Chad Ochocinco

Chad Ochocinco

The Giants lost several wide receivers to injury on Sunday, so Chad "Ochocinco" Johnson asks for a job.
Chad Johnson, Terrell Owens ask Giants for a WR job following Odell Beckham's ankle injury
The Giants lost several wide receivers to injury on Sunday, so Chad "Ochocinco" Johnson asks for a job.
<p>Former NFL wide receiver Chad Johnson donated $2,200 to the Turbo Track Club of Baltimore, Maryland to help a group of four young girls cover travel expenses for the upcoming USATF Hershey National Junior Olympic Track &#38; Field Championships later this month.</p><p>Johnson responded to a tweet from Tariq Touré asking for help and then made a very generous donation on <a href="https://www.gofundme.com/43zkz1c" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:the club&#39;s GoFundMe page" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">the club&#39;s GoFundMe page</a>. Johnson <a href="https://twitter.com/ochocinco/status/884867937408102401" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:responded" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">responded</a> with &quot;You good now, I&#39;ll see y&#39;all at Junior Olympics in Kansas. Good luck from @BabyChaiel_85 &#38; myself, I love you guys.&quot;</p><p>Johnson&#39;s 12-year-old daughter, Chai&#39;el, has garnered national attention for her success at the National Junior Olympics in 2016 and 2016. She has run 2:18 for 800 meters. </p><p><em>Watch Johnson&#39;s daughter race below:</em></p><p>USA Track and Field expects nearly 10,000 athletes will compete at Rock Chalk Park in Lawrence, Kansas for the championship.</p>
Chad Ochocinco helps send girls track club to junior nationals with $2,200 donation

Former NFL wide receiver Chad Johnson donated $2,200 to the Turbo Track Club of Baltimore, Maryland to help a group of four young girls cover travel expenses for the upcoming USATF Hershey National Junior Olympic Track & Field Championships later this month.

Johnson responded to a tweet from Tariq Touré asking for help and then made a very generous donation on the club's GoFundMe page. Johnson responded with "You good now, I'll see y'all at Junior Olympics in Kansas. Good luck from @BabyChaiel_85 & myself, I love you guys."

Johnson's 12-year-old daughter, Chai'el, has garnered national attention for her success at the National Junior Olympics in 2016 and 2016. She has run 2:18 for 800 meters.

Watch Johnson's daughter race below:

USA Track and Field expects nearly 10,000 athletes will compete at Rock Chalk Park in Lawrence, Kansas for the championship.

