Peter Laviolette lauds Alex Ovechkin for doing the ‘dirty work’ on offense

  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
Matt Weyrich
·2 min read
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
This content is not available due to your privacy preferences.
Update your settings here to see it.

Laviolette lauds Ovechkin for doing the ‘dirty work’ on offense originally appeared on NBC Sports Washington

Alex Ovechkin has his office, but he doesn’t need to stay there in order to get work done.

The Capitals’ future Hall of Famer is in the midst of one of the best stretches of his career. In his last 11 games, Ovechkin has scored 11 goals, added two assists and averaged 4.1 shots on goal per contest. His stellar play has Washington in the hunt for the President’s Trophy with just over six weeks left in the regular season.

As remarkable as Ovechkin’s recent tear has been, head coach Peter Laviolette talked Monday on the Sports Junkies about how impressed he’s been by the 35-year-old’s ability to score from all over the ice.

“What impresses me is, from an offensive standpoint, he works for that offense,” Laviolette said. “He’s not somebody who stands over on the side — the power play is a little bit different, he’s set up to shoot the puck — but…he [is] doing the dirty work [and] he’s willing to do the work, whatever it takes, to be a productive offensive player and to me, that’s great leadership with regard to our team and setting the example of what you have to do and where you have to be to score goals.”

Download and subscribe to the Capitals Talk podcast

Ovechkin got off to a slow start this season, scoring only seven goals in his first 19 games. After missing a few games due to COVID protocols, he took a few weeks to find his rhythm. Now, he’s tied for fifth in the NHL with 18 goals and sits just four behind Toronto Maple Leafs center Auston Matthews for the most in the league.

“As far as the goals go, before they started dropping you could see there was a lot of pucks going towards the net,” Laviolette said. “Obviously, he’s good at what he does and I think for him, one of the most important things is opportunity. When you see him start to take ice and move towards the net looking to release the puck, usually good things will happen.”

For more interviews, tune into the Sports Junkies on NBC Sports Washington, weekdays from 6-10 a.m.