Countries with the most first-day deaths

More than 300,000 babies die within 24 hours of being born in India each year from infections and other preventable causes, a report said as it blamed a lack of political will and funding for the crisis. More than half of all Indian women give birth without the help of skilled health care professionals, leading to infections and complications. According to Save the Children which published the findings at the launch of its annual State of the World's Mothers report, the three major causes of newborn deaths are complications during birth, prematurity and infections; and added access to low-cost, life-saving interventions could cut down the figures by as much as 75 percent.

SRINAGAR, KASHMIR, INDIA - SEPTEMBER 2: Rehana Qadir, holds her 11 day old injured infant on September 2, 2012 after she and other family members from north Kashmir's border were allegedly beaten by renegades in Srinagar, the summer capital of Indian administered Kashmir, India. They said they were attacked on August 29 by Ikhwanis, or Indian government sponsored gunmen. (Photo by Yawar Nazir/Getty Images)
Residents Protest Beating In Kashmir
SRINAGAR, KASHMIR, INDIA - SEPTEMBER 2: Rehana Qadir, holds her 11 day old injured infant on September 2, 2012 after she and other family members from north Kashmir's border were allegedly beaten by renegades in Srinagar, the summer capital of Indian administered Kashmir, India. They said they were attacked on August 29 by Ikhwanis, or Indian government sponsored gunmen. (Photo by Yawar Nazir/Getty Images)
LAGOS, NIGERIA - JULY 13: Young babies sleep together under a heat lamp at the Lagos Island Maternity Hospital, the 3rd Thisday Africa Rising Festival at the Thisday Arena on July 13, 2008 in Lagos, Nigeria. (Photo by Bennett Raglin/WireImage)
3rd Thisday Africa Rising Festival - Day 2
LAGOS, NIGERIA - JULY 13: Young babies sleep together under a heat lamp at the Lagos Island Maternity Hospital, the 3rd Thisday Africa Rising Festival at the Thisday Arena on July 13, 2008 in Lagos, Nigeria. (Photo by Bennett Raglin/WireImage)
ISLAMABAD-PAKISTAN-MAY 31: A Pakistani woman prays next to the shrine of Bari Imam Abdul Latif Kazmi as her baby sleeps, paying homage during the annual Bari Imam festival in Islamabad, May 31, 2007. Thousands of Pakistani pilgrims turn out every year to honor the 17th century sufi, considered the patron saint of Islamabad. (Photo by Paula Bronstein /Getty Images)
PAK: Annual Bari Imam Shrine Festival Attracts Devotees
ISLAMABAD-PAKISTAN-MAY 31: A Pakistani woman prays next to the shrine of Bari Imam Abdul Latif Kazmi as her baby sleeps, paying homage during the annual Bari Imam festival in Islamabad, May 31, 2007. Thousands of Pakistani pilgrims turn out every year to honor the 17th century sufi, considered the patron saint of Islamabad. (Photo by Paula Bronstein /Getty Images)
SHANDONG, CHINA - August 03: (CHINA MAINLAND OUT) An eight-day-old premature infant sleeps after being abandoned under a bridge August 03, 2012 in Qingdao, Shandong, China. (Photo by TPG/Getty Images)
Abandoned Infant Under Bridge In Qingdao
SHANDONG, CHINA - August 03: (CHINA MAINLAND OUT) An eight-day-old premature infant sleeps after being abandoned under a bridge August 03, 2012 in Qingdao, Shandong, China. (Photo by TPG/Getty Images)
GOMA, DR CONGO - NOVEMBER 10: (ISRAEL OUT) A Congolese baby, ill with Cholera, receives treatment in a clinic at the Don Bosko orphanage November 10, 2008 in the town of Goma, Congo. Over 250,000 people have been displaced after fighting erupted between the rebel CNDP and the army in the last several weeks. According to reports, violence continues despite a cease fire declared by (CNDP) rebel leader General Laurent Nkunda, whose stated goal is to defend Congo's Tutsi minority from Hutu militias and to bring down a corrupt government. (Photo by Uriel Sinai/Getty Images)
Peace Talk Hopes Raised By Cease-fire
GOMA, DR CONGO - NOVEMBER 10: (ISRAEL OUT) A Congolese baby, ill with Cholera, receives treatment in a clinic at the Don Bosko orphanage November 10, 2008 in the town of Goma, Congo. Over 250,000 people have been displaced after fighting erupted between the rebel CNDP and the army in the last several weeks. According to reports, violence continues despite a cease fire declared by (CNDP) rebel leader General Laurent Nkunda, whose stated goal is to defend Congo's Tutsi minority from Hutu militias and to bring down a corrupt government. (Photo by Uriel Sinai/Getty Images)
383885 15: A baby girl stays close to her mother April 13, 2000 in Danan, in the Ogadin Province of Ethiopia. They have walked for days from the countryside to look for food and water during a severe drought that hit the country in the Spring of 2000. (Photo by Per-Anders Pettersson/Liaison)
Hunger in Ethiopia
383885 15: A baby girl stays close to her mother April 13, 2000 in Danan, in the Ogadin Province of Ethiopia. They have walked for days from the countryside to look for food and water during a severe drought that hit the country in the Spring of 2000. (Photo by Per-Anders Pettersson/Liaison)
