fourth quarter of an NBA basketball game Sunday, March 18, 2018, in Minneapolis. The Rockets defeated the Timberwolves 129-120. (AP Photo/Andy Clayton-King)
Minnesota Timberwolves forward Nemanja Bjelica (8) celebrates a turnover with teammates Derrick Rose (25) and Gorgui Dieng (5) against the Houston Rockets in the fourth quarter of an NBA basketball game Sunday, March 18, 2018, in Minneapolis. The Rockets defeated the Timberwolves 129-120. (AP Photo/Andy Clayton-King)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) drives against the Houston Rockets in the second quarter of an NBA basketball game Sunday, March 18, 2018, in Minneapolis. The Rockets defeated the Timberwolves 129-120. (AP Photo/Andy Clayton-King)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) drives against the Houston Rockets in the second quarter of an NBA basketball game Sunday, March 18, 2018, in Minneapolis. The Rockets defeated the Timberwolves 129-120. (AP Photo/Andy Clayton-King)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) drives against the Houston Rockets in the second quarter of an NBA basketball game Sunday, March 18, 2018, in Minneapolis. The Rockets defeated the Timberwolves 129-120. (AP Photo/Andy Clayton-King)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) shoots over Houston Rockets forward Ryan Anderson (33) in the second quarter of an NBA basketball game Sunday, March 18, 2018, in Minneapolis. The Rockets defeated the Timberwolves 129-120. (AP Photo/Andy Clayton-King)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) shoots over Houston Rockets forward Ryan Anderson (33) in the second quarter of an NBA basketball game Sunday, March 18, 2018, in Minneapolis. The Rockets defeated the Timberwolves 129-120. (AP Photo/Andy Clayton-King)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose (25) shoots over Houston Rockets forward Ryan Anderson (33) in the second quarter of an NBA basketball game Sunday, March 18, 2018, in Minneapolis. The Rockets defeated the Timberwolves 129-120. (AP Photo/Andy Clayton-King)
Minnesota Timberwolves Derrick Rose (25) shoots over Houston Rockets guard James Harden (13) in the first quarter of an NBA basketball game Sunday, March 18, 2018, in Minneapolis. (AP Photo/Andy Clayton-King)
Minnesota Timberwolves Derrick Rose (25) shoots over Houston Rockets guard James Harden (13) in the first quarter of an NBA basketball game Sunday, March 18, 2018, in Minneapolis. (AP Photo/Andy Clayton-King)
Minnesota Timberwolves Derrick Rose (25) shoots over Houston Rockets guard James Harden (13) in the first quarter of an NBA basketball game Sunday, March 18, 2018, in Minneapolis. (AP Photo/Andy Clayton-King)
Houston Rockets James Harden (13) looks on while Minnesota Timberwolves players Derrick Rose (25), Nemanja Bjelica (8) and Gorgui Dieng celebrate a turnover in the fourth quarter of an NBA basketball game Sunday, March 18, 2018, in Minneapolis. The Rockets defeated the Timberwolves 129-120. (AP Photo/Andy Clayton-King)
Houston Rockets James Harden (13) looks on while Minnesota Timberwolves players Derrick Rose (25), Nemanja Bjelica (8) and Gorgui Dieng celebrate a turnover in the fourth quarter of an NBA basketball game Sunday, March 18, 2018, in Minneapolis. The Rockets defeated the Timberwolves 129-120. (AP Photo/Andy Clayton-King)
Houston Rockets James Harden (13) looks on while Minnesota Timberwolves players Derrick Rose (25), Nemanja Bjelica (8) and Gorgui Dieng celebrate a turnover in the fourth quarter of an NBA basketball game Sunday, March 18, 2018, in Minneapolis. The Rockets defeated the Timberwolves 129-120. (AP Photo/Andy Clayton-King)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose prepares to pass the ball during the first half of an NBA basketball game against the San Antonio Spurs, Saturday, March 17, 2018, in San Antonio. San Antonio won 117-101. (AP Photo/Darren Abate)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose prepares to pass the ball during the first half of an NBA basketball game against the San Antonio Spurs, Saturday, March 17, 2018, in San Antonio. San Antonio won 117-101. (AP Photo/Darren Abate)
Minnesota Timberwolves guard Derrick Rose prepares to pass the ball during the first half of an NBA basketball game against the San Antonio Spurs, Saturday, March 17, 2018, in San Antonio. San Antonio won 117-101. (AP Photo/Darren Abate)
Minnesota Timberwolves' Derrick Rose, right, and Marcus Georges-Hunt sit on the bench during the second half of an NBA basketball game against the San Antonio Spurs, Saturday, March 17, 2018, in San Antonio. San Antonio won 117-101. (AP Photo/Darren Abate)
Minnesota Timberwolves' Derrick Rose, right, and Marcus Georges-Hunt sit on the bench during the second half of an NBA basketball game against the San Antonio Spurs, Saturday, March 17, 2018, in San Antonio. San Antonio won 117-101. (AP Photo/Darren Abate)
Minnesota Timberwolves' Derrick Rose, right, and Marcus Georges-Hunt sit on the bench during the second half of an NBA basketball game against the San Antonio Spurs, Saturday, March 17, 2018, in San Antonio. San Antonio won 117-101. (AP Photo/Darren Abate)
Minnesota Timberwolves' Derrick Rose plays against the Golden State Warriors in the first half of an NBA basketball game Sunday, March 11, 2018, in Minneapolis. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)
Minnesota Timberwolves' Derrick Rose plays against the Golden State Warriors in the first half of an NBA basketball game Sunday, March 11, 2018, in Minneapolis. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)
Minnesota Timberwolves' Derrick Rose plays against the Golden State Warriors in the first half of an NBA basketball game Sunday, March 11, 2018, in Minneapolis. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)
Minnesota Timberwolves' Derrick Rose plays against the Golden State Warriors in an NBA basketball game Sunday, March 11, 2018, in Minneapolis. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)
Minnesota Timberwolves' Derrick Rose plays against the Golden State Warriors in an NBA basketball game Sunday, March 11, 2018, in Minneapolis. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)
Minnesota Timberwolves' Derrick Rose plays against the Golden State Warriors in an NBA basketball game Sunday, March 11, 2018, in Minneapolis. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)
Minnesota Timberwolves' Derrick Rose, right, shoots as Golden State Warriors' Kevin Durant, left, looks on as Rose made his playing debut with the Timberwolves in the first half of an NBA basketball game Sunday, March 11, 2018, in Minneapolis. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)
Minnesota Timberwolves' Derrick Rose, right, shoots as Golden State Warriors' Kevin Durant, left, looks on as Rose made his playing debut with the Timberwolves in the first half of an NBA basketball game Sunday, March 11, 2018, in Minneapolis. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)
Minnesota Timberwolves' Derrick Rose, right, shoots as Golden State Warriors' Kevin Durant, left, looks on as Rose made his playing debut with the Timberwolves in the first half of an NBA basketball game Sunday, March 11, 2018, in Minneapolis. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)
<p>Derrick Rose shuts down critics: 'I know who I am'</p>
Derrick Rose shuts down critics: 'I know who I am'

Derrick Rose shuts down critics: 'I know who I am'

The veteran point guard is motivated to show he can still play and said he's "all in" with the Timberwolves.
Derrick Rose shuts down critics: 'I know who I am'
The veteran point guard is motivated to show he can still play and said he's "all in" with the Timberwolves.
<p>Derrick Rose shuts down critics: 'I know who I am'</p>
Derrick Rose shuts down critics: 'I know who I am'

Derrick Rose shuts down critics: 'I know who I am'

Derrick Rose to critics: 'I don't need your f------ validation'
Derrick Rose to critics: 'I don't need your f------ validation'
Derrick Rose to critics: 'I don't need your f------ validation'
<p>Over the summer, as the dust was settling on NBA free agency, basketball fans from coast to coast were preparing for a bloodbath in the Western Conference. Paul George, Jimmy Butler, and Paul Millsap were each headed from East to West to help put their respective teams over the top, and they were joining a conference that already went 10 deep with star-studded playoff contenders. The East would be even more irrelevant than it usually is, but that was fine. The West would be a glorious thunderdome full of All-Stars and elite teams.</p><p>That's not quite how it's played out. While there's still plenty of room for west coast elitists to argue that the West is superior and <a href="https://www.si.com/nba/2018/03/07/nba-finals-format-adam-siliver-rockets-warriors-cavaliers-east-west" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:the league needs playoff reform" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">the league needs playoff reform</a>, this season has <em>not</em> been a seven month showcase for the most exciting teams in the league. Not like <a href="https://www.basketball-reference.com/leagues/NBA_2008_standings.html" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:2008" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">2008</a> (12 of the top 14 teams were Western Conference teams), or even <a href="https://www.basketball-reference.com/leagues/NBA_2014_standings.html" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:2014" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">2014</a> (eight of the top 10 in the West, seven playoff teams with 50+ wins). As good as this field looked on paper, it hasn't been quite as captivating in practice. What's actually happened is a little bit trickier to describe.</p><p>More than anything, this year's West is a testament to just how impossible team-building can seem in the Warriors era. There's still a month left in the regular season, but even now, the conference has more cautionary tales than contenders. There have been two problems. First: None of these teams can touch the Warriors, and they probably can't even compete with the Rockets. That makes it harder to be impressed by the short-term progress of, say, the Blazers. Then: Once you realize that all these teams have gone all-in on rosters that can't make a dent at the top of the league, you begin to worry about what comes next.</p><p>I realized all of this when I was thinking through the playoff race in the West. Granted, that race is objectively dramatic right now. There are four games separating third place and 10th place and the playoff bracket changes dramatically every week. It should be fun. It should be thrilling. But it's really more ... Stressful? Depressing? Full of existential melancholy?</p><p>The Nuggets, for example, have spent the season watching Nikola Jokic's defense get exposed as a glaring flaw that raises questions about the ceiling for any team built around him. Jamal Murray and Gary Harris have been good, but not quite good enough to count on every night. Will Barton's a free agent who will likely be too expensive to keep. Wilson Chandler's age has begun to show at small forward this year, and Trey Lyles has been impressive for stretches, but he's very much <a href="https://www.si.com/nba/2017/06/22/nuggets-jazz-trade-grades-trey-lyles-donovan-mitchell-tyler-lydon" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:not Donovan Mitchell" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">not Donovan Mitchell</a>, and he doesn't have a clear role when Paul Millsap's healthy. As the Gary Harris extension kicks in and Jokic gets paid, it'll be difficult to bring in much more help. So, even in the best case scenario where Denver rebounds to make the playoffs, will a sweep to the Warriors or Rockets really make the future look any brighter?</p><p>Or the Thunder. They'll probably make the playoffs—Denver's recent slide helps—but what does this team become if Paul George leaves this summer? Andre Roberson's injury has hurt them worse than anyone could have imagined, and suddenly the all-in bet on one year of George is becoming a more sobering proposition. Next year: Steven Adams will still be very good, but he's not good enough to play credible sidekick to Westbrook. Carmelo Anthony will be opting into the final year of his deal at $28 million. The luxury tax will make it very difficult to add additional pieces. And Westbrook's game is already aging poorly, a year before his $205 million contract extension kicks in. Even if George returns, the West will be an uphill battle. If he leaves, it begins to look impossible. </p><p>In Portland, Damian Lillard <a href="https://www.si.com/nba/2018/03/07/damian-lillard-blazers-win-streak-open-floor-podcast" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:has been incredible" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">has been incredible</a> over the past two months. He's averaging close to 30 per game since January 1st, he's dominating fourth quarters on a nightly basis, and he's injected himself into the MVP race just as he's saved this Blazers season. One reason to worry: Portland is living this timeline for the third year in a row. It's the season where the Blazers start the year looking unremarkable, they falter halfway through, people begin to worry, and then Lillard puts them on his back and plays so well that everyone forgets what they were worried about. At some point reality will set in. Lillard is playing at an MVP level in the middle of his prime, but he doesn't have enough help to compete with elite teams. Al-Farouq Aminu, Evan Turner, Meyers Leonard, and Moe Harkless are not moving the needle. So even as Portland charges up the West—currently in third place—it would surprise no one if they lost in the first round.</p><p>The Wolves' future in a similarly perilous state. Thibs just <a href="https://www.si.com/nba/2018/03/08/derrick-rose-timberwolves-contract" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:added Derrick Rose" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">added Derrick Rose</a> for the stretch run, the final jewel in his Timberbulls crown, but the real concern is Andrew Wiggins' looming extension—$148 million over the next five years—coupled with max money due to Karl Towns and an aging Jimmy Butler. The roster is going to get very expensive fairly quickly. It will be difficult to optimize the talent of Towns and Butler if the team can't afford help anywhere else. And, obviously, <a href="https://www.si.com/nba/2018/02/24/minnesota-timberwolves-jimmy-butler-knee-injury-update" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Jimmy Butler is hurt" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Jimmy Butler is hurt</a>, so there's a real question about whether they will even make the playoffs this year.</p><p>The rest of the playoff race brings similar questions. Donovan Mitchell and Rudy Gobert and the Jazz are great, but how does that team improve from here? The <a href="https://www.si.com/nba/2018/01/29/blake-griffin-trade-clippers-pistons-tobias-harris-avery-bradley" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Clippers traded Blake Griffin" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Clippers traded Blake Griffin</a> and they're in a massive market, so they're the clearest exception to the rule of existential dread. They get to play with house money while they wait for 2019. The Spurs, though, are faced with a potentially restless Kawhi Leonard and few options for improving around him; you could argue they should be more stressed out than anyone. And Anthony Davis; all the dynamics described in the Blazers paragraph are just as true of Brow and the Pelicans, only New Orleans has had half the success of Portland.</p><p>How did the West get here? It's tempting to blame this on the dominance and inevitability of the Durant Warriors (and to a lesser extent the Rockets). Golden State and Houston are so good that they've made it ridiculous for us to even pretend that most of the West competition has a chance. That's definitely part of what undermines the drama. But I think it's also a function of unforgiving cap conditions, rising superstar salaries, and the cost of doing business in today's NBA. </p><p>It takes multiple stars to even have a prayer against superteams, but for any team that loads up with stars in today's cap environment, the margin for error becomes incredibly thin. One bad contract, one bad injury, and suddenly the future looks a lot more complicated. Teams like the Pelicans and Blazers took their risks a few years ago. Others saw KD's Warriors and took more risks this summer. The approach worked in Houston. Everywhere else, the results have been mixed, and hard questions will begin as soon as this summer.</p><p>For now, with a month left in the regular season, it's worth admitting that none of this has been as much as as fun as expected, and it's not because any of the West's teams are bad. It's just really difficult to enjoy them without wondering whether they're already doomed.</p>
The Year of Stress in the Western Conference

Over the summer, as the dust was settling on NBA free agency, basketball fans from coast to coast were preparing for a bloodbath in the Western Conference. Paul George, Jimmy Butler, and Paul Millsap were each headed from East to West to help put their respective teams over the top, and they were joining a conference that already went 10 deep with star-studded playoff contenders. The East would be even more irrelevant than it usually is, but that was fine. The West would be a glorious thunderdome full of All-Stars and elite teams.

