Afghan women jailed over moral crimes

The majority of the 202 Afghan women living in Badam Bagh, Afghanistan's central women's prison, are serving sentences of up to seven years for 'moral' crimes like leaving their husbands, refusing to accept a marriage arranged by their parents, or choosing to leave their parent's home with a man of their choice.

Picture taken March 28, 2013 shows Afghan female prisoner Nuria with her infant boy at Badam Bagh, Afghanistan's central women's prison, in Kabul, Afghanistan. “When I went to court for the divorce, instead of giving me a divorce, they charged me with running away,” Nuria said. The man she wanted to marry was also charged and is now serving time in Afghanistan's notorious Pul-e-Charkhi prison. 202 women living in the six- year- old jail, the majority of the women are serving sentences of up to seven years for leaving their husbands, refusing to accept a marriage arranged by their parents, or choosing to leave their parent's home with a man of their choice. (AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus)
Picture taken March 28, 2013 shows Afghan female prisoner Nuria with her infant boy at Badam Bagh, Afghanistan's central women's prison, in Kabul, Afghanistan. “When I went to court for the divorce, instead of giving me a divorce, they charged me with running away,” Nuria said. The man she wanted to marry was also charged and is now serving time in Afghanistan's notorious Pul-e-Charkhi prison. 202 women living in the six- year- old jail, the majority of the women are serving sentences of up to seven years for leaving their husbands, refusing to accept a marriage arranged by their parents, or choosing to leave their parent's home with a man of their choice. (AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus)
Picture taken March 28, 2013 shows Afghan female prisoner Nuria with her infant boy at Badam Bagh, Afghanistan's central women's prison, in Kabul, Afghanistan. “When I went to court for the divorce, instead of giving me a divorce, they charged me with running away,” Nuria said. The man she wanted to marry was also charged and is now serving time in Afghanistan's notorious Pul-e-Charkhi prison. 202 women living in the six- year- old jail, the majority of the women are serving sentences of up to seven years for leaving their husbands, refusing to accept a marriage arranged by their parents, or choosing to leave their parent's home with a man of their choice. (AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus)
Picture taken March 28, 2013 shows an Afghan female prisoner with her child inside her prison tract in Badam Bagh, Afghanistan's central women's prison, in Kabul, Afghanistan. 202 women living in the six- year- old jail, the majority of the women are serving sentences of up to seven years for leaving their husbands, refusing to accept a marriage arranged by their parents, or choosing to leave their parent's home with a man of their choice, all so-called “moral” crimes(. AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus)
Picture taken March 28, 2013 shows an Afghan female prisoner with her child inside her prison tract in Badam Bagh, Afghanistan's central women's prison, in Kabul, Afghanistan. 202 women living in the six- year- old jail, the majority of the women are serving sentences of up to seven years for leaving their husbands, refusing to accept a marriage arranged by their parents, or choosing to leave their parent's home with a man of their choice, all so-called “moral” crimes(. AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus)
Picture taken March 28, 2013 shows an Afghan female prisoner with her child inside her prison tract in Badam Bagh, Afghanistan's central women's prison, in Kabul, Afghanistan. 202 women living in the six- year- old jail, the majority of the women are serving sentences of up to seven years for leaving their husbands, refusing to accept a marriage arranged by their parents, or choosing to leave their parent's home with a man of their choice, all so-called “moral” crimes(. AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus)
Picture taken March 28, 2013 shows Afghan female prisoner in their cell at Badam Bagh, Afghanistan's central women's prison, in Kabul, Afghanistan. Twohundred-and-two women living in the six- year- old jail, the majority of the women are serving sentences of up to seven years for leaving their husbands, refusing to accept a marriage arranged by their parents, or choosing to leave their parent's home with a man of their choice, all so-called “moral” crimes(. AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus)
Picture taken March 28, 2013 shows Afghan female prisoner in their cell at Badam Bagh, Afghanistan's central women's prison, in Kabul, Afghanistan. Twohundred-and-two women living in the six- year- old jail, the majority of the women are serving sentences of up to seven years for leaving their husbands, refusing to accept a marriage arranged by their parents, or choosing to leave their parent's home with a man of their choice, all so-called “moral” crimes(. AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus)
Picture taken March 28, 2013 shows Afghan female prisoner in their cell at Badam Bagh, Afghanistan's central women's prison, in Kabul, Afghanistan. Twohundred-and-two women living in the six- year- old jail, the majority of the women are serving sentences of up to seven years for leaving their husbands, refusing to accept a marriage arranged by their parents, or choosing to leave their parent's home with a man of their choice, all so-called “moral” crimes(. AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus)
