Nick Foles says he changed numbers in Jacksonville because No. 9 'stays in Philadelphia'

Yahoo Sports Contributor
Yahoo Sports

Generally, when a team signs a high-profile free agent, he gets “his” number. It might cost him a little bit if it already belongs to one of his new teammates, but many players are particular about the digit on their jersey.

Nick Foles is particular, but in a more thoughtful way.

‘Number 9 stays in Philadelphia’

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New team, new number: <a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="/nfl/teams/jacksonville/" data-ylk="slk:Jacksonville Jaguars">Jacksonville Jaguars</a> quarterback Nick Foles switched from No. 9 to No. 7. (AP)
New team, new number: Jacksonville Jaguars quarterback Nick Foles switched from No. 9 to No. 7. (AP)

Now with the Jacksonville Jaguars, Foles spent a few minutes with NBC Sports Philadelphia reporter Derrick Gunn on Tuesday.

Gunn asked Foles why he’s opted to wear No. 7 with the Jaguars instead of No. 9, which he wore in both of his stints with the Philadelphia Eagles.

“Number 9 stays in Philadelphia,” Foles told Gunn. “That number means a lot to me. It pertains to that city.”

It’s the number Foles was wearing when he stepped in for the injured Carson Wentz late in the 2017 season and helped lead the Eagles to their first-ever Super Bowl championship, over the New England Patriots.

Foles has not previously worn No. 7 during his NFL career.

Eagles could still use him

In February, the Eagles exercised their option year on Foles’ contract, but Foles voided the deal so he could become a free agent and get another chance at leading a team.

He’s already missed in Philadelphia — not just because of his thoughtful nature, but because of how capably he stepped in when Wentz was hurt.

In the Eagles’ preseason opener, backup quarterback Nate Sudfeld suffered a broken wrist that required surgery that will keep him out into the regular season. Fans are wishing they still knew Foles was on the roster in case anything happens to Wentz.

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