Pete Alonso talks old school baseball vs. new school analytics: 'There needs to be a blend'

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Coby Green
·2 min read
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Pete Alonso swings vs. Marlins
Pete Alonso swings vs. Marlins

The battle between old school baseball and the new school analytics wave has long been talked about over the last few seasons, and they've seemed to come to a head in the Mets organization this week with the firing of hitting coach Chili Davis and assistant hitting coach Tom Slater.

Davis described himself as an old school coach, and there are certainly players in the league that would call themselves old school as well -- including Pete Alonso.

Speaking to reporters over Zoom on Tuesday, Alonso had a lot to say about how you have to be able to balance both in today's game.

"I'm an old school type guy, I'm an old school type player, but for me, I've been doing my homework, doing my research in the offseason to speak analytics," Alonso said. "To be able to bridge that gap and be able to make those numbers...all those great things that the analytics departments do and to be able to translate those.

"All the things that analytics does in hitting, it helps formulate our game plan and approach plan. But I know that as times keep going on, the game stays the same. I mean, the game's been the same since the Civil War. And I think when you get in that box and you think about numbers, percentages, the pitcher is going to win 10 out of 10 times."

With Davis suggesting to the New York Post that Francisco Lindor's hitting slump had something to do with his firing, Alonso shared the opposite sentiment.

"When it's game time, when it's my turn to hit in the box, it's not Luis [Rojas], it's not Chili, it's not the analytic department that's in the box hitting, it's Pete Alonso, it's me," He said. "And that's the same thing with every one of those guys in the clubhouse. We've got 13 hitters, and as soon as they step in the box, you might as well kick the computer and break the screen.

"Analytics do help, I'm not trashing analytics because they help with attack plans, approach plans, but when you're walking from the on-deck circle to that box, that's when you've got to go to war. It's mono-e-mono with the pitcher and the defense. It's nine-against-one."

As we saw in last year's final World Series game, when Kevin Cash took out a red hot Blake Snell because it was what the analytics suggested, sometimes you just have to use your own head versus what the numbers or a computer says.

"I think there needs to be a blend between analytics and numbers, with "old school" approach," Alonso said.