Baltimore celebrates the Ravens' Super Bowl victory

The Baltimore Ravens celebrated the second NFL title in franchise history with a Charm City parade on Tuesday.

Baltimore Ravens fans blow horns during a victory ceremony at City Hall Tuesday, Feb. 5, 2013 in Baltimore. The Ravens defeated the San Francisco 49ers in NFL football's Super Bowl XLVII 34-31 on Sunday. (AP Photo/Gail Burton)(AP Photo/Gail Burton)
Baltimore Ravens fans blow horns during a victory ceremony at City Hall Tuesday, Feb. 5, 2013 in Baltimore. The Ravens defeated the San Francisco 49ers in NFL football's Super Bowl XLVII 34-31 on Sunday. (AP Photo/Gail Burton)(AP Photo/Gail Burton)
Baltimore Ravens fans blow horns during a victory ceremony at City Hall Tuesday, Feb. 5, 2013 in Baltimore. The Ravens defeated the San Francisco 49ers in NFL football's Super Bowl XLVII 34-31 on Sunday. (AP Photo/Gail Burton)(AP Photo/Gail Burton)
Sam Muffoletto, 21, and Phil Luzi, 21, hold up signs and a home-made Super Bowl trophy as they wait for the start of Baltimore's celebration for the Super Bowl champion Baltimore Ravens at Ravens stadium on Tuesday, Feb. 5, 2013. Officials expect about 100,000 people to attend the events. (AP Photo/Alex Dominguez)
Sam Muffoletto, 21, and Phil Luzi, 21, hold up signs and a home-made Super Bowl trophy as they wait for the start of Baltimore's celebration for the Super Bowl champion Baltimore Ravens at Ravens stadium on Tuesday, Feb. 5, 2013. Officials expect about 100,000 people to attend the events. (AP Photo/Alex Dominguez)
Sam Muffoletto, 21, and Phil Luzi, 21, hold up signs and a home-made Super Bowl trophy as they wait for the start of Baltimore's celebration for the Super Bowl champion Baltimore Ravens at Ravens stadium on Tuesday, Feb. 5, 2013. Officials expect about 100,000 people to attend the events. (AP Photo/Alex Dominguez)
Baltimore Ravens running back Alex Collins runs for 37 yards.
Can't-Miss Play: Collins plows two defenders on 37-yard run
Baltimore Ravens running back Alex Collins runs for 37 yards.
Baltimore Ravens running back Alex Collins runs for 37 yards.
Can't-Miss Play: Collins plows two defenders on 37-yard run
Baltimore Ravens running back Alex Collins runs for 37 yards.
Baltimore Ravens running back Alex Collins runs for 37 yards.
Can't-Miss Play: Collins plows two defenders on 37-yard run
Baltimore Ravens running back Alex Collins runs for 37 yards.
Baltimore Ravens running back Alex Collins runs for 37 yards.
Can't-Miss Play: Collins plows two defenders on 37-yard run
Baltimore Ravens running back Alex Collins runs for 37 yards.
FILE - In this Dec. 10, 2017, file photo, Baltimore Ravens head coach John Harbaugh watches from the sideline during an NFL football game against the Pittsburgh Steelers in Pittsburgh. Theres no easy road to the AFC playoffs. But the Baltimore Ravens are facing a three-week pathway to the postseason deprived of danger. Dont tell Harbaugh that, though.(AP Photo/Don Wright, File)
Winless Browns blocking Ravens' path to playoffs
FILE - In this Dec. 10, 2017, file photo, Baltimore Ravens head coach John Harbaugh watches from the sideline during an NFL football game against the Pittsburgh Steelers in Pittsburgh. Theres no easy road to the AFC playoffs. But the Baltimore Ravens are facing a three-week pathway to the postseason deprived of danger. Dont tell Harbaugh that, though.(AP Photo/Don Wright, File)
FILE - In this Dec. 10, 2017, file photo, Baltimore Ravens head coach John Harbaugh watches from the sideline during an NFL football game against the Pittsburgh Steelers in Pittsburgh. There’s no easy road to the AFC playoffs. But the Baltimore Ravens are facing a three-week pathway to the postseason deprived of danger. Don’t tell Harbaugh that, though.(AP Photo/Don Wright, File)
FILE - In this Dec. 10, 2017, file photo, Baltimore Ravens head coach John Harbaugh watches from the sideline during an NFL football game against the Pittsburgh Steelers in Pittsburgh. There’s no easy road to the AFC playoffs. But the Baltimore Ravens are facing a three-week pathway to the postseason deprived of danger. Don’t tell Harbaugh that, though.(AP Photo/Don Wright, File)
FILE - In this Dec. 10, 2017, file photo, Baltimore Ravens head coach John Harbaugh watches from the sideline during an NFL football game against the Pittsburgh Steelers in Pittsburgh. There’s no easy road to the AFC playoffs. But the Baltimore Ravens are facing a three-week pathway to the postseason deprived of danger. Don’t tell Harbaugh that, though.(AP Photo/Don Wright, File)
<p>LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. – Orioles general manager Dan Duquette has told teams to bring him their best offers on star infielder Manny Machado, one of the five best players in baseball who will leave them soon by trade or later by free agency after next season. With that decision, which not coincidentally came just days after the Yankees acquired Giancarlo Stanton, expanding the 16-win gap between the two clubs, the Orioles will be shutting down a competitive six-year run with Machado, manager Buck Showalter and centerfielder Adam Jones as the pillars.</p><p>But here’s the truth: that run actually ended in the second half of last year, and the Orioles are smart for recognizing it.