Derek Jeter

The New York Yankees shortstop is set for another playoff appearance.

<p>Christian Yelich&#39;s agent doesn&#39;t want his client to be the last man standing after the Marlins&#39; firesale this offseason. </p><p>Joe Longo <a href="http://www.espn.com/mlb/story/_/id/22123963/christian-yelich-relationship-miami-marlins-irretrievably-broken-agent-says" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:told ESPN" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">told ESPN</a> that his client&#39;s relationship with the Marlins is &quot;irretrievably broken&quot; and that it&#39;d be in the best interest of both parties for the organization to trade him before spring training. </p><p>&quot;They have a plan,&quot; Longo said. &quot;I respect that plan, but that plan shouldn&#39;t include Christian at this point in his career. He&#39;s in the middle of the best years of his career, and having him be part of a 100-loss season is not really where [we] want to see him going.&quot;</p><p>The plan, which has been put into action by a new ownership group headlined by Derek Jeter, has been to trade away the team&#39;s best players in an attempt to shed salary and start a full rebuild. Miami has already traded away Dee Gordon (to the Mariners), Marcel Ozuna (Cardinals) and reigning NL MVP Giancarlo Stanton (Yankees) in moves that have been criticized as prioritizing fiscal balance over on-field performance. </p><p>That&#39;s left Yelich, 26, as perhaps the best player left on the Marlins roster. The centerfielder batted .282 with 18 homers and 81 RBIs in 2017 and is a career .290 hitter. He won the Gold Glove in 2014 and the Silver Slugger in 2016, and his contract makes him an attractive trade target—Yelich has four years left on a seven-year, $49.5 million deal he signed with Miami in 2015. </p><p>Yelich has expressed displeasure with the direction of the franchise, as has catcher J.T. Realmuto and <a href="https://www.si.com/mlb/2018/01/10/starlin-castro-miami-marlins-trade-request" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:new addition Starlin Castro" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">new addition Starlin Castro</a>, who came over from the Yankees in the Stanton deal. </p>
Christian Yelich's Relationship With Marlins 'Broken,' Agent Says

Christian Yelich's agent doesn't want his client to be the last man standing after the Marlins' firesale this offseason.

Joe Longo told ESPN that his client's relationship with the Marlins is "irretrievably broken" and that it'd be in the best interest of both parties for the organization to trade him before spring training.

"They have a plan," Longo said. "I respect that plan, but that plan shouldn't include Christian at this point in his career. He's in the middle of the best years of his career, and having him be part of a 100-loss season is not really where [we] want to see him going."

The plan, which has been put into action by a new ownership group headlined by Derek Jeter, has been to trade away the team's best players in an attempt to shed salary and start a full rebuild. Miami has already traded away Dee Gordon (to the Mariners), Marcel Ozuna (Cardinals) and reigning NL MVP Giancarlo Stanton (Yankees) in moves that have been criticized as prioritizing fiscal balance over on-field performance.

That's left Yelich, 26, as perhaps the best player left on the Marlins roster. The centerfielder batted .282 with 18 homers and 81 RBIs in 2017 and is a career .290 hitter. He won the Gold Glove in 2014 and the Silver Slugger in 2016, and his contract makes him an attractive trade target—Yelich has four years left on a seven-year, $49.5 million deal he signed with Miami in 2015.

Yelich has expressed displeasure with the direction of the franchise, as has catcher J.T. Realmuto and new addition Starlin Castro, who came over from the Yankees in the Stanton deal.