That's not quite how it's played out. While there's still plenty of room for west coast elitists to argue that the West is superior and the league needs playoff reform, this season has not been a seven month showcase for the most exciting teams in the league. Not like 2008 (12 of the top 14 teams were Western Conference teams), or even 2014 (eight of the top 10 in the West, seven playoff teams with 50+ wins). As good as this field looked on paper, it hasn't been quite as captivating in practice. What's actually happened is a little bit trickier to describe.

More than anything, this year's West is a testament to just how impossible team-building can seem in the Warriors era. There's still a month left in the regular season, but even now, the conference has more cautionary tales than contenders. There have been two problems. First: None of these teams can touch the Warriors, and they probably can't even compete with the Rockets. That makes it harder to be impressed by the short-term progress of, say, the Blazers. Then: Once you realize that all these teams have gone all-in on rosters that can't make a dent at the top of the league, you begin to worry about what comes next.

I realized all of this when I was thinking through the playoff race in the West. Granted, that race is objectively dramatic right now. There are four games separating third place and 10th place and the playoff bracket changes dramatically every week. It should be fun. It should be thrilling. But it's really more ... Stressful? Depressing? Full of existential melancholy?

The Nuggets, for example, have spent the season watching Nikola Jokic's defense get exposed as a glaring flaw that raises questions about the ceiling for any team built around him. Jamal Murray and Gary Harris have been good, but not quite good enough to count on every night. Will Barton's a free agent who will likely be too expensive to keep. Wilson Chandler's age has begun to show at small forward this year, and Trey Lyles has been impressive for stretches, but he's very much not Donovan Mitchell, and he doesn't have a clear role when Paul Millsap's healthy. As the Gary Harris extension kicks in and Jokic gets paid, it'll be difficult to bring in much more help. So, even in the best case scenario where Denver rebounds to make the playoffs, will a sweep to the Warriors or Rockets really make the future look any brighter?

Or the Thunder. They'll probably make the playoffs—Denver's recent slide helps—but what does this team become if Paul George leaves this summer? Andre Roberson's injury has hurt them worse than anyone could have imagined, and suddenly the all-in bet on one year of George is becoming a more sobering proposition. Next year: Steven Adams will still be very good, but he's not good enough to play credible sidekick to Westbrook. Carmelo Anthony will be opting into the final year of his deal at $28 million. The luxury tax will make it very difficult to add additional pieces. And Westbrook's game is already aging poorly, a year before his $205 million contract extension kicks in. Even if George returns, the West will be an uphill battle. If he leaves, it begins to look impossible.

In Portland, Damian Lillard has been incredible over the past two months. He's averaging close to 30 per game since January 1st, he's dominating fourth quarters on a nightly basis, and he's injected himself into the MVP race just as he's saved this Blazers season. One reason to worry: Portland is living this timeline for the third year in a row. It's the season where the Blazers start the year looking unremarkable, they falter halfway through, people begin to worry, and then Lillard puts them on his back and plays so well that everyone forgets what they were worried about. At some point reality will set in. Lillard is playing at an MVP level in the middle of his prime, but he doesn't have enough help to compete with elite teams. Al-Farouq Aminu, Evan Turner, Meyers Leonard, and Moe Harkless are not moving the needle. So even as Portland charges up the West—currently in third place—it would surprise no one if they lost in the first round.

The Wolves' future in a similarly perilous state. Thibs just added Derrick Rose for the stretch run, the final jewel in his Timberbulls crown, but the real concern is Andrew Wiggins' looming extension—$148 million over the next five years—coupled with max money due to Karl Towns and an aging Jimmy Butler. The roster is going to get very expensive fairly quickly. It will be difficult to optimize the talent of Towns and Butler if the team can't afford help anywhere else. And, obviously, Jimmy Butler is hurt, so there's a real question about whether they will even make the playoffs this year.

The rest of the playoff race brings similar questions. Donovan Mitchell and Rudy Gobert and the Jazz are great, but how does that team improve from here? The Clippers traded Blake Griffin and they're in a massive market, so they're the clearest exception to the rule of existential dread. They get to play with house money while they wait for 2019. The Spurs, though, are faced with a potentially restless Kawhi Leonard and few options for improving around him; you could argue they should be more stressed out than anyone. And Anthony Davis; all the dynamics described in the Blazers paragraph are just as true of Brow and the Pelicans, only New Orleans has had half the success of Portland.

How did the West get here? It's tempting to blame this on the dominance and inevitability of the Durant Warriors (and to a lesser extent the Rockets). Golden State and Houston are so good that they've made it ridiculous for us to even pretend that most of the West competition has a chance. That's definitely part of what undermines the drama. But I think it's also a function of unforgiving cap conditions, rising superstar salaries, and the cost of doing business in today's NBA.

It takes multiple stars to even have a prayer against superteams, but for any team that loads up with stars in today's cap environment, the margin for error becomes incredibly thin. One bad contract, one bad injury, and suddenly the future looks a lot more complicated. Teams like the Pelicans and Blazers took their risks a few years ago. Others saw KD's Warriors and took more risks this summer. The approach worked in Houston. Everywhere else, the results have been mixed, and hard questions will begin as soon as this summer.

For now, with a month left in the regular season, it's worth admitting that none of this has been as much as as fun as expected, and it's not because any of the West's teams are bad. It's just really difficult to enjoy them without wondering whether they're already doomed.

<p>Over the summer, as the dust was settling on NBA free agency, basketball fans from coast to coast were preparing for a bloodbath in the Western Conference. Paul George, Jimmy Butler, and Paul Millsap were each headed from East to West to help put their respective teams over the top, and they were joining a conference that already went 10 deep with star-studded playoff contenders. The East would be even more irrelevant than it usually is, but that was fine. The West would be a glorious thunderdome full of All-Stars and elite teams.</p><p>That's not quite how it's played out. While there's still plenty of room for west coast elitists to argue that the West is superior and <a href="https://www.si.com/nba/2018/03/07/nba-finals-format-adam-siliver-rockets-warriors-cavaliers-east-west" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:the league needs playoff reform" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">the league needs playoff reform</a>, this season has <em>not</em> been a seven month showcase for the most exciting teams in the league. Not like <a href="https://www.basketball-reference.com/leagues/NBA_2008_standings.html" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:2008" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">2008</a> (12 of the top 14 teams were Western Conference teams), or even <a href="https://www.basketball-reference.com/leagues/NBA_2014_standings.html" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:2014" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">2014</a> (eight of the top 10 in the West, seven playoff teams with 50+ wins). As good as this field looked on paper, it hasn't been quite as captivating in practice. What's actually happened is a little bit trickier to describe.</p><p>More than anything, this year's West is a testament to just how impossible team-building can seem in the Warriors era. There's still a month left in the regular season, but even now, the conference has more cautionary tales than contenders. There have been two problems. First: None of these teams can touch the Warriors, and they probably can't even compete with the Rockets. That makes it harder to be impressed by the short-term progress of, say, the Blazers. Then: Once you realize that all these teams have gone all-in on rosters that can't make a dent at the top of the league, you begin to worry about what comes next.</p><p>I realized all of this when I was thinking through the playoff race in the West. Granted, that race is objectively dramatic right now. There are four games separating third place and 10th place and the playoff bracket changes dramatically every week. It should be fun. It should be thrilling. But it's really more ... Stressful? Depressing? Full of existential melancholy?</p><p>The Nuggets, for example, have spent the season watching Nikola Jokic's defense get exposed as a glaring flaw that raises questions about the ceiling for any team built around him. Jamal Murray and Gary Harris have been good, but not quite good enough to count on every night. Will Barton's a free agent who will likely be too expensive to keep. Wilson Chandler's age has begun to show at small forward this year, and Trey Lyles has been impressive for stretches, but he's very much <a href="https://www.si.com/nba/2017/06/22/nuggets-jazz-trade-grades-trey-lyles-donovan-mitchell-tyler-lydon" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:not Donovan Mitchell" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">not Donovan Mitchell</a>, and he doesn't have a clear role when Paul Millsap's healthy. As the Gary Harris extension kicks in and Jokic gets paid, it'll be difficult to bring in much more help. So, even in the best case scenario where Denver rebounds to make the playoffs, will a sweep to the Warriors or Rockets really make the future look any brighter?</p><p>Or the Thunder. They'll probably make the playoffs—Denver's recent slide helps—but what does this team become if Paul George leaves this summer? Andre Roberson's injury has hurt them worse than anyone could have imagined, and suddenly the all-in bet on one year of George is becoming a more sobering proposition. Next year: Steven Adams will still be very good, but he's not good enough to play credible sidekick to Westbrook. Carmelo Anthony will be opting into the final year of his deal at $28 million. The luxury tax will make it very difficult to add additional pieces. And Westbrook's game is already aging poorly, a year before his $205 million contract extension kicks in. Even if George returns, the West will be an uphill battle. If he leaves, it begins to look impossible. </p><p>In Portland, Damian Lillard <a href="https://www.si.com/nba/2018/03/07/damian-lillard-blazers-win-streak-open-floor-podcast" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:has been incredible" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">has been incredible</a> over the past two months. He's averaging close to 30 per game since January 1st, he's dominating fourth quarters on a nightly basis, and he's injected himself into the MVP race just as he's saved this Blazers season. One reason to worry: Portland is living this timeline for the third year in a row. It's the season where the Blazers start the year looking unremarkable, they falter halfway through, people begin to worry, and then Lillard puts them on his back and plays so well that everyone forgets what they were worried about. At some point reality will set in. Lillard is playing at an MVP level in the middle of his prime, but he doesn't have enough help to compete with elite teams. Al-Farouq Aminu, Evan Turner, Meyers Leonard, and Moe Harkless are not moving the needle. So even as Portland charges up the West—currently in third place—it would surprise no one if they lost in the first round.</p><p>The Wolves' future in a similarly perilous state. Thibs just <a href="https://www.si.com/nba/2018/03/08/derrick-rose-timberwolves-contract" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:added Derrick Rose" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">added Derrick Rose</a> for the stretch run, the final jewel in his Timberbulls crown, but the real concern is Andrew Wiggins' looming extension—$148 million over the next five years—coupled with max money due to Karl Towns and an aging Jimmy Butler. The roster is going to get very expensive fairly quickly. It will be difficult to optimize the talent of Towns and Butler if the team can't afford help anywhere else. And, obviously, <a href="https://www.si.com/nba/2018/02/24/minnesota-timberwolves-jimmy-butler-knee-injury-update" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Jimmy Butler is hurt" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Jimmy Butler is hurt</a>, so there's a real question about whether they will even make the playoffs this year.</p><p>The rest of the playoff race brings similar questions. Donovan Mitchell and Rudy Gobert and the Jazz are great, but how does that team improve from here? The <a href="https://www.si.com/nba/2018/01/29/blake-griffin-trade-clippers-pistons-tobias-harris-avery-bradley" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Clippers traded Blake Griffin" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Clippers traded Blake Griffin</a> and they're in a massive market, so they're the clearest exception to the rule of existential dread. They get to play with house money while they wait for 2019. The Spurs, though, are faced with a potentially restless Kawhi Leonard and few options for improving around him; you could argue they should be more stressed out than anyone. And Anthony Davis; all the dynamics described in the Blazers paragraph are just as true of Brow and the Pelicans, only New Orleans has had half the success of Portland.</p><p>How did the West get here? It's tempting to blame this on the dominance and inevitability of the Durant Warriors (and to a lesser extent the Rockets). Golden State and Houston are so good that they've made it ridiculous for us to even pretend that most of the West competition has a chance. That's definitely part of what undermines the drama. But I think it's also a function of unforgiving cap conditions, rising superstar salaries, and the cost of doing business in today's NBA. </p><p>It takes multiple stars to even have a prayer against superteams, but for any team that loads up with stars in today's cap environment, the margin for error becomes incredibly thin. One bad contract, one bad injury, and suddenly the future looks a lot more complicated. Teams like the Pelicans and Blazers took their risks a few years ago. Others saw KD's Warriors and took more risks this summer. The approach worked in Houston. Everywhere else, the results have been mixed, and hard questions will begin as soon as this summer.</p><p>For now, with a month left in the regular season, it's worth admitting that none of this has been as much as as fun as expected, and it's not because any of the West's teams are bad. It's just really difficult to enjoy them without wondering whether they're already doomed.</p>
The Year of Stress in the Western Conference

Over the summer, as the dust was settling on NBA free agency, basketball fans from coast to coast were preparing for a bloodbath in the Western Conference. Paul George, Jimmy Butler, and Paul Millsap were each headed from East to West to help put their respective teams over the top, and they were joining a conference that already went 10 deep with star-studded playoff contenders. The East would be even more irrelevant than it usually is, but that was fine. The West would be a glorious thunderdome full of All-Stars and elite teams.