</p><p>Today’s baseball is defined by where a team is on the winning curve. The smart clubs pick from two paths: you’re either in (competing for the postseason) or you’re out (building for the next chance to compete). The middle ground, in which 75-win teams trick themselves into believing a needle-threading, best-case scenario makes them competitive, wastes time and resources. Baltimore needs to bail from that middle ground, just as the Phillies, White Sox and Tigers belatedly have done in the past few years. So, too, do the Tampa Bay Rays, which would hand the Yankees and Red Sox more wins in a weakened division.</p><p>Officially, the Orioles haven’t punted quite yet. And even trading Machado would not necessarily trigger a full-on, back-up-the-truck, Marlins-style rebuild.</p><p>“We’re tying to make our team better for next year,” Duquette said. “Right now we are listening to offers and considering the options.”</p><p>Unofficially, they know they’d be foolish to keep Machado on a non-contender with no momentum, which is what the Orioles are today. In the past four years the Orioles have grown older, more expensive, worse and less attractive. They have taken an 18% hit at the gate in just four years, losing almost half a million fans. They have one of the four worst farm systems in baseball. They don’t pursue international free agents. Their pitching last year was the worst in the league, excepting Detroit. They are so desperate for pitching that on Thursday they took not one, not two, but three pitching lottery tickets in the Rule 5 draft. Machado, Jones, Zach Britton and Brad Brach are free agents at the end of next season, and Jonathon Schoop is next on the departure line the year after that. Chris Davis, declining at 31, is the only player they have under contract for 2020.</p><p>The beginning of the end happened midway through last season. For seven years Showalter has squeezed the most out of his roster, exceeding the team’s expected record, or Pythagorean won-lost record, in five of those years. On May 20 last season the Orioles were in first place with a 25–16 record, despite the likes of Ubaldo Jimenez and Wade Miley making regular turns in the rotation and Chris Tillman missing a month.</p><p>It was a mirage. The lack of pitching depth in the organization doomed Baltimore. After May 20, the Orioles were 50–71—only the White Sox and Tigers, with their white flags waving, played worse. The staff posted a 5.21 ERA in those final 121 games. Over the last five weeks the rotation went 3–19. There was nothing fluky about how Baltimore spiraled to the bottom of the AL East.</p><p>“When you look at teams today,” Showalter said, “you look at how they match up in the fourth and fifth spots in the rotation—and really, you need seven or eight starters—and the relievers who are in front of your three guys at the end. That’s where you find the biggest difference. You need depth.”</p><p>The Orioles figure to be no deeper and no better this year. The old narrative on the Orioles hitting the re-set button is that feisty owner Peter Angelos would never allow it. He is 88 years old. (His son, John, has been running the day-to-day operations of the club for more than a decade.)</p><p>There is that oft-repeated story of the 1996 season, when general manager Pat Gillick and manager Davey Johnson saw a team going nowhere in July and wanted to trade pitcher David Wells and outfielder Bobby Bonilla to re-boot for 1997. Angelos looked at the team’s phenomenal season ticket base of 27,500 and would not allow it. He took both players off the market, and the veteran Orioles team responded with run to the American League Championship Series.</p><p>But that story is not just 21 years old, it also has no relevance to the Orioles’ situation today. The Baltimore Ravens had yet to play their first game at the trade deadline of 1996, and the Washington Nationals were still nine years away from moving into the neighborhood. Camden Yards was only four years old, still aglow as an attraction.</p><p>At the height of the Orioles owning the town, in 1997, 3.7 million people came to see them play at Camden Yards. Those days are long gone. More than half of those paid customers have deserted the team. Attendance reached just two million this season. Only the White Sox and the stadium-challenged A’s and Rays were a worse draw in the league. A series against the Red Sox in September, when Baltimore turns to football, drew an average of just 18,000 fans. Local TV viewership was down 26 percent.</p><p>The trade market for Machado is good, but limited because he is a one-year rental (assuming he is unlikely to forgo free agency and sign an extension as part of a trade). He could be a difference-maker for the Cardinals, Giants, Angels, Red Sox or—yes, don’t rule them out on anything—the Yankees. The White Sox and Phillies would like to get Machado now and win him over during the season to convince him to stay long term, a risky but worthwhile strategy. The Orioles must get young, near-major league ready pitching back in a deal.</p><p>The idea of trading Machado, a homegrown franchise player, must strike an Orioles fan as a lousy one, especially if he were to wind up with the Red Sox or Yankees. But at this ever-drooping point on the winning curve, as the Orioles slide further from contention, the idea of keeping him on another 75-win team is even worse. </p>
The Orioles Should Trade Manny Machado Now

LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. – Orioles general manager Dan Duquette has told teams to bring him their best offers on star infielder Manny Machado, one of the five best players in baseball who will leave them soon by trade or later by free agency after next season. With that decision, which not coincidentally came just days after the Yankees acquired Giancarlo Stanton, expanding the 16-win gap between the two clubs, the Orioles will be shutting down a competitive six-year run with Machado, manager Buck Showalter and centerfielder Adam Jones as the pillars.

But here’s the truth: that run actually ended in the second half of last year, and the Orioles are smart for recognizing it.

Today’s baseball is defined by where a team is on the winning curve. The smart clubs pick from two paths: you’re either in (competing for the postseason) or you’re out (building for the next chance to compete). The middle ground, in which 75-win teams trick themselves into believing a needle-threading, best-case scenario makes them competitive, wastes time and resources. Baltimore needs to bail from that middle ground, just as the Phillies, White Sox and Tigers belatedly have done in the past few years. So, too, do the Tampa Bay Rays, which would hand the Yankees and Red Sox more wins in a weakened division.

Officially, the Orioles haven’t punted quite yet. And even trading Machado would not necessarily trigger a full-on, back-up-the-truck, Marlins-style rebuild.

“We’re tying to make our team better for next year,” Duquette said. “Right now we are listening to offers and considering the options.”

Unofficially, they know they’d be foolish to keep Machado on a non-contender with no momentum, which is what the Orioles are today. In the past four years the Orioles have grown older, more expensive, worse and less attractive. They have taken an 18% hit at the gate in just four years, losing almost half a million fans. They have one of the four worst farm systems in baseball. They don’t pursue international free agents. Their pitching last year was the worst in the league, excepting Detroit. They are so desperate for pitching that on Thursday they took not one, not two, but three pitching lottery tickets in the Rule 5 draft. Machado, Jones, Zach Britton and Brad Brach are free agents at the end of next season, and Jonathon Schoop is next on the departure line the year after that. Chris Davis, declining at 31, is the only player they have under contract for 2020.

The beginning of the end happened midway through last season. For seven years Showalter has squeezed the most out of his roster, exceeding the team’s expected record, or Pythagorean won-lost record, in five of those years. On May 20 last season the Orioles were in first place with a 25–16 record, despite the likes of Ubaldo Jimenez and Wade Miley making regular turns in the rotation and Chris Tillman missing a month.

It was a mirage. The lack of pitching depth in the organization doomed Baltimore. After May 20, the Orioles were 50–71—only the White Sox and Tigers, with their white flags waving, played worse. The staff posted a 5.21 ERA in those final 121 games. Over the last five weeks the rotation went 3–19. There was nothing fluky about how Baltimore spiraled to the bottom of the AL East.

“When you look at teams today,” Showalter said, “you look at how they match up in the fourth and fifth spots in the rotation—and really, you need seven or eight starters—and the relievers who are in front of your three guys at the end. That’s where you find the biggest difference. You need depth.”

The Orioles figure to be no deeper and no better this year. The old narrative on the Orioles hitting the re-set button is that feisty owner Peter Angelos would never allow it. He is 88 years old. (His son, John, has been running the day-to-day operations of the club for more than a decade.)

There is that oft-repeated story of the 1996 season, when general manager Pat Gillick and manager Davey Johnson saw a team going nowhere in July and wanted to trade pitcher David Wells and outfielder Bobby Bonilla to re-boot for 1997. Angelos looked at the team’s phenomenal season ticket base of 27,500 and would not allow it. He took both players off the market, and the veteran Orioles team responded with run to the American League Championship Series.

But that story is not just 21 years old, it also has no relevance to the Orioles’ situation today. The Baltimore Ravens had yet to play their first game at the trade deadline of 1996, and the Washington Nationals were still nine years away from moving into the neighborhood. Camden Yards was only four years old, still aglow as an attraction.

At the height of the Orioles owning the town, in 1997, 3.7 million people came to see them play at Camden Yards. Those days are long gone. More than half of those paid customers have deserted the team. Attendance reached just two million this season. Only the White Sox and the stadium-challenged A’s and Rays were a worse draw in the league. A series against the Red Sox in September, when Baltimore turns to football, drew an average of just 18,000 fans. Local TV viewership was down 26 percent.