Team Owens&#39; Omar Bolden, left, breaks up a pass intended for Team Vick&#39;s Chad Ochocinco during a flag football exhibition game Tuesday, June 27, 2017, in San Jose, Calif. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
New flag football league brings out former NFL stars
Team Owens' Omar Bolden, left, breaks up a pass intended for Team Vick's Chad Ochocinco during a flag football exhibition game Tuesday, June 27, 2017, in San Jose, Calif. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
<p>SAN JOSE — On a sunny summer evening in California, four-time Pro Bowl quarterback Michael Vick dropped back inside his own 35-yard line and scanned the field. He picked out two-time Super Bowl champion Dennis Dixon, the team’s second-string quarterback subbing in at receiver, running a route out wide to the right. Vick’s lofted pass dropped perfectly into Dixon’s bare hands as he crossed the opponent’s 30. Dixon sprinted down the sideline. Safety Kerry Rhodes, an eight-year NFL veteran, grasped hopelessly at the air as he tried to catch him. Touchdown, seven points.</p><p><i>Seven</i> points? Yes, seven. Welcome to the American Flag Football League. Because Dixon’s 60-yard run was more than half the length of the 100-yard field, he scored seven points, not six. Vick then had a choice of whether to go for one, two or three extra points, according to how far back from the end zone the ball was snapped. He chose five yards, then hit recently retired running back Justin Forsett for one.</p><p>The new league played its inaugural game at Avaya Stadium, home of the San Jose Earthquakes, on Tuesday. That contest was simply a demonstration event, pitting two teams of NFL misfits against each other to showcase what pro flag football might look like.</p><p>Wearing No. 7, Vick lead the white team, and in No. 81, Terrell Owens headlined the red team. A few of the players had long careers in the NFL; many played just a handful of games before getting injured or being cut; some never got further than declaring for the draft. Max Seibald, one of Team Vick’s defensive backs, played college and professional lacrosse.</p><p>The AFFL is seven-on-seven no-contact football. Players stay on the field for both offense and defense, and “losers walk”—meaning when your opponent scores, they take your end zone and you have to walk to the other end of the field. Kickoffs are replaced with throw-offs, and since there are no field goals, there are no uprights behind the end zones.</p><p>Players tackle without contact, but instead by ripping off one of the flags hanging down from a belt around each athlete’s waist. “There is a flag on the play,” takes on a different meaning. (Though there are still penalty flags for those times when players instinctively grab a little bit more of each other than just the trailing streamers.)</p><p>Jeff Lewis, a bond trader, decided to launch the AFFL after watching his son, Hayden, play flag football. Lewis ran three test games with high school and college players prior to Tuesday. “The same exact thing happens every time,” Lewis said afterwards. “Great athletes, tough guy football players, turn into little kids.”</p><p>Gone are the bulky pads and helmets. Vick wore a blue soft helmet over his baseball cap, similar to the headgear some rugby players wear. Most players at Tuesday’s game wore baseball caps and headbands, making them seem more like real people and less like football robots. One of the AFFL’s intentions is to turn players into personalities, or at least humanize them a little. They can tweet from the sidelines and excessive celebration is actively encouraged.</p><p>“For a lot of us who grew up playing backyard football,” said Owens after the game, “this is what we like to do.”</p><p>“I can’t stress enough how much fun it was just to be out here in this atmosphere just running around,”</p><p>Behind the smiles, a little confusion and frustration was evident early on as players got use to the rules. But as they did, the spectacle improved. Team Owens’s Nikita Whitlock, a former Giants fullback who was suspended by the NFL for 10 games last year for taking performance enhancing drugs, danced and spun through Team Vick’s line on several plays.</p><p>“I’ve been playing flag football since I was a kid,” said Team Vick’s ex-pro receiver Chad (Ochocinco) Johnson. “Defensively and offensively, it’s no different than being in the NFL.”</p><p>As Team Vick began another series at the beginning of the fourth quarter, one fan taunted the quarterback from the stands: “Vick, throw a pick.” There wasn’t much doubt about whose side he might be on, wearing Owens’s No. 81 Niners jersey and watching this game less than five miles away from Levi’s Stadium.</p><p>Vick had already obliged, throwing an interception in the second quarter, but unfortunately for Team Owens supporters, he also threw eight touchdowns on the way to a 64–41 victory.</p><p>Many of the stands at Avaya were closed off on Tuesday, and attendance at the game was low. The loudest roars came from jets landing at San Jose International Airport across the street. No one even tried to make enough noise to drown out play calls on third down.</p><p>The fans that did come to watch came because of contact football, wearing jerseys representing NFL teams and the handful of former pros on the field. Even Team Vick’s Evan Rodriguez, who won the MVP award in the flag football game on Tuesday, saw this event from an NFL perspective. “[I’m] definitely trying to get back in the NFL,” he said after the game. Rodriguez played 20 games over three years for the Bears, Bills and Buccaneers, but last year he played indoor football for the Lehigh Valley Steelhawks in Allentown, Pa. “Hopefully this wakes them up.”</p><p>One of the challenges for the AFFL is going to be finding a way to attract enough ex-NFL star talent to bring in football fans without becoming a rec league where former pros simply go to retire. Another problem will be surviving in the hyper-competitive U.S. sports market. Soccer, a global success story, has taken decades to reach respectability in America.</p><p>Next year’s inaugural AFFL season is planned for the summer months, May through July. But the window between the end of the NBA and NHL playoffs and the return of full contact pro and college football is short, and while MLB is only in midseason, is short. And unfortunately, that pits flag football head-to-head with another sports event that has been steadily gaining momentum in the American market: the World Cup.</p>
Star-studded flag football league leans on NFL influences in debut

SAN JOSE — On a sunny summer evening in California, four-time Pro Bowl quarterback Michael Vick dropped back inside his own 35-yard line and scanned the field. He picked out two-time Super Bowl champion Dennis Dixon, the team’s second-string quarterback subbing in at receiver, running a route out wide to the right. Vick’s lofted pass dropped perfectly into Dixon’s bare hands as he crossed the opponent’s 30. Dixon sprinted down the sideline. Safety Kerry Rhodes, an eight-year NFL veteran, grasped hopelessly at the air as he tried to catch him. Touchdown, seven points.