That's not quite how it's played out. While there's still plenty of room for west coast elitists to argue that the West is superior and the league needs playoff reform, this season has not been a seven month showcase for the most exciting teams in the league. Not like 2008 (12 of the top 14 teams were Western Conference teams), or even 2014 (eight of the top 10 in the West, seven playoff teams with 50+ wins). As good as this field looked on paper, it hasn't been quite as captivating in practice. What's actually happened is a little bit trickier to describe.

More than anything, this year's West is a testament to just how impossible team-building can seem in the Warriors era. There's still a month left in the regular season, but even now, the conference has more cautionary tales than contenders. There have been two problems. First: None of these teams can touch the Warriors, and they probably can't even compete with the Rockets. That makes it harder to be impressed by the short-term progress of, say, the Blazers. Then: Once you realize that all these teams have gone all-in on rosters that can't make a dent at the top of the league, you begin to worry about what comes next.

I realized all of this when I was thinking through the playoff race in the West. Granted, that race is objectively dramatic right now. There are four games separating third place and 10th place and the playoff bracket changes dramatically every week. It should be fun. It should be thrilling. But it's really more ... Stressful? Depressing? Full of existential melancholy?

The Nuggets, for example, have spent the season watching Nikola Jokic's defense get exposed as a glaring flaw that raises questions about the ceiling for any team built around him. Jamal Murray and Gary Harris have been good, but not quite good enough to count on every night. Will Barton's a free agent who will likely be too expensive to keep. Wilson Chandler's age has begun to show at small forward this year, and Trey Lyles has been impressive for stretches, but he's very much not Donovan Mitchell, and he doesn't have a clear role when Paul Millsap's healthy. As the Gary Harris extension kicks in and Jokic gets paid, it'll be difficult to bring in much more help. So, even in the best case scenario where Denver rebounds to make the playoffs, will a sweep to the Warriors or Rockets really make the future look any brighter?

Or the Thunder. They'll probably make the playoffs—Denver's recent slide helps—but what does this team become if Paul George leaves this summer? Andre Roberson's injury has hurt them worse than anyone could have imagined, and suddenly the all-in bet on one year of George is becoming a more sobering proposition. Next year: Steven Adams will still be very good, but he's not good enough to play credible sidekick to Westbrook. Carmelo Anthony will be opting into the final year of his deal at $28 million. The luxury tax will make it very difficult to add additional pieces. And Westbrook's game is already aging poorly, a year before his $205 million contract extension kicks in. Even if George returns, the West will be an uphill battle. If he leaves, it begins to look impossible.

In Portland, Damian Lillard has been incredible over the past two months. He's averaging close to 30 per game since January 1st, he's dominating fourth quarters on a nightly basis, and he's injected himself into the MVP race just as he's saved this Blazers season. One reason to worry: Portland is living this timeline for the third year in a row. It's the season where the Blazers start the year looking unremarkable, they falter halfway through, people begin to worry, and then Lillard puts them on his back and plays so well that everyone forgets what they were worried about. At some point reality will set in. Lillard is playing at an MVP level in the middle of his prime, but he doesn't have enough help to compete with elite teams. Al-Farouq Aminu, Evan Turner, Meyers Leonard, and Moe Harkless are not moving the needle. So even as Portland charges up the West—currently in third place—it would surprise no one if they lost in the first round.

The Wolves' future in a similarly perilous state. Thibs just added Derrick Rose for the stretch run, the final jewel in his Timberbulls crown, but the real concern is Andrew Wiggins' looming extension—$148 million over the next five years—coupled with max money due to Karl Towns and an aging Jimmy Butler. The roster is going to get very expensive fairly quickly. It will be difficult to optimize the talent of Towns and Butler if the team can't afford help anywhere else. And, obviously, Jimmy Butler is hurt, so there's a real question about whether they will even make the playoffs this year.

The rest of the playoff race brings similar questions. Donovan Mitchell and Rudy Gobert and the Jazz are great, but how does that team improve from here? The Clippers traded Blake Griffin and they're in a massive market, so they're the clearest exception to the rule of existential dread. They get to play with house money while they wait for 2019. The Spurs, though, are faced with a potentially restless Kawhi Leonard and few options for improving around him; you could argue they should be more stressed out than anyone. And Anthony Davis; all the dynamics described in the Blazers paragraph are just as true of Brow and the Pelicans, only New Orleans has had half the success of Portland.

How did the West get here? It's tempting to blame this on the dominance and inevitability of the Durant Warriors (and to a lesser extent the Rockets). Golden State and Houston are so good that they've made it ridiculous for us to even pretend that most of the West competition has a chance. That's definitely part of what undermines the drama. But I think it's also a function of unforgiving cap conditions, rising superstar salaries, and the cost of doing business in today's NBA.

It takes multiple stars to even have a prayer against superteams, but for any team that loads up with stars in today's cap environment, the margin for error becomes incredibly thin. One bad contract, one bad injury, and suddenly the future looks a lot more complicated. Teams like the Pelicans and Blazers took their risks a few years ago. Others saw KD's Warriors and took more risks this summer. The approach worked in Houston. Everywhere else, the results have been mixed, and hard questions will begin as soon as this summer.

For now, with a month left in the regular season, it's worth admitting that none of this has been as much as as fun as expected, and it's not because any of the West's teams are bad. It's just really difficult to enjoy them without wondering whether they're already doomed.

<p>Over the summer, as the dust was settling on NBA free agency, basketball fans from coast to coast were preparing for a bloodbath in the Western Conference. Paul George, Jimmy Butler, and Paul Millsap were each headed from East to West to help put their respective teams over the top, and they were joining a conference that already went 10 deep with star-studded playoff contenders. The East would be even more irrelevant than it usually is, but that was fine. The West would be a glorious thunderdome full of All-Stars and elite teams.</p><p>That's not quite how it's played out. While there's still plenty of room for west coast elitists to argue that the West is superior and <a href="https://www.si.com/nba/2018/03/07/nba-finals-format-adam-siliver-rockets-warriors-cavaliers-east-west" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:the league needs playoff reform" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">the league needs playoff reform</a>, this season has <em>not</em> been a seven month showcase for the most exciting teams in the league. Not like <a href="https://www.basketball-reference.com/leagues/NBA_2008_standings.html" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:2008" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">2008</a> (12 of the top 14 teams were Western Conference teams), or even <a href="https://www.basketball-reference.com/leagues/NBA_2014_standings.html" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:2014" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">2014</a> (eight of the top 10 in the West, seven playoff teams with 50+ wins). As good as this field looked on paper, it hasn't been quite as captivating in practice. What's actually happened is a little bit trickier to describe.</p><p>More than anything, this year's West is a testament to just how impossible team-building can seem in the Warriors era. There's still a month left in the regular season, but even now, the conference has more cautionary tales than contenders. There have been two problems. First: None of these teams can touch the Warriors, and they probably can't even compete with the Rockets. That makes it harder to be impressed by the short-term progress of, say, the Blazers. Then: Once you realize that all these teams have gone all-in on rosters that can't make a dent at the top of the league, you begin to worry about what comes next.</p><p>I realized all of this when I was thinking through the playoff race in the West. Granted, that race is objectively dramatic right now. There are four games separating third place and 10th place and the playoff bracket changes dramatically every week. It should be fun. It should be thrilling. But it's really more ... Stressful? Depressing? Full of existential melancholy?</p><p>The Nuggets, for example, have spent the season watching Nikola Jokic's defense get exposed as a glaring flaw that raises questions about the ceiling for any team built around him. Jamal Murray and Gary Harris have been good, but not quite good enough to count on every night. Will Barton's a free agent who will likely be too expensive to keep. Wilson Chandler's age has begun to show at small forward this year, and Trey Lyles has been impressive for stretches, but he's very much <a href="https://www.si.com/nba/2017/06/22/nuggets-jazz-trade-grades-trey-lyles-donovan-mitchell-tyler-lydon" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:not Donovan Mitchell" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">not Donovan Mitchell</a>, and he doesn't have a clear role when Paul Millsap's healthy. As the Gary Harris extension kicks in and Jokic gets paid, it'll be difficult to bring in much more help. So, even in the best case scenario where Denver rebounds to make the playoffs, will a sweep to the Warriors or Rockets really make the future look any brighter?</p><p>Or the Thunder. They'll probably make the playoffs—Denver's recent slide helps—but what does this team become if Paul George leaves this summer? Andre Roberson's injury has hurt them worse than anyone could have imagined, and suddenly the all-in bet on one year of George is becoming a more sobering proposition. Next year: Steven Adams will still be very good, but he's not good enough to play credible sidekick to Westbrook. Carmelo Anthony will be opting into the final year of his deal at $28 million. The luxury tax will make it very difficult to add additional pieces. And Westbrook's game is already aging poorly, a year before his $205 million contract extension kicks in. Even if George returns, the West will be an uphill battle. If he leaves, it begins to look impossible. </p><p>In Portland, Damian Lillard <a href="https://www.si.com/nba/2018/03/07/damian-lillard-blazers-win-streak-open-floor-podcast" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:has been incredible" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">has been incredible</a> over the past two months. He's averaging close to 30 per game since January 1st, he's dominating fourth quarters on a nightly basis, and he's injected himself into the MVP race just as he's saved this Blazers season. One reason to worry: Portland is living this timeline for the third year in a row. It's the season where the Blazers start the year looking unremarkable, they falter halfway through, people begin to worry, and then Lillard puts them on his back and plays so well that everyone forgets what they were worried about. At some point reality will set in. Lillard is playing at an MVP level in the middle of his prime, but he doesn't have enough help to compete with elite teams. Al-Farouq Aminu, Evan Turner, Meyers Leonard, and Moe Harkless are not moving the needle. So even as Portland charges up the West—currently in third place—it would surprise no one if they lost in the first round.</p><p>The Wolves' future in a similarly perilous state. Thibs just <a href="https://www.si.com/nba/2018/03/08/derrick-rose-timberwolves-contract" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:added Derrick Rose" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">added Derrick Rose</a> for the stretch run, the final jewel in his Timberbulls crown, but the real concern is Andrew Wiggins' looming extension—$148 million over the next five years—coupled with max money due to Karl Towns and an aging Jimmy Butler. The roster is going to get very expensive fairly quickly. It will be difficult to optimize the talent of Towns and Butler if the team can't afford help anywhere else. And, obviously, <a href="https://www.si.com/nba/2018/02/24/minnesota-timberwolves-jimmy-butler-knee-injury-update" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Jimmy Butler is hurt" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Jimmy Butler is hurt</a>, so there's a real question about whether they will even make the playoffs this year.</p><p>The rest of the playoff race brings similar questions. Donovan Mitchell and Rudy Gobert and the Jazz are great, but how does that team improve from here? The <a href="https://www.si.com/nba/2018/01/29/blake-griffin-trade-clippers-pistons-tobias-harris-avery-bradley" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Clippers traded Blake Griffin" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Clippers traded Blake Griffin</a> and they're in a massive market, so they're the clearest exception to the rule of existential dread. They get to play with house money while they wait for 2019. The Spurs, though, are faced with a potentially restless Kawhi Leonard and few options for improving around him; you could argue they should be more stressed out than anyone. And Anthony Davis; all the dynamics described in the Blazers paragraph are just as true of Brow and the Pelicans, only New Orleans has had half the success of Portland.</p><p>How did the West get here? It's tempting to blame this on the dominance and inevitability of the Durant Warriors (and to a lesser extent the Rockets). Golden State and Houston are so good that they've made it ridiculous for us to even pretend that most of the West competition has a chance. That's definitely part of what undermines the drama. But I think it's also a function of unforgiving cap conditions, rising superstar salaries, and the cost of doing business in today's NBA. </p><p>It takes multiple stars to even have a prayer against superteams, but for any team that loads up with stars in today's cap environment, the margin for error becomes incredibly thin. One bad contract, one bad injury, and suddenly the future looks a lot more complicated. Teams like the Pelicans and Blazers took their risks a few years ago. Others saw KD's Warriors and took more risks this summer. The approach worked in Houston. Everywhere else, the results have been mixed, and hard questions will begin as soon as this summer.</p><p>For now, with a month left in the regular season, it's worth admitting that none of this has been as much as as fun as expected, and it's not because any of the West's teams are bad. It's just really difficult to enjoy them without wondering whether they're already doomed.</p>
The Year of Stress in the Western Conference

Over the summer, as the dust was settling on NBA free agency, basketball fans from coast to coast were preparing for a bloodbath in the Western Conference. Paul George, Jimmy Butler, and Paul Millsap were each headed from East to West to help put their respective teams over the top, and they were joining a conference that already went 10 deep with star-studded playoff contenders. The East would be even more irrelevant than it usually is, but that was fine. The West would be a glorious thunderdome full of All-Stars and elite teams.