The trade market for Machado is good, but limited because he is a one-year rental (assuming he is unlikely to forgo free agency and sign an extension as part of a trade). He could be a difference-maker for the Cardinals, Giants, Angels, Red Sox or—yes, don’t rule them out on anything—the Yankees. The White Sox and Phillies would like to get Machado now and win him over during the season to convince him to stay long term, a risky but worthwhile strategy. The Orioles must get young, near-major league ready pitching back in a deal.

The idea of trading Machado, a homegrown franchise player, must strike an Orioles fan as a lousy one, especially if he were to wind up with the Red Sox or Yankees. But at this ever-drooping point on the winning curve, as the Orioles slide further from contention, the idea of keeping him on another 75-win team is even worse.

<p>LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. – Orioles general manager Dan Duquette has told teams to bring him their best offers on star infielder Manny Machado, one of the five best players in baseball who will leave them soon by trade or later by free agency after next season. With that decision, which not coincidentally came just days after the Yankees acquired Giancarlo Stanton, expanding the 16-win gap between the two clubs, the Orioles will be shutting down a competitive six-year run with Machado, manager Buck Showalter and centerfielder Adam Jones as the pillars.</p><p>But here’s the truth: that run actually ended in the second half of last year, and the Orioles are smart for recognizing it.</p><p>Today’s baseball is defined by where a team is on the winning curve. The smart clubs pick from two paths: you’re either in (competing for the postseason) or you’re out (building for the next chance to compete). The middle ground, in which 75-win teams trick themselves into believing a needle-threading, best-case scenario makes them competitive, wastes time and resources. Baltimore needs to bail from that middle ground, just as the Phillies, White Sox and Tigers belatedly have done in the past few years. So, too, do the Tampa Bay Rays, which would hand the Yankees and Red Sox more wins in a weakened division.</p><p>Officially, the Orioles haven’t punted quite yet. And even trading Machado would not necessarily trigger a full-on, back-up-the-truck, Marlins-style rebuild.</p><p>“We’re tying to make our team better for next year,” Duquette said. “Right now we are listening to offers and considering the options.”</p><p>Unofficially, they know they’d be foolish to keep Machado on a non-contender with no momentum, which is what the Orioles are today. In the past four years the Orioles have grown older, more expensive, worse and less attractive. They have taken an 18% hit at the gate in just four years, losing almost half a million fans. They have one of the four worst farm systems in baseball. They don’t pursue international free agents. Their pitching last year was the worst in the league, excepting Detroit. They are so desperate for pitching that on Thursday they took not one, not two, but three pitching lottery tickets in the Rule 5 draft. Machado, Jones, Zach Britton and Brad Brach are free agents at the end of next season, and Jonathon Schoop is next on the departure line the year after that. Chris Davis, declining at 31, is the only player they have under contract for 2020.</p><p>The beginning of the end happened midway through last season. For seven years Showalter has squeezed the most out of his roster, exceeding the team’s expected record, or Pythagorean won-lost record, in five of those years. On May 20 last season the Orioles were in first place with a 25–16 record, despite the likes of Ubaldo Jimenez and Wade Miley making regular turns in the rotation and Chris Tillman missing a month.</p><p>It was a mirage. The lack of pitching depth in the organization doomed Baltimore. After May 20, the Orioles were 50–71—only the White Sox and Tigers, with their white flags waving, played worse. The staff posted a 5.21 ERA in those final 121 games. Over the last five weeks the rotation went 3–19. There was nothing fluky about how Baltimore spiraled to the bottom of the AL East.</p><p>“When you look at teams today,” Showalter said, “you look at how they match up in the fourth and fifth spots in the rotation—and really, you need seven or eight starters—and the relievers who are in front of your three guys at the end. That’s where you find the biggest difference. You need depth.”</p><p>The Orioles figure to be no deeper and no better this year. The old narrative on the Orioles hitting the re-set button is that feisty owner Peter Angelos would never allow it. He is 88 years old. (His son, John, has been running the day-to-day operations of the club for more than a decade.)</p><p>There is that oft-repeated story of the 1996 season, when general manager Pat Gillick and manager Davey Johnson saw a team going nowhere in July and wanted to trade pitcher David Wells and outfielder Bobby Bonilla to re-boot for 1997. Angelos looked at the team’s phenomenal season ticket base of 27,500 and would not allow it. He took both players off the market, and the veteran Orioles team responded with run to the American League Championship Series.</p><p>But that story is not just 21 years old, it also has no relevance to the Orioles’ situation today. The Baltimore Ravens had yet to play their first game at the trade deadline of 1996, and the Washington Nationals were still nine years away from moving into the neighborhood. Camden Yards was only four years old, still aglow as an attraction.</p><p>At the height of the Orioles owning the town, in 1997, 3.7 million people came to see them play at Camden Yards. Those days are long gone. More than half of those paid customers have deserted the team. Attendance reached just two million this season. Only the White Sox and the stadium-challenged A’s and Rays were a worse draw in the league. A series against the Red Sox in September, when Baltimore turns to football, drew an average of just 18,000 fans. Local TV viewership was down 26 percent.</p><p>The trade market for Machado is good, but limited because he is a one-year rental (assuming he is unlikely to forgo free agency and sign an extension as part of a trade). He could be a difference-maker for the Cardinals, Giants, Angels, Red Sox or—yes, don’t rule them out on anything—the Yankees. The White Sox and Phillies would like to get Machado now and win him over during the season to convince him to stay long term, a risky but worthwhile strategy. The Orioles must get young, near-major league ready pitching back in a deal.</p><p>The idea of trading Machado, a homegrown franchise player, must strike an Orioles fan as a lousy one, especially if he were to wind up with the Red Sox or Yankees. But at this ever-drooping point on the winning curve, as the Orioles slide further from contention, the idea of keeping him on another 75-win team is even worse. </p>
The Orioles Should Trade Manny Machado Now

LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. – Orioles general manager Dan Duquette has told teams to bring him their best offers on star infielder Manny Machado, one of the five best players in baseball who will leave them soon by trade or later by free agency after next season. With that decision, which not coincidentally came just days after the Yankees acquired Giancarlo Stanton, expanding the 16-win gap between the two clubs, the Orioles will be shutting down a competitive six-year run with Machado, manager Buck Showalter and centerfielder Adam Jones as the pillars.

But here’s the truth: that run actually ended in the second half of last year, and the Orioles are smart for recognizing it.

Today’s baseball is defined by where a team is on the winning curve. The smart clubs pick from two paths: you’re either in (competing for the postseason) or you’re out (building for the next chance to compete). The middle ground, in which 75-win teams trick themselves into believing a needle-threading, best-case scenario makes them competitive, wastes time and resources. Baltimore needs to bail from that middle ground, just as the Phillies, White Sox and Tigers belatedly have done in the past few years. So, too, do the Tampa Bay Rays, which would hand the Yankees and Red Sox more wins in a weakened division.

Officially, the Orioles haven’t punted quite yet. And even trading Machado would not necessarily trigger a full-on, back-up-the-truck, Marlins-style rebuild.

“We’re tying to make our team better for next year,” Duquette said. “Right now we are listening to offers and considering the options.”

Unofficially, they know they’d be foolish to keep Machado on a non-contender with no momentum, which is what the Orioles are today. In the past four years the Orioles have grown older, more expensive, worse and less attractive. They have taken an 18% hit at the gate in just four years, losing almost half a million fans. They have one of the four worst farm systems in baseball. They don’t pursue international free agents. Their pitching last year was the worst in the league, excepting Detroit. They are so desperate for pitching that on Thursday they took not one, not two, but three pitching lottery tickets in the Rule 5 draft. Machado, Jones, Zach Britton and Brad Brach are free agents at the end of next season, and Jonathon Schoop is next on the departure line the year after that. Chris Davis, declining at 31, is the only player they have under contract for 2020.

The beginning of the end happened midway through last season. For seven years Showalter has squeezed the most out of his roster, exceeding the team’s expected record, or Pythagorean won-lost record, in five of those years. On May 20 last season the Orioles were in first place with a 25–16 record, despite the likes of Ubaldo Jimenez and Wade Miley making regular turns in the rotation and Chris Tillman missing a month.

It was a mirage. The lack of pitching depth in the organization doomed Baltimore. After May 20, the Orioles were 50–71—only the White Sox and Tigers, with their white flags waving, played worse. The staff posted a 5.21 ERA in those final 121 games. Over the last five weeks the rotation went 3–19. There was nothing fluky about how Baltimore spiraled to the bottom of the AL East.

“When you look at teams today,” Showalter said, “you look at how they match up in the fourth and fifth spots in the rotation—and really, you need seven or eight starters—and the relievers who are in front of your three guys at the end. That’s where you find the biggest difference. You need depth.”

The Orioles figure to be no deeper and no better this year. The old narrative on the Orioles hitting the re-set button is that feisty owner Peter Angelos would never allow it. He is 88 years old. (His son, John, has been running the day-to-day operations of the club for more than a decade.)

There is that oft-repeated story of the 1996 season, when general manager Pat Gillick and manager Davey Johnson saw a team going nowhere in July and wanted to trade pitcher David Wells and outfielder Bobby Bonilla to re-boot for 1997. Angelos looked at the team’s phenomenal season ticket base of 27,500 and would not allow it. He took both players off the market, and the veteran Orioles team responded with run to the American League Championship Series.

