Africa's poaching problem

Recent and archive images relating to the poaching of animals in Africa.

Zimbabwean ivory poachers have killed more than 80 elephants by poisoning water holes with cyanide, endangering one of the world's biggest herds, a minister said on Wednesday. (Reuters)

Africa's poaching problem

An endangered east African black rhinoceros and her young one walk in Tanzania's Serengeti park, May 21, 2010, during the start of an initiative that will see 32 huge beasts flown to Tanzania from South Africa. An explosion in poaching in the 1960 and 70s saw the population of east African black rhinos in Tanzania plummet from over 1,000 to just 70. Seven of the remaining rhinos were relocated to South Africa in an effort to protect them and bring the rhino sub-species back from the brink of extinction. (REUTERS/Tom Kirkwood)

Africa's poaching problem

A bullet riddled sign marks the entrance to Virunga National Park, occupied by rebels and other armed militias during years of conflict near Goma in eastern Congo, August 30, 2010. Congo's army and park rangers are conducting joint operations to secure large swathes of Virunga Park, formerly named Albert National Park, which has for more than decade been home to various armed groups who rely on poaching and banditry to survive while using the park's wild terrain to hide during Congo's civil conflict. (REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly)

Africa's poaching problem

A warden stands guard as an illegal consignment of five tonnes of Ivory confiscated from smugglers is destroyed during the African Elephant Law Enforcement Day in Tsavo West National Park, 380 km (236 miles) east of capital Nairobi July 20, 2011. The confiscated consignment, recovered from smugglers in Singapore in 2002, originated from poaching activities in both Zambia and Malawi, government officials said. (REUTERS/Noor Khamis)

Africa's poaching problem

A rhino is dehorned by a veterinary surgeon and rangers to prevent poaching at the Kruger national park in Mpumalanga province September 16, 2011. South Africa loses hundreds of rhinos a year to illegal horn trade as high demand for rhino horn in the illegal market triggers an unprecedented poaching crisis. (REUTERS/Ilya Kachaev)

Africa's poaching problem

A ranger shows part of a rhino horn after a rhino was dehorned by a veterinary surgeon to prevent poaching at the Kruger national park in Mpumalanga province September 16, 2011. South Africa loses hundreds of rhinos a year to illegal horn trade as high demand for rhino horn in the illegal market triggers an unprecedented poaching crisis. (REUTERS/Ilya Kachaev)

Africa's poaching problem

Dehorned rhinos are seen at the Kruger national park in Mpumalanga province September 16, 2011. The rhinos were dehorned by a veterinary surgeon to prevent poaching. South Africa loses hundreds of rhinos a year to illegal horn trade as high demand for rhino horn in the illegal market triggers an unprecedented poaching crisis. (REUTERS/Ilya Kachaev)

Africa's poaching problem

The carcass of a rhino is seen after it was killed for its horn by poachers at the Kruger national park in Mpumalanga province September 14, 2011. South Africa loses hundreds of rhinos a year to illegal horn trade as high demand for rhino horn in the illegal market triggers an unprecedented poaching crisis. (REUTERS/Ilya Kachaev)

Africa's poaching problem

Policeman look on as a protester carries a placard calling for an end to rhino poaching, which threatens the survival of rhino species, outside the Chinese embassy in Pretoria September 22, 2011. South Africa loses hundreds of rhinos a year to illegal horn trade as high demand for rhino horn in the illegal market triggers an unprecedented poaching crisis. (REUTERS/Siphiwe Sibeko)

Africa's poaching problem

Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS) officials display recovered elephants tusks and illegally held firearms taken from poachers, at their headquarters in Kenya's capital Nairobi, January 16, 2013. With the increases in price and demand of ivory in South-East Asian countries, poaching activities have increased with KWS reporting the highest ever recorded loss in a single year of 384 elephants and 19 rhinos in 2012 as compared to 289 elephants and 29 to poaching in 2011. (REUTERS/Noor Khamis)

Africa's poaching problem

Seized ivory tusks are displayed at the Customs and Excise Department in Hong Kong October 3, 2013. Hong Kong Customs has conducted a series of anti-smuggling operations since late September, seizing a total of 189 ivory tusks weighing about 769 kg (1,700 pounds) with a total value of about $11.53 million, found in three containers. The three 20-foot containers, arrived from Cote d'Ivoire, Africa, marked as containing soya, customs officers said. (REUTERS/Tyrone Siu)

Africa's poaching problem

Seized ivory tusks are displayed at the Customs and Excise Department in Hong Kong October 3, 2013. Hong Kong Customs has conducted a series of anti-smuggling operations since late September, seizing a total of 189 ivory tusks weighing about 769 kg (1,700 pounds) with a total value of about $11.53 million, found in three containers. The three 20-foot containers, arrived from Cote d'Ivoire, Africa, marked as containing soya, customs officers said. (REUTERS/Tyrone Siu)

Africa's poaching problem

A Kenya Wildlife Services ranger shows elephant tusks intercepted from poachers during a commemoration of the 1989 ivory burning at the Nairobi National Park July 18, 2009. In 1989 tons of ivory were torched by then president Daniel Arap Moi in an effort to combat elephant and rhino poaching. Kenya remains opposed to the lifting of the international ivory trade ban. (REUTERS/Thomas Mukoya)

