Patriots legend Richard Seymour opens up about poker career

NBC Sports Boston Staff
NBC Sports Boston

When athletes retire from the sport they've played their whole lives, it's natural for them to miss the competition. That feeling is no different for former Patriots defensive end Richard Seymour.

The Hall-of-Fame hopeful, though, has chosen a unique way to get the competitive juices flowing. On July 11, he finished an impressive 131st at the World Series of Poker Main Event in Las Vegas, taking home $59,295. 

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"Once you're done playing football you still have a competitive drive," Seymour told Yahoo! Sports. "Poker is an outlet for me where I have a competitive drive, you have to be very cerebral. It requires a lot like it did for me in football – I have to be patient, I have to know how to pick my spots, pay attention to guys' tendencies. It was just a natural progression after leaving sports at a high level."

Seymour, according to Yahoo! Sports, learned how to play poker from his father and picked it up at a competitive level shortly after he retired from the NFL in 2012. In last week's WSOP, he peaked at $3.6 million. Seymour said he's used his Super Bowl ring as a chip holder to intimidate competitors at the poker table. He also said he takes advantage of his status as a football legend, often bluffing when opponents assume he'll be an aggressive player. 

"Some guys play me differently because they say, ‘If I knock Richard Seymour out it's a cool story to tell my buddies'," he said. "Which I don't mind that, it just depends on how I'm feeling that day..."My temperament fits poker well; I'm naturally kind of reserved, I'm not super emotional one way or another, so if bad things happen, which they're going to in poker, it's about how do you respond?"

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Patriots legend Richard Seymour opens up about poker career originally appeared on NBC Sports Boston

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