Chernobyl today

Ukraine will mark the 27th anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster, the world's worst civil nuclear accident, on April 26. A look at life inside the exclusion zone today.

A view of an underpass in the deserted town of Pripyat near the closed Chernobyl nuclear power plant Ukraine Tuesday, Nov. 27, 2012. Workers on Tuesday raised the first section of a colossal arch-shaped structure that is eventually to cover the exploded reactor at the Chernobyl nuclear power station. Project officials on Tuesday hailed the raising as a significant step in a complex effort to liquidate the consequences of the world's worst nuclear accident, in 1986. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky)
A view of an underpass in the deserted town of Pripyat near the closed Chernobyl nuclear power plant Ukraine Tuesday, Nov. 27, 2012. Workers on Tuesday raised the first section of a colossal arch-shaped structure that is eventually to cover the exploded reactor at the Chernobyl nuclear power station. Project officials on Tuesday hailed the raising as a significant step in a complex effort to liquidate the consequences of the world's worst nuclear accident, in 1986. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky)
A view of an underpass in the deserted town of Pripyat near the closed Chernobyl nuclear power plant Ukraine Tuesday, Nov. 27, 2012. Workers on Tuesday raised the first section of a colossal arch-shaped structure that is eventually to cover the exploded reactor at the Chernobyl nuclear power station. Project officials on Tuesday hailed the raising as a significant step in a complex effort to liquidate the consequences of the world's worst nuclear accident, in 1986. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky)
A view of empty houses in the town of Pripyat near the closed Chernobyl nuclear power plant Ukraine Tuesday, Nov. 27, 2012. Workers on Tuesday, raised the first section of a colossal arch-shaped structure that is eventually to cover the exploded reactor at the Chernobyl nuclear power station. Project officials on Tuesday hailed the raising as a significant step in a complex effort to liquidate the consequences of the world's worst nuclear accident, in 1986. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky)
A view of empty houses in the town of Pripyat near the closed Chernobyl nuclear power plant Ukraine Tuesday, Nov. 27, 2012. Workers on Tuesday, raised the first section of a colossal arch-shaped structure that is eventually to cover the exploded reactor at the Chernobyl nuclear power station. Project officials on Tuesday hailed the raising as a significant step in a complex effort to liquidate the consequences of the world's worst nuclear accident, in 1986. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky)
A view of empty houses in the town of Pripyat near the closed Chernobyl nuclear power plant Ukraine Tuesday, Nov. 27, 2012. Workers on Tuesday, raised the first section of a colossal arch-shaped structure that is eventually to cover the exploded reactor at the Chernobyl nuclear power station. Project officials on Tuesday hailed the raising as a significant step in a complex effort to liquidate the consequences of the world's worst nuclear accident, in 1986. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky)
A view of empty houses in the deserted town of Pripyat near the closed Chernobyl nuclear power plant Ukraine Tuesday, Nov. 27, 2012. Workers on Tuesday raised the first section of a colossal arch-shaped structure that is eventually to cover the exploded reactor at the Chernobyl nuclear power station. Project officials on Tuesday hailed the raising as a significant step in a complex effort to liquidate the consequences of the world's worst nuclear accident, in 1986. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky)
A view of empty houses in the deserted town of Pripyat near the closed Chernobyl nuclear power plant Ukraine Tuesday, Nov. 27, 2012. Workers on Tuesday raised the first section of a colossal arch-shaped structure that is eventually to cover the exploded reactor at the Chernobyl nuclear power station. Project officials on Tuesday hailed the raising as a significant step in a complex effort to liquidate the consequences of the world's worst nuclear accident, in 1986. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky)
A view of empty houses in the deserted town of Pripyat near the closed Chernobyl nuclear power plant Ukraine Tuesday, Nov. 27, 2012. Workers on Tuesday raised the first section of a colossal arch-shaped structure that is eventually to cover the exploded reactor at the Chernobyl nuclear power station. Project officials on Tuesday hailed the raising as a significant step in a complex effort to liquidate the consequences of the world's worst nuclear accident, in 1986. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky)
(FILE PHOTO) April 26 will mark 25 years since the world's worst nuclear disaster at the Chernobyl power plant in the Ukraine. Please refer to the following profile on Getty Images Archival for further archival imagery. https://ec.yimg.com/ec?url=http%3a%2f%2fwww.gettyimages.co.uk%2fSearch%2fSearch.aspx%3fEventId%3d109853078%26amp%3bEditorialProduct%3dArchival%23&t=1513235802&sig=ELJpqUJhxI5BLd3vKDUeRA--~D CHERNOBYL - JANUARY 25: The remnants of beds are seen in an abandoned in a pre school in the deserted town of Pripyat on January 25, 2006 in Chernobyl, Ukraine. Prypyat and the surrounding area will not be safe for human habitation for several centuries. Scientists estimate that the most dangerous radioactive elements will take up to 900 years to decay sufficiently to render the area safe. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
(FILE PHOTO) 25 Years Since The Chernobyl Nuclear Disaster
(FILE PHOTO) April 26 will mark 25 years since the world's worst nuclear disaster at the Chernobyl power plant in the Ukraine. Please refer to the following profile on Getty Images Archival for further archival imagery. http://www.gettyimages.co.uk/Search/Search.aspx?EventId=109853078&EditorialProduct=Archival# CHERNOBYL - JANUARY 25: The remnants of beds are seen in an abandoned in a pre school in the deserted town of Pripyat on January 25, 2006 in Chernobyl, Ukraine. Prypyat and the surrounding area will not be safe for human habitation for several centuries. Scientists estimate that the most dangerous radioactive elements will take up to 900 years to decay sufficiently to render the area safe. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)

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