DHAKA, BANGLADESH - APRIL 25: A girl holds a sick baby at the ICDDR,B Cholera Hospital in Dhaka, Bangladesh on April 25, 2006. At times nearly 1000 patients with diarrhea are admitted every day to the ICDDR,B hospital, locally known as the Cholera hospital. Most of the tiny patients confined to the children's ward are weak, malnourished and dehydrated. They've suffered attack after attack of diarrhea and, in some cases, are clinging to life. But many children never reach a treatment center and die from dehydration as they lose critical body fluids faster than they can be replaced. Four million people live in squatter settlements, around the city, without access to clean water, and terrible sanitary conditions. Water contamination, extreme poverty, and lack of hygiene lead to severe diarrheal diseases and Cholera. In a country where seasonal floods inundate almost one-third of the country every year, diarrheal diseases are a fact of life, and a fatal reality. 3 million people a year still die from diarrheal complications, including 1.9 million children under 5. (Photo by Jonathan Torgovnik/Getty Images)
Cholera in Dhaka
DHAKA, BANGLADESH - APRIL 25: A girl holds a sick baby at the ICDDR,B Cholera Hospital in Dhaka, Bangladesh on April 25, 2006. At times nearly 1000 patients with diarrhea are admitted every day to the ICDDR,B hospital, locally known as the Cholera hospital. Most of the tiny patients confined to the children's ward are weak, malnourished and dehydrated. They've suffered attack after attack of diarrhea and, in some cases, are clinging to life. But many children never reach a treatment center and die from dehydration as they lose critical body fluids faster than they can be replaced. Four million people live in squatter settlements, around the city, without access to clean water, and terrible sanitary conditions. Water contamination, extreme poverty, and lack of hygiene lead to severe diarrheal diseases and Cholera. In a country where seasonal floods inundate almost one-third of the country every year, diarrheal diseases are a fact of life, and a fatal reality. 3 million people a year still die from diarrheal complications, including 1.9 million children under 5. (Photo by Jonathan Torgovnik/Getty Images)
MANOKWARI, WEST PAPUA, INDONESIA - OCTOBER 13: A 6-month-old baby receives treatment for tropical malaria in hospital on October 13, 2009 in Manokwari, West Papua, Indonesia. Malaria, whilst not a new disease, continues to be a significant problem in Papua. Whilst hospitals try to treat the condition, the malaria parasites have become resistant to anti-malaria medicines and thus the spread continues. At last count, the overall incidence of malaria was estimated as 876 per 1,000 people per year, however the true incidence is unknown since laboratory confirmation is rare and only around 20 per cent of patients seek treatment at Indonesia's Government facilities. (Photo by Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images)
Attempts To Control Malaria In Indonesia's Papua Province Continue
MANOKWARI, WEST PAPUA, INDONESIA - OCTOBER 13: A 6-month-old baby receives treatment for tropical malaria in hospital on October 13, 2009 in Manokwari, West Papua, Indonesia. Malaria, whilst not a new disease, continues to be a significant problem in Papua. Whilst hospitals try to treat the condition, the malaria parasites have become resistant to anti-malaria medicines and thus the spread continues. At last count, the overall incidence of malaria was estimated as 876 per 1,000 people per year, however the true incidence is unknown since laboratory confirmation is rare and only around 20 per cent of patients seek treatment at Indonesia's Government facilities. (Photo by Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images)
AFGHANISTAN, HELMAND PROVINCE, CHARAHI QAMBAR CAMP - MAY 9: A sick newborn, May 9, 2009 in Helmand Province, Afghanistan. In the North of Kabul, the Charahi Qambar camp shelters refugees from Helmand province, where the International Security Assistance Force operates. (Photo by Reza/Getty Images)
Afghanistan
AFGHANISTAN, HELMAND PROVINCE, CHARAHI QAMBAR CAMP - MAY 9: A sick newborn, May 9, 2009 in Helmand Province, Afghanistan. In the North of Kabul, the Charahi Qambar camp shelters refugees from Helmand province, where the International Security Assistance Force operates. (Photo by Reza/Getty Images)
Since it was first reported 20 years ago, 60 million have been infected and 20 million have died of AIDS., It is an international crisis, but in sub-Saharan Africa AIDS is inflicting a catastrophe of epic proportions on an already poverty stricken and weak population. The disease is killing 9,000 Africans every day leaving millions of children orphaned and a region with a life expectancy likely to fall to only 38 years by 2010. This year the Dark Continent? will suffer 5 million new infections compared with only 40,000 in North America. A teenage son in South Africa has a 50/50 chance of dying of AIDS ? in Botswana it would be a 66% chance., Living in these countries, there is no escape from HIV/AIDS
Newborn baby, close-up. Arusha, Tanzania 2002
Since it was first reported 20 years ago, 60 million have been infected and 20 million have died of AIDS., It is an international crisis, but in sub-Saharan Africa AIDS is inflicting a catastrophe of epic proportions on an already poverty stricken and weak population. The disease is killing 9,000 Africans every day leaving millions of children orphaned and a region with a life expectancy likely to fall to only 38 years by 2010. This year the Dark Continent? will suffer 5 million new infections compared with only 40,000 in North America. A teenage son in South Africa has a 50/50 chance of dying of AIDS ? in Botswana it would be a 66% chance., Living in these countries, there is no escape from HIV/AIDS

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