Seven points? Yes, seven. Welcome to the American Flag Football League. Because Dixon’s 60-yard run was more than half the length of the 100-yard field, he scored seven points, not six. Vick then had a choice of whether to go for one, two or three extra points, according to how far back from the end zone the ball was snapped. He chose five yards, then hit recently retired running back Justin Forsett for one.

The new league played its inaugural game at Avaya Stadium, home of the San Jose Earthquakes, on Tuesday. That contest was simply a demonstration event, pitting two teams of NFL misfits against each other to showcase what pro flag football might look like.

Wearing No. 7, Vick lead the white team, and in No. 81, Terrell Owens headlined the red team. A few of the players had long careers in the NFL; many played just a handful of games before getting injured or being cut; some never got further than declaring for the draft. Max Seibald, one of Team Vick’s defensive backs, played college and professional lacrosse.

The AFFL is seven-on-seven no-contact football. Players stay on the field for both offense and defense, and “losers walk”—meaning when your opponent scores, they take your end zone and you have to walk to the other end of the field. Kickoffs are replaced with throw-offs, and since there are no field goals, there are no uprights behind the end zones.

Players tackle without contact, but instead by ripping off one of the flags hanging down from a belt around each athlete’s waist. “There is a flag on the play,” takes on a different meaning. (Though there are still penalty flags for those times when players instinctively grab a little bit more of each other than just the trailing streamers.)

Jeff Lewis, a bond trader, decided to launch the AFFL after watching his son, Hayden, play flag football. Lewis ran three test games with high school and college players prior to Tuesday. “The same exact thing happens every time,” Lewis said afterwards. “Great athletes, tough guy football players, turn into little kids.”

Gone are the bulky pads and helmets. Vick wore a blue soft helmet over his baseball cap, similar to the headgear some rugby players wear. Most players at Tuesday’s game wore baseball caps and headbands, making them seem more like real people and less like football robots. One of the AFFL’s intentions is to turn players into personalities, or at least humanize them a little. They can tweet from the sidelines and excessive celebration is actively encouraged.

“For a lot of us who grew up playing backyard football,” said Owens after the game, “this is what we like to do.”

“I can’t stress enough how much fun it was just to be out here in this atmosphere just running around,”

Behind the smiles, a little confusion and frustration was evident early on as players got use to the rules. But as they did, the spectacle improved. Team Owens’s Nikita Whitlock, a former Giants fullback who was suspended by the NFL for 10 games last year for taking performance enhancing drugs, danced and spun through Team Vick’s line on several plays.

“I’ve been playing flag football since I was a kid,” said Team Vick’s ex-pro receiver Chad (Ochocinco) Johnson. “Defensively and offensively, it’s no different than being in the NFL.”

As Team Vick began another series at the beginning of the fourth quarter, one fan taunted the quarterback from the stands: “Vick, throw a pick.” There wasn’t much doubt about whose side he might be on, wearing Owens’s No. 81 Niners jersey and watching this game less than five miles away from Levi’s Stadium.

Vick had already obliged, throwing an interception in the second quarter, but unfortunately for Team Owens supporters, he also threw eight touchdowns on the way to a 64–41 victory.

Many of the stands at Avaya were closed off on Tuesday, and attendance at the game was low. The loudest roars came from jets landing at San Jose International Airport across the street. No one even tried to make enough noise to drown out play calls on third down.

The fans that did come to watch came because of contact football, wearing jerseys representing NFL teams and the handful of former pros on the field. Even Team Vick’s Evan Rodriguez, who won the MVP award in the flag football game on Tuesday, saw this event from an NFL perspective. “[I’m] definitely trying to get back in the NFL,” he said after the game. Rodriguez played 20 games over three years for the Bears, Bills and Buccaneers, but last year he played indoor football for the Lehigh Valley Steelhawks in Allentown, Pa. “Hopefully this wakes them up.”

