Amanda Knox

Italy's top criminal court has scathingly faulted prosecutors for presenting a flawed and hastily constructed case against Amanda Knox and her former Italian boyfriend, saying Monday it threw out their convictions for the 2007 murder of her British roommate in part because there was no proof they were at the crime scene.

The Court of Cassation issued its formal written explanation, as required by Italian law, for its March ruling vindicating the pair once and for all in the murder of Meredith Kercher, in the apartment the two women shared while students in Perugia, Italy.

The court wrote there was an "absolute lack of biological traces" of Knox, an American, or co-defendant Raffaele Sollecito in the room or on the victim's body. Slamming the quality of the prosecution's case, the court cited "blameworthy omissions of investigative activity."

Media clamor also was a factor in what was ultimately a flawed case, the high court concluded.

"The international spotlight on the case in fact resulted in the investigation undergoing a sudden acceleration, that, in the frantic search for one or more guilty parties to consign to international public opinion, certainly didn't help the search for substantial truth," the judges wrote.

The high court in March declared that Knox, now 28, and Sollecito, now 31, didn't murder the 21-year-old Kercher, a stronger exoneration than merely finding there was insufficient evidence to convict.

Had the Cassation Court upheld the 2014 appeals court convictions of the pair, Knox would have faced 28½ years in an Italian prison, assuming she would have been extradited from the United States, while Sollecito had faced 25 years.

Knox and Sollecito had served nearly four years in Italian prison after a first, lower court conviction by a Perugia court. (AP)

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Amanda Knox talks to the press surrounded by family outside her mother's home in Seattle, Washington

Amanda Knox talks to the press surrounded by family outside her mother's home in Seattle, Washington March 27, 2015. Italy's top court on Friday annulled the conviction of American Amanda Knox for the 2007 murder of British student Meredith Kercher and, in a surprise verdict, acquitted her of the charge. The Court of Cassation threw out the second guilty verdict to have been passed on Knox, 27, and her Italian former boyfriend Raffaele Sollecito for the lethal stabbing. REUTERS/Jason Redmond

Amanda Knox (C) speaks to the media during a brief press conference in front of her parents' home March 27, 2015 in Seattle, Washington

Amanda Knox (C) speaks to the media during a brief press conference in front of her parents' home March 27, 2015 in Seattle, Washington (AFP Photo/Stephen Brashear)

Sollecito Looks on next to his lawyer Bongiorno during a news conference in Rome

Raffaele Sollecito (C) looks on next to his lawyer Giulia Bongiorno during a news conference in Rome March 30, 2015. Italy's top court on Friday annulled the conviction of American Amanda Knox for the 2007 murder of British student Meredith Kercher and, in a surprise verdict, acquitted her of the charge. The Court of Cassation threw out the second guilty verdict to have been passed on Knox, 27, and her Italian former boyfriend Raffaele Sollecito for the lethal stabbing. REUTERS/Max Rossi

Italy's Court of Cassation palace is seen in Rome

Italy's Court of Cassation palace is seen in Rome March 27, 2015. Italy's highest court is expected to rule on Friday on whether to uphold the conviction of American Amanda Knox and her Italian ex-boyfriend Raffaele Sollecito for the murder of British student Meredith Kercher. REUTERS/Remo Casilli

Amanda Knox

Amanda Knox sits alone before being interviewed on the set of ABC's "Good Morning America" in New York January 31, 2014. (REUTERS/Andrew Kelly)

Amanda Knox

Raffaele Sollecito (C) arrives at a news conference as he is flanked by his lawyers Giulia Bongiorno (L) and Luca Maori (R) in Rome July 1, 2014. (REUTERS/Remo Casilli)

Amanda Knox bows her head during a television interview, Friday, Jan. 31, 2014 in New York. Knox said she will fight the reinstated guilty verdict against her and an ex-boyfriend in the 2007 slaying of a British roommate in Italy and vowed to "never go willingly" to face her fate in that country's judicial system . "I'm going to fight this to the very end," she said in an interview with Robin Roberts on ABC's "Good Morning America." (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

