Controversial sports mascots

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Chief Wahoo, the smiling symbol of the Cleveland Indians was replaced as a primary logo. Instead, the team will emphasize a block letter "C." The Indians aren't eliminating the Chief — the home uniform will continue to feature him on caps and jersey sleeves — but fans will see less of him overall.

What other mascots have caused a bit of controversy over the years?

CLEVELAND INDIANS: The team continues to use the image of Chief Wahoo despite criticism from those who find it offensive. (Photo by: Diamond Images/Getty Images)
CLEVELAND INDIANS: The team continues to use the image of Chief Wahoo despite criticism from those who find it offensive. (Photo by: Diamond Images/Getty Images)
CLEVELAND INDIANS: The team continues to use the image of Chief Wahoo despite criticism from those who find it offensive. (Photo by: Diamond Images/Getty Images)
A California high school is redesigning its mascot of an Arab after an Arab-American group complained that the portrayal of a snarling, mustached man is steeped in offensive stereotypes. Coachella Valley High School, however, wants to keep the mascot to reflect the region east of Los Angeles' date-growing history.
A California high school is redesigning its mascot of an Arab after an Arab-American group complained that the portrayal of a snarling, mustached man is steeped in offensive stereotypes. Coachella Valley High School, however, wants to keep the mascot to reflect the region east of Los Angeles' date-growing history.
A California high school is redesigning its mascot of an Arab after an Arab-American group complained that the portrayal of a snarling, mustached man is steeped in offensive stereotypes. Coachella Valley High School, however, wants to keep the mascot to reflect the region east of Los Angeles' date-growing history.
UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS, AMHERST: After a group of American Indians complained in 1972, the school ceased calling its teams the Redmen. Teams are now known as the Minutemen, and women's teams as Minutewomen. Getty Images.
UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS, AMHERST: After a group of American Indians complained in 1972, the school ceased calling its teams the Redmen. Teams are now known as the Minutemen, and women's teams as Minutewomen. Getty Images.
UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS, AMHERST: After a group of American Indians complained in 1972, the school ceased calling its teams the Redmen. Teams are now known as the Minutemen, and women's teams as Minutewomen. Getty Images.
Ray Halbritter, National Representative of the Oneida Indian Nation gestures as he speaks during the Oneida Indian Nation's Change the Mascot symposium, Monday, Oct. 7, 2013, in Washington, calling for the Washington Redskins NFL football team to change its name. During an interview, President Barack Obama suggested that the owner of the Washington Redskins football team consider changing its name because, the president said, the current name offends "a sizable group of people." (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
Ray Halbritter, National Representative of the Oneida Indian Nation gestures as he speaks during the Oneida Indian Nation's Change the Mascot symposium, Monday, Oct. 7, 2013, in Washington, calling for the Washington Redskins NFL football team to change its name. During an interview, President Barack Obama suggested that the owner of the Washington Redskins football team consider changing its name because, the president said, the current name offends "a sizable group of people." (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
Ray Halbritter, National Representative of the Oneida Indian Nation gestures as he speaks during the Oneida Indian Nation's Change the Mascot symposium, Monday, Oct. 7, 2013, in Washington, calling for the Washington Redskins NFL football team to change its name. During an interview, President Barack Obama suggested that the owner of the Washington Redskins football team consider changing its name because, the president said, the current name offends "a sizable group of people." (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS, URBANA-CHAMPAIGN: The team retired Chief Illiniwek as a mascot in 2007. The school kept the name of the Fighting Illini. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)
UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS, URBANA-CHAMPAIGN: The team retired Chief Illiniwek as a mascot in 2007. The school kept the name of the Fighting Illini. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)
UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS, URBANA-CHAMPAIGN: The team retired Chief Illiniwek as a mascot in 2007. The school kept the name of the Fighting Illini. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)
FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY: The school in Tallahassee has kept its team name of the Seminoles. The NCAA allowed the name because of the team's close relationship with the Seminole Tribe of Florida.(Photo by Stacy Revere/Getty Images)
FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY: The school in Tallahassee has kept its team name of the Seminoles. The NCAA allowed the name because of the team's close relationship with the Seminole Tribe of Florida.(Photo by Stacy Revere/Getty Images)
FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY: The school in Tallahassee has kept its team name of the Seminoles. The NCAA allowed the name because of the team's close relationship with the Seminole Tribe of Florida.(Photo by Stacy Revere/Getty Images)
COLLEGE OF WILLIAM & MARY: The college in Williamsburg, Va., dropped Indian feathers from its logo after the NCAA found the image could be offensive. The school kept the name the Tribe and recently adopted a new mascot: the Griffin.
COLLEGE OF WILLIAM & MARY: The college in Williamsburg, Va., dropped Indian feathers from its logo after the NCAA found the image could be offensive. The school kept the name the Tribe and recently adopted a new mascot: the Griffin.
COLLEGE OF WILLIAM & MARY: The college in Williamsburg, Va., dropped Indian feathers from its logo after the NCAA found the image could be offensive. The school kept the name the Tribe and recently adopted a new mascot: the Griffin.
UNIVERSITY OF NORTH DAKOTA: The school dropped the Fighting Sioux nickname after failing to obtain approval from the state's two namesake tribes under an NCAA settlement. The team currently does not have an official nickname or mascot. (Photo by Doug Pensinger/Getty Images)
UNIVERSITY OF NORTH DAKOTA: The school dropped the Fighting Sioux nickname after failing to obtain approval from the state's two namesake tribes under an NCAA settlement. The team currently does not have an official nickname or mascot. (Photo by Doug Pensinger/Getty Images)
UNIVERSITY OF NORTH DAKOTA: The school dropped the Fighting Sioux nickname after failing to obtain approval from the state's two namesake tribes under an NCAA settlement. The team currently does not have an official nickname or mascot. (Photo by Doug Pensinger/Getty Images)

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