One of the challenges for the AFFL is going to be finding a way to attract enough ex-NFL star talent to bring in football fans without becoming a rec league where former pros simply go to retire. Another problem will be surviving in the hyper-competitive U.S. sports market. Soccer, a global success story, has taken decades to reach respectability in America.

Next year’s inaugural AFFL season is planned for the summer months, May through July. But the window between the end of the NBA and NHL playoffs and the return of full contact pro and college football is short, and while MLB is only in midseason, is short. And unfortunately, that pits flag football head-to-head with another sports event that has been steadily gaining momentum in the American market: the World Cup.

<p>SAN JOSE — On a sunny summer evening in California, four-time Pro Bowl quarterback Michael Vick dropped back inside his own 35-yard line and scanned the field. He picked out two-time Super Bowl champion Dennis Dixon, the team’s second-string quarterback subbing in at receiver, running a route out wide to the right. Vick’s lofted pass dropped perfectly into Dixon’s bare hands as he crossed the opponent’s 30. Dixon sprinted down the sideline. Safety Kerry Rhodes, an eight-year NFL veteran, grasped hopelessly at the air as he tried to catch him. Touchdown, seven points.</p><p><i>Seven</i> points? Yes, seven. Welcome to the American Flag Football League. Because Dixon’s 60-yard run was more than half the length of the 100-yard field, he scored seven points, not six. Vick then had a choice of whether to go for one, two or three extra points, according to how far back from the end zone the ball was snapped. He chose five yards, then hit recently retired running back Justin Forsett for one.</p><p>The new league played its inaugural game at Avaya Stadium, home of the San Jose Earthquakes, on Tuesday. That contest was simply a demonstration event, pitting two teams of NFL misfits against each other to showcase what pro flag football might look like.</p><p>Wearing No. 7, Vick lead the white team, and in No. 81, Terrell Owens headlined the red team. A few of the players had long careers in the NFL; many played just a handful of games before getting injured or being cut; some never got further than declaring for the draft. Max Seibald, one of Team Vick’s defensive backs, played college and professional lacrosse.</p><p>The AFFL is seven-on-seven no-contact football. Players stay on the field for both offense and defense, and “losers walk”—meaning when your opponent scores, they take your end zone and you have to walk to the other end of the field. Kickoffs are replaced with throw-offs, and since there are no field goals, there are no uprights behind the end zones.</p><p>Players tackle without contact, but instead by ripping off one of the flags hanging down from a belt around each athlete’s waist. “There is a flag on the play,” takes on a different meaning. (Though there are still penalty flags for those times when players instinctively grab a little bit more of each other than just the trailing streamers.)</p><p>Jeff Lewis, a bond trader, decided to launch the AFFL after watching his son, Hayden, play flag football. Lewis ran three test games with high school and college players prior to Tuesday. “The same exact thing happens every time,” Lewis said afterwards. “Great athletes, tough guy football players, turn into little kids.”</p><p>Gone are the bulky pads and helmets. Vick wore a blue soft helmet over his baseball cap, similar to the headgear some rugby players wear. Most players at Tuesday’s game wore baseball caps and headbands, making them seem more like real people and less like football robots. One of the AFFL’s intentions is to turn players into personalities, or at least humanize them a little. They can tweet from the sidelines and excessive celebration is actively encouraged.</p><p>“For a lot of us who grew up playing backyard football,” said Owens after the game, “this is what we like to do.”</p><p>“I can’t stress enough how much fun it was just to be out here in this atmosphere just running around,”</p><p>Behind the smiles, a little confusion and frustration was evident early on as players got use to the rules. But as they did, the spectacle improved. Team Owens’s Nikita Whitlock, a former Giants fullback who was suspended by the NFL for 10 games last year for taking performance enhancing drugs, danced and spun through Team Vick’s line on several plays.</p><p>“I’ve been playing flag football since I was a kid,” said Team Vick’s ex-pro receiver Chad (Ochocinco) Johnson. “Defensively and offensively, it’s no different than being in the NFL.”</p><p>As Team Vick began another series at the beginning of the fourth quarter, one fan taunted the quarterback from the stands: “Vick, throw a pick.” There wasn’t much doubt about whose side he might be on, wearing Owens’s No. 81 Niners jersey and watching this game less than five miles away from Levi’s Stadium.</p><p>Vick had already obliged, throwing an interception in the second quarter, but unfortunately for Team Owens supporters, he also threw eight touchdowns on the way to a 64–41 victory.</p><p>Many of the stands at Avaya were closed off on Tuesday, and attendance at the game was low. The loudest roars came from jets landing at San Jose International Airport across the street. No one even tried to make enough noise to drown out play calls on third down.</p><p>The fans that did come to watch came because of contact football, wearing jerseys representing NFL teams and the handful of former pros on the field. Even Team Vick’s Evan Rodriguez, who won the MVP award in the flag football game on Tuesday, saw this event from an NFL perspective. “[I’m] definitely trying to get back in the NFL,” he said after the game. Rodriguez played 20 games over three years for the Bears, Bills and Buccaneers, but last year he played indoor football for the Lehigh Valley Steelhawks in Allentown, Pa. “Hopefully this wakes them up.”</p><p>One of the challenges for the AFFL is going to be finding a way to attract enough ex-NFL star talent to bring in football fans without becoming a rec league where former pros simply go to retire. Another problem will be surviving in the hyper-competitive U.S. sports market. Soccer, a global success story, has taken decades to reach respectability in America.</p><p>Next year’s inaugural AFFL season is planned for the summer months, May through July. But the window between the end of the NBA and NHL playoffs and the return of full contact pro and college football is short, and while MLB is only in midseason, is short. And unfortunately, that pits flag football head-to-head with another sports event that has been steadily gaining momentum in the American market: the World Cup.</p>
Star-studded flag football league leans on NFL influences in debut