That's not quite how it's played out. While there's still plenty of room for west coast elitists to argue that the West is superior and the league needs playoff reform, this season has not been a seven month showcase for the most exciting teams in the league. Not like 2008 (12 of the top 14 teams were Western Conference teams), or even 2014 (eight of the top 10 in the West, seven playoff teams with 50+ wins). As good as this field looked on paper, it hasn't been quite as captivating in practice. What's actually happened is a little bit trickier to describe.

More than anything, this year's West is a testament to just how impossible team-building can seem in the Warriors era. There's still a month left in the regular season, but even now, the conference has more cautionary tales than contenders. There have been two problems. First: None of these teams can touch the Warriors, and they probably can't even compete with the Rockets. That makes it harder to be impressed by the short-term progress of, say, the Blazers. Then: Once you realize that all these teams have gone all-in on rosters that can't make a dent at the top of the league, you begin to worry about what comes next.

I realized all of this when I was thinking through the playoff race in the West. Granted, that race is objectively dramatic right now. There are four games separating third place and 10th place and the playoff bracket changes dramatically every week. It should be fun. It should be thrilling. But it's really more ... Stressful? Depressing? Full of existential melancholy?

The Nuggets, for example, have spent the season watching Nikola Jokic's defense get exposed as a glaring flaw that raises questions about the ceiling for any team built around him. Jamal Murray and Gary Harris have been good, but not quite good enough to count on every night. Will Barton's a free agent who will likely be too expensive to keep. Wilson Chandler's age has begun to show at small forward this year, and Trey Lyles has been impressive for stretches, but he's very much not Donovan Mitchell, and he doesn't have a clear role when Paul Millsap's healthy. As the Gary Harris extension kicks in and Jokic gets paid, it'll be difficult to bring in much more help. So, even in the best case scenario where Denver rebounds to make the playoffs, will a sweep to the Warriors or Rockets really make the future look any brighter?

Or the Thunder. They'll probably make the playoffs—Denver's recent slide helps—but what does this team become if Paul George leaves this summer? Andre Roberson's injury has hurt them worse than anyone could have imagined, and suddenly the all-in bet on one year of George is becoming a more sobering proposition. Next year: Steven Adams will still be very good, but he's not good enough to play credible sidekick to Westbrook. Carmelo Anthony will be opting into the final year of his deal at $28 million. The luxury tax will make it very difficult to add additional pieces. And Westbrook's game is already aging poorly, a year before his $205 million contract extension kicks in. Even if George returns, the West will be an uphill battle. If he leaves, it begins to look impossible.

In Portland, Damian Lillard has been incredible over the past two months. He's averaging close to 30 per game since January 1st, he's dominating fourth quarters on a nightly basis, and he's injected himself into the MVP race just as he's saved this Blazers season. One reason to worry: Portland is living this timeline for the third year in a row. It's the season where the Blazers start the year looking unremarkable, they falter halfway through, people begin to worry, and then Lillard puts them on his back and plays so well that everyone forgets what they were worried about. At some point reality will set in. Lillard is playing at an MVP level in the middle of his prime, but he doesn't have enough help to compete with elite teams. Al-Farouq Aminu, Evan Turner, Meyers Leonard, and Moe Harkless are not moving the needle. So even as Portland charges up the West—currently in third place—it would surprise no one if they lost in the first round.

The Wolves' future in a similarly perilous state. Thibs just added Derrick Rose for the stretch run, the final jewel in his Timberbulls crown, but the real concern is Andrew Wiggins' looming extension—$148 million over the next five years—coupled with max money due to Karl Towns and an aging Jimmy Butler. The roster is going to get very expensive fairly quickly. It will be difficult to optimize the talent of Towns and Butler if the team can't afford help anywhere else. And, obviously, Jimmy Butler is hurt, so there's a real question about whether they will even make the playoffs this year.

The rest of the playoff race brings similar questions. Donovan Mitchell and Rudy Gobert and the Jazz are great, but how does that team improve from here? The Clippers traded Blake Griffin and they're in a massive market, so they're the clearest exception to the rule of existential dread. They get to play with house money while they wait for 2019. The Spurs, though, are faced with a potentially restless Kawhi Leonard and few options for improving around him; you could argue they should be more stressed out than anyone. And Anthony Davis; all the dynamics described in the Blazers paragraph are just as true of Brow and the Pelicans, only New Orleans has had half the success of Portland.

How did the West get here? It's tempting to blame this on the dominance and inevitability of the Durant Warriors (and to a lesser extent the Rockets). Golden State and Houston are so good that they've made it ridiculous for us to even pretend that most of the West competition has a chance. That's definitely part of what undermines the drama. But I think it's also a function of unforgiving cap conditions, rising superstar salaries, and the cost of doing business in today's NBA.

It takes multiple stars to even have a prayer against superteams, but for any team that loads up with stars in today's cap environment, the margin for error becomes incredibly thin. One bad contract, one bad injury, and suddenly the future looks a lot more complicated. Teams like the Pelicans and Blazers took their risks a few years ago. Others saw KD's Warriors and took more risks this summer. The approach worked in Houston. Everywhere else, the results have been mixed, and hard questions will begin as soon as this summer.

For now, with a month left in the regular season, it's worth admitting that none of this has been as much as as fun as expected, and it's not because any of the West's teams are bad. It's just really difficult to enjoy them without wondering whether they're already doomed.

FILE - Int this Jan. 20, 2018, file photo, Cleveland Cavaliers' Derrick Rose (1) passes during the second half of an NBA basketball game against the against the Oklahoma City Thunder in Cleveland. A person familiar with the situation said Thursday, March 8, 2018, that Rose has agreed to sign with the Minnesota Timberwolves for the remainder of the season. Cleveland traded Rose to Utah, and the Jazz waived him before he played there. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak, File)
FILE - Int this Jan. 20, 2018, file photo, Cleveland Cavaliers' Derrick Rose (1) passes during the second half of an NBA basketball game against the against the Oklahoma City Thunder in Cleveland. A person familiar with the situation said Thursday, March 8, 2018, that Rose has agreed to sign with the Minnesota Timberwolves for the remainder of the season. Cleveland traded Rose to Utah, and the Jazz waived him before he played there. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak, File)
FILE - Int this Jan. 20, 2018, file photo, Cleveland Cavaliers' Derrick Rose (1) passes during the second half of an NBA basketball game against the against the Oklahoma City Thunder in Cleveland. A person familiar with the situation said Thursday, March 8, 2018, that Rose has agreed to sign with the Minnesota Timberwolves for the remainder of the season. Cleveland traded Rose to Utah, and the Jazz waived him before he played there. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak, File)
Newly signed Minnesota Timberwolves' Derrick Rose watches his new team in the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Boston Celtics Thursday, March 8, 2018, in St. Paul, Minn. The Celtics won 117-109. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)
Newly signed Minnesota Timberwolves' Derrick Rose watches his new team in the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Boston Celtics Thursday, March 8, 2018, in St. Paul, Minn. The Celtics won 117-109. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)
Newly signed Minnesota Timberwolves' Derrick Rose watches his new team in the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Boston Celtics Thursday, March 8, 2018, in St. Paul, Minn. The Celtics won 117-109. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)
<p>The Timberwolves' signing of former MVP Derrick Rose, who'll be reunited with his former coach Tom Thibodeau, throws a new wrinkle in the Celtics' plans tonight in Minnesota.</p>
Surprise! Celtics have a former MVP to deal with tonight

The Timberwolves' signing of former MVP Derrick Rose, who'll be reunited with his former coach Tom Thibodeau, throws a new wrinkle in the Celtics' plans tonight in Minnesota.

<p>On Friday, <em>Sports Illustrated </em>will premiere its <a href="https://www.si.com/high-school/2018/03/06/si-tv-we-town-documentary-mo-bamba-cam-reddish-video" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:new full-length original documentary, We Town" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">new full-length original documentary,<em> We Town</em></a>, only on<span> SI TV</span>. The new documentary follows the story of Westtown School, a small quaker school in Pennsylvania that also happens to be home to arguably the greatest starting five in history. The star players on its 2016-17 team were Mo Bamba and Cameron Reddish; other top players included heralded recruits Brandon Randolph, Anthony Ochefu and Jake Forrester.</p><p>Westtown isn't the only school that has featured future NBA players on one team. <a href="http://www.maxpreps.com/news/pCOVQR8IJ06bhDHsq2UAUg/the-greatest-high-school-basketball-teams-of-all-time.htm" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:MaxPreps" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">MaxPreps</a> did its own ranking a few years back, and here, SI takes a look at some of the most dominant high school programs in history.</p><h3>Dunbar (Baltimore), Early '80s</h3><p><strong>NOTABLE STARS:</strong><em>Muggsy Bogues </em>(1st-round pick; 14-year NBA career); <em>Reggie Lewis</em> (1st-round pick; NBA All-Star; <em>Reggie Williams</em> (1st-round pick; 10-year NBA career)</p><p>Dunbar was an absolute powerhouse in the early 1980s. It had <em>three</em> first round draft picks in Bogues, Lewis and Williams. The 1981–1982 and 1982–1983 teams went undefeated, and <a href="http://www.baltimoresun.com/sports/high-school/varsity-letters/bs-va-sp-dunbar-basketball-espn-20170721-story.html" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:11 players went to Division I schools" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">11 players went to Division I schools</a>. David Wingate led the 1982 team and went on to spend 15 years in the NBA. </p><h3>St. Anthony's (Jersey City, New Jersey), 1989</h3><p><strong>NOTABLE STARS: </strong><em>Coach Bob Hurley</em> (Hall of Fame); <em>Terry Dehere</em> (1st-round pick); <em>Bobby Hurley</em> (1st-round pick); <em>Rodrick Rhodes </em>(1st-round pick)</p><p>The incredible thing about St. Anthony's, which <a href="http://www.espn.com/mens-college-basketball/story/_/id/19086417/st-anthony-high-school-close-end-school-year" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:shut its doors in 2017" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">shut its doors in 2017</a> after struggling financially for years, was how often, and how long, the program was successful. Under the direction of legendary Hall of Fame coach Bob Hurley Sr., it became <a href="https://www.si.com/more-sports/2017/04/05/st-anthony-jersey-city-bob-hurley-basketball-team-close" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:one of the best programs" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">one of the best programs</a> in high school sports history. The 1989 team, which finished 32–0 and was inducted into the NJSIAA Hall of Fame in 2017, is the one that will be remembered, but the program seemed to constantly churn out NBA-level talent, (including current San Antonio Spur Kyle Anderson). Hurley won more than 1,000 games with the team and led the program to 28 state titles.</p><h3>Chino Hills (Chino Hills, California), 2015-16</h3><p><strong>NOTABLE STARS: </strong><em>Lonzo Ball</em> (1st-round pick); <em>LiAngelo Ball; LaMelo Ball </em></p><p>Whether you love or love to hate the Ball family, there's no keeping this team off the list. The trio of Lonzo, LiAngelo and LaMelo helped lead Chino Hills to a 35–0 record and state championship in 2016. The team averaged 98 points per game (yes, you read that correctly). Everyone knows the saga of the Ball brothers since, (particularly LiAngelo's shoplifting drama), but at least they'll always have Chino Hills. </p><h3>Thornridge (Dolton, Illinois), 1971-1972</h3><p><strong>NOTABLE STARS: </strong><em>Quinn Buckner</em> (1st-round pick; 1976 gold medalist) </p><p>While Chicago always has a big pool of consistent talent, Thornridge's 1972 team is regarded as arguably the best in state history. The 33–0 team was led by Quinn Buckner, who won an Olympic gold medal in 1976 and a title with the Celtics in 1984. Thornridge won back-to-back state championships in 1971 and 1972. </p><h3>Oak Hill Academy (Mouth of Wilson, Virginia), 1992-93</h3><p><strong>NOTABLE STARS: </strong><em>Jerry Stackhouse</em><strong>(</strong>1st-round pick); <em>Jeff McInnis</em> (2nd-round pick);</p><p>The school's 1993 undefeated and national title-winning team, which had an average margin of victory of 32 points, sent eight players to Division I schools with four going on to the NBA. Stars Jerry Stackhouse, Jeff McInnis and Makhtar Ndiaye were on the squad. And that's certainly not the end of the line when it comes to dominant Oak Hill teams—it has stayed a basketball powerhouse over the years, winning national titles again in 1994, 1999, 2001, 2004, 2007, 2012 and 2016. Oh, and Carmelo Anthony is also an alumnus. </p><h3>Simeon (Chicago), Mid-late aughts</h3><p><strong>NOTABLE STARS: </strong><em>Derrick Rose</em> (1st overall pick); Jabari Parker (2nd overall pick)</p><p>As we've seen from this list alone, Chicago is a basketball city. While Morgan Park, Orr and Whitney Young are constantly battling it out, Simeon has had a complete stranglehold over the high school basketball scene in the mid-to-late aughts. Derrick Rose led it to back-to-back state titles in 2006 and 2007, while the Wolverines went on to win four(!!) straight state championships from 2009 to 2013, a team that Jabari Parker was a part of. </p><p><em>Information from <a href="http://www.maxpreps.com/news/pCOVQR8IJ06bhDHsq2UAUg/the-greatest-high-school-basketball-teams-of-all-time.htm" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:MaxPreps" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">MaxPreps</a> was used in this article.</em></p>
A Look Back at the Best High School Basketball Programs in History

On Friday, Sports Illustrated will premiere its new full-length original documentary, We Town, only on SI TV. The new documentary follows the story of Westtown School, a small quaker school in Pennsylvania that also happens to be home to arguably the greatest starting five in history. The star players on its 2016-17 team were Mo Bamba and Cameron Reddish; other top players included heralded recruits Brandon Randolph, Anthony Ochefu and Jake Forrester.