Raffaele Sollecito is flanked by his stepmother Mara Papagni, left, and his aunt Sara Achille, right, as he leaves after attending the final hearing before the third court verdict for the murder of British student Meredith Kercher, in Florence, Italy, Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014. The first two trials produced flip-flop verdicts of guilty then innocent for Kercher former roommate, American student Amanda Knox, who is not attending the hearing, and her former Italian boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, and the case has produced harshly clashing versions of events. A Florence appeals panel designated by Italy's supreme court to address issues it raised about the acquittal is set to deliberate Thursday, with a verdict expected later in the day. (AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)

Lumumba, a Congolese bar owner whom Knox had accused of committing the murder of British student Kercher, leaves after attending a retrial session in Florence

Patrick Lumumba, a Congolese bar owner whom Amanda Knox had accused of committing the murder of British student Meredith Kercher, leaves after attending a retrial session in Florence January 30, 2014. REUTERS/Giampiero Sposito (ITALY - Tags: CRIME LAW)

Raffaele Sollecito talks with his stepmother Mara Papagni prior to the start of the final hearing before the third court verdict for the murder of British student Meredith Kercher, in Florence, Italy, Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014. The first two trials produced flip-flop verdicts of guilty then innocent for Kercher former roommate, American student Amanda Knox, who is not attending the hearing, and her former Italian boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, and the case has produced harshly clashing versions of events. A Florence appeals panel designated by Italy's supreme court to address issues it raised about the acquittal is set to deliberate Thursday, with a verdict expected later in the day. (AP Photo/Fabrizio Giovannozzi)

Amanda Knox

Amanda Knox during an interview on the "Today" show, Friday, Sept. 20, 2013 in New York. Knox defended her decision not to return to Italy for a new appeals trial over the 2007 killing of her British roommate, even as she acknowledged that "everything is at stake," insisting she is innocent. In March, Italy's supreme court ordered a new trial for Knox and her former Italian boyfriend. An appeals court in 2011 had acquitted both, overturning convictions by a lower court. Italian law cannot compel Knox to return for the new legal proceeding. (AP Photo/NBC, Peter Kramer)

Raffaele Sollecito arrives to attend the final hearing before the third court verdict for the murder of British student Meredith Kercher, in Florence, Italy, Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014. The first two trials produced flip-flop verdicts of guilty then innocent for Kercher former roommate, American student Amanda Knox, who is not attending the hearing, and her former Italian boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, and the case has produced harshly clashing versions of events. A Florence appeals panel designated by Italy's supreme court to address issues it raised about the acquittal is set to deliberate Thursday, with a verdict expected later in the day. (AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)

ITALY KNOX/

Amanda Knox (R) cries and gestures to friends while her mother Edda Mellas sits next to her during a news conference at Sea-Tac International Airport, Washington after Knox landed there on a flight from Italy, October 4, 2011. (REUTERS/Anthony Bolante)

Amanda Knox

Amanda Knox (C) holds hands with her mother Edda Mellas (L) and hugs her younger sister Deanna Knox (R) at a news conference at Sea-Tac International Airport, Washington after landing there on a flight from Italy, October 4, 2011. Knox returned home to Seattle on Tuesday, one day after an Italian court cleared the 24-year-old college student of murder and freed her from prison. (REUTERS/Anthony Bolante)

Amanda Knox

Amanda Knox of the U.S. reacts after the verdict on Knox and Raffaele Sollecito of Italy in the killing of British student Meredith Kercher was announced at a court in Perugia October 3, 2011. The Italian court cleared Knox, a 24-year-old Seattle native, and Sollecito, Knox's former boyfriend, of the 2007 killing of Kercher and ordered they be freed on Monday after nearly four years in prison for a crime they always denied committing. The verdict came after independent forensic investigators sharply criticised police scientific evidence in the original investigation, saying it was unreliable. (REUTERS/Tiziana Fab)