SAN JOSE — On a sunny summer evening in California, four-time Pro Bowl quarterback Michael Vick dropped back inside his own 35-yard line and scanned the field. He picked out two-time Super Bowl champion Dennis Dixon, the team’s second-string quarterback subbing in at receiver, running a route out wide to the right. Vick’s lofted pass dropped perfectly into Dixon’s bare hands as he crossed the opponent’s 30. Dixon sprinted down the sideline. Safety Kerry Rhodes, an eight-year NFL veteran, grasped hopelessly at the air as he tried to catch him. Touchdown, seven points.

Seven points? Yes, seven. Welcome to the American Flag Football League. Because Dixon’s 60-yard run was more than half the length of the 100-yard field, he scored seven points, not six. Vick then had a choice of whether to go for one, two or three extra points, according to how far back from the end zone the ball was snapped. He chose five yards, then hit recently retired running back Justin Forsett for one.

The new league played its inaugural game at Avaya Stadium, home of the San Jose Earthquakes, on Tuesday. That contest was simply a demonstration event, pitting two teams of NFL misfits against each other to showcase what pro flag football might look like.

Wearing No. 7, Vick lead the white team, and in No. 81, Terrell Owens headlined the red team. A few of the players had long careers in the NFL; many played just a handful of games before getting injured or being cut; some never got further than declaring for the draft. Max Seibald, one of Team Vick’s defensive backs, played college and professional lacrosse.

The AFFL is seven-on-seven no-contact football. Players stay on the field for both offense and defense, and “losers walk”—meaning when your opponent scores, they take your end zone and you have to walk to the other end of the field. Kickoffs are replaced with throw-offs, and since there are no field goals, there are no uprights behind the end zones.

Players tackle without contact, but instead by ripping off one of the flags hanging down from a belt around each athlete’s waist. “There is a flag on the play,” takes on a different meaning. (Though there are still penalty flags for those times when players instinctively grab a little bit more of each other than just the trailing streamers.)

Jeff Lewis, a bond trader, decided to launch the AFFL after watching his son, Hayden, play flag football. Lewis ran three test games with high school and college players prior to Tuesday. “The same exact thing happens every time,” Lewis said afterwards. “Great athletes, tough guy football players, turn into little kids.”