But that story is not just 21 years old, it also has no relevance to the Orioles’ situation today. The Baltimore Ravens had yet to play their first game at the trade deadline of 1996, and the Washington Nationals were still nine years away from moving into the neighborhood. Camden Yards was only four years old, still aglow as an attraction.

At the height of the Orioles owning the town, in 1997, 3.7 million people came to see them play at Camden Yards. Those days are long gone. More than half of those paid customers have deserted the team. Attendance reached just two million this season. Only the White Sox and the stadium-challenged A’s and Rays were a worse draw in the league. A series against the Red Sox in September, when Baltimore turns to football, drew an average of just 18,000 fans. Local TV viewership was down 26 percent.

The trade market for Machado is good, but limited because he is a one-year rental (assuming he is unlikely to forgo free agency and sign an extension as part of a trade). He could be a difference-maker for the Cardinals, Giants, Angels, Red Sox or—yes, don’t rule them out on anything—the Yankees. The White Sox and Phillies would like to get Machado now and win him over during the season to convince him to stay long term, a risky but worthwhile strategy. The Orioles must get young, near-major league ready pitching back in a deal.

The idea of trading Machado, a homegrown franchise player, must strike an Orioles fan as a lousy one, especially if he were to wind up with the Red Sox or Yankees. But at this ever-drooping point on the winning curve, as the Orioles slide further from contention, the idea of keeping him on another 75-win team is even worse.

Pittsburgh Steelers wide receiver Antonio Brown (84) celebrates setting up the game winning field goal during the second half of an NFL football game against the Baltimore Ravens in Pittsburgh, Sunday, Dec. 10, 2017. The Steelers won 39-38. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)
Stakes high as streaking Steelers host Brady, Patriots
Pittsburgh Steelers wide receiver Antonio Brown (84) celebrates setting up the game winning field goal during the second half of an NFL football game against the Baltimore Ravens in Pittsburgh, Sunday, Dec. 10, 2017. The Steelers won 39-38. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)
Robert Griffin III says that he turned down offers from both the Arizona Cardinals and the Baltimore Ravens before the 2017 season.
Robert Griffin III says he turned down offers from Cardinals, Ravens
Robert Griffin III says that he turned down offers from both the Arizona Cardinals and the Baltimore Ravens before the 2017 season.
Robert Griffin III says that he turned down offers from both the Arizona Cardinals and the Baltimore Ravens before the 2017 season.
Robert Griffin III says he turned down offers from Cardinals, Ravens
Robert Griffin III says that he turned down offers from both the Arizona Cardinals and the Baltimore Ravens before the 2017 season.
<p>Former Heisman Trophy winner Robert Griffin has not signed with any team since being released by the Cleveland Browns in March, but he told ESPN that he turned down offers to join the Arizona Cardinals and Baltimore Ravens. </p><p>“I had an offer from Arizona, and also from Baltimore,” Griffin said. </p><p>Griffin has not given up hope on signing with a team in time for a possible postseason run.</p><p>&quot;I had interest in the offseason,” he added. “It just wasn’t the right fit and I had to make that decision for myself to say, ‘Look, if I don’t accept this offer, there’s a chance I won’t play football this year.’ And I would talk to my family, and I was OK with that, OK with the fact that it might happen.”</p><p>Watch RG3&#39;s comments below:</p><p>Griffin last played for the Browns on Jan. 1, 2017. He finished last season with just five games played and 87 completed passes for 886 yards, two touchdowns and three interceptions. He injured his collarbone early in the year but came back in time to lead the Browns to their own victory of the season.</p><p>He has 8,983 yards with 42 touchdowns and 26 interceptions in his career.</p><p>[<a href="http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2017/12/14/robert-griffin-iii-says-he-turned-down-offers-from-the-cardinals-and-ravens/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:h/t" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">h/t</a> ProFootballTalk]</p>
Robert Griffin III Claims He Turned Down Offers From Cardinals and Ravens

Former Heisman Trophy winner Robert Griffin has not signed with any team since being released by the Cleveland Browns in March, but he told ESPN that he turned down offers to join the Arizona Cardinals and Baltimore Ravens.

“I had an offer from Arizona, and also from Baltimore,” Griffin said.

Griffin has not given up hope on signing with a team in time for a possible postseason run.

"I had interest in the offseason,” he added. “It just wasn’t the right fit and I had to make that decision for myself to say, ‘Look, if I don’t accept this offer, there’s a chance I won’t play football this year.’ And I would talk to my family, and I was OK with that, OK with the fact that it might happen.”

Watch RG3's comments below:

Griffin last played for the Browns on Jan. 1, 2017. He finished last season with just five games played and 87 completed passes for 886 yards, two touchdowns and three interceptions. He injured his collarbone early in the year but came back in time to lead the Browns to their own victory of the season.

