Pete Alonso says Mets offense hasn't yet hit on all cylinders: 'When we do it's gonna be scary'

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Pete Alonso celebrates home run with James McCann at Wrigley Field
Pete Alonso celebrates home run with James McCann at Wrigley Field

Mets first baseman Pete Alonso was upset when the team fired hitting coach Chili Davis and assistant Tom Slater amid New York's slow offensive start.

But Alonso said shortly after the firings that he would be receptive to new hitting coach Hugh Quattlebaum and assistant hitting coach Kevin Howard.

And things have gone extremely well so far.

"They've been great. They're great personalities and then also they provide some great insight," Alonso told reporters on Friday via Zoom. "They're super prepared and they work their asses off. It's been great working with them. It's been great. We've established our identity and they've kind of worked with us, they've been super flexible.

"It's been great, because we have such a great identity. I feel like every single day they're working to improve that identity and to be able to get us firing on all cylinders. I feel like from an offensive standpoint, we've been performing and we've been putting up runs. But I feel like we haven't hit on all cylinders consistently, and when we do it's gonna be scary."

The Mets, who are averaging 4.8 runs per game in May, have scored 53 runs in 11 games in May after scoring 58 runs in 21 games in April.

Apr 13, 2021; New York City, New York, USA; New York Mets first baseman Pete Alonso (20) at Citi Field.
Apr 13, 2021; New York City, New York, USA; New York Mets first baseman Pete Alonso (20) at Citi Field.

ALONSO NOT WORRIED ABOUT HOME RUN DROUGHT

But while the Mets have woken up offensively, the homers have still largely been absent -- including when it comes to Alonso.

Alonso, who has five homers this season, hit his last one way back on April 25 against the Nationals.

Asked whether he has noticed an impact on how far the new "deadened" baseballs have been carrying this season, Alonso said "When I hit it like I should, it always goes."

Alonso was also unbothered by his cold snap when it comes to homers, saying that guys have been pitching around him more this season and he hasn't gotten as many opportunities in the strike zone.

Adding that he's been under control and commanding his zone, Alonso thinks the balls will start flying out soon enough.

"I feel like when the weather warms up -- and now we're in a lovely dome (in Tampa) where it's climate-controlled -- I think that in certain areas or in certain parts of the country, balls are flying a little bit more," Alonso said. "Like in the South or in the West Coast where the weather's warmer.

"But in New York, it's been a pretty cold spring so far so I don't think it's necessarily too much of a big deal or noticeable at all. I think I just need to keep hitting the ball hard, and whatever happens, happens."