Gone are the bulky pads and helmets. Vick wore a blue soft helmet over his baseball cap, similar to the headgear some rugby players wear. Most players at Tuesday’s game wore baseball caps and headbands, making them seem more like real people and less like football robots. One of the AFFL’s intentions is to turn players into personalities, or at least humanize them a little. They can tweet from the sidelines and excessive celebration is actively encouraged.

“For a lot of us who grew up playing backyard football,” said Owens after the game, “this is what we like to do.”

“I can’t stress enough how much fun it was just to be out here in this atmosphere just running around,”

Behind the smiles, a little confusion and frustration was evident early on as players got use to the rules. But as they did, the spectacle improved. Team Owens’s Nikita Whitlock, a former Giants fullback who was suspended by the NFL for 10 games last year for taking performance enhancing drugs, danced and spun through Team Vick’s line on several plays.

“I’ve been playing flag football since I was a kid,” said Team Vick’s ex-pro receiver Chad (Ochocinco) Johnson. “Defensively and offensively, it’s no different than being in the NFL.”

As Team Vick began another series at the beginning of the fourth quarter, one fan taunted the quarterback from the stands: “Vick, throw a pick.” There wasn’t much doubt about whose side he might be on, wearing Owens’s No. 81 Niners jersey and watching this game less than five miles away from Levi’s Stadium.

Vick had already obliged, throwing an interception in the second quarter, but unfortunately for Team Owens supporters, he also threw eight touchdowns on the way to a 64–41 victory.

Many of the stands at Avaya were closed off on Tuesday, and attendance at the game was low. The loudest roars came from jets landing at San Jose International Airport across the street. No one even tried to make enough noise to drown out play calls on third down.

The fans that did come to watch came because of contact football, wearing jerseys representing NFL teams and the handful of former pros on the field. Even Team Vick’s Evan Rodriguez, who won the MVP award in the flag football game on Tuesday, saw this event from an NFL perspective. “[I’m] definitely trying to get back in the NFL,” he said after the game. Rodriguez played 20 games over three years for the Bears, Bills and Buccaneers, but last year he played indoor football for the Lehigh Valley Steelhawks in Allentown, Pa. “Hopefully this wakes them up.”

One of the challenges for the AFFL is going to be finding a way to attract enough ex-NFL star talent to bring in football fans without becoming a rec league where former pros simply go to retire. Another problem will be surviving in the hyper-competitive U.S. sports market. Soccer, a global success story, has taken decades to reach respectability in America.

Next year’s inaugural AFFL season is planned for the summer months, May through July. But the window between the end of the NBA and NHL playoffs and the return of full contact pro and college football is short, and while MLB is only in midseason, is short. And unfortunately, that pits flag football head-to-head with another sports event that has been steadily gaining momentum in the American market: the World Cup.

Chad &quot;Ochocinco&quot; Johnson and Terrell Owens talked some trash at flag football practice for the American Flag Football League. Check out the cameo from Michael Vick!
Ex-NFLers Try Flag Football
Chad "Ochocinco" Johnson and Terrell Owens talked some trash at flag football practice for the American Flag Football League. Check out the cameo from Michael Vick!
Chad &quot;Ochocinco&quot; Johnson and Terrell Owens talked some trash at flag football practice for the American Flag Football League. Check out the cameo from Michael Vick!
Ex-NFLers Try Flag Football
Chad "Ochocinco" Johnson and Terrell Owens talked some trash at flag football practice for the American Flag Football League. Check out the cameo from Michael Vick!
Chad "Ochocinco" Johnson and Terrell Owens talked some trash at flag football practice for the American Flag Football League. Check out the cameo from Michael Vick!
Ex-NFLers Try Flag Football
Chad "Ochocinco" Johnson and Terrell Owens talked some trash at flag football practice for the American Flag Football League. Check out the cameo from Michael Vick!
Chad &quot;Ochocinco&quot; Johnson and Terrell Owens talked some trash at flag football practice for the American Flag Football League. Check out the cameo from Michael Vick!
Ex-NFLers Try Flag Football
Chad "Ochocinco" Johnson and Terrell Owens talked some trash at flag football practice for the American Flag Football League. Check out the cameo from Michael Vick!
Chad &#39;Ochocinco&#39; Johnson plays Santa, deals out trash talk
Chad 'Ochocinco' Johnson plays Santa, deals out trash talk
Chad 'Ochocinco' Johnson plays Santa, deals out trash talk
<p><i>Photo : PETA</i></p>
Chad Ochocinco