Marlins owner Derek Jeter reportedly wants to get rid of the home run sculpture at Marlins Park.
Derek Jeter wants to get rid of the Marlins’ home run sculpture
Marlins owner Derek Jeter reportedly wants to get rid of the home run sculpture at Marlins Park.
Marlins owner Derek Jeter reportedly wants to get rid of the home run sculpture at Marlins Park.
Derek Jeter wants to get rid of the Marlins’ home run sculpture
Marlins owner Derek Jeter reportedly wants to get rid of the home run sculpture at Marlins Park.
Derek Jeter might get his way and get rid of the Marlins' home-run sculpture
Derek Jeter might get his way and get rid of the Marlins' home-run sculpture
Derek Jeter might get his way and get rid of the Marlins' home-run sculpture
Derek Jeter might get his way and get rid of the Marlins' home-run sculpture
Derek Jeter might get his way and get rid of the Marlins' home-run sculpture
Derek Jeter might get his way and get rid of the Marlins' home-run sculpture
Derek Jeter might get his way and get rid of the Marlins&#39; home-run sculpture
Derek Jeter might get his way and get rid of the Marlins' home-run sculpture
Derek Jeter might get his way and get rid of the Marlins' home-run sculpture
Marlins fan organizes revolt against Derek Jeter and Bruce Sherman
Marlins fan organizes revolt against Derek Jeter and Bruce Sherman
Marlins fan organizes revolt against Derek Jeter and Bruce Sherman
Marlins fan organizes revolt against Derek Jeter and Bruce Sherman
Marlins fan organizes revolt against Derek Jeter and Bruce Sherman
Marlins fan organizes revolt against Derek Jeter and Bruce Sherman
Marlins fan organizes revolt against Derek Jeter and Bruce Sherman
Marlins fan organizes revolt against Derek Jeter and Bruce Sherman
Marlins fan organizes revolt against Derek Jeter and Bruce Sherman
FILE - In this Dec. 3, 2017, file photo, Derek Jeter, chief executive officer and part owner of the Miami Marlins and former New York Yankees player, sits court side as the Miami Heat played against the Golden State Warriors in an NBA basketball game, in Miami. The latest acquisition by Jeters publishing imprint: A memoir by Robert Scheer, founder of the foster youth charity Comfort Cases. Jeter Publishing told The Associated Press on Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018, that Sheers A Forever Family will come out in November. (AP Photo/Joe Skipper, File)
Jeter imprint acquires book by Comfort Cases founder
FILE - In this Dec. 3, 2017, file photo, Derek Jeter, chief executive officer and part owner of the Miami Marlins and former New York Yankees player, sits court side as the Miami Heat played against the Golden State Warriors in an NBA basketball game, in Miami. The latest acquisition by Jeters publishing imprint: A memoir by Robert Scheer, founder of the foster youth charity Comfort Cases. Jeter Publishing told The Associated Press on Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018, that Sheers A Forever Family will come out in November. (AP Photo/Joe Skipper, File)
FILE - In this Dec. 3, 2017, file photo, Derek Jeter, chief executive officer and part owner of the Miami Marlins and former New York Yankees player, sits court side as the Miami Heat played against the Golden State Warriors in an NBA basketball game, in Miami. The latest acquisition by Jeter’s publishing imprint: A memoir by Robert Scheer, founder of the foster youth charity Comfort Cases. Jeter Publishing told The Associated Press on Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018, that Sheer’s “A Forever Family” will come out in November. (AP Photo/Joe Skipper, File)
FILE - In this Dec. 3, 2017, file photo, Derek Jeter, chief executive officer and part owner of the Miami Marlins and former New York Yankees player, sits court side as the Miami Heat played against the Golden State Warriors in an NBA basketball game, in Miami. The latest acquisition by Jeter’s publishing imprint: A memoir by Robert Scheer, founder of the foster youth charity Comfort Cases. Jeter Publishing told The Associated Press on Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018, that Sheer’s “A Forever Family” will come out in November. (AP Photo/Joe Skipper, File)
FILE - In this Dec. 3, 2017, file photo, Derek Jeter, chief executive officer and part owner of the Miami Marlins and former New York Yankees player, sits court side as the Miami Heat played against the Golden State Warriors in an NBA basketball game, in Miami. The latest acquisition by Jeter’s publishing imprint: A memoir by Robert Scheer, founder of the foster youth charity Comfort Cases. Jeter Publishing told The Associated Press on Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018, that Sheer’s “A Forever Family” will come out in November. (AP Photo/Joe Skipper, File)
<p>Second baseman Starlin Castro has yet to play a game for the Miami Marlins but already wants to be traded, <a href="https://twitter.com/Ken_Rosenthal/status/951115630014554112" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:according" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">according</a> to Ken Rosenthal of The Athletic. Castro does not want to be part of another rebuilding process like he was with the Chicago Cubs from 2010 to 2015.</p><p>Castro was acquired by the Marlins in the December trade that sent National League MVP Giancarlo Stanton to the New York Yankees. Stanton is expected to be the team&#39;s starting second baseman after the Marlins dealt Dee Gordon to the Seattle Mariners.</p><p>The New York Mets were rumored to have interest in Castro shortly after the Stanton trade, if the Marlins were willing to flip him for more prospects. Castro&#39;s contract has him slated to earn $10 million in 2018, $11 million in 2019 and includes a $16 million option or $1 million buyout for 2020.</p><p>Castro is coming off a season in which he hit .300/.338/.452 with 16 home runs and 63 RBIs in 112 games. He spent just two seasons in New York after rising to stardom with the Cubs. The Cubs traded him to the Yankees in December 2015 for pitcher Adam Warren and Brendan Ryan. The Cubs went on to win the World Series in 2016.</p><p>The Marlins are also reportedly listening to offers for outfielder Christian Yelich and catcher J.T. Realmuto as the fire sale under a new ownership group, which includes Derek Jeter, continues. The Marlins&#39; goal is to get their Opening Day payroll around $90 million.</p>
Report: Starlin Castro Wants To Be Traded From The Marlins

