Do the Packers owe Aaron Rodgers an apology? Peter King says maybe

  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
·3 min read
In this article:
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
This content is not available due to your privacy preferences.
Update your settings here to see it.

King: Packers should hear Aaron Rodgers out about his concerns originally appeared on NBC Sports Washington

Though there are still many ways that the Aaron Rodgers-Green Bay Packers saga could end, NBC Sports' Peter King thinks that if reports are true about how the team handled drafting Jordan Love, they might owe Rodgers an apology at least.

As for his future in Wisconsin, that, King thinks, still has some time to play out.

“The NFL used to be a league in which GMs pick the players, coaches coach the players and players simply play. But if smart players want more than that, and the alternative is that smart players (Russell Wilson, Rodgers and who knows in the future) want out if they’re ignored, why not allow players to give input?” King writes in his latest Football Morning in America column. “If the alternative is alienating great players to the point where they want out, wouldn’t you consider a different way of doing things? The Packers should.”

Rodgers clarified in an interview on ESPN earlier this month that it was never Love he had a problem with - but rather in his words "a philosophy". "It’s about character, it’s about culture, it’s about doing things the right way," he told Kenny Mayne. "A lot of this was put in motion last year and the wrench was just kind of thrown into it when I won MVP and played the way I played last year. This is just kind of, I think, the spill-out of all that. But it is about the people and that’s the most important thing.”

King wrote that if the Packers, as it has been reported, never gave Rodgers a heads up about the team targeting Love in the draft, then "shame on them."

“Even if you’re not going to seek Rodgers’ input on team decisions (that’s a tricky subject, and I’m not sure I’d want to open that window either), you can hear him out about concerns," he wrote.

Still, the situation between Green Bay and their once-in-a-generation quarterback has not yet reached a boiling point, per King. “So it’s May 31, and I’d say this little staredown between the quarterback and the team that swears it won’t trade him is 60 days from getting real,” writes King. “It’s one thing to be rock-solid in your position on May 31, with the season three months away. But it’s another thing when the reality of the stances—both by Rodgers and the team that insists there will not be a trade—reach the real time of training camp, and the season.”

Are the Packers and Rodgers beyond reconciliation? Not quite yet, King thinks. He has a strategy for bringing the MVP back to Green Bay: “What I’d do if I were president Mark Murphy and GM Brian Gutekunst: set up a half-hour every week for Gutekunst and/or Murphy to clear calendars for Rodgers and perhaps other team leaders to bring grievances/concerns to them. Or just simply to get to know them better.”

One thing is clear: if the Green Bay Packers and Aaron Rodgers are unable to mend their differences within the next three months, the NFC will look a lot different in 2021.