Photo : PETA

<p>Photo: PETA </p>
Chad Ochocinco

Photo: PETA

Chad &quot;Ochocinco&quot; Johnson has never been afraid to speak his mind. The six-time Pro Bowl wide receiver did exactly that on Twitter earlier today...
WATCH: Chad Ochocinco, 'Still On The McDonald's Sh*t,' Offers The Worst Nutrition Advice Ever
Chad "Ochocinco" Johnson has never been afraid to speak his mind. The six-time Pro Bowl wide receiver did exactly that on Twitter earlier today...
Chad &quot;Ochocinco&quot; Johnson has never been afraid to speak his mind. The six-time Pro Bowl wide receiver did exactly that on Twitter earlier today...
WATCH: Chad Ochocinco, 'Still On The McDonald's Sh*t,' Offers The Worst Nutrition Advice Ever
Chad "Ochocinco" Johnson has never been afraid to speak his mind. The six-time Pro Bowl wide receiver did exactly that on Twitter earlier today...
In case you haven&#39;t heard, Chad Ochocinco is really good at the FIFA video game. The retired NFL wide receiver has been on top of the virtual soc...
Chad Ochocinco Crashed a Florida Frathouse and Won 19 Straight Games of 'FIFA '16'
In case you haven't heard, Chad Ochocinco is really good at the FIFA video game. The retired NFL wide receiver has been on top of the virtual soc...
In case you haven&#39;t heard, Chad Ochocinco is really good at the FIFA video game. The retired NFL wide receiver has been on top of the virtual soc...
Chad Ochocinco Crashed a Florida Frathouse and Won 19 Straight Games of 'FIFA '16'
In case you haven't heard, Chad Ochocinco is really good at the FIFA video game. The retired NFL wide receiver has been on top of the virtual soc...
Doom, the granddaddy of deathmatch, is back with an explosive tournament. NFL stars Rob Gronkowski, Antonio Brown and Chad "Ochocinco" Johnson along with Thierry Henry competed with and against gaming influencers to learn the meaning of teamwork, victory dances, and fragging. For more in-depth coverage of competitive gaming, visit <a href="https://ec.yimg.com/ec?url=http%3a%2f%2fesports.yahoo.com%26quot%3b&t=1513146279&sig=YmaxzVTPBSkXCzs8sypTkw--~D data-ylk="slk:Yahoo Esports" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Yahoo Esports</a>.
Day of Doom: Star Athletes & YouTubers compete in a blood-soaked tournament
Doom, the granddaddy of deathmatch, is back with an explosive tournament. NFL stars Rob Gronkowski, Antonio Brown and Chad "Ochocinco" Johnson along with Thierry Henry competed with and against gaming influencers to learn the meaning of teamwork, victory dances, and fragging. For more in-depth coverage of competitive gaming, visit Yahoo Esports.
Doom, the granddaddy of deathmatch, is back with an explosive tournament. NFL stars Rob Gronkowski, Antonio Brown and Chad &quot;Ochocinco&quot; Johnson along with Thierry Henry competed with and against gaming influencers to learn the meaning of teamwork, victory dances, and fragging. For more in-depth coverage of competitive gaming, visit <a href="https://ec.yimg.com/ec?url=http%3a%2f%2fesports.yahoo.com%26quot%3b&t=1513146279&sig=YmaxzVTPBSkXCzs8sypTkw--~D data-ylk="slk:Yahoo Esports" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Yahoo Esports</a>.
Day of Doom: Star Athletes & YouTubers compete in a blood-soaked tournament
Doom, the granddaddy of deathmatch, is back with an explosive tournament. NFL stars Rob Gronkowski, Antonio Brown and Chad "Ochocinco" Johnson along with Thierry Henry competed with and against gaming influencers to learn the meaning of teamwork, victory dances, and fragging. For more in-depth coverage of competitive gaming, visit Yahoo Esports.
Doom, the granddaddy of deathmatch, is back with an explosive tournament. NFL stars Rob Gronkowski, Antonio Brown and Chad &quot;Ochocinco&quot; Johnson along with Thierry Henry competed with and against gaming influencers to learn the meaning of teamwork, victory dances, and fragging. For more in-depth coverage of competitive gaming, visit <a href="https://ec.yimg.com/ec?url=http%3a%2f%2fesports.yahoo.com%26quot%3b&t=1513146279&sig=YmaxzVTPBSkXCzs8sypTkw--~D data-ylk="slk:Yahoo Esports" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Yahoo Esports</a>.