Africa's poaching problem

A Kenya Wildlife Services ranger guards a shipment of elephant tusks during a commemoration of the 1989 ivory burning at the Nairobi National Park July 18, 2009. In 1989 tons of ivory were torched by then president Daniel Arap Moi in an effort to combat elephant and rhino poaching. Kenya remains opposed to the lifting of the international ivory trade ban. (REUTERS/Thomas Mukoya)

Africa's poaching problem

Seized illegal ivory elephant charms are displayed as New York's District Attorney Cyrus Vance speaks during a news conference to announce the guilty pleas of two ivory dealers and their business for selling illegal elephant ivory, in New York July 12, 2012. Over $2 million worth of illegal elephant ivory was seized in the course of the investigation. (REUTERS/Keith Bedford)

Africa's poaching problem

Members of the Pilanesberg National Park Anti-Poaching Unit (APU) stand guard as conservationists and police investigate the scene of a rhino poaching incident April 19, 2012. Elephant and rhino poaching is surging, conservationists say, an illegal piece of Asia's scramble for African resources, driven by the growing purchasing power of the region's newly affluent classes. In South Africa, nearly two rhinos a day are being killed to meet demand for the animal's horn, which is worth more than its weight in gold.  (REUTERS/Mike Hutchings)

Africa's poaching problem

Members of the Pilanesberg National Park Anti-Poaching Unit (APU) stand guard as conservationists and police investigate the scene of a rhino poaching incident April 19, 2012. Elephant and rhino poaching is surging, conservationists say, an illegal piece of Asia's scramble for African resources, driven by the growing purchasing power of the region's newly affluent classes. In South Africa, nearly two rhinos a day are being killed to meet demand for the animal's horn, which is worth more than its weight in gold. (REUTERS/Mike Hutchings)

Africa's poaching problem

The carcasses of some of the 22 elephants slaughtered in a helicopter-bourne attack lie on the ground in the Democratic Republic of Congo's Garamba National Park, in this undated handout picture released by the DRC Military. (REUTERS/DRC Military)

Africa's poaching problem

A twig is used to keep an elephant's trunk open while a Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) official attaches a GPS-satellite collar in a remote area of South Sudan, whose location cannot be disclosed due to issues of accelerating poaching, June 3, 2013. WCS in partnership with South Sudan's Ministry of Wildlife Conservation and Tourism is attaching GPS-satellite collars to elephants across South Sudan to help understand movement patterns and monitor and protect them funded by USAID and WCS. South Sudan's elephant population has already has dropped to less than 5,000 from around 80,000 in the 1950s. (REUTERS/Hereward Holland)

Africa's poaching problem

An adult male elephant looks up at a helicopter in a remote area of South Sudan, whose location cannot be disclosed due to issues of accelerating poaching, June 3, 2013. The Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) in partnership with South Sudan's Ministry of Wildlife Conservation and Tourism is attaching GPS-satellite collars to elephants across South Sudan to help understand movement patterns and monitor and protect them funded by USAID and WCS. South Sudan's elephant population has already has dropped to less than 5,000 from around 80,000 in the 1950s. (REUTERS/Hereward Holland)

Africa's poaching problem

Ivory tusks are stored in boxes at Hong Kong Customs August 7, 2013, after they were seized from a container at Kwai Chung Container Terminal a day earlier. Through intelligence exchange with Chinese Customs, Hong Kong Customs on Tuesday seized a total of 1,120 ivory tusks, 13 rhino horns and five pieces of leopard skin, weighing about 2,266 kg (4982 pounds), inside a container shipped from Nigeria to Hong Kong. The total seizure is worth about HK$41 million (US$5.26 million), according to the official press release. (REUTERS/Bobby Yip)

Africa's poaching problem

A herd of elephants gather at a watering hole inside Hwange National Park, about 840 km (521 miles) outside Harare, October 28, 2013. Zimbabwean ivory poachers have in the past two months killed more than 101 elephants by poisoning water holes with cyanide, which according to Zimbabwe's Environment Minister Saviour Kasukuwere on September 25, 2013, is endangering one of the world's biggest herds. (REUTERS/Philimon Bulawayo)

Africa's poaching problem

A herd of elephants gather at a watering hole inside Hwange National Park, about 840 km (521 miles) outside Harare, October 28, 2013. Zimbabwean ivory poachers have in the past two months killed more than 101 elephants by poisoning water holes with cyanide, which according to Zimbabwe's Environment Minister Saviour Kasukuwere on September 25, 2013, is endangering one of the world's biggest herds. (REUTERS/Philimon Bulawayo)

Africa's poaching problem

Pieces of ivory and animal skins are displayed during a news conference at the Kenya Wildlife Services headquarters in Nairobi, November 17, 2008. An operation by Interpol and five African elephant range countries has arrested 57 suspected poachers and nabbed 1,000 kg of ivory during a four-month operation, wildlife officials said on Monday. (REUTERS/Antony Njuguna)

Africa's poaching problem

Pieces of ivory and animal skins are displayed during a news conference at the Kenya Wildlife Services headquarters in Nairobi November 17, 2008. An operation by Interpol and five African elephant range countries has arrested 57 suspected poachers and nabbed 1,000 kg of ivory during a four-month operation, wildlife officials said on Monday. (REUTERS/Antony Njuguna)

Africa's poaching problem

An elephant sprays earth in the Tsavo East National Park, 280 km (173 miles) east of Kenya's capital Nairobi February 10, 2011. A census of elephants in the Tsavo-Mkomazi conservation area is ongoing as drought and poaching are putting pressure on the large animals, it remains to be seen whether the population is expanding or contracting. (REUTERS/Noor Khamis)