Cyprus financial crisis

Russia rebuffed Cypriot entreaties for aid on March 22, leaving the island's increasingly isolated leaders scrambling to strike a bailout deal with the European Union or face the collapse of its financial system.

Cypriot students shout slogans near the presidential palace in capital Nicosia, on Tuesday, March 26, 2013. Banks across Cyprus remain firmly padlocked Tuesday after financial authorities extended the country’s bank closure, fearing worried depositors will rush to drain their accounts. The shut-down is hammering businesses, which have been without access to their funds for more than a week.(AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)

Protesters hold up their hands as they protest outside the parliament in capital Nicosia, Cyprus, Monday, March 18, 2013. A vote on a bailout package for Cyprus that includes an immediate tax on all savings accounts has been postponed until Tuesday evening. Yiannakis Omirou, the speaker of Parliament, said the delay was needed to give the government time to amend the deal reached over the weekend that prompted an outcry from those who thought their money was safe. In order to get euro 10 billion ($13 billion) in bailout loans from international creditors, Cyprus agreed to take a percentage of all deposits — including ordinary citizens' savings — an unprecedented step in Europe's 3 ½-year debt crisis. (AP Photo/Petros Karadjias)

Cyprus' Finance Minister Michalis Sarris, center back to camera, speaks to the media after his meeting with Russian Finance Minister Anton Siluanov at the building of Russian Finance Ministry in Moscow, Russia, Wednesday, March 20, 2013. Cyprus' finance minister is in Russia for talks with the Kremlin over financial aid for the troubled island nation. (AP Photo/Misha Japaridze)