He has 8,983 yards with 42 touchdowns and 26 interceptions in his career.

[h/t ProFootballTalk]

BALTIMORE, MD - NOVEMBER 01: An NFL logo is seen on the field as the Baltimore Ravens play the San Diego Chargers at M&T Bank Stadium on November 1, 2015 in Baltimore, Maryland. (Photo by Patrick Smith/Getty Images)
The National Football League Has a Woman Problem, and Vice Versa
BALTIMORE, MD - NOVEMBER 01: An NFL logo is seen on the field as the Baltimore Ravens play the San Diego Chargers at M&T Bank Stadium on November 1, 2015 in Baltimore, Maryland. (Photo by Patrick Smith/Getty Images)
Pittsburgh Steelers wide receiver Antonio Brown (84) hauls in a pass from quarterback Ben Roethlisberger with Baltimore Ravens cornerback Brandon Carr (24) defending during the second half of an NFL football game in Pittsburgh, Sunday, Dec. 10, 2017. The play set up the game-winning field goal. The Steelers won 39-38. (AP Photo/Don Wright)
Steelers offense at full strength - finally - vs. Pats
Pittsburgh Steelers wide receiver Antonio Brown (84) hauls in a pass from quarterback Ben Roethlisberger with Baltimore Ravens cornerback Brandon Carr (24) defending during the second half of an NFL football game in Pittsburgh, Sunday, Dec. 10, 2017. The play set up the game-winning field goal. The Steelers won 39-38. (AP Photo/Don Wright)
Pittsburgh Steelers fullback Roosevelt Nix-Jones, right, celebrates his touchdown catch during the second half of an NFL football game against the Baltimore Ravens in Pittsburgh, Sunday, Dec. 10, 2017. (AP Photo/Don Wright)
Steelers offense at full strength - finally - vs. Pats
Pittsburgh Steelers fullback Roosevelt Nix-Jones, right, celebrates his touchdown catch during the second half of an NFL football game against the Baltimore Ravens in Pittsburgh, Sunday, Dec. 10, 2017. (AP Photo/Don Wright)
Pittsburgh Steelers wide receiver Martavis Bryant (10) stiff-arms Baltimore Ravens cornerback Anthony Levine (41) during the second half of an NFL football game in Pittsburgh, Sunday, Dec. 10, 2017. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)
Steelers offense at full strength - finally - vs. Pats
Pittsburgh Steelers wide receiver Martavis Bryant (10) stiff-arms Baltimore Ravens cornerback Anthony Levine (41) during the second half of an NFL football game in Pittsburgh, Sunday, Dec. 10, 2017. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)
FILE - In this Nov. 10, 2016, file photo, sportscaster Bob Costas sits on a stage before an NFL football game between the Baltimore Ravens and the Cleveland Browns, in Baltimore. Costas has won the Ford C. Frick Award presented by the baseball Hall of Fame for broadcasting excellence. The honor was announced Wednesday, Dec. 13, 2017, at the winter meetings. (AP Photo/Gail Burton, File)
Costas wins Hall's Frick Award for baseball broadcasting
FILE - In this Nov. 10, 2016, file photo, sportscaster Bob Costas sits on a stage before an NFL football game between the Baltimore Ravens and the Cleveland Browns, in Baltimore. Costas has won the Ford C. Frick Award presented by the baseball Hall of Fame for broadcasting excellence. The honor was announced Wednesday, Dec. 13, 2017, at the winter meetings. (AP Photo/Gail Burton, File)
Watch as the Pittsburgh Steelers start off slow against the Baltimore Ravens but get strong play by quarterback Ben Roethlisberger and wide receiver Antonio Brown to earn the win.
Pittsburgh Steelers get a win for Ryan Shazier | 'NFL Turning Point'
Watch as the Pittsburgh Steelers start off slow against the Baltimore Ravens but get strong play by quarterback Ben Roethlisberger and wide receiver Antonio Brown to earn the win.
Watch as the Pittsburgh Steelers start off slow against the Baltimore Ravens but get strong play by quarterback Ben Roethlisberger and wide receiver Antonio Brown to earn the win.
Pittsburgh Steelers get a win for Ryan Shazier | 'NFL Turning Point'
Watch as the Pittsburgh Steelers start off slow against the Baltimore Ravens but get strong play by quarterback Ben Roethlisberger and wide receiver Antonio Brown to earn the win.
Watch as the Pittsburgh Steelers start off slow against the Baltimore Ravens but get strong play by quarterback Ben Roethlisberger and wide receiver Antonio Brown to earn the win.
Pittsburgh Steelers get a win for Ryan Shazier | 'NFL Turning Point'
Watch as the Pittsburgh Steelers start off slow against the Baltimore Ravens but get strong play by quarterback Ben Roethlisberger and wide receiver Antonio Brown to earn the win.
Watch as the Pittsburgh Steelers start off slow against the Baltimore Ravens but get strong play by quarterback Ben Roethlisberger and wide receiver Antonio Brown to earn the win.