Picture taken March 28, 2013 shows Afghan female prisoner peering through the window in their cell at Badam Bagh, Afghanistan's central women's prison, in Kabul, Afghanistan. Two hundred-and-two women living in the six- year- old jail, the majority of the women are serving sentences of up to seven years for leaving their husbands, refusing to accept a marriage arranged by their parents, or choosing to leave their parent's home with a man of their choice, all so-called “moral” crimes(. AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus)
Picture taken March 28, 2013 shows Afghan female prisoner peering through the window in their cell at Badam Bagh, Afghanistan's central women's prison, in Kabul, Afghanistan. Two hundred-and-two women living in the six- year- old jail, the majority of the women are serving sentences of up to seven years for leaving their husbands, refusing to accept a marriage arranged by their parents, or choosing to leave their parent's home with a man of their choice, all so-called “moral” crimes(. AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus)
Picture taken March 28, 2013 shows Afghan female prisoner peering through the window in their cell at Badam Bagh, Afghanistan's central women's prison, in Kabul, Afghanistan. Two hundred-and-two women living in the six- year- old jail, the majority of the women are serving sentences of up to seven years for leaving their husbands, refusing to accept a marriage arranged by their parents, or choosing to leave their parent's home with a man of their choice, all so-called “moral” crimes(. AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus)
Picture taken March 28, 2013 shows Afghan female prisoner Fauzia steering out of the prison bars at Badam Bagh, Afghanistan's central women's prison, in Kabul, Afghanistan. Fauzia is the oldest woman in jail and has served already seven years in jail. She will serve a 17 year sentence for killing her husband and her daughter-in-law. “I was in one room. I came into the next room and they were there having sexual relations. I found a big knife and killed them both,” she said in a voice empty of emotion. (AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus)
Picture taken March 28, 2013 shows Afghan female prisoner Fauzia steering out of the prison bars at Badam Bagh, Afghanistan's central women's prison, in Kabul, Afghanistan. Fauzia is the oldest woman in jail and has served already seven years in jail. She will serve a 17 year sentence for killing her husband and her daughter-in-law. “I was in one room. I came into the next room and they were there having sexual relations. I found a big knife and killed them both,” she said in a voice empty of emotion. (AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus)
Picture taken March 28, 2013 shows Afghan female prisoner Fauzia steering out of the prison bars at Badam Bagh, Afghanistan's central women's prison, in Kabul, Afghanistan. Fauzia is the oldest woman in jail and has served already seven years in jail. She will serve a 17 year sentence for killing her husband and her daughter-in-law. “I was in one room. I came into the next room and they were there having sexual relations. I found a big knife and killed them both,” she said in a voice empty of emotion. (AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus)
Picture taken March 28, 2013 shows an Afghan female prisoner kissing her child inside her prison tract in Badam Bagh, Afghanistan's central women's prison, in Kabul, Afghanistan. 202 women living in the six- year- old jail, the majority of the women are serving sentences of up to seven years for leaving their husbands, refusing to accept a marriage arranged by their parents, or choosing to leave their parent's home with a man of their choice, all so-called “moral” crimes(. AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus)
Picture taken March 28, 2013 shows an Afghan female prisoner kissing her child inside her prison tract in Badam Bagh, Afghanistan's central women's prison, in Kabul, Afghanistan. 202 women living in the six- year- old jail, the majority of the women are serving sentences of up to seven years for leaving their husbands, refusing to accept a marriage arranged by their parents, or choosing to leave their parent's home with a man of their choice, all so-called “moral” crimes(. AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus)
Picture taken March 28, 2013 shows an Afghan female prisoner kissing her child inside her prison tract in Badam Bagh, Afghanistan's central women's prison, in Kabul, Afghanistan. 202 women living in the six- year- old jail, the majority of the women are serving sentences of up to seven years for leaving their husbands, refusing to accept a marriage arranged by their parents, or choosing to leave their parent's home with a man of their choice, all so-called “moral” crimes(. AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus)
Picture taken March 28, 2013 shows an Afghan female guard peering through the main gate at Badam Bagh, Afghanistan's central women's prison, in Kabul, Afghanistan. 202 women living in the six- year- old jail, the majority of the women are serving sentences of up to seven years for leaving their husbands, refusing to accept a marriage arranged by their parents, or choosing to leave their parent's home with a man of their choice, all so-called “moral” crimes(. AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus)