Westtown isn't the only school that has featured future NBA players on one team. MaxPreps did its own ranking a few years back, and here, SI takes a look at some of the most dominant high school programs in history.

Dunbar (Baltimore), Early '80s

NOTABLE STARS:Muggsy Bogues (1st-round pick; 14-year NBA career); Reggie Lewis (1st-round pick; NBA All-Star; Reggie Williams (1st-round pick; 10-year NBA career)

Dunbar was an absolute powerhouse in the early 1980s. It had three first round draft picks in Bogues, Lewis and Williams. The 1981–1982 and 1982–1983 teams went undefeated, and 11 players went to Division I schools. David Wingate led the 1982 team and went on to spend 15 years in the NBA.

St. Anthony's (Jersey City, New Jersey), 1989

NOTABLE STARS: Coach Bob Hurley (Hall of Fame); Terry Dehere (1st-round pick); Bobby Hurley (1st-round pick); Rodrick Rhodes (1st-round pick)

The incredible thing about St. Anthony's, which shut its doors in 2017 after struggling financially for years, was how often, and how long, the program was successful. Under the direction of legendary Hall of Fame coach Bob Hurley Sr., it became one of the best programs in high school sports history. The 1989 team, which finished 32–0 and was inducted into the NJSIAA Hall of Fame in 2017, is the one that will be remembered, but the program seemed to constantly churn out NBA-level talent, (including current San Antonio Spur Kyle Anderson). Hurley won more than 1,000 games with the team and led the program to 28 state titles.

Chino Hills (Chino Hills, California), 2015-16

NOTABLE STARS: Lonzo Ball (1st-round pick); LiAngelo Ball; LaMelo Ball

Whether you love or love to hate the Ball family, there's no keeping this team off the list. The trio of Lonzo, LiAngelo and LaMelo helped lead Chino Hills to a 35–0 record and state championship in 2016. The team averaged 98 points per game (yes, you read that correctly). Everyone knows the saga of the Ball brothers since, (particularly LiAngelo's shoplifting drama), but at least they'll always have Chino Hills.

Thornridge (Dolton, Illinois), 1971-1972

NOTABLE STARS: Quinn Buckner (1st-round pick; 1976 gold medalist)

While Chicago always has a big pool of consistent talent, Thornridge's 1972 team is regarded as arguably the best in state history. The 33–0 team was led by Quinn Buckner, who won an Olympic gold medal in 1976 and a title with the Celtics in 1984. Thornridge won back-to-back state championships in 1971 and 1972.

Oak Hill Academy (Mouth of Wilson, Virginia), 1992-93

NOTABLE STARS: Jerry Stackhouse(1st-round pick); Jeff McInnis (2nd-round pick);

The school's 1993 undefeated and national title-winning team, which had an average margin of victory of 32 points, sent eight players to Division I schools with four going on to the NBA. Stars Jerry Stackhouse, Jeff McInnis and Makhtar Ndiaye were on the squad. And that's certainly not the end of the line when it comes to dominant Oak Hill teams—it has stayed a basketball powerhouse over the years, winning national titles again in 1994, 1999, 2001, 2004, 2007, 2012 and 2016. Oh, and Carmelo Anthony is also an alumnus.

Simeon (Chicago), Mid-late aughts

NOTABLE STARS: Derrick Rose (1st overall pick); Jabari Parker (2nd overall pick)

As we've seen from this list alone, Chicago is a basketball city. While Morgan Park, Orr and Whitney Young are constantly battling it out, Simeon has had a complete stranglehold over the high school basketball scene in the mid-to-late aughts. Derrick Rose led it to back-to-back state titles in 2006 and 2007, while the Wolverines went on to win four(!!) straight state championships from 2009 to 2013, a team that Jabari Parker was a part of.

Information from MaxPreps was used in this article.

<p>On Friday, <em>Sports Illustrated </em>will premiere its <a href="https://www.si.com/high-school/2018/03/06/si-tv-we-town-documentary-mo-bamba-cam-reddish-video" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:new full-length original documentary, We Town" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">new full-length original documentary,<em> We Town</em></a>, only on<span> SI TV</span>. The new documentary follows the story of Westtown School, a small quaker school in Pennsylvania that also happens to be home to arguably the greatest starting five in history. The star players on its 2016-17 team were Mo Bamba and Cameron Reddish; other top players included heralded recruits Brandon Randolph, Anthony Ochefu and Jake Forrester.</p><p>Westtown isn't the only school that has featured future NBA players on one team. <a href="http://www.maxpreps.com/news/pCOVQR8IJ06bhDHsq2UAUg/the-greatest-high-school-basketball-teams-of-all-time.htm" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:MaxPreps" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">MaxPreps</a> did its own ranking a few years back, and here, SI takes a look at some of the most dominant high school programs in history.</p><h3>Dunbar (Baltimore), Early '80s</h3><p><strong>NOTABLE STARS:</strong><em>Muggsy Bogues </em>(1st-round pick; 14-year NBA career); <em>Reggie Lewis</em> (1st-round pick; NBA All-Star; <em>Reggie Williams</em> (1st-round pick; 10-year NBA career)</p><p>Dunbar was an absolute powerhouse in the early 1980s. It had <em>three</em> first round draft picks in Bogues, Lewis and Williams. The 1981–1982 and 1982–1983 teams went undefeated, and <a href="http://www.baltimoresun.com/sports/high-school/varsity-letters/bs-va-sp-dunbar-basketball-espn-20170721-story.html" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:11 players went to Division I schools" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">11 players went to Division I schools</a>. David Wingate led the 1982 team and went on to spend 15 years in the NBA. </p><h3>St. Anthony's (Jersey City, New Jersey), 1989</h3><p><strong>NOTABLE STARS: </strong><em>Coach Bob Hurley</em> (Hall of Fame); <em>Terry Dehere</em> (1st-round pick); <em>Bobby Hurley</em> (1st-round pick); <em>Rodrick Rhodes </em>(1st-round pick)</p><p>The incredible thing about St. Anthony's, which <a href="http://www.espn.com/mens-college-basketball/story/_/id/19086417/st-anthony-high-school-close-end-school-year" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:shut its doors in 2017" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">shut its doors in 2017</a> after struggling financially for years, was how often, and how long, the program was successful. Under the direction of legendary Hall of Fame coach Bob Hurley Sr., it became <a href="https://www.si.com/more-sports/2017/04/05/st-anthony-jersey-city-bob-hurley-basketball-team-close" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:one of the best programs" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">one of the best programs</a> in high school sports history. The 1989 team, which finished 32–0 and was inducted into the NJSIAA Hall of Fame in 2017, is the one that will be remembered, but the program seemed to constantly churn out NBA-level talent, (including current San Antonio Spur Kyle Anderson). Hurley won more than 1,000 games with the team and led the program to 28 state titles.</p><h3>Chino Hills (Chino Hills, California), 2015-16</h3><p><strong>NOTABLE STARS: </strong><em>Lonzo Ball</em> (1st-round pick); <em>LiAngelo Ball; LaMelo Ball </em></p><p>Whether you love or love to hate the Ball family, there's no keeping this team off the list. The trio of Lonzo, LiAngelo and LaMelo helped lead Chino Hills to a 35–0 record and state championship in 2016. The team averaged 98 points per game (yes, you read that correctly). Everyone knows the saga of the Ball brothers since, (particularly LiAngelo's shoplifting drama), but at least they'll always have Chino Hills. </p><h3>Thornridge (Dolton, Illinois), 1971-1972</h3><p><strong>NOTABLE STARS: </strong><em>Quinn Buckner</em> (1st-round pick; 1976 gold medalist) </p><p>While Chicago always has a big pool of consistent talent, Thornridge's 1972 team is regarded as arguably the best in state history. The 33–0 team was led by Quinn Buckner, who won an Olympic gold medal in 1976 and a title with the Celtics in 1984. Thornridge won back-to-back state championships in 1971 and 1972. </p><h3>Oak Hill Academy (Mouth of Wilson, Virginia), 1992-93</h3><p><strong>NOTABLE STARS: </strong><em>Jerry Stackhouse</em><strong>(</strong>1st-round pick); <em>Jeff McInnis</em> (2nd-round pick);</p><p>The school's 1993 undefeated and national title-winning team, which had an average margin of victory of 32 points, sent eight players to Division I schools with four going on to the NBA. Stars Jerry Stackhouse, Jeff McInnis and Makhtar Ndiaye were on the squad. And that's certainly not the end of the line when it comes to dominant Oak Hill teams—it has stayed a basketball powerhouse over the years, winning national titles again in 1994, 1999, 2001, 2004, 2007, 2012 and 2016. Oh, and Carmelo Anthony is also an alumnus. </p><h3>Simeon (Chicago), Mid-late aughts</h3><p><strong>NOTABLE STARS: </strong><em>Derrick Rose</em> (1st overall pick); Jabari Parker (2nd overall pick)</p><p>As we've seen from this list alone, Chicago is a basketball city. While Morgan Park, Orr and Whitney Young are constantly battling it out, Simeon has had a complete stranglehold over the high school basketball scene in the mid-to-late aughts. Derrick Rose led it to back-to-back state titles in 2006 and 2007, while the Wolverines went on to win four(!!) straight state championships from 2009 to 2013, a team that Jabari Parker was a part of. </p><p><em>Information from <a href="http://www.maxpreps.com/news/pCOVQR8IJ06bhDHsq2UAUg/the-greatest-high-school-basketball-teams-of-all-time.htm" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:MaxPreps" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">MaxPreps</a> was used in this article.</em></p>
A Look Back at the Best High School Basketball Programs in History

On Friday, Sports Illustrated will premiere its new full-length original documentary, We Town, only on SI TV. The new documentary follows the story of Westtown School, a small quaker school in Pennsylvania that also happens to be home to arguably the greatest starting five in history. The star players on its 2016-17 team were Mo Bamba and Cameron Reddish; other top players included heralded recruits Brandon Randolph, Anthony Ochefu and Jake Forrester.

Westtown isn't the only school that has featured future NBA players on one team. MaxPreps did its own ranking a few years back, and here, SI takes a look at some of the most dominant high school programs in history.

Dunbar (Baltimore), Early '80s

NOTABLE STARS:Muggsy Bogues (1st-round pick; 14-year NBA career); Reggie Lewis (1st-round pick; NBA All-Star; Reggie Williams (1st-round pick; 10-year NBA career)

Dunbar was an absolute powerhouse in the early 1980s. It had three first round draft picks in Bogues, Lewis and Williams. The 1981–1982 and 1982–1983 teams went undefeated, and 11 players went to Division I schools. David Wingate led the 1982 team and went on to spend 15 years in the NBA.

St. Anthony's (Jersey City, New Jersey), 1989

NOTABLE STARS: Coach Bob Hurley (Hall of Fame); Terry Dehere (1st-round pick); Bobby Hurley (1st-round pick); Rodrick Rhodes (1st-round pick)

The incredible thing about St. Anthony's, which shut its doors in 2017 after struggling financially for years, was how often, and how long, the program was successful. Under the direction of legendary Hall of Fame coach Bob Hurley Sr., it became one of the best programs in high school sports history. The 1989 team, which finished 32–0 and was inducted into the NJSIAA Hall of Fame in 2017, is the one that will be remembered, but the program seemed to constantly churn out NBA-level talent, (including current San Antonio Spur Kyle Anderson). Hurley won more than 1,000 games with the team and led the program to 28 state titles.

Chino Hills (Chino Hills, California), 2015-16

NOTABLE STARS: Lonzo Ball (1st-round pick); LiAngelo Ball; LaMelo Ball

Whether you love or love to hate the Ball family, there's no keeping this team off the list. The trio of Lonzo, LiAngelo and LaMelo helped lead Chino Hills to a 35–0 record and state championship in 2016. The team averaged 98 points per game (yes, you read that correctly). Everyone knows the saga of the Ball brothers since, (particularly LiAngelo's shoplifting drama), but at least they'll always have Chino Hills.

Thornridge (Dolton, Illinois), 1971-1972

NOTABLE STARS: Quinn Buckner (1st-round pick; 1976 gold medalist)

While Chicago always has a big pool of consistent talent, Thornridge's 1972 team is regarded as arguably the best in state history. The 33–0 team was led by Quinn Buckner, who won an Olympic gold medal in 1976 and a title with the Celtics in 1984. Thornridge won back-to-back state championships in 1971 and 1972.

Oak Hill Academy (Mouth of Wilson, Virginia), 1992-93

NOTABLE STARS: Jerry Stackhouse(1st-round pick); Jeff McInnis (2nd-round pick);

The school's 1993 undefeated and national title-winning team, which had an average margin of victory of 32 points, sent eight players to Division I schools with four going on to the NBA. Stars Jerry Stackhouse, Jeff McInnis and Makhtar Ndiaye were on the squad. And that's certainly not the end of the line when it comes to dominant Oak Hill teams—it has stayed a basketball powerhouse over the years, winning national titles again in 1994, 1999, 2001, 2004, 2007, 2012 and 2016. Oh, and Carmelo Anthony is also an alumnus.