Amanda Knox

Amanda Knox's father Curt Knox is hugged by his wife Cassandra in Perugia's court after the verdict was read October 3, 2011. An Italian court cleared 24-year-old American Amanda Knox and her former boyfriend of the 2007 killing of British student Meredith Kercher and ordered they be freed on Monday after nearly four years in prison for a crime they always denied committing. (REUTERS/Oli Scarff)

Amanda Knox

Amanda Knox's sister Deanna (L) reacts after the verdict on Knox of the U.S. and Raffaele Sollecito of Italy in the killing of British student Meredith Kercher was announced at a court in Perugia October 3, 2011. (REUTERS/Tiziana Fabi)

Amanda Knox

Amanda Knox reacts after hearing the verdict during her appeal trial in Perugia October 3, 2011. An Italian court cleared 24-year-old American Knox and her former boyfriend of the 2007 killing of British student Meredith Kercher and ordered they be freed on Monday after nearly four years in prison for a crime they always denied committing. (REUTERS/Tiziana Fabi)

Amanda Knox

British student Meredith Kercher's family members, (from L-R) mother Arline, sister Stephanie and brother Lyle attend a news conference in Perugia October 3, 2011. The family of murdered British student Kercher still finds it difficult to forgive her murder, her brother and sister said on Monday, just hours before an expected verdict in an appeal by U.S. student Amanda Knox. (REUTERS/Giorgio Benvenuti)

Amanda Knox

Amanda Knox (R), the U.S. student convicted of killing her British flatmate in Italy three years ago, looks as she attends in a court during a trial session in Perugia July 30, 2011. Independent forensic experts took the stand on Monday to attack key pieces of evidence used to convict U.S. student Amanda Knox of the murder of her British flatmate in the Italian city of Perugia in 2007. (REUTERS/Alessandro Bianchi)

Amanda Knox

Amanda Knox, the U.S. student convicted of killing her British flatmate in Italy three years ago, attends her trial session in a court in Perugia July 30, 2011. Independent forensic experts took the stand on Monday to attack key pieces of evidence used to convict U.S. student Amanda Knox of the murder of her British flatmate in the Italian city of Perugia in 2007. (REUTERS/Alessandro Bianchi)

Amanda Knox

Amanda Knox, the U.S. student convicted of killing her British flatmate in Italy three years ago, reacts as she attends a trial session in Perugia July 25, 2011. The appeal by Knox against her conviction for the 2007 murder of British student Meredith Kercher resumed in Italy on Monday, with Knox telling a key witness to "tell the truth", after he insisted she was guilty. (REUTERS/Alessandro Bianchi)

Amanda Knox

Amanda Knox, the U.S. student convicted of killing her British flatmate in Italy three years ago, leaves the court after a trial session in Perugia November 24, 2010. (REUTERS/Alessandro Bianchi)

Amanda Knox

British student Meredith Kercher's mother Arline reacts during a news conference following the verdict of the murder trial session that found American student Amanda Knox guilty in Perugia December 5, 2009. (REUTERS/Max Rossi)

Amanda Knox

American university student Amanda Knox (R) leaves the court after she was found guilty at the end of the murder trial session Perugia December 5, 2009. (REUTERS/Max Rossi)

Amanda Knox

American university student Amanda Knox leaves the court at the end of the last murder trial session before the verdict in Perugia December 4, 2009. (REUTERS/Alessandro Bianchi)

Amanda Knox

American university student Amanda Knox is covered by her lawyer Carlo Dalla Vedova during the murder trial in Perugia December 4, 2009. (REUTERS/Alessandro Bianchi)

Amanda Knox

American university student Amanda Knox is embraced by her lawyer Luciano Ghirg (R) during her murder trial in Perugia December 3, 2009. (REUTERS/Alessandro Bianchi)

Amanda Knox

American university student Amanda Knox's mother Edda cries after her daughter's speech during the her murder trial in Perugia December 3, 2009. (REUTERS/Alessandro Bianchi)

Amanda Knox

American university student Amanda Knox leaves the court at the end of the last murder trial session before the verdict in Perugia December 4, 2009. (REUTERS/Alessandro Bianchi)