NFLN's Marc Ross: Ryan Fitzpatrick signing not a 'good strategy to win in the NFL'

  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
·3 min read
In this article:
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
This content is not available due to your privacy preferences.
Update your settings here to see it.

NFLN's Ross: Fitz signing not a 'good strategy to win in the NFL' originally appeared on NBC Sports Washington

When the Washington Football Team signed quarterback Ryan Fitzpatrick in free agency, the reasoning behind the move was that at the very least, the veteran should provide an upgrade at the sport's most important position. 

NFL Network analyst Marc Ross isn't quite sure that will happen, telling the Sports Junkies that "the best [Fitzpatrick] has ever been is average."

"This is kind of like a common-sense think with this Ryan Fitzpatrick situation, where people say 'he's playing the best football of his career.' Well, what does that mean? He's average," Ross said. "Because the best he's ever been is average. Has he had a couple of 400-yard games once or twice a season? Absolutely. But the entirety of every season and his career is mediocrity."

Ross then went a step further, saying Fitzpatrick's "wonderful" personality is the reason the 38-year-old still has a job in the NFL, rather than his skill set.

"If Ryan Fitzpatrick had a bad personality and not everybody loved him, he'd been out of the NFL a while ago. But because he has this wonderful, jovial personality and everybody loves him, he keeps getting these chances," Ross said.

He wasn't done there, either.

"Well, why has this guy been on nine teams? Why has he never been to the playoffs? Why does he have 30 less wins than losses? You just have to base it on the common sense there and the facts. It's nothing personal, it's just the facts when it comes to Ryan Fitzpatrick," Ross continued.

To counter Ross' point, it's hard to imagine an NFL team signing a player because of their personality. In a multi-million dollar business, moves like that simply aren't made. Jobs are on the line every day based on wins and losses.

And, recently, the numbers do suggest that Fitzpatrick is playing some of the best football of his career, even if Ross believes he's been "average."

Over his last 16 starts, Fitzpatrick has thrown for nearly 4,500 yards with 27 touchdowns and 13 interceptions. That's a major upgrade from the QB play Washington received over its last 16 games.

This content is not available due to your privacy preferences.
Update your settings here to see it.

Numbers don't lie. Those are facts. If Fitzpatrick plays at that same pace for Washington, the offense will be significantly better.

Where Ross does have a point, though, is that there really isn't a precedent of success for a move like this. And, while Fitzpatrick's numbers show he's played solid football as of late, there's still a reason he's been on nine teams and never made the playoffs.

Instead of signing Fitzpatrick, a player where you know what you're going to get, Ross would have liked to see Washington go after a younger signal-caller that was available, such as Sam Darnold.

"I thought they should have made a push for Sam Darnold. Here's a 23-year-old who has also shown flashes, who also has this immense talent that Ryan Fitzpatrick never had," Ross said. That is more of a logical reason to say 'we think Sam Darnold may still have something.' Carolina believed it. They went that route with him. Whereas we know exactly what Ryan Fitzpatrick is going to give us. He's shown us what he's going to give us."

With Fitzpatrick, the thinking in Washington is that if he can just give the team competent QB play, the franchise can ride the back of its elite defense to 10 or 11 wins and a potential playoff run.

Ross, though, thinks that plan is nothing more than just wishful thinking.

"This Ryan Fitzpatrick strategy is hope," he said. "It's all about hope and hope and hope. And that's not a good strategy to win in the NFL."