Simeon (Chicago), Mid-late aughts

NOTABLE STARS: Derrick Rose (1st overall pick); Jabari Parker (2nd overall pick)

As we've seen from this list alone, Chicago is a basketball city. While Morgan Park, Orr and Whitney Young are constantly battling it out, Simeon has had a complete stranglehold over the high school basketball scene in the mid-to-late aughts. Derrick Rose led it to back-to-back state titles in 2006 and 2007, while the Wolverines went on to win four(!!) straight state championships from 2009 to 2013, a team that Jabari Parker was a part of.

Information from MaxPreps was used in this article.

<p>On Friday, <em>Sports Illustrated </em>will premiere its <a href="https://www.si.com/high-school/2018/03/06/si-tv-we-town-documentary-mo-bamba-cam-reddish-video" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:new full-length original documentary, We Town" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">new full-length original documentary,<em> We Town</em></a>, only on<span> SI TV</span>. The new documentary follows the story of Westtown School, a small quaker school in Pennsylvania that also happens to be home to arguably the greatest starting five in history. The star players on its 2016-17 team were Mo Bamba and Cameron Reddish; other top players included heralded recruits Brandon Randolph, Anthony Ochefu and Jake Forrester.</p><p>Westtown isn't the only school that has featured future NBA players on one team. <a href="http://www.maxpreps.com/news/pCOVQR8IJ06bhDHsq2UAUg/the-greatest-high-school-basketball-teams-of-all-time.htm" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:MaxPreps" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">MaxPreps</a> did its own ranking a few years back, and here, SI takes a look at some of the most dominant high school programs in history.</p><h3>Dunbar (Baltimore), Early '80s</h3><p><strong>NOTABLE STARS:</strong><em>Muggsy Bogues </em>(1st-round pick; 14-year NBA career); <em>Reggie Lewis</em> (1st-round pick; NBA All-Star; <em>Reggie Williams</em> (1st-round pick; 10-year NBA career)</p><p>Dunbar was an absolute powerhouse in the early 1980s. It had <em>three</em> first round draft picks in Bogues, Lewis and Williams. The 1981–1982 and 1982–1983 teams went undefeated, and <a href="http://www.baltimoresun.com/sports/high-school/varsity-letters/bs-va-sp-dunbar-basketball-espn-20170721-story.html" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:11 players went to Division I schools" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">11 players went to Division I schools</a>. David Wingate led the 1982 team and went on to spend 15 years in the NBA. </p><h3>St. Anthony's (Jersey City, New Jersey), 1989</h3><p><strong>NOTABLE STARS: </strong><em>Coach Bob Hurley</em> (Hall of Fame); <em>Terry Dehere</em> (1st-round pick); <em>Bobby Hurley</em> (1st-round pick); <em>Rodrick Rhodes </em>(1st-round pick)</p><p>The incredible thing about St. Anthony's, which <a href="http://www.espn.com/mens-college-basketball/story/_/id/19086417/st-anthony-high-school-close-end-school-year" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:shut its doors in 2017" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">shut its doors in 2017</a> after struggling financially for years, was how often, and how long, the program was successful. Under the direction of legendary Hall of Fame coach Bob Hurley Sr., it became <a href="https://www.si.com/more-sports/2017/04/05/st-anthony-jersey-city-bob-hurley-basketball-team-close" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:one of the best programs" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">one of the best programs</a> in high school sports history. The 1989 team, which finished 32–0 and was inducted into the NJSIAA Hall of Fame in 2017, is the one that will be remembered, but the program seemed to constantly churn out NBA-level talent, (including current San Antonio Spur Kyle Anderson). Hurley won more than 1,000 games with the team and led the program to 28 state titles.</p><h3>Chino Hills (Chino Hills, California), 2015-16</h3><p><strong>NOTABLE STARS: </strong><em>Lonzo Ball</em> (1st-round pick); <em>LiAngelo Ball; LaMelo Ball </em></p><p>Whether you love or love to hate the Ball family, there's no keeping this team off the list. The trio of Lonzo, LiAngelo and LaMelo helped lead Chino Hills to a 35–0 record and state championship in 2016. The team averaged 98 points per game (yes, you read that correctly). Everyone knows the saga of the Ball brothers since, (particularly LiAngelo's shoplifting drama), but at least they'll always have Chino Hills. </p><h3>Thornridge (Dolton, Illinois), 1971-1972</h3><p><strong>NOTABLE STARS: </strong><em>Quinn Buckner</em> (1st-round pick; 1976 gold medalist) </p><p>While Chicago always has a big pool of consistent talent, Thornridge's 1972 team is regarded as arguably the best in state history. The 33–0 team was led by Quinn Buckner, who won an Olympic gold medal in 1976 and a title with the Celtics in 1984. Thornridge won back-to-back state championships in 1971 and 1972. </p><h3>Oak Hill Academy (Mouth of Wilson, Virginia), 1992-93</h3><p><strong>NOTABLE STARS: </strong><em>Jerry Stackhouse</em><strong>(</strong>1st-round pick); <em>Jeff McInnis</em> (2nd-round pick);</p><p>The school's 1993 undefeated and national title-winning team, which had an average margin of victory of 32 points, sent eight players to Division I schools with four going on to the NBA. Stars Jerry Stackhouse, Jeff McInnis and Makhtar Ndiaye were on the squad. And that's certainly not the end of the line when it comes to dominant Oak Hill teams—it has stayed a basketball powerhouse over the years, winning national titles again in 1994, 1999, 2001, 2004, 2007, 2012 and 2016. Oh, and Carmelo Anthony is also an alumnus. </p><h3>Simeon (Chicago), Mid-late aughts</h3><p><strong>NOTABLE STARS: </strong><em>Derrick Rose</em> (1st overall pick); Jabari Parker (2nd overall pick)</p><p>As we've seen from this list alone, Chicago is a basketball city. While Morgan Park, Orr and Whitney Young are constantly battling it out, Simeon has had a complete stranglehold over the high school basketball scene in the mid-to-late aughts. Derrick Rose led it to back-to-back state titles in 2006 and 2007, while the Wolverines went on to win four(!!) straight state championships from 2009 to 2013, a team that Jabari Parker was a part of. </p><p><em>Information from <a href="http://www.maxpreps.com/news/pCOVQR8IJ06bhDHsq2UAUg/the-greatest-high-school-basketball-teams-of-all-time.htm" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:MaxPreps" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">MaxPreps</a> was used in this article.</em></p>
A Look Back at the Best High School Basketball Programs in History

On Friday, Sports Illustrated will premiere its new full-length original documentary, We Town, only on SI TV. The new documentary follows the story of Westtown School, a small quaker school in Pennsylvania that also happens to be home to arguably the greatest starting five in history. The star players on its 2016-17 team were Mo Bamba and Cameron Reddish; other top players included heralded recruits Brandon Randolph, Anthony Ochefu and Jake Forrester.

Westtown isn't the only school that has featured future NBA players on one team. MaxPreps did its own ranking a few years back, and here, SI takes a look at some of the most dominant high school programs in history.

Dunbar (Baltimore), Early '80s

NOTABLE STARS:Muggsy Bogues (1st-round pick; 14-year NBA career); Reggie Lewis (1st-round pick; NBA All-Star; Reggie Williams (1st-round pick; 10-year NBA career)

Dunbar was an absolute powerhouse in the early 1980s. It had three first round draft picks in Bogues, Lewis and Williams. The 1981–1982 and 1982–1983 teams went undefeated, and 11 players went to Division I schools. David Wingate led the 1982 team and went on to spend 15 years in the NBA.

St. Anthony's (Jersey City, New Jersey), 1989

NOTABLE STARS: Coach Bob Hurley (Hall of Fame); Terry Dehere (1st-round pick); Bobby Hurley (1st-round pick); Rodrick Rhodes (1st-round pick)

The incredible thing about St. Anthony's, which shut its doors in 2017 after struggling financially for years, was how often, and how long, the program was successful. Under the direction of legendary Hall of Fame coach Bob Hurley Sr., it became one of the best programs in high school sports history. The 1989 team, which finished 32–0 and was inducted into the NJSIAA Hall of Fame in 2017, is the one that will be remembered, but the program seemed to constantly churn out NBA-level talent, (including current San Antonio Spur Kyle Anderson). Hurley won more than 1,000 games with the team and led the program to 28 state titles.

Chino Hills (Chino Hills, California), 2015-16

NOTABLE STARS: Lonzo Ball (1st-round pick); LiAngelo Ball; LaMelo Ball

Whether you love or love to hate the Ball family, there's no keeping this team off the list. The trio of Lonzo, LiAngelo and LaMelo helped lead Chino Hills to a 35–0 record and state championship in 2016. The team averaged 98 points per game (yes, you read that correctly). Everyone knows the saga of the Ball brothers since, (particularly LiAngelo's shoplifting drama), but at least they'll always have Chino Hills.

Thornridge (Dolton, Illinois), 1971-1972

NOTABLE STARS: Quinn Buckner (1st-round pick; 1976 gold medalist)

While Chicago always has a big pool of consistent talent, Thornridge's 1972 team is regarded as arguably the best in state history. The 33–0 team was led by Quinn Buckner, who won an Olympic gold medal in 1976 and a title with the Celtics in 1984. Thornridge won back-to-back state championships in 1971 and 1972.

Oak Hill Academy (Mouth of Wilson, Virginia), 1992-93

NOTABLE STARS: Jerry Stackhouse(1st-round pick); Jeff McInnis (2nd-round pick);

The school's 1993 undefeated and national title-winning team, which had an average margin of victory of 32 points, sent eight players to Division I schools with four going on to the NBA. Stars Jerry Stackhouse, Jeff McInnis and Makhtar Ndiaye were on the squad. And that's certainly not the end of the line when it comes to dominant Oak Hill teams—it has stayed a basketball powerhouse over the years, winning national titles again in 1994, 1999, 2001, 2004, 2007, 2012 and 2016. Oh, and Carmelo Anthony is also an alumnus.

Simeon (Chicago), Mid-late aughts

NOTABLE STARS: Derrick Rose (1st overall pick); Jabari Parker (2nd overall pick)

As we've seen from this list alone, Chicago is a basketball city. While Morgan Park, Orr and Whitney Young are constantly battling it out, Simeon has had a complete stranglehold over the high school basketball scene in the mid-to-late aughts. Derrick Rose led it to back-to-back state titles in 2006 and 2007, while the Wolverines went on to win four(!!) straight state championships from 2009 to 2013, a team that Jabari Parker was a part of.

Information from MaxPreps was used in this article.

Former MVP Derrick Rose is signing with Minnesota for the rest of the year to reunite with his old coach Tom Thibodeau.
Tom Thibodeau and the Timberwolves are taking another flier on Derrick Rose
Former MVP Derrick Rose is signing with Minnesota for the rest of the year to reunite with his old coach Tom Thibodeau.
Former MVP Derrick Rose is signing with Minnesota for the rest of the year to reunite with his old coach Tom Thibodeau.
Tom Thibodeau and the Timberwolves are taking another flier on Derrick Rose
Former MVP Derrick Rose is signing with Minnesota for the rest of the year to reunite with his old coach Tom Thibodeau.
The Timberwolves are signing Derrick Rose for the rest of the season, ESPN’s Adrian Wojnarowski reports.Rose has been without a team ever since he was waived by the Jazz on Feb. 10, two days after a deadline-day trade with the Cavs. He then went uncl
Report: Timberwolves Signing Derrick Rose for the Rest of the Season
The Timberwolves are signing Derrick Rose for the rest of the season, ESPN’s Adrian Wojnarowski reports.Rose has been without a team ever since he was waived by the Jazz on Feb. 10, two days after a deadline-day trade with the Cavs. He then went uncl
After being waived by the Utah Jazz following his trade from the Cleveland Cavaliers, Derrick Rose has joined the Minnesota Timberwolves.
Derrick Rose lands with Minnesota Timberwolves
After being waived by the Utah Jazz following his trade from the Cleveland Cavaliers, Derrick Rose has joined the Minnesota Timberwolves.
<p>Derrick Rose lands with Minnesota Timberwolves</p>
Derrick Rose lands with Minnesota Timberwolves

Derrick Rose lands with Minnesota Timberwolves

Tom Thibodeau and the Timberwolves are taking another flier on Derrick Rose
Tom Thibodeau and the Timberwolves are taking another flier on Derrick Rose
Tom Thibodeau and the Timberwolves are taking another flier on Derrick Rose
Tom Thibodeau strikes
Report: Timberwolves signing Derrick Rose
Tom Thibodeau strikes
Tom Thibodeau strikes
Report: Timberwolves signing Derrick Rose
Tom Thibodeau strikes
<p>NBA free agency rumors: Derrick Rose lands with Timberwolves for rest of season</p>
NBA free agency rumors: Derrick Rose lands with Timberwolves for rest of season

NBA free agency rumors: Derrick Rose lands with Timberwolves for rest of season

<p>NBA free agency rumors: Derrick Rose lands with Timberwolves for rest of season</p>
NBA free agency rumors: Derrick Rose lands with Timberwolves for rest of season

NBA free agency rumors: Derrick Rose lands with Timberwolves for rest of season

<p>Derrick Rose and Tom Thibodeau are reportedly reuniting, with Rose supposedly signing with the Minnesota Timberwolves for the remainder of the season.</p>
Together again: Derrick Rose reportedly joining up with Tom Thibodeau and the Timberwolves

Derrick Rose and Tom Thibodeau are reportedly reuniting, with Rose supposedly signing with the Minnesota Timberwolves for the remainder of the season.

