Phillip Fulmer was briefly banned from Tennessee practices for coaching linemen

Yahoo Sports
Former Tennessee head coach, Phillip Fulmer, is seen an NCAA college football game between Tennessee and South Carolina Saturday, Oct. 14, 2017, in Knoxville, Tenn. (AP Photo/Wade Payne)
Former Tennessee head coach, Phillip Fulmer, is seen an NCAA college football game between Tennessee and South Carolina Saturday, Oct. 14, 2017, in Knoxville, Tenn. (AP Photo/Wade Payne)

Tennessee self-reported an NCAA violation directly as a result of the actions of athletic director Phillip Fulmer.

It’s nothing salacious. Don’t worry, Tennessee fans.

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According to the Knoxville News Sentinel, the Vols violated NCAA rules when Fulmer, UT’s head coach from 1992-2008, jumped in during a football practice last September to assist a few offensive linemen during a drill.

Fulmer’s tutelage did not jibe with the NCAA’s rules about the number of on-field coaches, resulting in a Level III violation. From the News Sentinel:

Fulmer’s coaching violated NCAA bylaw 11.7.1.1, which pertains to the number and duties of coaches. The bylaw states that an institutional staff member must count against coaching staff limits if he engages in technical or tactical instruction with players, assists in tactical decisions during games or practice, or engages in off-campus recruiting.

It was one of three minor violations from the football program that the school reported last year. Tennessee’s report said Fulmer “provided brief encouragement/instruction to two football student-athletes who were engaged in a blocking drill” for “less than 30 seconds.”

The horror!

As a result, the SEC prohibited Fulmer from attending football practice for five days. The school also provided further compliance education for Fulmer, who became the full-time AD last December. Fulmer previously served as a “special advisor” to the UT president — including during the time of this violation — after the school fired John Currie following his football coaching search fiasco.

The two other football-related violations involved contact with a non-qualifier junior college recruit and contact with a recruit’s father during a non-contact period. Both were considered Level III violations, the lowest level.

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