Second baseman Starlin Castro has yet to play a game for the Miami Marlins but already wants to be traded, according to Ken Rosenthal of The Athletic. Castro does not want to be part of another rebuilding process like he was with the Chicago Cubs from 2010 to 2015.

Castro was acquired by the Marlins in the December trade that sent National League MVP Giancarlo Stanton to the New York Yankees. Stanton is expected to be the team's starting second baseman after the Marlins dealt Dee Gordon to the Seattle Mariners.

The New York Mets were rumored to have interest in Castro shortly after the Stanton trade, if the Marlins were willing to flip him for more prospects. Castro's contract has him slated to earn $10 million in 2018, $11 million in 2019 and includes a $16 million option or $1 million buyout for 2020.

Castro is coming off a season in which he hit .300/.338/.452 with 16 home runs and 63 RBIs in 112 games. He spent just two seasons in New York after rising to stardom with the Cubs. The Cubs traded him to the Yankees in December 2015 for pitcher Adam Warren and Brendan Ryan. The Cubs went on to win the World Series in 2016.

The Marlins are also reportedly listening to offers for outfielder Christian Yelich and catcher J.T. Realmuto as the fire sale under a new ownership group, which includes Derek Jeter, continues. The Marlins' goal is to get their Opening Day payroll around $90 million.

<p>After a 14-year career that saw him crowned as the American League&#39;s top player in 2006, Justin Morneau is hanging up his spikes. The veteran first baseman is reportedly joining the Twins, the team with which he spent the bulk of his time in the majors, <a href="https://www.mlb.com/twins/news/twins-hire-justin-morneau-as-special-assistant/c-264448924" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:as a special assistant to their front office" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">as a special assistant to their front office</a>, bringing an end to his playing days at the age of 36.</p><p>Born in Canada and drafted out of a British Columbia high school by Minnesota in the third round of the 1999 draft, Morneau made his debut in 2003 but didn&#39;t become a regular at first base until the second half of the &#39;04 season, after the Twins traded veteran starter Doug Mientkiewicz to the Red Sox. The lefty-swinging Morneau quickly became a feared presence alongside catcher Joe Mauer in the middle of Minnesota&#39;s order: From 2005 through an injury-shortened &#39;10, he averaged 26 home runs and 101 RBIs per season, hitting .289/.362/.513 with a 131 OPS+. That included his MVP-winning 2006 season, when he bashed 34 home runs, drove in 130 runs, hit .321/.375/.559, and narrowly edged out Derek Jeter for the hardware (though Morneau led the AL in none of those categories, and his 4.3 Wins Above Replacement that year was good for just 23rd among all Junior Circuit regulars), as well as a runner-up finish to Dustin Pedroia in &#39;08. Those numbers also helped earn Morneau a six-year, $80 million deal after the &#39;07 season.</p><p>With Morneau, Mauer and ace Johan Santana all flourishing at once, the Twins won five AL Central crowns from 2003 through &#39;10, but they were knocked out of the playoffs in the Division Round every time—four times by the Yankees, three times in sweeps. The division title in &#39;10 was the end of the road for those Twins, who plummeted to 99 losses and the Central basement the next year, beginning a run of four straight sub-.500 seasons in the Twin Cities. That coincided with Morneau&#39;s decline: Injuries, including a concussion he suffered sliding into a base in July 2010 and which plagued him for years afterward, limited to him an average of 95 games per season from &#39;10 through &#39;12. His inability to stay on the field and fading numbers brought an end to his time with the Twins in August 2013, when they dealt him to the Pirates for a pair of minor leaguers.</p><p>Morneau&#39;s stay in Pittsburgh was brief and unexceptional, and after hitting free agency that winter, he signed a modest two-year pact worth $14 million with the Rockies. That looked to be a shrewd move by Colorado, as Morneau won the NL batting title in 2014 with a .319 average, hit 17 home runs, and posted his highest full-season OPS+ (125) and WAR (3.2) totals since &#39;09. But his &#39;15 season was mostly washed out by another concussion suffered on a diving play, as he appeared in only 49 games, and Colorado declined its end of a mutual option at the end of the year. A free agent once again, Morneau returned to the AL Central by signing a one-year, $1 million contract with the White Sox, but an elbow injury cost him the first half of the season, and his bat never recovered, as he hit a mere .261/.303/.429 in 218 plate appearances at the age of 35.</p><p>Morneau was active at the beginning of 2017, playing for Team Canada in the World Baseball Classic, but he was unable to parlay his brief time in the tournament into another major league job, and it looks like he&#39;s decided that this will be the end of the line for him. He finishes his career with 247 home runs and a lifetime .281/.348/.481 batting line to go with his MVP trophy, four All-Star team nods, and two Silver Slugger awards. And while that&#39;s not a Hall of Fame career by any stretch, he&#39;ll still walk away as one of the top hitters of the 2000s, one of the best Canadian players ever, and as a standout figure in Twins franchise history. Good luck and happy trails, Justin.</p>
Twins Star and 2006 AL MVP Justin Morneau Retires, Joins Minnesota's Front Office

