Phillies pay Marc Zumoff touching tribute vs. Marlins

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Phillies pay Marc Zumoff touching tribute vs. Marlins originally appeared on NBC Sports Philadelphia

All of Philadelphia, and all of the sports world at large, came together Tuesday to thank Marc Zumoff for a legendary career after the television voice of the Philadelphia 76ers announced his retirement with a touching letter to fans.

Messages poured in from all over, from fans across the city to sports industry giants across the country, thanking Zumoff for his decades covering the Sixers and defining a generation's fandom.

And down in South Philly, as the Phillies prepped to face the Marlins, the city's baseball team decided its own pay tribute to Zumoff. To honor a giant in the city's media landscape, the team turned its nightly game notes provided to media members into one big shoutout to Zumoff's tremendous catchphrases.

Here are some of the Zooisms the Phillies' communications staff selected as subtitles for the notes:

  • "And we're running tonight from South Philly" was a breakdown of the Phillies' success rate on steal attempts 

  • "Turning garbage into gold" was a look at Rhys Hoskins' success against 95+ MPH fastballs this year 

  • "Locking all windows and doors" was a look at the hot streak Phillies starting pitchers stitched together against the Mets

Here's a look at the whole game notes section dedicated to Zumoff:

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What a fantastic move to honor one of the absolute greats. Well played, Phils.

And the truest tribute of all was probably the Phillies' bullpen actually holding onto a lead as they were coming in for a landing.