Picture taken March 28, 2013 shows an Afghan female guard peering through the main gate at Badam Bagh, Afghanistan's central women's prison, in Kabul, Afghanistan. 202 women living in the six- year- old jail, the majority of the women are serving sentences of up to seven years for leaving their husbands, refusing to accept a marriage arranged by their parents, or choosing to leave their parent's home with a man of their choice, all so-called “moral” crimes(. AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus)
Picture taken March 28, 2013 shows an Afghan female guard peering through the main gate at Badam Bagh, Afghanistan's central women's prison, in Kabul, Afghanistan. 202 women living in the six- year- old jail, the majority of the women are serving sentences of up to seven years for leaving their husbands, refusing to accept a marriage arranged by their parents, or choosing to leave their parent's home with a man of their choice, all so-called “moral” crimes(. AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus)
Picture taken March 28, 2013 shows an Afghan female prisoner outside her cell at Badam Bagh, Afghanistan's central women's prison, in Kabul, Afghanistan. Twohundred-and-two women living in the six- year- old jail, the majority of the women are serving sentences of up to seven years for leaving their husbands, refusing to accept a marriage arranged by their parents, or choosing to leave their parent's home with a man of their choice, all so-called “moral” crimes(. AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus)
Picture taken March 28, 2013 shows an Afghan female prisoner outside her cell at Badam Bagh, Afghanistan's central women's prison, in Kabul, Afghanistan. Twohundred-and-two women living in the six- year- old jail, the majority of the women are serving sentences of up to seven years for leaving their husbands, refusing to accept a marriage arranged by their parents, or choosing to leave their parent's home with a man of their choice, all so-called “moral” crimes(. AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus)
Picture taken March 28, 2013 shows an Afghan female prisoner outside her cell at Badam Bagh, Afghanistan's central women's prison, in Kabul, Afghanistan. Twohundred-and-two women living in the six- year- old jail, the majority of the women are serving sentences of up to seven years for leaving their husbands, refusing to accept a marriage arranged by their parents, or choosing to leave their parent's home with a man of their choice, all so-called “moral” crimes(. AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus)
Picture taken March 28, 2013 shows Afghan female prisoner Mariam at Badam Bagh, Afghanistan's central women's prison, in Kabul, Afghanistan. Mariam left her husband and hoped her husband's cousin could help her and give shelter. Instead he raped her. Mariam shot him afterwards in the head and turned the gun on herself. She woke up in the hospital three days later and was brought from there to the prison. (AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus)
Picture taken March 28, 2013 shows Afghan female prisoner Mariam at Badam Bagh, Afghanistan's central women's prison, in Kabul, Afghanistan. Mariam left her husband and hoped her husband's cousin could help her and give shelter. Instead he raped her. Mariam shot him afterwards in the head and turned the gun on herself. She woke up in the hospital three days later and was brought from there to the prison. (AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus)
Picture taken March 28, 2013 shows Afghan female prisoner Mariam at Badam Bagh, Afghanistan's central women's prison, in Kabul, Afghanistan. Mariam left her husband and hoped her husband's cousin could help her and give shelter. Instead he raped her. Mariam shot him afterwards in the head and turned the gun on herself. She woke up in the hospital three days later and was brought from there to the prison. (AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus)
Picture taken March 28, 2013 shows Afghan female prisoner Adia, 27, at Badam Bagh, Afghanistan's central women's prison, in Kabul, Afghanistan. Adia left her husband, a drug addict, seeking shelter with her parents. They told her to go home to her husband, who had followed her demanding she return. She went to court to seek help but instead they sentenced her to six years in prison. Seven months pregnant, Adia will have her baby in jail. (AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus)
Picture taken March 28, 2013 shows Afghan female prisoner Adia, 27, at Badam Bagh, Afghanistan's central women's prison, in Kabul, Afghanistan. Adia left her husband, a drug addict, seeking shelter with her parents. They told her to go home to her husband, who had followed her demanding she return. She went to court to seek help but instead they sentenced her to six years in prison. Seven months pregnant, Adia will have her baby in jail. (AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus)
Picture taken March 28, 2013 shows Afghan female prisoner Adia, 27, at Badam Bagh, Afghanistan's central women's prison, in Kabul, Afghanistan. Adia left her husband, a drug addict, seeking shelter with her parents. They told her to go home to her husband, who had followed her demanding she return. She went to court to seek help but instead they sentenced her to six years in prison. Seven months pregnant, Adia will have her baby in jail. (AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus)

What to Read Next