After a 14-year career that saw him crowned as the American League's top player in 2006, Justin Morneau is hanging up his spikes. The veteran first baseman is reportedly joining the Twins, the team with which he spent the bulk of his time in the majors, as a special assistant to their front office, bringing an end to his playing days at the age of 36.

Born in Canada and drafted out of a British Columbia high school by Minnesota in the third round of the 1999 draft, Morneau made his debut in 2003 but didn't become a regular at first base until the second half of the '04 season, after the Twins traded veteran starter Doug Mientkiewicz to the Red Sox. The lefty-swinging Morneau quickly became a feared presence alongside catcher Joe Mauer in the middle of Minnesota's order: From 2005 through an injury-shortened '10, he averaged 26 home runs and 101 RBIs per season, hitting .289/.362/.513 with a 131 OPS+. That included his MVP-winning 2006 season, when he bashed 34 home runs, drove in 130 runs, hit .321/.375/.559, and narrowly edged out Derek Jeter for the hardware (though Morneau led the AL in none of those categories, and his 4.3 Wins Above Replacement that year was good for just 23rd among all Junior Circuit regulars), as well as a runner-up finish to Dustin Pedroia in '08. Those numbers also helped earn Morneau a six-year, $80 million deal after the '07 season.

With Morneau, Mauer and ace Johan Santana all flourishing at once, the Twins won five AL Central crowns from 2003 through '10, but they were knocked out of the playoffs in the Division Round every time—four times by the Yankees, three times in sweeps. The division title in '10 was the end of the road for those Twins, who plummeted to 99 losses and the Central basement the next year, beginning a run of four straight sub-.500 seasons in the Twin Cities. That coincided with Morneau's decline: Injuries, including a concussion he suffered sliding into a base in July 2010 and which plagued him for years afterward, limited to him an average of 95 games per season from '10 through '12. His inability to stay on the field and fading numbers brought an end to his time with the Twins in August 2013, when they dealt him to the Pirates for a pair of minor leaguers.

Morneau's stay in Pittsburgh was brief and unexceptional, and after hitting free agency that winter, he signed a modest two-year pact worth $14 million with the Rockies. That looked to be a shrewd move by Colorado, as Morneau won the NL batting title in 2014 with a .319 average, hit 17 home runs, and posted his highest full-season OPS+ (125) and WAR (3.2) totals since '09. But his '15 season was mostly washed out by another concussion suffered on a diving play, as he appeared in only 49 games, and Colorado declined its end of a mutual option at the end of the year. A free agent once again, Morneau returned to the AL Central by signing a one-year, $1 million contract with the White Sox, but an elbow injury cost him the first half of the season, and his bat never recovered, as he hit a mere .261/.303/.429 in 218 plate appearances at the age of 35.