Pittsburgh Steelers get a win for Ryan Shazier | 'NFL Turning Point'
Watch as the Pittsburgh Steelers start off slow against the Baltimore Ravens but get strong play by quarterback Ben Roethlisberger and wide receiver Antonio Brown to earn the win.
FILE - In this Sunday, Dec. 3, 2017, file photo, Baltimore Ravens defensive back Marlon Humphrey (29) celebrates his interception with teammate Tony Jefferson in the second half of an NFL football game against the Detroit Lions in Baltimore. As a member of the Alabama football, Marlon Humphrey knew what to expect against non-league foes such as Mercer and Kent State. Now a rookie starting cornerback with the Ravens, he finds himself in a similar situation entering Sundays game against the winless Cleveland Browns. (AP Photo/Gail Burton, File)
Ravens insist they won't take winless Browns lightly
FILE - In this Sunday, Dec. 3, 2017, file photo, Baltimore Ravens defensive back Marlon Humphrey (29) celebrates his interception with teammate Tony Jefferson in the second half of an NFL football game against the Detroit Lions in Baltimore. As a member of the Alabama football, Marlon Humphrey knew what to expect against non-league foes such as Mercer and Kent State. Now a rookie starting cornerback with the Ravens, he finds himself in a similar situation entering Sundays game against the winless Cleveland Browns. (AP Photo/Gail Burton, File)
FILE - In this Sunday, Dec. 3, 2017, file photo, Baltimore Ravens defensive back Marlon Humphrey (29) celebrates his interception with teammate Tony Jefferson in the second half of an NFL football game against the Detroit Lions in Baltimore. As a member of the Alabama football, Marlon Humphrey knew what to expect against non-league foes such as Mercer and Kent State. Now a rookie starting cornerback with the Ravens, he finds himself in a similar situation entering Sunday’s game against the winless Cleveland Browns. (AP Photo/Gail Burton, File)
FILE - In this Sunday, Dec. 3, 2017, file photo, Baltimore Ravens defensive back Marlon Humphrey (29) celebrates his interception with teammate Tony Jefferson in the second half of an NFL football game against the Detroit Lions in Baltimore. As a member of the Alabama football, Marlon Humphrey knew what to expect against non-league foes such as Mercer and Kent State. Now a rookie starting cornerback with the Ravens, he finds himself in a similar situation entering Sunday’s game against the winless Cleveland Browns. (AP Photo/Gail Burton, File)
FILE - In this Sunday, Dec. 3, 2017, file photo, Baltimore Ravens defensive back Marlon Humphrey (29) celebrates his interception with teammate Tony Jefferson in the second half of an NFL football game against the Detroit Lions in Baltimore. As a member of the Alabama football, Marlon Humphrey knew what to expect against non-league foes such as Mercer and Kent State. Now a rookie starting cornerback with the Ravens, he finds himself in a similar situation entering Sunday’s game against the winless Cleveland Browns. (AP Photo/Gail Burton, File)
FILE - In this Nov. 10, 2016, file photo, sportscaster Bob Costas sits on a stage before an NFL football game between the Baltimore Ravens and the Cleveland Browns, in Baltimore. Costas has won the Ford C. Frick Award presented by the baseball Hall of Fame for broadcasting excellence. The honor was announced Wednesday, Dec. 13, 2017, at the winter meetings. (AP Photo/Gail Burton, File)
FILE - In this Nov. 10, 2016, file photo, sportscaster Bob Costas sits on a stage before an NFL football game between the Baltimore Ravens and the Cleveland Browns, in Baltimore. Costas has won the Ford C. Frick Award presented by the baseball Hall of Fame for broadcasting excellence. The honor was announced Wednesday, Dec. 13, 2017, at the winter meetings. (AP Photo/Gail Burton, File)
FILE - In this Nov. 10, 2016, file photo, sportscaster Bob Costas sits on a stage before an NFL football game between the Baltimore Ravens and the Cleveland Browns, in Baltimore. Costas has won the Ford C. Frick Award presented by the baseball Hall of Fame for broadcasting excellence. The honor was announced Wednesday, Dec. 13, 2017, at the winter meetings. (AP Photo/Gail Burton, File)
Mike McClure is joined by Hana Ostapchuk to break down the numbers and key players in the matchup between the Baltimore Ravens and the Cleveland Browns.
Ravens-Browns Matchup Analysis
Mike McClure is joined by Hana Ostapchuk to break down the numbers and key players in the matchup between the Baltimore Ravens and the Cleveland Browns.

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