<p>The Timberwolves are signing Derrick Rose for the rest of the season, <a href="https://twitter.com/wojespn/status/971771527304794112" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:ESPN’s Adrian Wojnarowski reports" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">ESPN’s Adrian Wojnarowski reports</a>. </p><p>Rose has been without a team ever since he was waived by the Jazz on Feb. 10, two days after a deadline-day trade with the Cavs. He then went unclaimed on waivers. </p><p>Minnesota was long rumored as the eventual landing spot for Rose, given that head coach Tom Thibodeau has acquired a handful of his former Bulls players, like Taj Gibson and Jimmy Butler. </p><p>Rose was decent with the Knicks last year but struggled in his brief time in Cleveland this season, averaging just 9.8 points and 1.6 assists in 19.3 minutes per game over 16 appearances. </p><p>The Wolves are locked in a wild playoff race in the Western Conference. They’re currently 38–28, good for sixth place, but just 2 1/2 games ahead of the 10th-place Jazz and 1 1/2 games behind the third-place Blazers. </p>
Report: Timberwolves Signing Derrick Rose for the Rest of the Season

The Timberwolves are signing Derrick Rose for the rest of the season, ESPN’s Adrian Wojnarowski reports.

Rose has been without a team ever since he was waived by the Jazz on Feb. 10, two days after a deadline-day trade with the Cavs. He then went unclaimed on waivers.

Minnesota was long rumored as the eventual landing spot for Rose, given that head coach Tom Thibodeau has acquired a handful of his former Bulls players, like Taj Gibson and Jimmy Butler.

Rose was decent with the Knicks last year but struggled in his brief time in Cleveland this season, averaging just 9.8 points and 1.6 assists in 19.3 minutes per game over 16 appearances.

The Wolves are locked in a wild playoff race in the Western Conference. They’re currently 38–28, good for sixth place, but just 2 1/2 games ahead of the 10th-place Jazz and 1 1/2 games behind the third-place Blazers.

<p>Last December, SI.com <a href="https://www.si.com/tech-media/2017/12/15/adrienne-lawrence-john-buccigross-text-messages-espn-sexual-harassment-pregnancy-discrimination" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:wrote" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">wrote</a> about the potential legal consequences of allegations contained in an <a href="https://www.bostonglobe.com/sports/2017/12/14/women-who-worked-espn-say-its-problems-far-beyond-barstool-sports/L1v9HJIvtnHuBPiMru6yGM/story.html" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:investigative report" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">investigative report</a> by <em>The Boston Globe</em>’s Jenn Abelson on sexual misconduct at ESPN.</p><p>On Monday, one major consequence materialized: Former ESPN employee Adrienne Lawrence filed a sex discrimination lawsuit against ESPN in the U.S. District Court for the District of Connecticut. In this federal complaint, Lawrence’s attorneys, Brian Cohen and Russell Yankwitt, depict ESPN as a “company rife with misogyny.”</p><h3><strong>Detailing the allegedly hostile work environment experienced by female ESPN employees</strong></h3><p>The allegations contained in Lawrence’s complaint are far-reaching and highly disturbing. The complaint raises the following accusations against ESPN’s male executives, producers and on-air talent:</p><p>They keep “scorecards” which list and rank female ESPN colleagues based on sexual attraction; They frequently watch porn in the presence of female colleagues; They openly describe female celebrities with whom they would like to have sex, and then wonder what those celebrities “taste like” during sex; As a matter of workplace environment, they expect their female colleagues “to tolerate the predatory culture without protest” and to “go along to get along;” They discourage female colleagues from sharing any of their complaints and advise them to be thick-skinned about their ESPN experience; They engage in “grooming” to coerce female colleagues into sexual relationships. The complaint describes grooming as “<em>a manipulative tactic that typically involves targeting a vulnerable victim, gaining private access to the victim, gaining the victim’s trust, desensitizing the victim to sexualization through testing and gradually increasing the sexualization of the relationship;</em>” They are enabled by ESPN’s human resources staff, who cover up misconduct rather than credibly investigate it; They make pregnant broadcasters feel as if they could lose their jobs if they take time off; They create an environment where female on-air talent are led to believe that providing “sexual favors” to management can be a form of exchange for on-air opportunities; and They retaliate against female employees who complain about sexual misconduct. Retaliation comes in the form of fabricating performance reviews to depict the complainers as bad workers, choosing to advance undeserving male employees over more deserving female employees and awarding contract extensions to harassers.</p><p>To be clear, the aforementioned list contains allegations—<strong><em>not</em></strong> established facts. A complaint is a retelling of events from the perspective of the person suing. It is not the narrative of a neutral observer or a court. As explained more fully below, ESPN will have an opportunity to rebut Lawrence’s claims in legal filings and, potentially, in a trial. On Monday night, the company’s communication office offered this statement to SI.com:</p><p>“We conducted a thorough investigation of the claims Adrienne Lawrence surfaced to ESPN and they are entirely without merit. Ms. Lawrence was hired into a two-year talent development program and was told that her contract would not be renewed at the conclusion of the training program. At that same time, ESPN also told 100 other talent with substantially more experience, that their contracts would not be renewed. The company will vigorously defend its position and we are confident we will prevail in court.”</p><p>Lawrence’s complaint draws mainly from her own experience at ESPN but also from information shared by four “confidential witnesses.” These four unnamed persons are described as:</p><p>a male who worked in ESPN security and was fired after complaining that female employees were subject to harassment; a male who worked in ESPN’s corporate communications office an who left the company after being disgusted by witnessing harassment against female colleagues; a female who currently works as an ESPN production assistant and who was “retaliated against” for reporting to her superiors about a “serial sexual harasser” in her work environment; and a female who currently works for ESPN as a studio director who has observed disparate treatment of women and pregnant women.</p><h3><strong>Lawrence’s claims about her experience at ESPN</strong></h3><p>While Lawrence’s 93-page complaint painstakingly scrutinizes ESPN’s treatment of women since the 1980s, Lawrence only worked at ESPN from 2015 to 2017. Her complaint indicates that, after working as an associate at a prestigious law firm, she joined ESPN’s Fellowship program in 2015. She did so despite giving up a $235,000 salary for one that paid $75,000. The fellow program rotates fellows across different ESPN departments for multi-month assignments.</p><p>Although only a fellow at ESPN, Lawrence contends that she took on the functions of an “anchor” and on-air “legal analyst.” She also authored articles for different ESPN websites and associated verticals. Lawrence’s complaint contends that she consistently received high praise for her work and was regarded by her supervisors as a “rising star.”</p><p>Despite what Lawrence describes as a highly successful run at ESPN, she contends her experience was ruined by a number of male colleagues who engaged in varying forms of sexual misconduct. She recalls her two years at ESPN as a time when she was routinely harassed, often treated differently because she was a woman and regularly subjected to an unsettling and hostile work environment.</p><p>Lawrence’s complaint specifies a series of alleged incidents and patterns of misconduct, including:</p><p>Told that while on-air, she had to wear “form fitting” clothing. This clothing included tight dresses and similar styles that would accentuate her female attributes. By comparison, clothing for male on-air talent was treated with more latitude and less sexualization; Routinely subjected to sexual advances and inappropriate remarks; Ostracized by colleagues for rejecting their sexual advances; Experienced the halting of a promising career when her “objections communicated to management that she was unwilling to capitulate to sexual pressure, entertain inappropriate sexual advances, or remain silent about unprofessional behavior in order to advance at ESPN;” Eventually decided to wear a fake engagement ring to work in hopes that it would deter ESPN’s male “predators”—it didn’t work; Victimized by <em>SportsCenter</em> anchor John Buccigross, whom Lawrence says tried to “lure” her with a promise of mentorship “intending to groom her for a sexual relationship.” Lawrence’s complaint spends pages portraying Buccigross as a predator. She says he “pretended to like everything Ms. Lawrence liked, including things she had never mentioned to him but had recently posted on her social media pages.” He also, according to Lawrence, made sexual advances and texted her shirtless photographs of himself. Lawrence later heard from former ESPN radio host Ryen Russillo that he heard she and Buccigross were dating, and that she was receiving negative treatment from her co-workers because of it; Suffered the consequences of Human Resources “colluding” with Buccigross to conceal his conduct and, accordingly, cast doubt on Lawrence’s word; Experienced retaliation by ESPN management for her complaints against Buccigross. Such alleged retaliation included ESPN denying her a chance to cover the Derrick Rose trial in Los Angeles, and later reducing her airtime and writing opportunities; Also experienced retaliation when ESPN declined to offer her a position at the conclusion of her fellowship in 2017—this decision came despite what Lawrence describes as exemplary work product and assurances of full-time employment; and Suffered the wrath of “bots” and “fake accounts” on social media that Lawrence says ESPN used to “incite and promote hatred” toward Lawrence and support for Buccigross.</p><p>To be clear, the aforementioned list contains <strong><em>allegations</em></strong>—not (necessarily) facts. Whether these allegations will be supported by evidence and testimony remains to be seen. One of the claims Lawrence made—that longtime anchor Chris Berman left a racially abusive voicemail for fellow anchor Jemele Hill in 2016—was refuted by Hill on Monday.</p><p>“A few years ago, I had a personal conflict with Chris Berman, but the way this conflict has been characterized is dangerously inaccurate,” Hill wrote in a statement. “Chris never left any racially disparaging remarks on my voicemail and our conflict was handled swiftly and with the utmost professionalism. I felt as if my concerns were taken seriously by ESPN and addressed in a way that made me feel like a valued employee. Frankly, I’m more disappointed that someone I considered to be a friend at one point would misrepresent and relay a private conversation without my knowledge—in which I simply attempted to be a sounding board—for personal gain.”</p><h3><strong>Lawrence’s legal claims </strong></h3><p>Lawrence’s complaint takes these allegations and uses them to assert several specific legal claims.</p><p>First, Lawrence contends that ESPN—which is legally responsible for the conduct of its employees when those employees act within the scope of their employment—discriminated against her on the basis of her sex. Such misconduct, if proven, would be in violation of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. To that end, Lawrence charges “throughout the course of her employment at ESPN,” she was subject to “unlawful conduct of a sexual nature that was so severe or pervasive as to alter the conditions of [her employment].”</p><p>Second, Lawrence insists she suffered from what’s called “<em>quid pro quo</em> sexual harassment.” Such a claim concerns Lawrence’s assertions that by repeatedly rejecting sexual advances, she experienced adverse employment consequences—most notably, she received less airtime, was passed over on law-related assignments (e.g., Derrick Rose trial) and, despite earlier assurances, was denied a permanent position. <em>Quid pro quo</em> is Latin for “something for something.” In the context of sexual harassment law, it’s a violation of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act to make threats or take punitive action against an employee who doesn’t submit to sexual advances.</p><p>Third, Lawrence charges that she suffered employment retaliation, which is also a violation of Title VII. As described above, Lawrence maintains that once she made her bosses and human resources officials aware of the harassment, her standing at ESPN diminished and she was relegated to the bench (so to speak).</p><p>Fourth, Lawrence invokes a Connecticut statute that prohibits hostile work environment sexual harassment, <em>quid pro quo</em> sexual harassment and retaliation. Specifically, the Connecticut Fair Employment Practices Act makes it unlawful for employers to tolerate unwelcome sexual advances and similar misconduct. Lawrence would be able to advance such a claim with evidence and testimony that shows ESPN management failed to take steps to remedy workplace abuse and intimidation of a sexual nature.</p><p>Lawrence’s retaliation claim goes beyond ESPN the company to also name four ESPN executives as co-defendants: senior director for talent Meg Green, senior director for employee relations Rob Gallo, senior coordinating producer Jack Obringer and former director of employee relations Donna Hricisko.</p><p>As to damages, Lawrence contends that mistreatment at the hands of ESPN and its executives caused her to suffer severe emotional distress and to lose both wages and employment opportunities. Further, she seeks attorneys’ fees and punitive damages for “intentional, willful, wanton, and malicious” actions against her.</p><h3><strong>ESPN’s likely legal defenses</strong></h3><p>In the weeks ahead, ESPN will answer Lawrence’s complaint. It will do so by denying her allegations and offering a very different depiction of the facts.</p><p>To that end, ESPN will likely contend that much of Lawrence’s complaint details allegations that predate her employment and that haven’t been proven in a court of law. Lawrence relies on several books and news articles to frame ESPN as a misogynistic employer. ESPN is poised to argue that these sources promote sensationalized headlines and also offer claims that are irrelevant to Lawrence’s specific experience. In fact, the court might classify such sources as inadmissible should it deem them more prejudicial than probative.</p><p>Lawrence would likely respond by arguing that a historical assessment of ESPN’s workplace is essential to her claims. If, as Lawrence asserts, ESPN has a long history of permitting workplace misconduct, it would help to explain why Lawrence experienced harassment during her two years with the company. In reviewing sexual harassment claims, courts generally require the plaintiff to prove there is a pattern of misconduct and a pattern of management failing to act.</p><p>ESPN will likely also depict Lawrence in the most negative light possible. While Lawrence describes her performance reviews as exemplary, ESPN might offer documentation and testimony to the contrary. ESPN might also offer transcripts of text messages sent between Lawrence and ESPN employees, or emails by Lawrence using the ESPN.com server, that paint her claims in a different light. Likewise, ESPN attorneys will interview employees who worked with Lawrence to assess if any can share testimony that undermines Lawrence’s portrayal of facts. As described above, Lawrence accuses a number of high-profile ESPN personalities with assorted forms of misconduct. Some of them may offer testimony that rejects such accounts and, possibly, attempts to implicate Lawrence as engaging in her own inappropriate conduct.</p><p>As to ESPN not hiring Lawrence upon completion of her fellowship, ESPN could highlight (as Lawrence’s complaint acknowledges) that the company laid off over 100 employees at around the time her fellowship ended. ESPN, then, could explain that it was not in a financial position to hire her at that time. In addition, there does not appear to be any contractual guarantee that partaking in an ESPN fellowship leads to employment.</p><p><em>SI Senior Editor Richard Deitsch contributed to this report.</em></p><p><a href="https://law.unh.edu/faculty/mccann" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Michael McCann" class="link rapid-noclick-resp"><em>Michael McCann</em></a><em>, SI's legal analyst, provides legal and business analysis for The Crossover. He is also the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs at the University of New Hampshire School of Law and co-author with Ed O'Bannon of the forthcoming book </em><a href="https://www.amazon.com/Court-Justice-Inside-Against-Basketball/dp/1635762626/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1506713819&sr=8-1&keywords=Court+Justice%3A+The+Inside+Story+of+My+Battle+Against+the+NCAA+and+My+Life+in+Basketball" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Court Justice: The Inside Story of My Battle Against the NCAA" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Court Justice: The Inside Story of My Battle Against the NCAA</a>.?</p>
Breaking Down Adrienne Lawrence's Lawsuit Against ESPN and the Company's Possible Defenses

Last December, SI.com wrote about the potential legal consequences of allegations contained in an investigative report by The Boston Globe’s Jenn Abelson on sexual misconduct at ESPN.