Morneau was active at the beginning of 2017, playing for Team Canada in the World Baseball Classic, but he was unable to parlay his brief time in the tournament into another major league job, and it looks like he's decided that this will be the end of the line for him. He finishes his career with 247 home runs and a lifetime .281/.348/.481 batting line to go with his MVP trophy, four All-Star team nods, and two Silver Slugger awards. And while that's not a Hall of Fame career by any stretch, he'll still walk away as one of the top hitters of the 2000s, one of the best Canadian players ever, and as a standout figure in Twins franchise history. Good luck and happy trails, Justin.

In the words of Vince Lombardi: Winning isn&apos;t the most important thing. It&apos;s the secondary thing.
Derek Jeter will get big bonuses if the Marlins turn a profit
In the words of Vince Lombardi: Winning isn't the most important thing. It's the secondary thing.
In the words of Vince Lombardi: Winning isn&apos;t the most important thing. It&apos;s the secondary thing.
Derek Jeter will get big bonuses if the Marlins turn a profit
In the words of Vince Lombardi: Winning isn't the most important thing. It's the secondary thing.
In the words of Vince Lombardi: Winning isn&apos;t the most important thing. It&apos;s the secondary thing.
Derek Jeter will get big bonuses if the Marlins turn a profit
In the words of Vince Lombardi: Winning isn't the most important thing. It's the secondary thing.
Derek Jeter has 8.8 million reasons to make the Marlins profitable
Derek Jeter has 8.8 million reasons to make the Marlins profitable
Derek Jeter has 8.8 million reasons to make the Marlins profitable
<p>The career of former Red Sox reliever Daniel Bard—<a href="https://www.sbnation.com/mlb/2018/1/4/16797700/daniel-bard-retirement" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:officially at an end today, according to him" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">officially at an end today, according to him</a>, but long ago finished—was full of promise but short on success. Two-plus seasons of exemplary relief work from 2009 through &#39;11 that gave way to <a href="http://grantland.com/features/daniel-bard-returns-pawtucket/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:a rough few months spent as a starter in &#39;12" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">a rough few months spent as a starter in &#39;12</a> followed by several years of bouncing from team to team in the minors. Injuries piled up along the way, his control vanished, and now his career is over. He last appeared on a major league mound in 2013, and by the end of his time in baseball, he was a gnarly car crash on the side of the road—teams slowed down, gawked, and moved on.</p><p>Bard&#39;s minor league numbers were appalling: 27 walks and 11 wild pitches in 15 1/3 innings in &#39;13 with Boston; nine walks, seven hit batsmen and 13 (!) runs allowed against only two outs collected across four games in &#39;14 with the Rangers&#39; Class A team. He then vanished into the ether for two years; 13 walks, six wild pitches and five plunked batters upon his return in &#39;16 with St. Louis, this time 31 years old and in high-A ball, facing hitters 10 years his junior. And finally, 24 walks in 9 1/3 innings last year split between the Cardinals and the Mets, the latter in Florida&#39;s Gulf Coast League, against kids fresh out of high school or graduated from Dominican summer leagues. His final line in his final game: nine batters faced, two retired, four walks, two hit by pitch, four runs allowed. That was it.</p><p>?</p><p>Given that statistical abattoir, why am I noting Bard&#39;s decision to call it quits? The same reason that general managers looked at those numbers, watched video of him struggling to throw strikes to 19-year-olds, and still picked up a phone to call his agent: the promise of what once was. Somewhere, underneath the walks and wildness, teams believed they could unearth the Daniel Bard who was a former first-round pick out of UNC, who threw 100 mph with ease, who shut down rallies and blew his fastball by hitters out of Boston&#39;s bullpen. If there were one thing on the minds of those front office executives as they threw Bard a minor league lifeline, it was probably the memory of this August 2010 outing against the Yankees, when he came in with the bases loaded and stranded everyone by making Derek Jeter and Nick Swisher look as if they&#39;d been been playing dizzy bat before walking to the plate.</p><p>Watch that pitch to Swisher: a 99-mph fastball with changeup movement, like a reverse slider on full tilt. You and I have both seen swings that come up empty, swings that never had a chance to connect, swings that were misguided disasters. But Swisher&#39;s whiff is futility made flesh (or at least maple); he was so overmatched and flummoxed that he might as well have turned around and taken a cut in the other direction. It&#39;s a pitch so ludicrous, so hard to understand that the only explanation for it is some kind of magic. For a moment—a brief, tiny, incredible moment—Daniel Bard reached a level of performance that few can even imagine, much less get to. He slipped the surly bonds of Yankee Stadium and touched the face of Koufax.</p><p>Pitchers fail and break all the time; there&#39;s nothing new in that. And while the magnitude of Bard&#39;s collapse is staggering in its size, plenty of other hurlers before and after him have seen careers go up in smoke where once there looked to be nothing but brilliance. But before his descent into becoming a modern-day Steve Blass, Bard gave us that one moment, shining and perfect and eternal, in which he threw one of the nastiest, most unhittable pitches that the world has ever seen. Long after he&#39;s gone, I&#39;ll remember and thank him for that, and I hope that in life after baseball, he can find some measure of peace and happiness that equals that August day in the Bronx.</p>
An Ode to Daniel Bard: The Now-Retired Hurler Who Threw One of the Nastiest Pitches Ever

