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Offensive standouts for Chargers from Senior Bowl: Day 3

The Reese’s Senior Bowl concluded practices on Thursday, with at least two high-ranking members of the Chargers scouting team in Mobile, AL to watch some of this year’s top draft prospects.

Here’s who stood out on the offensive side of the ball.

RB MarShawn Lloyd, USC

Jason Parkhurst-USA TODAY Sports
Jason Parkhurst-USA TODAY Sports

A transfer from South Carolina to USC, Lloyd took over as the Trojans’ main ball carrier in 2023, finishing the season with 116 rushes for 820 yards and 9 touchdowns. His draft stock was often overshadowed by the passing game, which featured presumptive #1 draft pick Caleb Williams, fellow Senior Bowler Brenden Rice, and slot receiver Tahj Washington.

Lloyd has been solid for all three days of practice in Mobile, but he had a few reps on Thursday to add a little pop to close out his week. In red zone period, he hit a cutback followed by an outside juke that drew oohs from the crowd despite a short gain. He’s also done well catching the ball in receiving drills. With a crowded running back class devoid of consensus, Lloyd could be drafted anywhere from the third to fifth round.

TE Ben Sinnott, Kansas State

Jay Biggerstaff-USA TODAY Sports
Jay Biggerstaff-USA TODAY Sports

Sinnott weighed in at 254 pounds in Mobile after playing his final season at Kansas State around 245, almost ten pounds of bulk that he seems to have added for stoutness during the week of practice. Despite the extra weight, the tight end has looked impressive as a route runner, frequently shaking free of his assignment, especially near the goal line.

On Thursday, Sinnott had plenty of chances to shine thanks to an extended red zone install that involved one-on-ones for all skill position players. His best route was an out and up where he faked as if he was running a shallow out route to the front pylon. Instead, he took one false step to fool the defender and turned the route upfield, leaving his assignment in the dust and skying for the toe-tap touchdown reception along the back sideline.

TE Theo Johnson, Penn State

Vasha Hunt-USA TODAY Sports
Vasha Hunt-USA TODAY Sports

An interesting name to monitor for Chargers interest given that Los Angeles visited Nittany Lions games six times this season, Johnson has made a killing in Mobile by showing he’s an equally proficient receiver and run blocker. He should also be a player familiar to new Chargers head coach Jim Harbaugh, whose Michigan teams have played him every season.

Johnson stood out in team period as one of the better blockers at tight end, including a nice seal block in red zone period to spring a big play. He followed that up with smooth route running in red zone one-on-ones, highlighted by a touchdown reception on Oregon State safety Kitan Oladapo.

OL Dominick Puni, Kansas

Vasha Hunt-USA TODAY Sports
Vasha Hunt-USA TODAY Sports

After playing left guard in 2022, Central Missouri transfer Puni slid outside to play left tackle for the Jayhawks this season. In Mobile, Puni has played tackle, guard, and center, making him one of the rare players able to plug in at any of the five offensive line positions.

Puni primarily stood out as a run blocker on Thursday, frequently climbing to the second level and walling off linebackers during team period, regardless of where he lined up. He’s also shown a nice mix of power and agility to hang with pass rushers all week and is one of the overall winners of the event.

OT Travis Glover, Georgia State

Vasha Hunt-USA TODAY Sports
Vasha Hunt-USA TODAY Sports

I’ll be honest: Glover is a pet project of mine. The Georgia State offensive tackle was added to the roster late on Wednesday as an injury replacement for Kentucky’s Jeremy Flax, but his presence was never officially announced by the Senior Bowl. Being awarded Flax’s #71 jersey but with GLOVER on the back and wearing a similarly blue-shaded helmet as the injured lineman only made things more confusing for those in attendance.

What perhaps made it most baffling was that Glover stepped in as if he belonged on this stage, which is not always the case for late call-ups, who are often local products or prospects training in the vicinity. He won battles with Texas Tech freak of nature Myles Cole in one-on-ones, then moved to team run drills and mauled any defender he could find in the area. Glover’s film is littered with unrefined footwork and hand usage, but a more professional coaching experience in Mobile has already begun to pay dividends.

Story originally appeared on Chargers Wire