On Monday, one major consequence materialized: Former ESPN employee Adrienne Lawrence filed a sex discrimination lawsuit against ESPN in the U.S. District Court for the District of Connecticut. In this federal complaint, Lawrence’s attorneys, Brian Cohen and Russell Yankwitt, depict ESPN as a “company rife with misogyny.”

Detailing the allegedly hostile work environment experienced by female ESPN employees

The allegations contained in Lawrence’s complaint are far-reaching and highly disturbing. The complaint raises the following accusations against ESPN’s male executives, producers and on-air talent:

They keep “scorecards” which list and rank female ESPN colleagues based on sexual attraction; They frequently watch porn in the presence of female colleagues; They openly describe female celebrities with whom they would like to have sex, and then wonder what those celebrities “taste like” during sex; As a matter of workplace environment, they expect their female colleagues “to tolerate the predatory culture without protest” and to “go along to get along;” They discourage female colleagues from sharing any of their complaints and advise them to be thick-skinned about their ESPN experience; They engage in “grooming” to coerce female colleagues into sexual relationships. The complaint describes grooming as “a manipulative tactic that typically involves targeting a vulnerable victim, gaining private access to the victim, gaining the victim’s trust, desensitizing the victim to sexualization through testing and gradually increasing the sexualization of the relationship;” They are enabled by ESPN’s human resources staff, who cover up misconduct rather than credibly investigate it; They make pregnant broadcasters feel as if they could lose their jobs if they take time off; They create an environment where female on-air talent are led to believe that providing “sexual favors” to management can be a form of exchange for on-air opportunities; and They retaliate against female employees who complain about sexual misconduct. Retaliation comes in the form of fabricating performance reviews to depict the complainers as bad workers, choosing to advance undeserving male employees over more deserving female employees and awarding contract extensions to harassers.

To be clear, the aforementioned list contains allegations—not established facts. A complaint is a retelling of events from the perspective of the person suing. It is not the narrative of a neutral observer or a court. As explained more fully below, ESPN will have an opportunity to rebut Lawrence’s claims in legal filings and, potentially, in a trial. On Monday night, the company’s communication office offered this statement to SI.com:

“We conducted a thorough investigation of the claims Adrienne Lawrence surfaced to ESPN and they are entirely without merit. Ms. Lawrence was hired into a two-year talent development program and was told that her contract would not be renewed at the conclusion of the training program. At that same time, ESPN also told 100 other talent with substantially more experience, that their contracts would not be renewed. The company will vigorously defend its position and we are confident we will prevail in court.”

Lawrence’s complaint draws mainly from her own experience at ESPN but also from information shared by four “confidential witnesses.” These four unnamed persons are described as:

a male who worked in ESPN security and was fired after complaining that female employees were subject to harassment; a male who worked in ESPN’s corporate communications office an who left the company after being disgusted by witnessing harassment against female colleagues; a female who currently works as an ESPN production assistant and who was “retaliated against” for reporting to her superiors about a “serial sexual harasser” in her work environment; and a female who currently works for ESPN as a studio director who has observed disparate treatment of women and pregnant women.

Lawrence’s claims about her experience at ESPN

While Lawrence’s 93-page complaint painstakingly scrutinizes ESPN’s treatment of women since the 1980s, Lawrence only worked at ESPN from 2015 to 2017. Her complaint indicates that, after working as an associate at a prestigious law firm, she joined ESPN’s Fellowship program in 2015. She did so despite giving up a $235,000 salary for one that paid $75,000. The fellow program rotates fellows across different ESPN departments for multi-month assignments.

Although only a fellow at ESPN, Lawrence contends that she took on the functions of an “anchor” and on-air “legal analyst.” She also authored articles for different ESPN websites and associated verticals. Lawrence’s complaint contends that she consistently received high praise for her work and was regarded by her supervisors as a “rising star.”

Despite what Lawrence describes as a highly successful run at ESPN, she contends her experience was ruined by a number of male colleagues who engaged in varying forms of sexual misconduct. She recalls her two years at ESPN as a time when she was routinely harassed, often treated differently because she was a woman and regularly subjected to an unsettling and hostile work environment.

Lawrence’s complaint specifies a series of alleged incidents and patterns of misconduct, including:

Told that while on-air, she had to wear “form fitting” clothing. This clothing included tight dresses and similar styles that would accentuate her female attributes. By comparison, clothing for male on-air talent was treated with more latitude and less sexualization; Routinely subjected to sexual advances and inappropriate remarks; Ostracized by colleagues for rejecting their sexual advances; Experienced the halting of a promising career when her “objections communicated to management that she was unwilling to capitulate to sexual pressure, entertain inappropriate sexual advances, or remain silent about unprofessional behavior in order to advance at ESPN;” Eventually decided to wear a fake engagement ring to work in hopes that it would deter ESPN’s male “predators”—it didn’t work; Victimized by SportsCenter anchor John Buccigross, whom Lawrence says tried to “lure” her with a promise of mentorship “intending to groom her for a sexual relationship.” Lawrence’s complaint spends pages portraying Buccigross as a predator. She says he “pretended to like everything Ms. Lawrence liked, including things she had never mentioned to him but had recently posted on her social media pages.” He also, according to Lawrence, made sexual advances and texted her shirtless photographs of himself. Lawrence later heard from former ESPN radio host Ryen Russillo that he heard she and Buccigross were dating, and that she was receiving negative treatment from her co-workers because of it; Suffered the consequences of Human Resources “colluding” with Buccigross to conceal his conduct and, accordingly, cast doubt on Lawrence’s word; Experienced retaliation by ESPN management for her complaints against Buccigross. Such alleged retaliation included ESPN denying her a chance to cover the Derrick Rose trial in Los Angeles, and later reducing her airtime and writing opportunities; Also experienced retaliation when ESPN declined to offer her a position at the conclusion of her fellowship in 2017—this decision came despite what Lawrence describes as exemplary work product and assurances of full-time employment; and Suffered the wrath of “bots” and “fake accounts” on social media that Lawrence says ESPN used to “incite and promote hatred” toward Lawrence and support for Buccigross.

To be clear, the aforementioned list contains allegations—not (necessarily) facts. Whether these allegations will be supported by evidence and testimony remains to be seen. One of the claims Lawrence made—that longtime anchor Chris Berman left a racially abusive voicemail for fellow anchor Jemele Hill in 2016—was refuted by Hill on Monday.

“A few years ago, I had a personal conflict with Chris Berman, but the way this conflict has been characterized is dangerously inaccurate,” Hill wrote in a statement. “Chris never left any racially disparaging remarks on my voicemail and our conflict was handled swiftly and with the utmost professionalism. I felt as if my concerns were taken seriously by ESPN and addressed in a way that made me feel like a valued employee. Frankly, I’m more disappointed that someone I considered to be a friend at one point would misrepresent and relay a private conversation without my knowledge—in which I simply attempted to be a sounding board—for personal gain.”

Lawrence’s legal claims

Lawrence’s complaint takes these allegations and uses them to assert several specific legal claims.

First, Lawrence contends that ESPN—which is legally responsible for the conduct of its employees when those employees act within the scope of their employment—discriminated against her on the basis of her sex. Such misconduct, if proven, would be in violation of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. To that end, Lawrence charges “throughout the course of her employment at ESPN,” she was subject to “unlawful conduct of a sexual nature that was so severe or pervasive as to alter the conditions of [her employment].”

Second, Lawrence insists she suffered from what’s called “quid pro quo sexual harassment.” Such a claim concerns Lawrence’s assertions that by repeatedly rejecting sexual advances, she experienced adverse employment consequences—most notably, she received less airtime, was passed over on law-related assignments (e.g., Derrick Rose trial) and, despite earlier assurances, was denied a permanent position. Quid pro quo is Latin for “something for something.” In the context of sexual harassment law, it’s a violation of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act to make threats or take punitive action against an employee who doesn’t submit to sexual advances.

Third, Lawrence charges that she suffered employment retaliation, which is also a violation of Title VII. As described above, Lawrence maintains that once she made her bosses and human resources officials aware of the harassment, her standing at ESPN diminished and she was relegated to the bench (so to speak).

Fourth, Lawrence invokes a Connecticut statute that prohibits hostile work environment sexual harassment, quid pro quo sexual harassment and retaliation. Specifically, the Connecticut Fair Employment Practices Act makes it unlawful for employers to tolerate unwelcome sexual advances and similar misconduct. Lawrence would be able to advance such a claim with evidence and testimony that shows ESPN management failed to take steps to remedy workplace abuse and intimidation of a sexual nature.

Lawrence’s retaliation claim goes beyond ESPN the company to also name four ESPN executives as co-defendants: senior director for talent Meg Green, senior director for employee relations Rob Gallo, senior coordinating producer Jack Obringer and former director of employee relations Donna Hricisko.

As to damages, Lawrence contends that mistreatment at the hands of ESPN and its executives caused her to suffer severe emotional distress and to lose both wages and employment opportunities. Further, she seeks attorneys’ fees and punitive damages for “intentional, willful, wanton, and malicious” actions against her.

ESPN’s likely legal defenses

In the weeks ahead, ESPN will answer Lawrence’s complaint. It will do so by denying her allegations and offering a very different depiction of the facts.

To that end, ESPN will likely contend that much of Lawrence’s complaint details allegations that predate her employment and that haven’t been proven in a court of law. Lawrence relies on several books and news articles to frame ESPN as a misogynistic employer. ESPN is poised to argue that these sources promote sensationalized headlines and also offer claims that are irrelevant to Lawrence’s specific experience. In fact, the court might classify such sources as inadmissible should it deem them more prejudicial than probative.

Lawrence would likely respond by arguing that a historical assessment of ESPN’s workplace is essential to her claims. If, as Lawrence asserts, ESPN has a long history of permitting workplace misconduct, it would help to explain why Lawrence experienced harassment during her two years with the company. In reviewing sexual harassment claims, courts generally require the plaintiff to prove there is a pattern of misconduct and a pattern of management failing to act.

ESPN will likely also depict Lawrence in the most negative light possible. While Lawrence describes her performance reviews as exemplary, ESPN might offer documentation and testimony to the contrary. ESPN might also offer transcripts of text messages sent between Lawrence and ESPN employees, or emails by Lawrence using the ESPN.com server, that paint her claims in a different light. Likewise, ESPN attorneys will interview employees who worked with Lawrence to assess if any can share testimony that undermines Lawrence’s portrayal of facts. As described above, Lawrence accuses a number of high-profile ESPN personalities with assorted forms of misconduct. Some of them may offer testimony that rejects such accounts and, possibly, attempts to implicate Lawrence as engaging in her own inappropriate conduct.

As to ESPN not hiring Lawrence upon completion of her fellowship, ESPN could highlight (as Lawrence’s complaint acknowledges) that the company laid off over 100 employees at around the time her fellowship ended. ESPN, then, could explain that it was not in a financial position to hire her at that time. In addition, there does not appear to be any contractual guarantee that partaking in an ESPN fellowship leads to employment.

SI Senior Editor Richard Deitsch contributed to this report.

Michael McCann, SI's legal analyst, provides legal and business analysis for The Crossover. He is also the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs at the University of New Hampshire School of Law and co-author with Ed O'Bannon of the forthcoming book Court Justice: The Inside Story of My Battle Against the NCAA.?

Look at it this way: his old coach Tom Thibodeau in Minnesota has not reached out with any formal communication.
Will we see Derrick Rose in the NBA again?
Look at it this way: his old coach Tom Thibodeau in Minnesota has not reached out with any formal communication.

What to Read Next