Luke Ingram

#48LB,
Height: 6' 5"
Weight: 258
Born:
College: Hawaii
Birth Place: Mililani, Hawaii
Draft: Undrafted
  • Fantasy Football 2017: 7 Sleepers at Running Back, Wide Receiver and Tight End To Consider Drafting
    Newsweek

    Fantasy Football 2017: 7 Sleepers at Running Back, Wide Receiver and Tight End To Consider Drafting

    All 32 NFL teams will head to training camps next week in preparation for the 2017 NFL season, which it means it's officially time to kick off research for your fantasy football league(s). The term sleeper doesn’t necessarily have a proper definition, but it’s largely a player that no one, not even their real-life NFL team, had previously expected to become a fine-tuned, consistent offensive machine week to week. Here’s an early list of seven players—a mix of running backs and wide receivers—who could possess some serious value later in drafts and thus exceed expectations and their ADP, from FantasyPros.com.

  • Seahawks RB Eddie Lacy gives fans a chance to meet him at training camp
    Seahawks Wire

    Seahawks RB Eddie Lacy gives fans a chance to meet him at training camp

    Seattle Seahawks training camp is 11 days away, and Eddie Lacy is giving fans the opportunity to meet him. The Pro-Bowl running back, who was signed to a one-year deal with the Seahawks in March, announced on Twitter Tuesday that he is holding a giveway for fans to meet and greet with “Hulk Mode” himself. The catch? All you have to do is purchase an item from Lacy’s site, eddielacyrb.com, to be entered to win the exclusive training camp meet and greet experience. According to the post, the contest will run through July 31. When the Seahawks running back isn’t busy throwing contests, he’s focused on getting season ready and dropping a few pounds using Beachbody’s P90X home fitness program. Lacy’s

  • The Seattle Times

    Seahawks’ Richard Sherman is right, but here’s why NFL players are unlikely to strike

    Richard Sherman’s provocative comments the other day about how NFL players need to be prepared to strike like their MLB and NBA brethren got me thinking about Marvin Miller. And how vastly different the labor worlds are in baseball (and even basketball) as opposed to football, making Sherman’s well-meaning — and accurate — sentiment extremely difficult to pull off in the real world. Miller was the man who founded the Major League Baseball Players Association in 1966 and turned it into the most powerful union in sports history. In my former life as a baseball reporter for 25 years, I was privileged to have several conversations with Miller before his death in 2012 at age 95 — cogent and feisty