The career of former Red Sox reliever Daniel Bard—officially at an end today, according to him, but long ago finished—was full of promise but short on success. Two-plus seasons of exemplary relief work from 2009 through '11 that gave way to a rough few months spent as a starter in '12 followed by several years of bouncing from team to team in the minors. Injuries piled up along the way, his control vanished, and now his career is over. He last appeared on a major league mound in 2013, and by the end of his time in baseball, he was a gnarly car crash on the side of the road—teams slowed down, gawked, and moved on.

Bard's minor league numbers were appalling: 27 walks and 11 wild pitches in 15 1/3 innings in '13 with Boston; nine walks, seven hit batsmen and 13 (!) runs allowed against only two outs collected across four games in '14 with the Rangers' Class A team. He then vanished into the ether for two years; 13 walks, six wild pitches and five plunked batters upon his return in '16 with St. Louis, this time 31 years old and in high-A ball, facing hitters 10 years his junior. And finally, 24 walks in 9 1/3 innings last year split between the Cardinals and the Mets, the latter in Florida's Gulf Coast League, against kids fresh out of high school or graduated from Dominican summer leagues. His final line in his final game: nine batters faced, two retired, four walks, two hit by pitch, four runs allowed. That was it.

?

Given that statistical abattoir, why am I noting Bard's decision to call it quits? The same reason that general managers looked at those numbers, watched video of him struggling to throw strikes to 19-year-olds, and still picked up a phone to call his agent: the promise of what once was. Somewhere, underneath the walks and wildness, teams believed they could unearth the Daniel Bard who was a former first-round pick out of UNC, who threw 100 mph with ease, who shut down rallies and blew his fastball by hitters out of Boston's bullpen. If there were one thing on the minds of those front office executives as they threw Bard a minor league lifeline, it was probably the memory of this August 2010 outing against the Yankees, when he came in with the bases loaded and stranded everyone by making Derek Jeter and Nick Swisher look as if they'd been been playing dizzy bat before walking to the plate.

Watch that pitch to Swisher: a 99-mph fastball with changeup movement, like a reverse slider on full tilt. You and I have both seen swings that come up empty, swings that never had a chance to connect, swings that were misguided disasters. But Swisher's whiff is futility made flesh (or at least maple); he was so overmatched and flummoxed that he might as well have turned around and taken a cut in the other direction. It's a pitch so ludicrous, so hard to understand that the only explanation for it is some kind of magic. For a moment—a brief, tiny, incredible moment—Daniel Bard reached a level of performance that few can even imagine, much less get to. He slipped the surly bonds of Yankee Stadium and touched the face of Koufax.

Pitchers fail and break all the time; there's nothing new in that. And while the magnitude of Bard's collapse is staggering in its size, plenty of other hurlers before and after him have seen careers go up in smoke where once there looked to be nothing but brilliance. But before his descent into becoming a modern-day Steve Blass, Bard gave us that one moment, shining and perfect and eternal, in which he threw one of the nastiest, most unhittable pitches that the world has ever seen. Long after he's gone, I'll remember and thank him for that, and I hope that in life after baseball, he can find some measure of peace and happiness that equals that August day in the Bronx.