Day of Doom: Star Athletes & YouTubers compete in a blood-soaked tournament
Doom, the granddaddy of deathmatch, is back with an explosive tournament. NFL stars Rob Gronkowski, Antonio Brown and Chad "Ochocinco" Johnson along with Thierry Henry competed with and against gaming influencers to learn the meaning of teamwork, victory dances, and fragging. For more in-depth coverage of competitive gaming, visit Yahoo Esports.
Doom, the granddaddy of deathmatch, is back with an explosive tournament. NFL stars Rob Gronkowski, Antonio Brown and Chad &quot;Ochocinco&quot; Johnson along with Thierry Henry competed with and against gaming influencers to learn the meaning of teamwork, victory dances, and fragging. For more in-depth coverage of competitive gaming, visit <a href="https://ec.yimg.com/ec?url=http%3a%2f%2fesports.yahoo.com%26quot%3b&t=1513146279&sig=YmaxzVTPBSkXCzs8sypTkw--~D data-ylk="slk:Yahoo Esports" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Yahoo Esports</a>.
Day of Doom: Star Athletes & YouTubers compete in a blood-soaked tournament
Doom, the granddaddy of deathmatch, is back with an explosive tournament. NFL stars Rob Gronkowski, Antonio Brown and Chad "Ochocinco" Johnson along with Thierry Henry competed with and against gaming influencers to learn the meaning of teamwork, victory dances, and fragging. For more in-depth coverage of competitive gaming, visit Yahoo Esports.
Chad Johnson, the man formerly known as Chad Ochocinco, is an eccentric dude. He is probably known more for his touchdown celebrations than his actu...
Chad Johnson Admits Using His Teammates' Urine to Help Deal With Ankle Sprains
Chad Johnson, the man formerly known as Chad Ochocinco, is an eccentric dude. He is probably known more for his touchdown celebrations than his actu...
Chad Johnson, the man formerly known as Chad Ochocinco, is an eccentric dude. He is probably known more for his touchdown celebrations than his actu...
Chad Johnson Admits Using His Teammates' Urine to Help Deal With Ankle Sprains
Chad Johnson, the man formerly known as Chad Ochocinco, is an eccentric dude. He is probably known more for his touchdown celebrations than his actu...
Football Player Chad “Ochocinco” Johnson Is Also a Talented Makeup Artist
Football Player Chad “Ochocinco” Johnson Is Also a Talented Makeup Artist
Football Player Chad “Ochocinco” Johnson Is Also a Talented Makeup Artist
Football Player Chad “Ochocinco” Johnson Is Also a Talented Makeup Artist
Football Player Chad “Ochocinco” Johnson Is Also a Talented Makeup Artist
Football Player Chad “Ochocinco” Johnson Is Also a Talented Makeup Artist
FILE- In this Feb. 4, 2011, file photo, Cincinnati Bengals wide receiver Chad Ochocinco asks NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell a question about a possible player lockout during a news conference at the NFL football Super Bowl XLV Media Center in Dallas. More than 5,500 journalists, psuedo-journalists and other credentialed &quot;media&quot; are expected to gather for Tuesday, Jan. 27, 2015, Media Day at the US Airways Center. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip, File)
Reporter's marriage proposal for Tom Brady tops zany list
FILE- In this Feb. 4, 2011, file photo, Cincinnati Bengals wide receiver Chad Ochocinco asks NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell a question about a possible player lockout during a news conference at the NFL football Super Bowl XLV Media Center in Dallas. More than 5,500 journalists, psuedo-journalists and other credentialed "media" are expected to gather for Tuesday, Jan. 27, 2015, Media Day at the US Airways Center. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip, File)

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