Jeter is shipping off all the stars and slashing payroll. Who WOULDN&apos;T buy a ticket for that?
Derek Jeter envisions substantial attendance spikes for Marlins, somehow
Jeter is shipping off all the stars and slashing payroll. Who WOULDN'T buy a ticket for that?
<p>Miami Marlins CEO Derek Jeter expects to the team to turn a profit this upcoming season, according to documents <a href="http://www.miamiherald.com/sports/spt-columns-blogs/barry-jackson/article192646499.html" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:obtained" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">obtained</a> by the <em>Miami Herald</em>.</p><p>The team has already cut almost $40 million in payroll this offseason due to a number of trades.</p><p>According to the paper, Jeter circulated a document in August letting potential investors know that they can expect big returns in the next few years.</p><p>The document was entitled Project Wolverine because of Jeter&#39;s ties to the state of Michigan, and gave a blueprint to goals that expected to be reached in ticket sales, television rights and sponsorship deals that go along with the rapidly decreasing payroll.</p><p>Coupled that with a $50 million payout that his MLB team will receive this season because of the league&#39;s sale of its stake in the digital media company BAMtech, the Marlins expect a &quot;cash flow&quot; profit in 2018 of around $70 million.</p><p>Project Wolverine expects the team&#39;s profits to increase to at least $22 million by the 2021 season, according to the August version of the document.</p><p>The offseason has seen many changes for the Marlins, who have not made the playoffs since winning the World Series in 2003.</p><p>The team traded current National League MVP Giancarlo Stanton to Jeter&#39;s former team, the New York Yankees. They also sent outfielder Marcell Ozuna to the St. Louis Cardinals and shipped second baseman Dee Gordon to the Seattle Mariners.</p>
Report: Marlins CEO Derek Jeter Projects Revenue Increase in 2018

Miami Marlins CEO Derek Jeter expects to the team to turn a profit this upcoming season, according to documents obtained by the Miami Herald.

The team has already cut almost $40 million in payroll this offseason due to a number of trades.

According to the paper, Jeter circulated a document in August letting potential investors know that they can expect big returns in the next few years.

The document was entitled Project Wolverine because of Jeter's ties to the state of Michigan, and gave a blueprint to goals that expected to be reached in ticket sales, television rights and sponsorship deals that go along with the rapidly decreasing payroll.

Coupled that with a $50 million payout that his MLB team will receive this season because of the league's sale of its stake in the digital media company BAMtech, the Marlins expect a "cash flow" profit in 2018 of around $70 million.

Project Wolverine expects the team's profits to increase to at least $22 million by the 2021 season, according to the August version of the document.

The offseason has seen many changes for the Marlins, who have not made the playoffs since winning the World Series in 2003.

The team traded current National League MVP Giancarlo Stanton to Jeter's former team, the New York Yankees. They also sent outfielder Marcell Ozuna to the St. Louis Cardinals and shipped second baseman Dee Gordon to the Seattle Mariners.

Jeter&#39;s revenue projections are notable given he has gutted the team this offseason, trading Giancarlo Stanton and other stars.
Derek Jeter projects Marlins revenue, attendance will increase in pitch to investors
Jeter's revenue projections are notable given he has gutted the team this offseason, trading Giancarlo Stanton and other stars.
<p>Derek Jeter projects Marlins revenue, attendance will increase in pitch to investors</p>
Derek Jeter projects Marlins revenue, attendance will increase in pitch to investors

Derek Jeter projects Marlins revenue, attendance will increase in pitch to investors

<p>Derek Jeter projects Marlins revenue, attendance will increase in pitch to investors</p>
Derek Jeter projects Marlins revenue, attendance will increase in pitch to investors

Derek Jeter projects Marlins revenue, attendance will increase in pitch to investors

An in so doing he&apos;s gotten the first truly bad press of his life.
Top 25 Baseball Stories of 2017 — No. 5: Derek Jeter buys the Marlins
An in so doing he's gotten the first truly bad press of his life.
An in so doing he&apos;s gotten the first truly bad press of his life.
Top 25 Baseball Stories of 2017 — No. 5: Derek Jeter buys the Marlins
An in so doing he's gotten the first truly bad press of his life.

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